Page 1

55° 58' 58.847''N 3° 13' 23.617''W

ROYAL FORTH YACHT CLUB Y E ARBOOK201 7


BEETHOVEN

SYMPHONY NO 5 CONDUCTED BY

EMMANUEL KRIVINE THURSDAY 8 NOVEMBER, 7.30PM USHER HALL

YOUR ORCHESTRA IN SCOTLAND

“Majestic, intimate, soulful and transcendent” For full details of our 2017/18 Season, visit

www.sco.org.uk


A WARM WELCOME

Welcome to Royal Forth!

S

ailing is one of the best ways to leave work behind and enjoy the fresh air, relaxing on a cruise, winning a race, or socialising with friends and family. Sailors looking for convenience and protected waters, near Scotland’s capital City of Edinburgh, will find us just 15 minutes away, at Granton harbour. We give a warm welcome to visitors and new members with an interest in sailing. As a community amateur sports club, we are open to all who wish to join us. Visitors are welcome to use the marina pontoons of Edinburgh Marina Ltd in Granton harbour, and for longer term use, we provide swinging moorings with a boat service every day of the week. Launching and recovering dinghies and boats up to 5 tonnes are easy with our slipway and crane. Onshore, our purpose-built clubhouse has showers, changing rooms, lounge and licensed bar with catering. We have storage for boats, and facilities for maintenance. Starting in sailing need not be expensive and we try to make that as easy as possible. For non boat owners we are pleased to offer a reduced membership rate for the first three years, so you can get fully involved before you decide whether you want

a boat. New members with a boat get the discount for the first year. We encourage new members to join in our open evening cruises (every second week) and monthly Cruise in Company. Beginners can sail in various boats, enjoy crewing, progress to Thursday evening racing, or just contemplate the sort of boat they may want. The Forth Yacht Clubs Association website has a good classified section if you want to buy a boat. Come along to the open evening or the monthly Cruise in company and get a place for the day/evening. Our volunteers organise this friendly cruising together, and well managed racing events from the casual evening race to national championships. If you want to build boating skills and confidence, our training volunteers give dinghy and keelboat coaching. Once you come more than a handful of times we would expect you to join the club, and share with other members in the benefits and costs. I wish you all good sailing in 2017.

Adrian Shield, Commodore

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Aerial panoramic view of Edinburgh's Granton Harbour at summer.

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CONTACT ROYAL FORTH

Club office Tel/ Fax: (working hours Tue – Fri 0800-1400)

CONTENTS

0131 552 8560

Facebook: RFYC – Royal Forth Yacht Club @RoyalForthYachtClub Email: royalforth@btconnect.com Web: www.rfyc.org (includes up to date information (visiting, opening hours, events, etc)

Royal Forth Yacht Club, Middle Pier, Granton Harbour, Edinburgh EH5 1HF Members’ lounge 07551 426 813 (working hours Sat & Sun 1200-1800, and during events) Boatman 07749 897 760 (working hours Mon-Sun, times depending on tides) Commodore  Adrian Shield Vice Cdre  Charles Morton (Sailing convenor) Rear Cdre  Ian Lindsay (House & Social convenor) Rear Cdre  John McLaren (Harbour convenor) Hon Secretary  Kenneth Mackay

6 Sailing To Edinburgh 8 Visiting Edinburgh 10 Around The Forth 12 RFYC On The Water In 2017 14 Volunteering And Officials 16 Historical 20 Cruising 37 Racing 42 Boats Of Royal Forth Yacht Club 44 Sailing Information 50 Sailing Calendar & Tide Tables Editor: Patrick Carnie Proof-reader: C Morton. Many thanks to all of the contributors for their stories, including those we couldn’t include due to space constraints. I wish you all a happy sailing season. To the best of the editors’, contributors’ and the Royal Forth Yacht Club’s knowledge the information in this Yearbook is correct at the time of going to press. Any opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the editors or the Royal Forth Yacht Club.

Hon. Treasurer  Alastair Wight Sailing Secretary  Cathy Sedgeworth Membership Secretary  Maria Walker

Front Cover: Lewis Smith, RFYC member, at the KBC Laser Radial World Championships 2016. Photo: David Branigan, Marine Photographer, www.oceansport.ie

Published by D-Tech Publishing Ltd., Suite 3.3 Station House, 34 St Enoch Square, Glasgow G1 4DF. Telephone 0141 222 2202.

Established 1868 as Granton Sailing Club, Royal Forth Yacht Club incorporates Royal Eastern Yacht Club (founded 1835) and Almond Yacht Club (founded 1897)

This yearbook is fully protected by copyright and nothing may be printed wholly or in part without the written permission of the publishers. The proprietors of this publication are publishers and not agents, or sub-agents of those who advertise therein. They cannot be held liable for any loss suffered as a result of information gained from this publication. The views expressed by authors of articles published in this publication are solely those of the author and are not necessarily the views of or shared by the publisher or the directors, shareholders and/or employees of D-Tech Publishing Ltd.

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Sinclair’s Bay

14h

MIN

CH

SAILING TO EDINBURGH RT

H

Eddrachillis Bay

NO

Enard Bay

C

H

RFYC coordinates: 55° 58' 58.8468''N, 3° 13' 23.6172''W 3h

H

E

M

IN

RFYC is well placed for yachtsmen visiting Edinburgh and the Forth as a destination or in passage north or south. It is a good stopover to visit the city, and just 20 miles from the mouth of the irth hF noc Dor Forth. A Forth Yacht Clubs Association Pilot Handbook is available T by post from the club to guide your visit to the Forth river, and the East Coast of Scotland from Berwick to Fraserburgh.

2h

y

art

om Cr

asa y

Loch Snizort

h

Firt

Inner Sou nd

Soun d of Ra

Approx distances from main North Sea cities and islands To RFYC from Lerwick, Shetland

269nm

Kirkwall, Orkney

217nm

Inverness/ Inbhir Nis

of Sl ea t

Inverness 210nm a

Aberdeen 87nm

nn

So

un d

Ca

Dundee 52nm

Rù m

of

of

d un So

So

d un

Newcastle upon Tyne

112nm

Sound of Arisaig

Great Yarmouth

304nm

Den Helder, NL

360nm

e

227nm

d

of

M ul

Lo ch

un

3h

Li

So

nn h

1h

Grimsby

Amsterdam, NL

Loch Tuath

l

376nm

Helgoland, GER in

399nm

o rn

rida L Sc

400nm

Cuxhaven, GER

438nm

Hamburg, GER

490nm

fL

Esbjerg, DEN o th

Dundee

Perth

th

Fir

of

Tay Rd Bridge

y Ta

St Andrews Bay

Lon

g

Fir

Approaching Granton, the weather forecast may be useful. The 7h UK Meteorological Office forecast provides up to date marine TH forecasts. The areas of R interest are the Forth offshore area (see FI www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/marine-shipping-forecast) AY R O M waters from Rattray Head to Berwick upon Tweed and the Inshore (see www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/marine-inshore-waters). Other web services are available – search for Granton or Leith. Spey Bay Inside the harbour, you should moor on the pontoons of Elgin Edinburgh Marina Ltd, directly south of the entrance, approx 3 cables (600m). This is jointly owned and managed by RFYC and Forth Corinthian YC. Details of the arrangements and facilities are in the Sailing information pages at the back. Both clubs do their best to make visitors welcome. Edinburgh Marina became operational for the first time in 1996, providing pontoon berthing and service facilities at all states of the tide. Long term objectives include provision of full marina facilities at an affordable price and to help sustain both clubs in the future. www.fcyc.org.uk/?page_ Aberdeen id=24 Visiting skippers and crew are very welcome to use the clubhouse facilities of the Royal Forth Yacht Club.

Bergen, NOR

Gothenburg, SWE

515nm

Clyd e

545nm

2h 2h

Soun d

(Check your own sailing distance at www.sea-distances.org or www.sea-seek.com) Kilbrannan

Laggan Bay

1h

Irvine

Ayr

6

Kincardine Br

Greenock

Oslo, NOR

Kirkcaldy

Stirling

400nm

Firth of

1h

So un d

s

349nm ch

of J

ur a

Lo ch Fy ne

Stavanger, NOR

Lo

2h

TH FIR Forth Rd Br

EDINBURGH Paisley

Glasgow East Kilbride

Kilmarnock

OF

TH FOR

NO RT H SEA


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VISITING EDINBURGH

E

dinburgh is one of the most famous cities in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Edinburgh uniquely offers culture, heritage and a distinctive experience for visitors. Edinburgh regularly tops TripAdvisor as a short break or holiday destination. Cruise ship passengers recently voted Edinburgh the “Best UK Port of Call". Edinburgh, the Forth and the neighbouring area provide a lively history, outstanding coastal scenery, interesting wildlife, great shopping, and lots to see and do. Breathtaking scenery, stunning cities, haunting history, UNESCO World Heritage Sites, historic castles, dramatic seascapes, world class sporting and cultural heritage and a warm welcome make Edinburgh, Scotland the perfect cruise destination. Scotland provides a rich array of activities with stunning landscapes, spectacular wildlife, wonderful local produce and a thriving arts and cultural scene. Fresh water – provided free at the pontoon as part of the service. Fuel and power – Fuel is available at nearby petrol stations (Morrisons or Asda), and battery charging facilities may be obtained at Royal Forth YC, but (in 2017) EML is unable to offer fuel or shore power on the pontoon due to legal restrictions. Red Diesel is available at Port Edgar, 6 miles by sea westwards. Toilets, showers, a warm welcome – available at RFYC clubhouse while the club is manned (contact details and hours on inside cover) or by key-pad access (available from the club office). The Key Access Number to gain access back onto the Pontoon and 8

the Key Access Number for the entrance gate and door into the Club can be obtained on payment of the berthing fee at the Club Office and at the Club Bar. Chandlery, sail repairs, marine electrics, boat repairs – the nearest are at Port Edgar, about 20 minutes drive west of Granton in South Queensferry. Deliveries may be made to the clubhouse during working hours – please advise the office at least a day in advance. GETTING AROUND Buses – There are frequent buses into Edinburgh City Centre. Granton Square is a bus terminus with timetabled services to the City Centre (19/47) and Leith (16). Universal fare: Adult 160p/Child 80p – no change is given. Lothian Buses app will plan your route https://lothianbuses.co.uk/ Taxis – the club has an arrangement with City Cabs, which provides a 10% discount on fares, on production of a card available from the club. A direct telephone link is available at the club to book your taxi. www.citycabs.co.uk STORES Within 20 minutes walk: West Granton Road Shops + cash machine [SW from GrantonSq 15 mins walk or 16/21/19 bus]. Granton Food & Wine and W Granton Superstore. Supermarkets (Iceland & Lidl). Fast food – classic British fish & chip shops.


Laundrette – The nearest laundrette is Bendix Self Service (0131 554 2180) at 342 Leith Walk on the 16 bus route (going east from Granton Sq into City Centre). Eastwards of Granton, Newhaven (about 2 miles) offers good quality harbourside restaurants, such as the Loch Fyne Oyster Bar and Porto & Fi. Masons, an excellent local baker, supplies many of our events. The Old Chain Pier and the Starbank Inn offer more traditional pub food and drinks. Newhaven harbour was established in 1504, to build a Scottish Navy. The historic harbour and deepwater anchorage, with its picturesque quayside, bars, cafes and restaurants offers a truly unique visit. Just inland from the historic Newhaven pier lighthouse, the Victorian fishmarket contains a traditional fish monger, plus the stunning Loch Fyne restaurant, offering fabulous Scottish seafood. Leith: Within a few minutes walk you’ll find this bustling town boasting delicious delis, chic drinking spots and several Michelin Star Restaurants. As the home of golf for over six centuries, many of Scotland’s legendary links and inland golf courses are on your doorstep. Just beyond Newhaven, Asda Supermarket Leith (Eastwards by 16 bus) is open 24 hours a day. Then you reach Ocean Terminal Shopping Centre in Leith, which offers a full range of creative retailers, waterfront dining and 12 screen cinema. The Royal Yacht Britannia is also at Ocean Terminal. A floating home to Her Majesty The Queen and the Royal Family for over

40 years, Britannia sailed over 1,000,000 miles around the world before coming to rest in Edinburgh. You can follow in the footsteps of Royalty to discover the heart and soul of this most special of Royal residences. Admission includes access to the Royal Racing Yacht Bloodhound and the Royal Sailing Exhibition. Explore the floating Royal residence with a fascinating audio tour of five decks (available in 27 different languages). She regularly rates as the top visitor attraction in Scotland and UK. Details at www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk In the city centre you will find the famous Edinburgh Castle, and a range of museums and galleries housing internationally significant collections. The Old and New Towns of Edinburgh are one of the most beautiful cityscapes in the world, inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1995. The unique character of the city comes from the striking contrast between the medieval Old Town and the Georgian New Town, with each area containing many significant historic buildings. Throughout the summer, Edinburgh plays host to some of the world’s greatest cultural festivals. Indeed, Edinburgh is the world's leading festival city, with 12 major annual festivals bringing talents from more than a third of the world's countries to our streets and stages. Reach beyond Edinburgh’s centre, to the Highlands of Scotland, the Borders country, the West Coast or just back to your own home. Travel connections are easy via Edinburgh Airport (www.edinburghairport.com), and the National Rail network (www.nationalrail.co.uk).

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AROUND THE FORTH From your base at Granton, you can explore some inspiring places. West of Granton As soon as you turn west, you will see one of Scotland's most iconic landmarks – the Forth Bridge was the world's first major steel bridge when it was completed in 1890, and is now a world heritage site. Recognisable by its complex structure and red paint, it is joined by two more modern road bridges. These three span three centuries, and tower over you as you navigate the narrows at Queensferry. They represent the best of design, engineering and construction in their time. Serving as key infrastructure links for Scotland, the bridges are free and accessible for everyone to enjoy. The Forth Bridge is the largest listed building in Britain and offers a maximum air draft of 44m. Details at http://www.forth-bridges.co.uk/ Queensferry has long been a crossing and gathering point, and is named for Mary Queen of Scots, who used this spot to make her journeys between palaces at Dunfermline (Scotland's ancient capital, and resting place of King Robert the Bruce) and Edinburgh. South Queensferry is a royal burgh (established 1636), and has its own Queensferry Museum, including memories of Andrew Carnegie the philanthropist who was born there. Full marine services are available at Port Edgar, formerly a naval minesweeping base, and located between the Road Bridges. It can be reached by sea, train or taxi. West of the bridges, you will pass Rosyth dockyard, where the Royal Navy’s aircraft carriers are being assembled, and then a huge oil refinery at Grangemouth.

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Beyond that, you can sail through the Forth & Clyde Canal to the Clyde Estuary, West Coast and Atlantic, take the Falkirk Wheel (the world’s only rotating boat lift) or cruise into the heart of Edinburgh. See the magnificent Kelpies sculpture or wander a unique and tranquil path through some of Scotland’s most densely populated areas. North of Granton Aberdour is a picturesque seaside town in Fife, home to two beautiful beaches, a harbour, castle, golf course and a choice of traditional pubs and shops. Silver Sands beach attracts watersports enthusiasts, walkers and families looking to relax on a sunny day. Aberdour’s main attraction is its delightful little harbour, and a 13th century fortified castle. East of Granton Dunbar, at the mouth of the Firth of Forth, is one of East Lothian's most beautiful & popular seaside towns. Dunbar is packed full of local independent businesses which helps maintain its diversity and distinctive character. It is known internationally as the birthplace of John Muir, renowned naturalist & conservationist, who is celebrated at his Birthplace museum. Dunbar’s secure harbour is home to an RNLI Offshore lifeboat, and a fishing fleet landing mainly shellfish. The earliest of the three harbours dates from 1710, and Dunbar was once a major herring and whaling port. The old castle walls host the UK's most accesible Kittiwake colony and, if you're lucky, you may also see Sammy, the resident friendly seal, who spends his time swimming around the harbour hoping for a fish supper from the fishermen.


Clockwise from top left: North Queensferry; Port Edgar; The Kelpies; Dunbar Harbour; Aberdour Castle; The Falkirk Wheel. 11


EAST COAST SAILING FESTIVAL 2017

First weekend of September, at Granton ECSF 2017 will be hosted jointly by the Royal Forth and the Forth Corinthian Yacht Clubs, on behalf of the Forth Yacht Clubs Association, and both clubs extend an invitation to join us at Granton and make it an event to remember.

Outline of events Feeder races from competing clubs. Social and on the water events each day from Friday 1st Sept to Monday 4th Sept

How it all began In 1985 a regatta was held on the Tay to celebrate the centenary of the Royal Tay Yacht Club. Yachts entered from Amble, Blyth, Sunderland, Hartlepool, Whitby, Dunbar, Royal Forth, Forth Corinthian, Cramond, Port Edgar, Limekilns, Dalgety Bay, Aberdour, Burntisland, Tayport, Wormit, Banff and Royal Tay.

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Visitors also attended from Norway and Denmark, and a dinghy regatta attracted visitors from many local clubs. Following the success of the RTYC Centenary Regatta, a meeting was held in 1986 between clubs from the Tay, Forth and North East England, after which East Coast Sailing Week (later Festival) was established. The first East Coast Sailing Week was held in 1987 at Granton, on the Forth, followed by the Tay in 1988, the Forth in 1989, and the Royal Northumberland Yacht Club at Blyth in 1990 – to celebrate their centenary. The event developed into a three centre event with the venues rotating. In 2015 the addition of a second venue on the Forth (Port Edgar as well as Granton) extended the timing from a 3 to a 4 year cycle. Many of the competitors have been attending the event since 1987 and a key factor has been the relationships which have built up over the last 28 years and continue to do so to this day. Royal Tay Yacht Club hosted the event in 2016.


ROYAL FORTH YACHT CLUB Sunday 14 May 2017 • 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Enquiries: royalforth@gmail.com

Middle Pier Granton Harbour Edinburgh EH5 1HF

0131 552 8560 www.royalforth.org

Come and try sailing in dinghies, keelboats, ride in a RIB or just watch the fun on the water.

Facebook: RFYC – Royal Forth Yacht Club

All free of charge • Food and refreshments will be available

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SUPPORT 150th Anniversary Development Appeal

F

ormed in 1868, the club’s 150th anniversary (sesquicentennial) will be 2018. Since its foundation, it has developed and improved its base in Granton Harbour, including a new clubhouse. Subsequently it has

• purchased Royal Forth committee boat, club launches, club RIBs, and a fleet of sailing dinghies,

• installed the club pillar crane, • provided a training shed (Mickery), • kept the clubhouse up to date with a new kitchen, showers and toilets,

• purchased a silt agitation dredger Boswall Bittern The Club has a long term land lease and a joint 20 year lease on the waters of the East Harbour. With security of tenure and a 150th Anniversary, we will invest nearly £100k in six sesquicentennial projects, as follows:

• Develop a mini marina of half-tide pontoons, initially for 10 yachts, off Pharos Pier

• Replace the May Shed with a new workshop/store • Provide 24 hour access to the Club’s showers and toilets • Purchase additional sailing dinghies • Upgrade the boatyard surfacing and boundary fences, Pharos Pier and to install security CCTV

• Run a membership drive

We invite members to donate to the best of their ability, for the benefit of the current membership and for future generations. As the Club is a Community Amateur Sports Club, Gift Aid can be claimed from the Exchequer. Every pound donated will be invested in one of the sesquicentennial development projects.

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Volunteering Developing friendships and sharing experiences are at the heart of the club. A huge part of this comes from volunteering, and it’s often true that the longest serving volunteers are not well enough recognised. The records focus on the service of past commodores and Honorary members, listed below. To minimise costs to members, the club is sustained by a mix of volunteers and handful of paid staff. Extra volunteers are always welcome and needed for the following roles (for some of which we offer relevant training)

• Committees: House & Social, Sailing and Harbour • Race management and support • Club boat drivers • Repair & maintenance of club vessels • Bar and catering duties • Moorings maintenance • Website • Grounds and Clubhouse maintenance Please consider becoming involved if possible: contact Sandra Cameron (office) or Maria Walker (membership secretary) in the first instance.


OFFICIALS OF THE CLUB 2017 Patron Admiral Vice Admiral

HRH The Princess Royal John Spencely

Flag Officers Commodore Vice Commodore Rear Commodore Rear Commodore

Adrian Shield Charles Morton (Sailing convenor) John McLaren (Harbour convenor) Ian Lindsay (House & Social Convener)

Hon Secretary Hon. Treasurer

Kenneth Mackay Alastair Wight

Council Members Hillary Sillitto Maria Walker John Lane Chris Howden Kenny Mackenzie Alastair Black Paul Lundberg Ian Rogers Office Bearers Cup Bearer Sailing Secretary Moorings Secretary Membership Secretary Yard & Moorings Manager

George C. Brown Cathy Sedgworth Jim Noble Maria Walker Mark Primrose

Sailing Committee Charles Morton (Vice Commodore) John Lane (Racing Results) Ian Rogers Chris Howden (RIBs & Safety Boats) Cathy Sedgeworth (Sailing Secretary) Simon Peakman Brian Robertson (Cruising) House & Social Committee Ian Lindsay (Rear Commodore) Maria Walker (Membership Secretary & Web back-up) Hillary Sillitto (Web Events) Alastair Black Denise Thomas Anthony Tait Harbour Committee John McLaren (Rear Commodore) Kenny MacKenzie Paul Lundberg Jim Noble (Moorings Secretary) Mark Primrose (Yard & Moorings Manager) Peter Hall Willie Thompson The officials are volunteers. Essential support is also provided our Administrator (Sandra Cameron), Bosun (Piotr) and Bar steward (Laurna).

Edinburgh Marina Limited Directors Peter Douglas (FCYC), Chairman George MacKay (FCYC) Mark Primrose (RFYC) Peter Sherlock (RFYC) Adrian Shield (RFYC) John Spencely (RFYC), Company Secretary

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HISTORY  Key Events In Forth Yachting Sailing on the Forth since 1835

T

he roots of the club go back to 1835, when the Eastern Regatta Club was founded in Edinburgh to promote “aquatic amusements and competition” in sailing and rowing matches (before the use of engines). The first regatta was held in 1836, over three days of sailing and rowing races, good food and good company. The regatta club became the Royal Eastern Yacht Club that same year. Granton Sailing Club was formed in 1868, and was renamed “Royal Forth Yacht Club” in 1883. The mid twentieth century saw various mergers, and Royal Forth merged with Royal Eastern in 1969. Granton Harbour, built between 1830 and 1863, has been a hugely successful port. Exporting coal, importing grass for making paper, protecting a fishing fleet of up to 80 trawlers and the Northern Lighthouse ships, or providing the base for Forth pilots, it has seen a range of maritime activity. From 1850 to 1890 it was home to the world's first ferry-train (crossing to Burntisland, Fife). Passenger and car ferry services continued into the 1960s. From 1942 to 1946, Granton harbour was home to a minesweeping training establishment, HMS Lochinvar. Granton Harbour closed as a commercial port in 1974. As maritime industrial and military activity has diminished, marine leisure has grown. Today the harbour is dominated by the boats of the Royal Forth Yacht Club, Forth Corinthian Yacht Club and the Forth Pilots, with regular activities for Sea Cadets and coastal rowers.

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1835

Eastern Regatta Club founded in Edinburgh

1836

Name changed to Royal Eastern Yacht Club by permission of King William IV. First regatta held off Leith

1838

Granton Pier opened

1842

Queen Victoria lands at Granton from the Royal Yacht ROYAL GEORGE

1859

“Royal Forth Regatta” organized by REYC

1868

Granton Sailing Club founded

1872

Granton Sailing Club name changed to Forth Yacht Club

1880

Forth Corinthian Yacht Club founded at Granton

1881

Forth Yacht Club acquires clubhouse at Boswall Road

1883

Queen Victoria grants permission to call the club Royal Forth Yacht Club. Admiralty warrant issued to fly special ensign

1897

Almond Yacht Club founded at Cramond, and moved to Granton in 1897

1906

Forth Week founded by REYC & RFYC

1934

1st Barge Cup team race vs Gareloch YC

1948

HRH Prince Phillip, the Duke of Edinburgh, elected Honorary member

1955

HM Yacht Britannia visits Granton Harbour

1957

Almond YC merged with RFYC

1968

RFYC Centenary regatta and first race from Helgoland

1969

REYC and RFYC merged

1984

RFYC moved to new clubhouse on Middle Pier

2002

HRH The Princess Royal elected Honorary member

2003

HRH The Princess Royal becomes Patron of the Royal Forth Yacht Club


Honour Roll  HISTORY Past Commodores of the Royal Forth Yacht Club (The Commodore of the Royal Eastern Yacht Club was, by tradition, the Duke of Buccleuch. Between 1835 & 1969 the 5th, 6th, 7th & 8th Dukes served in this role)

Honorary Members The Rule covering Honorary Membership was introduced in its present form in 1903 and since then has included: 1903

The Earl of Rosebery Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman M.P

1908

H.S.H. The Prince of Monaco The Earl of Dunraven

John Morrison

1909

The Earl of Dalkeith

1881

Thomas Craigie Glover

1912

1883

Sir Donald Currie G.C.M.G.

Robert Sinclair Esq. H.I.R.H. Archduke Karl Stephen of Austria

1910

Archibald Philip Primrose Earl of Rosebery K.G.K.T.

1919

1929

John Ferguson

Admiral Sir Cecil Burney Admiral Sir David Beatty

1937

Alexander James Ferguson

1922

J.H.H. Horsfield Esq.

1947

John Alexander MacQueen

1923

Sir Thomas C Glen-Coats, Bt

1957

The Hon. Lord Cameron D.S.C.

1937

The Duke of Buccleuch

1969

Hugh M. Arnott

1946

1972

James Leask

1975

Kenneth L. Gumley

1977

Roger O. S. Miller

1979

Marshall L. Napier

1981

Hamish Mackenzie

1983

Harry Holmes

Sir A. Young M.P. Alfred Milne Esq. John Dunlop Esq. The Flag Officer Scotland & Northern Ireland Hon. Sec. of Royal Northern & Clyde Yacht Club Hon. Sec. of Clyde Corinthian Yacht Club Hon. Sec. of Clyde Cruising Club Hon. Sec of Clyde Yacht Clubs Association

1985

Neil A. Ross

1948

H.R.H. The Duke of Edinburgh

1987

R. Alexander Flett

1982

George Farquhar Esq.

1989

David S. C. Boyd

1987

Dr. Meinhard Kohfahl

1991

William G. T. Rudd

2001

W Thompson Esq.

1993

Michael H. G. Pollett

2002

H.R.H. The Princess Royal

1995

Catherine H. Sedgeworth

2015

John D Spencely C.B.E.

1997

Stuart M. Crombie

2017

Dr. Jens Kohfahl

1999

W. David D. Darling

2001

Ian W. Paterson

2003

George C. Brown

2006

James A. G. Lowe

2009

Fiona M. Brown

2011

Richard M. Primrose

1868

George Stevenson

1872

Rear Admiral James Paterson Bower

1875

Capt. James Arthur Forbes R.N.

1879

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HISTORY  Loch Long Class Ken Dougall

H

ere is a picture I have of sailing at the club in 1964. Loch Long 11 was my father's (Dr HS Dougall) yacht and the one I learnt to sail in up to the age of 10. Loch Long 26 was owned by ABS Laidlaw another well known figure in the club. There was a large fleet of 10 Loch Longs in the club at the time but only two are showing in this picture. They were built to mark the coronation of George VI in 1937 and cost £60. Loch Long 11 was built in 1939. During the war the original plans for the Loch Longs were destroyed in a bombing raid on the Clyde. When they started building them again they used Loch Long 11's plans for the subsequent yachts. There are still large fleets in Cove on the Clyde, and in Aldeburgh. The Loch Long Fleet 1964 at RFYC had various links to current members. The families which owned Roma, Circe and Oronsay (and probably others) still have members of the club, in the second and third generations.

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Roma – Dr Hamish S Dougall Circe – Brian J Tunstill Oronsay – Somerville, Weir, Whike, Macdonald, refered to as "the Oronsay Girls" Lulu – Malcom C Huie and Logan J Beveridge Yogi – John AF Gibb Sapphire – A Macdonald Sheen – HG & AHG Munro Luffa – ABS Laidlaw Mistral – Peter Martin Capricorn – Dr E Chamberlain


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16:21

30/03/2016 16:21


CRUISING  From the club Patrick Angier

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here are not many capital cities where within 30 minutes of leaving your office you can be aboard your yacht and dropping the mooring for an adventure. The Forth is a very well kept secret. No longer is it the polluted drain of Edinburgh, but rather it is wildlife haven full of fish, seabirds and large mammals. Go out for an evening potter in the summer and seals will nudge the rudder, puffins will make you laugh (just watch them crash on the water – they just stop their wings rather than land gracefully) and if you sail down the coast to Bass Rock it’s like sailing through a swarm of bees, except each bee is a Gannet with 5 ft wing span. The Forth has its own microclimate – sometimes it’s a raging fury with north-easterly gales from the Arctic, but more usually with the prevailing southerly or westerly wind the sea is flat making superb sailing. If it’s cloudy on land it’s very often sunny out to sea. There is a real sense of smugness being out in the sun whilst the rest of the country is in rain. No it’s not as warm as the Mediterranean or even the south coast of England, but every summer we do have balmy days. Swimming – put a wetsuit on and it’s superb. In terms of cruising destinations we have Inchcolm Abbey, Inchkeith and Inchmikkery Islands all with an hour or so. Straight across the Forth is Aberdour with a good little harbour and pubs, and close by there is Silver Sands – drop the anchor and paddle ashore to play in the sand. Turn to port out of the harbour and go up river through the bridges and there are many little harbours and villages such as Charleston and Blackness Castle to visit. Keep going up to Grangemouth where you can enter the Forth and Clyde Canal and in two days you’re though to the west coast. Turn to starboard and the East Neuk of Fife and the East Lothian Coast are within three to five hours sail, or you can press on and be down in Eyemouth or up to the Tay Estuary or Arbroath within a day. If you keep going Orkney or the Caledonian Canal are two to three days sail. Heading south, in a similar time you will reach the East Anglian or even Dutch coasts. Every year a number of Granton based boats head off on substantial voyages and throughout the summer we welcome a 20

procession of yachts from Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Holland, France and the rest of the UK, with Edinburgh either their final destination or a stop along a voyage to Iceland, Northern Scandinavia or the west coast of Scotland. Some RFYC yachts are on extended cruises in other parts of the world. Cruising can be a very solitary pastime or very sociable. At RFYC we hold regular Cruises in Company – a loose group of old and new friends taking their boats for a walk in roughly the same direction. Lots of food and drink and other fun and games on the way. Often cruises just seem to happen between a bunch of likeminded souls – a memorable one was a group of four yachts which took the early morning ebb down the Firth – rafting up for a breakfast of grilled kippers (it was very calm) – ending up at the North Berwick traditional boat rally – lobster and chips on the beach – being invited to a ceilidh in the evening. Choice of Cruising Boats One can cruise in any boat, and we have boats ranging from a 12 ft clinker sailing dinghy to yachts of 40 ft that cruise regularly. Tides on the Forth can have a five metre swing and whilst the currents are not strong many of the harbours dry out so standing alongside the wall is required. Tall, thin bulb-keels are not ideal, more traditional long keels are preferred. Alternatively, many members have twin, or bilge, keeled boats which can dry out easily. There is a lot to be said for small day boats –the Wayfarer dinghy, Lune Longboats, Drascombe Luggers or small trailer-sailers such as a Cornish Shrimper or Cape Cutter. These are suitable for day sailing and overnight stops and they can be trailed easily behind the family car. Slightly bigger boats (c25 ft), exemplified by the Folkboat and Contessa 26 offer extended cruising ability without a huge amount of expense. Bigger boats offer a more comfort and are kinder to their crew in rougher weather. In the RFYC we have a good fleet of Dragons – wonderfully fast day sailers and H-Boats – nearly as fast but offering four separate full length berths, for good friends. The latter certainly makes a good club racing boat that can be also be cruised . Cost is a factor to consider. A boat up to about 25ft can be had for £5,000 to £10,000 with average annual running costs including moorings, antifouling and spares and maintenance of £2,500. This will get you an older but perfectly seaworthy boat that will provide huge amounts of fun and adventure but you can of course spend a lot lot more.


Cruise in Company.

Thursday evening cruises The Club runs a regular Thursday evening gathering (about 6 p.m) for people interested in an evening cruise in company. Given the tidal aspect of our harbour, this will be every 2nd week, and ties in with the boatman and the bar being open for racing. Crew are allocated to a boat and we all set off for a short cruise in a direction inspired by the wind and the tide. We all get a couple of hours on the water in a variety of conditions and people without boats get the chance to try out a number of boats which may inspire them to get their own boat. Non members are welcome and can join in, though if they come out more than a handful of times they will be expected to apply to join the club. At the end of the evening’s sailing the bar will usually be open and there will be the opportunity to socialise with the other crews and skippers and swap stories. Even if you look at the weather forecast and think it doesn’t look great, turn up anyway. You often find the weather has improved, or you go out anyway and have a great couple of hours on the water. And there is always the opportunity for some hot soup or a drink at the club on your return. An email group will be used to gauge the level of interest from crews and available skippers. The relevant evenings are shown in

the Sailing Calendar (page 50) and people could just turn up but with no guarantee of a place on a boat. Crews registering their interest via the email group will get priority if there is a shortage of spaces. We hope to see you there.

Evening on the Forth.

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CRUISING  Dubrovnik To St. Lucia Cape Verde archipelago; Murray Carmichael and Gordon Wilson.

Geoffrey Bowler, Out Of Port Member SY Janika Lycka (Najad 380), lying St Lucia

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he mission was to sail the Atlantic with Jimmy Cornell’s Barbados 50 Rally and the new boat was in Dubrovnik. So, after a delivery trip starting in May 2016 down the Adriatic and across the Med to Gibraltar (plus a wee diversion around Stromboli) then Madeira and Lanzarote, Janika Lycka joined 30 other yachts from UK, Australia, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland and Sweden. We found ourselves in Barbados for late November in time for the first of many Bajan rum punches, and the 50th anniversary of independence. Coppercoat, solar panels, satellite phone, engine service, SailGen – Before crossing, we had a month in a Greek boatyard then Lefkas marina, allowing good preparation for bluewater sailing and the Atlantic. Sailand in Lefkas was totally professional, fair-priced and did all the work on time. “Fibreglass Les” (Les Wood) was recommended by the Coppercoat manufacturers. And the bearded Greek rigger, Nick Sarailides, turned out to be a distant relative of the Earl of March and Wemyss, speaking English with an upper crust East Lothian accent and familiar with Longniddry (my home) – small world indeed. Jimmy Cornell’s Barbados 50 Odyssey: We joined the Barbados 50 Odyssey in Lanzarote in September and dispersed in Barbados in early December, having sailed to all the Canary Islands except Fuerteventura (ferry trip to there) and the Cape Verde archipelago, sailing to the islands of Santa Antao, Brava, Fogo, Santiago from Mindelo marina on Ilha de Sao Vicente. The friendship, camaraderie, parties, receptions, bus tours, marina berthing, assistance with Janika Lycka’s first loaf, customs and baked by Susan Wilson off the Atlantic coast of Africa. immigration, seminars and lectures, skippers’ briefings, the value for money were all superb. Jimmy, still with his Romanian accent, was omnipresent, 22

knowledgeable, funny, irascible. Twice daily VHF briefings kept the fleet informed. The French complained that they could not understand and my German neighbour on the pontoons commented, “Vhy kan’t ze French learn English like efferybody else?” Off Ilha Brava, Cape Verde islands, three of the French boats dragged their anchors overnight and, of course, no schadenfreude could be acknowledged. The ever-cheerful, morale-lifting Belgian Luc of the Cornell Team observed over VHF, ”Sree boats dragged zer ankurs, no damage, nobody ‘urt, zat is ze cruising, and the sun is shining.” RFYC Ensign – I flew (Janika Lycka wore) the RFYC ensign in Madeira, the Certificate of British Registry and Permit having come through. Kai Sprenger, our German crew member, unexpectedly produced a harmonica and played God Save The Queen as the flag was hoist. The Ensign attracts curiosity especially from Germans and more than once I have explained that we are not members of the Royal family. Embarrassingly, the burgee currently flies from the port signal halyard, as the masthead is cluttered with antennae and instruments and there is always a courtesy or Q flag starboard. This breach of etiquette will be remedied when we lay up for the hurricane season in Trinidad in June (I hope so – Ed). Atlantic crossing (15 – 24 November 2016) It wasn’t a race but… we arrived 13th and as a monohull and the third shortest boat in the fleet, we were pleased. My two sons, James and Nick, aged around 30, provided the father’s dream team. Both started their sailing at RFYC when Cathy Sedgeworth’s enlightened leadership encouraged family membership and both became sailing instructors at Port Edgar with James now a commercial yachtmaster. The wind was frequently stronger than the F3-F4


Martinique.

In Bridgetown Barbados.

The boat and The Rock Gibraltar.

cited in the Admiralty Mariner’s Handbook and was frequently round to the SE. We crossed early (before January) so the Trades proper had not fully developed. There was often swell from more than one direction with much rolling so sleep was lost. We reached, goose-winged, poled out and flew the gennaker. The only “incident” was the gennaker snuffer jamming 1/3 the way down as we were hit by a squall, coupled with the autohelm inexplicably gybing us: the boom brake earned its pay and the contents of the starboard book case and navigation station were quickly retrieved from the floor – and the gennaker from the sea. Barbados, St. Lucia and Martinique – Facilities for yachts in Barbados are limited so we berthed in the careenage, central Bridgetown, and at anchor in Carlisle Bay off the Barbados Yacht Club – where we celebrated Hogmanay. In the New Year, Janika Lycka headed for St. Lucia to the excellent Rodney Bay marina and the stunning scenery with the Pitons, Marigot Harbour, tropical forest – all quite different from flat Barbados. Then it was to Martinique, to be in France and back in the EU, using Euros, driving on the right and comfortable in the knowledge that the EHIC would be recognised. The huge and excellent Port du Marin marina provides every conceivable yacht service, and there are beautiful bays, and traffic to match the M8 at rush hour around the capital, Fort de France. Barbados has the best rum punch but the most difficult accent, a mix of English West country, Irish and Caribbean. The Caribbean wind is from the NE or E, F4-6 most of the time so one reaches from one spot in paradise to the next. Marina prices are fair, anchorages are free, and the chandlery and servicing facilities in many places are outstanding. So it will be some time before Janika Lycka returns to Scotland. The safe season runs from 1 December to 1 June, making time for some European summer and autumn sailing. Crew list: Gordon Campion, Murray Carmichael, Brian Tiplady, John Louden, Kai Sprenger, Susan Wilson, Linda Cooper, Dave and Val Littlewood. See our video at https://youtu.be/3zRqXY37OHw

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CRUISING  The Stockholm Archipelago Tim Simpson Our boat.

W

e charter in May because of the freedom it offers, so our annual cruise is different every year. In recent years we have flown the RFYC pennant off Greece, Croatia and Turkey. In 2016 we headed for the Baltic where the Stockholm Archipelago is well known as an idyllic sailing ground. We allowed for the Northerly latitude, parallel to the Shetlands, by taking the first week in June but this proved to be rather early for Sweden. Sailing there “wakes up” a week later when school holidays start and the weather for our week was still “Baltic”. Our party of seven flew to Stockholm, then by mini bus to Gåshaga on the island of Lidingö, where we chartered Bavaria 42 “Sol”. Next morning, we met our charter lady, whose major concern was that we did not hit any rocks. Our plan, to sail South to the island of Utö and then North to Möja, before returning to Lidingö via Vaxholm, received her approval. Sunday. Our departure coincided with the start of a race, which we avoided by sticking close to the S coast of Lidingö. After only 3 miles, we stowed sails and turned S under engine into the Baggenståket channel, a well buoyed and scenic passage, like a wooded loch 30m wide, lined with colourful wooden holiday homes. We anchored off the Dalaröbryggan Hotel for a squally lunch, then continued S on the Baggenståketfjärden, a broad waterway interrupted by small islands. Access to the sheltered lagoon of Hemviken, on Smådalarö, is through a narrow entrance. It was just enough to squeeze our large yacht through. Monday. The sky had cleared for a fine day. After sailing round Munken Island, our course was SW to Dalarö where the Mayor greeted us, saying that everything in Sweden is forbidden unless it is permitted, and invited us to the church for National Day. Dalarö is a picture postcard village. From here progress S was between the large island of Ornö and the mainland, on a beat in a moderate force 4-5 breeze. Lunch was at Kolnasvikern (NE Ornö) where (old habits die hard) we had a Greek-ish Salad. By late afternoon, we reached the anchorage at Utö, a former mining settlement, with timber huts, good timber piers and a windmill on the hill. The harbour is well protected by an outer island and the channel is very well buoyed, when you can pick it out. This hotel served excellent food, if a bit expensive. Tuesday. Warm and sunny with a light S breeze. We followed the coast of Utö N-wards and past Ornö, identify rocks for ourselves. Our morning was very pleasant, running before the wind, in the warmth of the sun. By lunchtime we had reached the N end of 24


Baggestaket channel.

Hemviken, island of Smådalarö.

Vaxholm.

Ornö where anchored in a large open anchorage for lunch. The afternoon sail was in far more open water, on the main route through the archipelago. The crew were keen to visit Sandhamn but the direct route between Runmarö and Nämdö is strewn with small islets and rocks. So we therefore carried on up the Nämdöfjärden to Djuro from where we followed the ferry route, well marked with buoys, to Sandhamn. The forecast was poor so we were happy to secure to a stout pontoon with springs and warps, amidships as well as fore and aft. As the wind built up to gale force, we settled into the warm Sandhamn pub where we had an excellent meal, and cheap too! Wednesday. Wet – but the wind had dropped to a bit over 20 knots. We had coffee and cakes in town before motoring back to the main route N. We hoisted sail, well reefed down, off Hasselkobben Island. The wind was still from the N as we set out to windward in company with another yacht from Sandön. Our reef was no disadvantage, with Rob offering a competitive edge. The lunch stop, Grissel Holmen at the S end of Korso, involved creeping round an islet in the channel with the echo sounder reading zero. We wished it had been set to tell the actual depth, since all these anchorages have very shallow entrances. Fortunately we take a lead line with us on these trips. The weather had improved by the afternoon. Our destination was Möja, where there is a shallow silted up inlet, Kyrkviken. The village is a loose settlement in the trees with a wooden kirk on the hill. Our dinner was pizza, cooked by an Italian and a chef from Venezuela, out of a timber garage. They were testing their oven ahead of the holidays, when the empty houses would fill up with people for the school holidays.

Thursday. With wind still from the N, but clear skies, we headed back round Södermöja. There was now a lively beat before rounding Sodra Stavsudda to turn W into a mass of tiny islands. For a coffee stop we visited Säck, a well-known anchorage approached through a deep rock cleft which opens out into a deep circular lagoon among rocky islets. The afternoon was spent on passage to the marina at Grinda – picking our way between wooded islets and avoiding rocks. In the usual pattern, the hotel was inland on the hill, which is where we had dinner. Unfortunately Arthur had an accident and cut his head on a finned radiator but the medical response was impressive; a helicopter arrived within about 20 minutes and took Arthur to a Stockholm hospital. Friday. Our last day and the weather was perfect. We set off on a close reach for Vårholma island, about 4 miles to the N, in open water. We found a private anchorage, completely sheltered, between St. Betsön and Bjuron islands. After coffee we sailed for the lighthouse at Brödstycket and turned S with Rindö to starboard, visiting both of the fortified gateways to Stockholm, at the Eastern, and Western, ends of Rindö Island. The Eastern fortress has a formidable stone tower, on each bank of a narrow waterway. From here we followed the Southern shore of Rindö to Vaxholm. A castle stands on the island which sits in the centre of this narrow entrance. There is a marina close to the castle, where we stopped to re-fuel and have lunch in a cafe overlooking the yachts. We arranged our final sail down to Gåshaga to make the most of our time with the charter boat. Arthur was on the quay side to greet us and show off his stitches.

25


Sunrise from Largo beach, East Coast of Fife

26


Bass Rock with thousands of gannet birds nesting, Firth of Forth.

27


ROYAL FORTH YACHT CLUB  Membership Application Form Please return to: Membership Secretary, Royal Forth Yacht Club, Middle Pier, Granton Harbour, Edinburgh, EH5 IHF Details for Membership Class

For Office Use

Insert class

Date Received.

Name Address

Date admitted

Post Code

Membership No.

Occupation Key Fob No.

Date of Birth Home Tel No.

Office Tel No.

E-mail Address £

Cheque enclosed with application (made payable to Royal Forth Yacht Club) for

Acknowledgment: By submitting this Application for Membership I acknowledge that I have read the Club’s most recent General Rules and understand that failure to adhere to the Club’s object of the encouragement of sailing and boating from its base at Granton Harbour with its headquarters at the Clubhouse, Granton shall, in the opinion of Council, be deemed to be injurious to the character and interests of the Club.

Signature of Applicant_____________________________________________________ Date_____________________________________ Family Membership Name

Date of Birth

Spouse/Partner Child 1 Child 2 Child 3

Boat Details (See page 46 for Mooring charges. Tick here to request a mooring application form: ) Name of Boat

LOA

Displacement

Type/Class

Draft (ft)

Rig

Sail Number

Handicap

VHF Call sign

Sailing Experience and Interests (RYA Certs, other Clubs)

28


Notes re Application for Membership  ROYAL FORTH YACHT CLUB Volunteering

The effective running of the Club depends not only on members of Council but on the help and support of willing volunteers from amongst the membership. Each year about 40 members volunteer in the various activities.

Please tick all those activities you would like to be involved with: Tick

Activity Committee work Race official Royal Forth Driver (training given) Safety Boat (needs qualification and/or training) Harbour work Yard Work Bar and kitchen support (training given) Anything else

Experience, comments, etc

Class of Membership Ordinary: Members (aged 18 and over) who have full rights and privileges of Membership. Associate: Members (aged 18 and over except for Cadets) who may use the Club and its facilities, except that they may not (i) moor a boat in the harbour or store one in the yard or (ii) vote at any General Meeting. Associate members include the following:Out of Port: Members not permanently resident within 60 miles by road of the Clubhouse (OOP); Under 25: Members under the age of 25 who have the right to keep and sail dinghies from the yard; Student / Apprentice: Members in full time education or training who have the right to keep and sail dinghies from the yard (Student); Cadet: Members under 18 years of age who may use the Club and its facilities except they may not purchase or consume alcohol on the premises. Non-Sailing Spouse/Partner: Members who are the spouse/partner of an Ordinary, Under 25 or Student / Apprentice Member. Such Members have the right to use the Clubhouse and take part in the social activities of the Club but not the sailing activities (NSS/P). Family: Membership covers Ordinary membership for the applicant and the applicant’s spouse/partner and Cadet membership for each child up to their 18th birthday. Occupation: If you are retired enter "Retired" and state your occupation previous to retirement. Address: The address you give must be that at which the applicant normally resides (care of and/or company addresses are not acceptable). Payment: Payment should accompany your application. Your cheque will not be negotiated until you have become a member. Current Subscription Rates:

1st year Subsequent years

Ordinary

OOP

Under 25

Student

Cadet

NSS/P

Family

£160.00

£65.00

£65.00

£25.00

£25.00

£25.00

£290.00

£260.00

£65.00

£65.00

£25.00

£25.00

£25.00

£435.00

Enquiries: Any enquiries may be directed to the Administrator at the above address, by telephone 0131 552 8560. E-Mail Address royalforth@btconnect.com Web Site www.rfyc.org Note: On becoming a Member the data collected on this form will only be used by the Club for its management and will not be disclosed to any external sources. Post Code, E-mail Address and Telephone Numbers will be included in the Club’s Internal Membership Directory, which is copied to all Members unless you request otherwise.

29


Sunset at Loch Linnhe.

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From Purgatory To Paradise  CRUISING

Peak Flow’s Summer Cruise 33 days 1158nm Hillary Sillitto

Purgatory – Granton to Inverness – 28 April-4 May – 221 nm Thursday 28 April. Glen: “I met my brother Richard off the Sleeper. After some guddling, we left the Granton pontoon at 10.00. After the North Carr buoy the wind really got up, and we ran under reefed genoa towards Arbroath in confused waves – a rock-and-roll of a ride, but we rode the swell, made the turn, and got through the gates at 19.00. First hot meal on the boat, and shore power to heat a cold night. Friday. Forecast 7-8 NE, so we stayed in port. Snow was lying on the boat! We explored Arbroath, got supplies, visited the RNLI/Bell Rock museum, and enjoyed an excellent seafood supper with sea view. Saturday. With better forecast and a blue sky, we set off at 7.45. Angus and Aberdeenshire were spectacular with the excellent light and snow on the hills. Sailing goosewinged, ‘running fast past Aberdeen’. Approached Peterhead through building waves, with reefed genoa. We passed through the breakwater and tied up in the marina by 19.30 to find no staff, no access keys, and no shore power – the perils of early season cruising. Sunday. Cold and windy. Three yachts set off in company, us running under genoa in steep seas with southerly F56. It calmed down off Troup Head, and we motored to Whitehills, where we adjourned to the pub for a sociable meal with folk from other yachts. Monday. Forecast SW 4-5. Departing 07.30, we sailed close hauled until the wind went due W. We motored into adverse wind and tide at 3000 rpm. You use more fuel at high revs! At 13.00, off Lossiemouth, the engine cut out.

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CRUISING  From Purgatory To Paradise Blasting down Loch Lochy, Caledonian Canal, at 7 knots, Genoa only.

Drifting around, Richard studied the handbooks and managed to bleed the system, and Glen decanted 25 litres of reserve fuel into the tank. Got the engine restarted at 14.00. At this point we should have gone into Lossiemouth but foolishly continued as before, motoring directly into strengthening westerly. By late afternoon we were seriously tired and fed up. The boat was shipping more and more water. Log entry for 16.40 reads ‘nightmare passage, 25 kt wind over tide’. Then, to cap it all, we found the bilge was full, tried to pump it, and the hand pump broke! With the benefit of hindsight, we should have sailed the boat closehauled, well reefed, and gone into Nigg Bay if necessary. We took forever to get through Chanonry Narrows, ground slowly under the Kessock Bridge as night fell, and reached the Marina just before 10pm. A truly purgatorial experience, from which many lessons may readily be drawn! Tuesday. Entering the Clachnaharry sea lock with tide running strongly out of the Beauly Firth, you feel sure you are going crash into the piers, or miss them completely, but somehow it calms down at the last minute. The staff made us welcome and our new fenderboard came into its own. We went through 2 locks and the railway swing bridge, and tied up to regroup in the Muirtown pound. The forecast was SW 4-6 for the next two days, and we didn’t want more purgatory going down Loch Ness. Pottered around fixing things and had a nice meal enjoying the sunset at the Clachaharry Inn. 32

Wednesday. We negotiated the swing bridge and the 4 lock Muirtown staircase, taking water at the top and buying Bilge Pump spares, then pootled along the canal and through the Dochgarroch Lock, mooring beyond the lock in the waters of Loch Ness. Passage to Paradise Inverness to Mallaig: 6-9 May / 124 nm Crew – Simon, Hillary and Margaret Fletcher Friday 6 May. A complex logistical plan was executed flawlessly. The team drove from Edinburgh to drop Simon, Margaret and full provisions on Peak Flow at Dochgarroch Lock. Then Hillary deposited Simon’s car at Banavie railway station, ready for a return journey home, using public buses to rejoin Peak Flow at Fort Augustus. Peak Flow slipped at 12:50 in brilliant warm sunshine, and a light WSW wind. Arriving to tie up at Fort Augustus shortly after Hillary at 17.10, went for excellent meal and drinks at a local pub. Saturday. Summer turned to winter overnight, with a cold F4-F5 Easterly, and cloudy. Slipping at 09.00, we soon found that the strong Easterly could warm us with excitement; sailing the lengths of Loch Oich and Loch Lochy under genoa alone, surging along at 6 to 7 knots, at one point touching 8.7 knots. Arriving at Neptune’s Staircase at 16.00, a cheery chat with the fellow on station led to his allowing us down the flight; goodwill in abundance. Tied up at Corpach at 17.30 Sunday. Slipped at 08.00 to enter the sea-lock, which we eventually did at 09.35. We slipped again at 11.30 to catch the tidal gates for the passage towards Mull. The F4-5 North-Easterly was still with us, so we hoisted Spinnaker as we passed Fort William, and progressed at 6-7knots down Loch Linnhe towards the Corran narrows. For caution, and with increasingly fluky winds, we used engine through the narrows, and beyond. We progressed down Loch Linnhe towards the sound of Mull with a fluky and variable wind. So while the Spinnaker went up and down, the temperature rose as the sun returned with clear blue skies and occasional fluffy clouds. Ghosting into the Sound of Mull at 3 to 4 Knots, the wind following us round; we went from heading south east to East North East with no change in the sail setting! Motor-sailed to Salen Bay, where the North Easterly now presented paradise! A beautiful spring evening, cruising chute pulling us at 5knots towards Tobermory, the sun slowly setting towards the hills ahead of us. A piper on a yacht near the harbour entrance hailed our graceful approach with some appropriate tunes as we glided towards the pontoons, to tie up at 18.50. Aperitifs on board followed by a fabulous meal in the Café Fish.


Monday. Paradise persisted overnight, so we languished until midday, when the NE F2-3 gave a great cruising chute sail past the Ardnamurchan lighthouse in full sunshine, then a 6 hour passage to Mallaig tacking frequently in fluctuating and variable Easterly and North Easterly winds. This presented great opportunities for Margaret to practice her helming skills while the male members fiddled with everything it was possible to fiddle with concerning rig tensions, sail adjustments and twists, mast rakes and bends. Docked at 20.20, all very tired but glowing, and ready for a great meal in the West highland Hotel, with the sun setting over Skye, to reflect on our passage to paradise. Swallows and Amazons adventures: Knoydart 21-27 May / 100 nm Crew – Simon and Hillary Saturday 21 May. Train to Mallaig from Edinburgh, then some hours victualling and refitting equipment, including a fully functioning autopilot and vang for the first time. Slipped 17.25, Easterly F2-3, and fetched to the visitor’s mooring at Doune for supper. Unloaded the dingy for the first time, and beached it near the restaurant. As dinner was served, we were presented with magnificent cloud formations over the mountains on Skye. Sunday. With light SSW winds forecast, and with plans to find an anchorage at the head of Loch Nevis, the day was spent finding, surveying and securing uncharted anchorages in interesting places for unpredictable winds. Cast off at 08.00, motored and occasionally sailed to find anchorages at the south side of Loch Nevis, with no real success. Moved North to the bay off Camusrory for lunch: a good holding found with 25-30 meters of chain. We needed a reliable anchorage that would be safe for days in winds shifting between westerly, south westerly, easterly and north-easterly. The area was surveyed with the depth sounder, and possible anchor locations noted. We ultimately decided to Anchored in Loch Nevis.

anchor with the main anchor near one shore, the kedge anchor towards another shore, and Peak Flow positioned in deep water in between. The dinghy was inflated and the main anchor dropped. The kedge anchor and chain was attached to a 60 meter line, rowed to the pre-determined spot, and dropped. On the third attempt, at 20.40, it held, firmly. This unmarked anchorage, 57°00.038N, 5°32.116W is Peak Flow’s anchorage for Loch Nevis adventures. Monday. Mountain Adventure: Rowed dinghy to shore for the ascent of Beinn Bhuidhe Tuesday. More Mountain Adventure: Rowed dinghy to shore for the ascent of Beinnn an Aodainn (Ben Aden), meeting Hillary’s daughter, son-in-law and mother-in-law at the summit. Returned to Peak flow, ferrying each person and gear to the yacht one by one. At 19.00 lifted the kedge and main anchor (with difficulty) and motored to Inverie arriving 20.50. for dinner in the Old Forge. Wednesday. A bright spring day with light easterly winds, sunny and with occasional clouds, a day for gentle cruising around the Sleat peninsular. Picked up the shore party at 10.00, then heading west towards Rum at 2-3knots. At 16.00 a F4 Easterly began to pick up, to give an entertaining beat, tacking back to Inverie. Tied up at Inverie pier at 19.40. Dinner at a take-away van near the hostel where Hillary’s family berthed. Thursday. Another bright and sunny day, tied up at Inverie Pier for breakfast in the café, and to meet the shore party. Untied at 10.30, motoring to the head of Loch Nevis to drop the shore party at Camusory pier at 12.15 for their long hike home across the mountains. The Easterly F3 picking up again, ran westwards down Loch Nevis under mainsail at 4 knots, raising the cruising chute for a 6-7 knot reach along the central part of Loch Nevis towards the Sound of Sleat.

Anchored in Loch Nevis.

Loch Eribol.

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Passing Assynt, Suilven conspicuous in the centre skyline.

Evening light Crowlin Sound anchorage, off Applecross.

The F4-5 ENE wind down the sound of Sleat gave a tremendous tack northwards towards Loch Hourn. The shelter of the hills around Loch Hourn quelled the wind to a SSE F2, but we continued a gentle sail to anchor at 18.30 at the marked anchorage off Arnisdale House in Camas bay. Friday. A slow rise for another bright day, with little or no wind. At 12.00 lifted anchor to go in search of good anchorages on the south side of Loch Hourn. Close recce of the shoreline revealed a number of great unmarked anchorages, including removed fish farm sites. At 13.30 headed southwards towards Mallaig, under motor. Enjoyed a gentle final 4 mile beat to Mallaig in a F2 south-westerly. Mallaig to Barra and back: 28 May-3 June / 157 nm Crew – Glen, Helen Kennedy, Richard Roberts and Christine Lambert Saturday 28 May. We came together in Mallaig in the early afternoon, provisioned, boarded, and set off at 17.30 towards Rùm. We quickly got the feel of sailing in a nice north-westerly Force 3. We dropped anchor in the wide bay before Kinloch Castle, relishing the first meal on board and the magical experience of such a landscape on a fine calm evening. Sunday. Up-anchor at 9.15 and beat around the north of Rùm. It was sunny with interesting and attractive effects of mist, with boats and islands moving in and out of sight. Passing north of Canna a gentle breeze enabled a broad reach towards Barra. A benign passage, with the odd large ship seen passing through the Minch. The highlight was a group of dolphins, who frolicked along under our bow for 15 minutes. We finished with pilotage into Castlebay Harbour moorings. Monday. Rowed the dinghy ashore on a beautiful morning, buying diesel, coffee and cakes, and admiring the castle. Then we set off to the Vatersay barrage, before a gentle sail past the chain of smaller islands south of Barra. It was quite lively and 34

Evening at Doune, Knoydart.

wavy, so after taking a look at the Sound of Pabbay we beat back and round into Castlebay. We enjoyed a meal at the Indian café/ restaurant near the pier. Tuesday. With a fair forecast and reasonable breeze (F3-4 NNE), we set off with two destinations in mind – either the new marina at Lochboisdale, or sail straight across to Canna. The latter option firmed up as we made good progress, sailing hard with 2 reefs in main and genoa, going like a train in NNE F5-6. Richard demonstrated a talent for helming in these conditions. The sun shone and the sea was blue! We passed close to the handsome northern cliffs of Canna and rounded the headland into Canna Harbour to moor by 17.00. Busy as ever, so we had to moor near Sanday. Wednesday. A particularly glorious 1st of June and the skipper granted a day’s shore leave on his favourite island. Took dinghy ashore the short way, to Sanday, making for a longish walk. Returning after a good dinner in the café at about 21.00 it was blowing old boots (N, 6-7) and rowing small dinghy out to yacht was strenuous and stressful, requiring 3 trips with 1 passenger each time. Thursday. Up anchor at 9.30, and sailing east with 2-reefed main towards Point of Sleat. Round the point we shortened the genoa and hammered along past Mallaig, into Loch Nevis and across to Inverie, with a particularly exciting final fetch towards the Old Forge. On mooring by 14.35. Rowed ashore, in challenging crosswind, for showers and excellent meal at Old Forge. Friday. We had a short motor-sail from Inverie to Mallaig,. Fond farewells and revictualling. 5 nm. Paradise – Mallaig to Stromness: 3-10 June / 306 nm Crew – Hillary, Simon, Glen Friday 3 June: The team set off in beautiful sunshine at 14:30 into a Northerly wind. Racing through Kylerhea narrows at 8 knots


From Purgatory To Paradise  CRUISING over the ground, the Waverley to passed heading south. Once through the Skye Bridge, we hoisted sail. The Crowlin Sound, running north-south between the two main islands, gives complete shelter from easterlies, and also from the pervasive sounds of modern civilisation. The evening sky, flecked with clouds and reflected in the gentle ripples of the calm anchorage, gave a spectacular setting for the first of Simon’s excellent meals. Saturday: The next morning’s sunshine led us to coin the phrase “from purgatory to paradise”. Before leaving, saw a Trident missile submarine. Frustratingly light wind led to motoring for six hours with only occasional attempts to sail. Eventually a 2-3 mile sail across the north end of the Gairloch peninsula to the entrance of Loch Ewe led to our anchorage on off Aultbea, to enjoy a wonderful sunset lit supper. Sunday: Sun, blue sky and light winds again. Anchor up 08:20, motored clear of Greenstone Point. A Minke whale passed a few hundred metres away. An honest ENE F3, later switching to N F2-3 gave us a beat for three hours, all the way across the mouth of Loch Broom and past Lochinver, with ever changing perspectives on the incredible Sutherland hills, dominated by Suilven. Tacking off Reiff Bay, a favourable eddy carried us towards the Stoer headland. We had great views of the lighthouse and the Old Man but needed the motor to deal with adverse currents. A F1-2 northerly gave us 7 miles sailing at 2-4 knots under an azure sky reflected in a deep blue sea, taking us to a spectacularly beautiful bay on the south side of Handa Island for the night. This was paradise plus. Monday: A 6:30 start to get round Cape Wrath with favourable tides, beginning with exploration of the bird cliffs on the west side of Handa Island in calm seas. Passing under the Great Stack of Handa, we set course for Sandwood Bay and Cape Wrath. By 09:30 we were sailing in a F3 north-easterly off Sandwood Bay. We saw rougher waters

Moonrise behind North Berwick Law.

northwards, but It was warm, calm and sunny. The easterly Force 5 after the shelter of Cape Wrath suddenly took us from Mediterranean to North Atlantic sailing. We beat north-easterly through confused waves, strengthening wind, with double reefs and a queasy crew. Tacking westerly, and we had an exciting beat on a good line towards Loch Eribol, easing the genoa give more power through the waves. “This is the sort of sailing Contessas were designed for” groaned a pale Simon. With wind lifts, we stayed on the same tack right into the mouth of Loch Eribol. Then southwards into the loch on a beam reach, to find a calm and peaceful anchorage on the south side of the Neackie “hammerhead”. The normal highland blue sky, mirror-like reflections in the water, wonderful views all round, and only one other yacht for company.

Tuesday: We raised anchor at 07:05, and by 08:30 we were clear of Loch Eribol heading ENE with a favourable tide, heading for Stromness or Scrabster depending on the wind. With a good sea breeze effect, we got to Holborn Point off Scrabster on one tack, then used the engine to counter the tide into Scrabster Harbour. We went ashore for the first time since leaving Mallaig. Wednesday: Shockingly, the sky was overcast. Slipping at 07:40, we sailed in a light easterly across the Pentland Firth to the west of Hoy, where its wind shadow off the old Man meant an hour’s motoring. Then a brisk ESE F3-4 yielded an exhilarating beat up Hoy Sound at the end of the flood tide, entering Stromness Marina at 13:20. Good food and drink in the Ferry Inn, then Simon took the ferry home. Thursday: Glen and I targeted Westray, despite the 07:15 start needed to avoid the flood tide in Hoy Sound. A light southeasterly powered us past Skara Brae and Rousay, using the engine briefly to punch through an unexpected adverse current in Weatherness Sound. We tied up in Pierowall Harbour at 16:15, enjoyed a walk to the superb beach, and had a good seafood pub meal.

Westray – Noup Point Lighthouse on skyline.

Whitehills harbour approach courtesy Bertie Mills Hbr Master.

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CRUISING  From Purgatory To Paradise Handa Island.

Friday: Setting off at 09:50 we had an uncomfortable downwind sail to the North of Westray in light winds and choppy seas. Past Noup Head, in favourable tide, the cruising chute gave a 15 mile broad reach from Noup head to the Brough of Birsay. Strengthening wind gave a marvellous two-hour blast with the genoa along the west side of Mainland. The prominent Kitchener memorial marked the loss of HMS Hampshire and over 700 lives 100 years earlier. Crew and partners had a delightful week’s holiday in Orkney, marred only by the dry windy weather giving Hillary extreme hay fever. Stromness to Granton: 18-22 June / 247 nm Crew – Hillary, Simon (Wick-Granton), Maria (Stromness-Whitehills) Saturday 18th June To get the right tide for the passage, we needed to be in the middle of the Pentland Firth at 06:00. We left Stromness Marina at 03:10. After the first hour, we sailed all the way to Wick. We passed Flotta at 5-7 knots and at 06:00 were out of Scapa Flow, avoiding a cruise ship in the traffic separation zone west of Swona. The favourable current and wind carried us briskly through the Pentland Firth and past Duncansby Head, to find big swells from the north. We arrived at Wick Marina shortly before 10:00, to find Simon waiting for us on the pontoon. We set off at 10:25 and headed south, aiming for Peterhead or Whitehills. The 36

wind got lighter, the swells got bigger, and at 14:00 we dropped the main and set the cruising chute. Around 16:45 the wind died and we started the engine. The boat was perfectly happy in the long, 3 metre high arctic swells. The Whitehills harbour master photographed our mast sticking out of the sea, hull completely hidden. The entrance to Whitehills was thought provoking, with a sharp last-minute turn into the shelter of the harbour wall, another sharp turn into the narrow harbour entrance, then a reverse turn into the outer harbour basin. We tied up at 22:00. Sunday: The morning was pleasant, the wind had gone round to the south, and the monstrous swells had dropped – a lovely day for a sail. The forecast was “southerly 3-4 rising 5-6 later, southerly gale overnight”. Maria decided to head home by train, and we were overwhelmed when the harbour master offered her a lift to Huntly. Whitehills really is a lovely place to visit. Simon and I set of at 09:45 and with a good wind once past Troup Head, we made 5-6 knots over the ground. By 13:00, approaching Fraserburgh, the wind was F5 SE, and both sailed were double reefed. By 14:00 the wind was Force 6, we were hitting 8 knots, the waves were nasty with wind over tide, and we called Fraserburgh harbour to ask very politely for a berth. We tied up at 15:00 on a high harbour wall. Monday: We left Fraserburgh at 08:25, on a fair morning, with a pleasant farewell from the harbour control. Going with the tide, we were off Peterhead around 11:00 and kept going to Stonehaven. With light winds and big waves, the engine and Fred worked hard. Approaching Stonehaven in fluky winds, we had some good sailing before the wind dropped again. We tied to the outer wall at Stonehaven at 18:00 and met my daughter and sonin-law at Stonehaven’s famous chippie. Tuesday: The tides and lock opening times for Arbroath didn't work out, so we planned to go straight to Granton, or divert to Anstruther or North Berwick. We left Stonehaven pier at 09:45. With a light southerly wind, we motored a lot at first. We sailed past Montrose, restarted the engine for a while to clear the cliffs off Arbroath, and then enjoyed an excellent sail to Fife Ness, passing two miles inside the Bell Rock. At 18:00 we were near the North Carr Buoy. The tide was turning and we used the engine round Fife Ness and past Crail against a 1-1.5 knot current, then we had good sailing up the Forth Estuary. From Kirkcaldy Bay, we had a wonderful view of the strawberry moon rising behind North Berwick Law. By 23:05 the wind had dropped to SW F3, dead on the nose, so we motored the rest of the way, passing north of Inchkeith, and tied up on the pontoon in Granton Harbour at 01:15, 22nd June.


PRIZE WINNERS 2016  RACING Opening Regatta – Keelboats

(Festival Series Overall – Fast)

H Boat Season Champion

KENNETH GUMLEY CUP Wizz Too – H. Boyd, H. Horsfall

RANGE ROVER QUAICH Kestra – R. Leask

BURNTISLAND CHALLENGE CUP Blocks – D. Gorman, D. Northridge

Evening Point Early – Fast

(Festival Series Overall – Slow)

Dragon Season Champion

ETCHELLS CHALLENGE TROPHY Blocks – D. Gorman, D. Northridge

GARRICK ANGUS CUP Eastie Beastie – J.Hunter (FCYC)

ROBIN CUP Kestra – R. Leask

NIELSON PLATE Varrich – R. Cowie , P. Hall, J. McLaren

CORONATION CUP Blocks – D. Gorman, D. Northridge

Season’s Challenge

Royal Eastern Regatta Fast

(Coronation Cup 2nd)

JAMES LEASK CUP Kestra – R. Leask WEST CUP Kestra – R. Leask

HRH PRINCESS ROYAL QUAICH Hanna – A. Bruce, I. Lindsay, F. MacNair, C.Morton

Seasons Crew Challenge

CRAWFORD CUP Peak Flow – G. Bramley, S. Harris, H. Sillito

Cadet of the Year

(West Cup 2nd) LAMB TANKARD Wizz Too – H. Boyd, H. Horsfall CROMBIE CUP Wizz Too – H. Boyd, H. Horsfall

Ladies race MACKIE INGLIS CUP Wizz Too – H. Horsfall

(Edinburgh Regatta Best Overall) BRITTANIA TROPHY Misty Blue – B. Pennycook, E. North (FCYC)

(Edinburgh Regatta best RFYC in Fleet 1) INVERALMOND CUP Kismet – C. Sedgeworth

(Edinburgh Regatta best RFYC in Fleet 2) ROGER MILLER CUP Timania – J.Hartley JUBILEE CUP Wizz Too – H. Boyd, H.Horsfall

Single Handed Race ELIOTT MEDWAY QUAICH Humdinger – A. Tait PENNEL TROPHY Kestra – R. Leask

Evening Points Late Fast CAPRICORN TROPHY Blocks – D. Gorman, D. Northridge

Saturday Points Fast ABERDOUR CHALLENGE CUP Kestra – R. Leask

Saturday Points Slow KING CUP Eriskay – D. Boyd, S. Boyd

Autumn Series IOD CUP Wizz Too – H. Boyd, H. Horsfall

BOLAN TROPHY Peak Flow – G. Bramley, S. Harris, H. Sillito WARDIE TANKARD Meteor – Peter Cooke ALMOND CUP Orla Tait

Sevices to RFYC DEBUTANTE CUP Mark Primrose STRANG QUAICH John Spencely

Forth Yachts Club Association YOUNG SAILOR OF THE YEAR Lewis Smith

Photography MAJA TROPHY Tom Wilson

Photography BELL’S SHIELD Robyn Dougall

Log Competition MC QUEEN CUP Jeanette Hardy

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RACING  H Boat class   Charles Morton

T

he International H boat, which will be 50 in 2017, owes its origins to a 1967 competition for a one design fibreglass racing keelboat with spinnaker which was won by Designer Hans Goop. The class quickly became popular in the Nordic countries, within ten years there were also boats in Switzerland, West Germany and Italy and to date more than 5000 have been built. It is the largest ISAF recognised keel boat class in Europe, second worldwide only to the Star, with active racing in eight countries. The boat has been popular at RFYC for the last twenty years and given the small number imported to the UK our current fleet of seven is probably the nations’ largest so we were delighted to take over the care of the UK National Championship Trophy earlier this year. Despite the emphasis in the original design on racing there must have been some thought for cruising – the early boats had guardrails, were equipped with winches for both jib and spinnaker and the coach-roof moulding included a mount for a sprayhood. More recent boats have dispensed with these and have added toe straps for hiking. To her admirers the H-boat offers a fast boat for racing with the benefits of some accommodation. A yachtingmonthly.com description concluded “If you want a boat that will shoot along in light airs, put a grin on your face when the breeze picks up, and will still look after you in the rough stuff, all for less than £10,000, then this secretive Baltic beauty could be the boat for you”. A late 1970s article in the Finnish boating magazine Venelehti referred to “keen 38

racing [and] full cruising comforts for a racing crew or a smallish family”. In 2017 even a small family would probably dispute that notion, with simple open plan accommodation generally without plumbed in facilities. Most would consider the accommodation challenging for more than a weekend with good friends. The H-boat cruising potential has, however, been confirmed by at least one RFYC boat which cruised on the west coast, I know of one another that was used for family cruising and a German H-boat crew have been even more adventurous. Sounding a note of caution the Venelehti article had finished by stating “The H-boat is not for offshore work”, but in 2001 this was disproved by Philipp Heisig and Kerstin Schmieder who acompanied that year’s Atlantic Rally for Cruisers and crossed the Atlantic in Elfie. Including the delivery trip from Italy to Gran Canaria their voyage exceeded 4,500nm, during which they suffered a broken forestay and a knockdown but also demonstrated that the H-boat is capable of surfing at over 14 knots. As if that was not enough in December 2017 Philipp Heisig plans to sail an H-boat 10,000nm from Antigua, via the Panama canal and Pacific islands, to New Zealand. Search “H boat trans Pacific” to follow him. As far as the UK is concerned, the exact number of (presumably second-hand) H-boats imported to the UK is not known. I believe the main importer was the south coast brokerage Simon Thomas (Yacht Sales) Ltd and as far as I can find out approximately forty H boats were registered with the RYA. Thus my best guess is that there have never been more than fifty in the UK and I know of at least two sold (back) to the continent. A browse through old RFYC handbooks reveals that the first H-boat arrived here in the early 1990s. By the mid-2000s there were eight on our yacht register, currently we have a fleet of seven so our claim to the largest fleet is based on my estimate that we have more than 10% of the known UK boats. Apart from those of the Forth fleet there is evidence of H-boats still active elsewhere; in Scotland there have been H-boats in the Kyles of Bute and racing results from the south coast indicate at least four boats active there, including a first place in IRC Class 3 and third place overall in a Round the Island [Wight] Race. The UK National Championship Trophy was competed for annually between 1980 and 1993, at which point it seems that the UK class association was wound up. There is one reference on an internet forum c2005 claiming that the association had been reformed and I remember


RACING 400nm Helgoland to Edinburgh Race 2017  a UK H-boat website at around that time, possibly based around a military sailing club on the south coast, but there is no trace of that now. The “H” stands for the Greek goddess Hestia, the goddess of the home hearth, both literally and metaphorically. It is no surprise that alliterative names abound within the class. The National Championship Trophy records Hallucination, Harmony, Hannah, Hope, Hoping, and Hubble Bubble. Past RFYC yacht registers reveal Hi Jack, Hitchiker, Hocus Pocus, Huffy, and Hummingbird and our current fleet includes Hanna, Hizz ya Whiz, Holly, Hopscotch (now Blocks), and Humdinger. Rush Hour makes the list by virtue of her second name. One of these boats has changed hands a number of times and has been known also as Hard to be Humble, Hotpants, and Hobo. Further up the Forth there is Hussy. The south coast adds Hecate, Huckleberry Finn, and Hayfever. One has to forgive the owner of K9 for ignoring alliteration and choosing the entirely appropriate Woof. These are great boats to sail and offer both the opportunity to race with enough shelter for a weekend cruise. RFYC would be interested to make contact with other H-boat owners and would welcome other boats to our fleet.

THIS JUNE WE AGAIN have the pleasure of welcoming offshore racers from Helgoland at the end of Nordseewoche (North Sea Week). The race is organised by NRV, Norddeutscher Regatta Verein. After a long weekend of racing in the Helgoland area, a fleet of typically forty yachts will race the four hundred nautical miles to Granton. The race is due to start at 16:30 on Monday 5th June, and the racers are expected to arrive at Granton later in the week. As they have been doing since the 1960s, RFYC will organise the finish of the race, and host the crews. The finish line is a transit from the Club house through the light at the end of the East pier. RFYC Club volunteers record finish times and maintain a radio watch through the days and nights of the race. The visitors always enjoy the social side of Royal Forth, and every evening is a busy social at the club, with visitors and members all welcome. Crews usually make a few tours from Edinburgh to the surrounding areas. Most of the boats will be moored on the EML. The race runs every two years. In 2015 it was a fantastic social occasion, and we hope this year will be the same or better. We’re looking forwards to their arrival and all members are welcome and encouraged to come along, have a look at the yachts, meet our visitors and get involved. Volunteers will be needed in shifts for radio cover, catering, bar and office duties, as well as general help during the week. Boats usually start arriving any time from Wednesday night and will stay until Sunday or longer.

References: venelehti.fi/wp-content/uploads/vene/ Linkitettavat/784854.pdf www.yachtingmonthly.com/reviews/yacht-reviews/hboat-yachting-monthly-review www.seglermagazin.de › Home › Regionen › Atlantik [via Google Translate] www.roundtheisland.org.uk

39


RACING  VX One UK Nationals

Will Davies

R

FYC welcomed nine VX One crews for their 2016 UK national Championships over the weekend of 10th-12th September. Crews attended from all over with representation from Torquay, Ullswater, Lock Earn, Tynemouth, Edinburgh and even Switzerland. Racing began on the Saturday, in a light to moderate southerly breeze. Windward / leeward courses were set on the Forth, with excellent conditions welcoming the non Scottish visiting boats. It was Beat Steffan, from Switzerland, crewed by Chris Turner, who revelled in the conditions, producing a clean sweep of 1st places on the opening day’s three races. Completing the podium on day one was Kevin Anderson and Edmond Clarke from Ullswater, followed by local RFYC boat Willpower (Will Davies and Donald McLean).

40

The day ended with an excellent commodore’s reception in the clubhouse. Day two brought more wind and sunshine. With wind increasing to moderate to strong, the VX One crews showed some exhilarating sailing and handling skills, with speeds of 20+knots recorded. Five back to back races were held, in anticipation of even higher winds expected on the Monday. The son and father team of Monian and Adrian Peach, from Torquay, and Nathan Bachelor, finished the day with three 1st places, which moved them up the leader board. Anderson/Clarke and another family team from Ullswater (Donald, Charlie and Kathlyn Chandler) also took a 1st each. Steffan/Turner and Anderson/Clarke had solid string of performances during the day, leaving the top three boats ending day two overall with only three points separating them. The class dinner was held in the evening, with RFYC once again providing an excellent meal and hospitality. All was to sail for on the final day, and as expected, the wind strengthened again, with winds gusting to 30 knots. The last two races were held to decide the final podium positions. In the end it was the Peach/Peach/Bachelor who deservedly won the UK Championships, followed by Anderson/Clarke and Steffen/Turner completing the podium. The Chandler’s won the top family prize (outside of the podium) in 4th. Huge credit must go to Royal Forth Yacht Club and John Robertson (PRO) for laying on a fantastic event, both on and off the water, which was thoroughly enjoyed by all who attended. The VX One Class continues to build a strong reputation of having a great boat that produces some tight and adrenaline filled racing, supported by extremely friendly owners. The class now looks forward to 2017, with events being planned for the Nationals, Inlands, Scottish Series in Tarbert and an inaugural Gold Cup event at Riva del Garda in August.


Lewis Smith  RACING

L

ewis Smith is a current member of the British Youth Sailing Team and of the Royal Forth Yacht Club. My grandfather Brian Tunstill, was a member of the Royal Forth Yacht Club and kept his yacht there. With such a close connection with RFYC I was enrolled as a member at just two months old. I started learning to sail in a Topper with the cadets at the club when I was 12 and I have been hooked ever since. Recently my sailing has taken me to a lot of cool places. Last summer was my final year of competitions in the Laser Radial as an under 19. I competed at the World Championships in Ireland; the European Championships in Estonia and Kieler Woche in Germany. It was a great summer with some results I am super pleased with. I learned loads and got to see some lovely places! I have now moved into the Laser Standard, the men’s Olympic class, after my summer of competitions in the Laser Radial. This has been a new challenge for me. Sailing against older, more experienced sailors in the senior fleet is pretty tough, but the learning curve is massive which is really positive.

2017 is a new year and I will be competing in new and old competitions. I will be racing in Kiel for Kielerwoche again this year followed by Nieuwpoort Week in Belgium, which should be a great experience! Nieuwpoort Week is the same venue that will be hosting the Under 21 World Championships later on in the year. In between both regattas in Belgium I will be competing at the Under 21 European Championships in Douarnenez, France. A big thanks goes to the Royal Forth Yacht Club and its members, without whom I may not have got into the sport I have grown to love. Over the years the club’s support has been key to my development and allowed me to take up a number of opportunities, for which I am very grateful. Thank you for reading, and happy sailing!

www.lewissmithsailing.com

LS Youth European Championships Port End Start. 41


BOATS OF ROYAL FORTH

Boat Name

Type

Owner(s)

Going for a Song

Weta

Fearghas McKay

Gonzo

Freedom 32

David Penny

Boat Name

Type

Owner(s)

Grace May

Prout

Nick Loening

1st Edition

RIB

Alasdair Lessels John McArthur

Grateful

Day Boat

Richard Primrose

Hanna

H Boat

Andrew Bruce Ian Lindsay Fraser MacNair Charles Morton

Am Bata Lurach

Drascombe Lugger

Michael Keating

Amare

Achilles 24

Alessandro Alvarengo

Amber

Newbridge Pioneer Pilot

Neil Walker

Hizz Ya Wizz

H Boat

Fearghas McKay

Arctic Gold

Fisher 37

Graham Kerr

Holly

H Boat

Nevin Jamieson

Artic Curlew

Skylso

Sandra Dunn

Hoodlum

Oyster 26

Atlantia

Formosa 51

Will Rudd

Kenneth MacKenzie Robert MacKenzie

Aziana

Seamaster 925

Brian Robertson

Humdinger

H-Boat

Anthony Tait

Bad Bone

Norman 19

Robert Grorfi

Idothea

Westerly Centaur

Gavin Harding

Ballochbui

Rustler 44

HRH The Princess Royal

Inkwazi

Trimaran

James Thomson

Barley

Bluenose (Keelboat)

Graeme Lee

Insipation

Moody Halberdier

Keith Bennett

Bascule

Hallberg-Rassy 342

John Robertson

Iothea

Westerly Centaur

Michael Griffiths

Bella

Ketch

John Sadler

Janika Lycka

Najad 380

Geoffrey Bowler

Blue Biscay

Biscay 36

Michael Fourman

Jetstream

Hunter 707

Dermot Gorman David Northridge

Blue llex

Frances 26

Graham Mitchell

Joanne of Kyle

Lymington Slipway 5 Tonner

Duncan Turnbull

Blue Swan

Trident 24

Peter Kirkman

Joule

Hunter Medina

Angus Buchanan

Boomerang

Flying Fifteen

Robert Weir

Kata Noi

Jaguar 27

Campbell McCausland

Border Maid

Folkboat

Patrick Angier

Kestra

Dragon

Richard Leask

Cacciatore

Hunter 707

Stewart Robertson

Kestra 11

Dragon

Richard Leask

Chione

Westerly Fulmar

Holway Cruft Julian Cruft

Kismet

Dragon

Catherine Sedgeworth Sheena Kerr

Contessa lll

Moody 38

Brian Smellie

K-Mar

Seamaster 23

Paul Lundberg

Cory Louise

Swallow Bay Cruiser

Adrian Shield

Lady Anna of Fife

Atlantic

Robert Briggs

Crafty Lady

Seawolf 30

John Lomas

Lady Caroline

Sports Cruiser

Graham Campbell

Defiant

Westerly Merlin

Alan Burnett Ronald Kermel

Lima

Ribquest

Chris Howden

Lucky Girl

Maxi 120

Charles Pank

Manana

Feeling 286s

Alan Watters

Merlin

Folkboat

Alan Stalker

Meteor

Dragon

Peter Cooke

Mhor Mischief

Cenit 35

Leeona Dorrian

Minnie

Beneteau Oceanis Clipper 331

Euan Stirling

Miss Tequilla

Beneteau Oceanis 461

Philip Rutledge

Mor March

Westerly Centaur

Daphne Meade

Myrine

Sabre 27

Stephen Pavis

Orithya

Westerly Centaur

Alison Cunningham John Cunningham

Dernier Sou

Gibsea 282

Alex Tulloch

Echo Echo

Nimbus Motorboat

Hugh McCaig

Eider

Contessa 32

Andrew Fulton

Ellipsis

Hanse 415

Duncan Hall

Enigma

Delphia 29

James Clydesdale

Eriskay

Westerly Fulmar

Sarah Boyd

Errant

Bermuden Sloop

Alastair Wight

Fija

Vivacity 24

Brian Ferrier

Fisherman

Norman 18

Marek Manka

Free Spirit

MG 33.5

Jeanette Hardy

Funtastic

Jeanneau Fun

Robin Brownlie Blair Forbes Gordon Morrison Stuart Smith Alan Stevens

Paul Hunter

Osprey Outlaw

Hunter 707

Emil Wakulicz

Peakflow

Contessa 32

Glen Bramley Simon Harris Hilary Sillitto

Galumph

Day Boat

Richard Primrose

Geronimo

Princess 27

Stuart Crombie

Pemva

Westerly Corsair

Kenneth Dougall

Gigha of Gare

Galion 28

Donald Cameron

Pescador

Kinsman

Alistair Drennan

Goin Ballistic

Motor Boat

Terry Holden

Polka

Pandora International 22

Christine Page

42


Boat Name

Type

R'N'R

Heavenly Twins Cat.

Owner(s)

Rush Hour

H Boat

Kenneth Mackay

Saluki

Hunter Pilot 27

David Gillon

Samba

Seamaster 925

Lorne Byatt

Sarah Jane

Prelude

David Kidston

Saremja

Westerly Renown

Alexander Bell

Sashi

Smith Bros. Open Launch

Hugh McCaig

Scallie

Cape Cutter 19

Timothy Hall David Urch

Sea Hunter

Motor Cruiser

Peter Hyde

Sea Mist

Nauticat 42

James Elder

Seren

O'Day 22

Crawford Ferguson

Shalimar

Cutlass 27

Denise Thomas William Thompson

Shamal

Beneteau First 24

Chris Binnie

Sheaval

Mirage 28

Andrew Milne George Milne

Shoddycloth

Seawolf 30

Steven McClay Neil Ballantyne

Sieglinde

Dragon

Henry Boyd Helen Horsfall

Silkie

Hunter Medina

Richard Geddes Anthony Bloomfield

Simandy

Sole Bay 40

James Noble

Sionna

Oyster 56

Michael Kearney

Class

Boat Name

Owner(s)

Skimmer

Dufour Sylphe

Richard Maspero

420

Lenam

Emma Palmer

Smithereen

Seamaster 925

Tom Wilson

420

Nautivela

Emma Palmer

Solan

Dragon

Guy Carswell

A Class Cat

Still Thinkin

Derek Gibb

Solveig

Seamaster 925

Stuart Fowler Neil Moffat

Barrow Boat

Miya Rose

Charles Pank

Fairy Duckling

Finn Fair

Finn Thomson

Gull

L'Oiseau

David Ogilvie

Laser

Lola mk111

Lewis Smith

Laser

Wee Hamish

Simon Peakman

Laser

Jamie Calder

Somerled

Tanzer 7.5

Mary Nicoll

Somerled of Forth

Southerly 101

Peter Black

Sonsie

Leisure 23

Alastair Black

Sorley

Folkboat

Gordon Robb

Stargazer

Dragon

Simon Peakman

Star Tern

Sadler 29

Alan Turner

Starspinner

Trapper 501

Graham Prince

Storm Cloud

Shark Cruiser Racer

Colin Cairns

Superfreak

Mystere Flier

Hamish Allison

Swelkie

Corribee

Derek Stalker

Tabula Rasa

WoodsJavelin Cat

Douglas Maccoll

Tarka Minor

Rustler 31

Ronald Masson

The Springer

Jaguar 22

Tim Simpson

Timania

Elizabethan 30

Peter Hartley

Two-Six-O

Westerly Griffon

David Robertson

Varrich

H Boat

Rob Cowie Peter Hall John McLaren

Villamoura

Regal 2465

Euan Stirling

Wee Dragon

Contessa 26

Henry Abraham Ian Trail

Boat Name

Type

Owner(s)

Whisper

Malo 39

Anthony Tait

Whizz Too

Dragon

Henry Boyd Helen Horsfall

Willow

Ribcraft 585

Duncan Hall

Willpower

VX One

Will Davies

Wilma

Motor Fisher

Kenneth Colquhoun

Zodiac One

Zodiac 5m pro

Kenneth Dougall

ZZZIP

Classic Motor Boat

Robin Brownlie

RFYC owns Royal Forth (Committee boat) Olympian – Mark laying RIB Boswall Zulu – Mark laying RIB 2 club launches

DINGHIES

Laser Laser

Emma Palmer

Laser Radial Mirror

Stewart Robertson Ross Slater

Murraymint

RS 200

Murray Thomson Sarah Robertson

RS 400

Stewart Robertson

Solo

Coast to Coast Rigging

Kevan Gibb

Tideway

Solveig

Blair Forbes

Topper

Taz

Kate Angier

Topper

Emma Palmer

Twinkle Twelve

Twinkle

Lorne Byatt

Wanderer

Vanilla Slice

Alastair Kinroy

Wayfarer

Lucky Dip

William McIntosh

Wayfarer

Stooshie

Henry Boyd Ellie Boyd

Wayfarer

Wishful Thinking

Charles Morton

43


SAILING INFORMATION 2017 CRUISING In recent seasons cruising events have been popular and they were well attended last year. We will aim to arrange a few “Cruises in Company”. Dependent on the weather and tides cruises will be to Aberdour and other anchorages, providing an opportunity for club members (keelboats, dinghies, crew) to meet, learn the art of coarse anchoring, perhaps exchange crews and generally to socialise on the water. Details will be communicated by posts on the website, email and posters on the notice board about two weeks in advance. Suggestions, ideas and questions are welcome (to Sailing Ctee). Look out for a cruising blog on the website at the start of the season. REGATTAS The Sailing committee also organises a number of yacht, keel & dinghy events. These are open to visitors – please ask at the club for details. Sailing Instructions (SIs) and Notices of Race (NORs) for open events will be published on the Club website. The East Coast Sailing Festival, incorporating the Edinburgh Gin Regatta, is our major open event this summer. The May Island and Anstruther Express races will be run from Granton. RFYC CLUB RACES A Sailing Instruction booklet for club races, which will include courses, will be available to download in A4 format from the website. The booklet, and laminated course charts, will also be available for purchase from the bar. There will be two handicap fleets; Fast fleet – FYCA handicap ≤1014 Cruiser fleet – FYCA handicap ≥ 1015 Points Series: Evening Points races, which are also open to members of FCYC, will take place on Wednesday, Thursday and a few Friday evenings. There will be two series, Early (eight races) and Late (seven races) and two handicap fleets: Weekend Points series will take place on every Saturday that has suitable tides. To encourage participation many of the

44

eponymous Saturday events have been added to the standard races to make a 15 race “all season” Saturday series. Autumn Points will be on three Saturdays in October and will be open to all yachts and keel boats. Two races each Saturday in Wardie Bay. Passage Races: Five longer races, held jointly with Forth Corinthian Yacht Club. RACE ORGANISATION & DUTIES Races are run by member volunteers. All members who race should take part in the race management duty roster, and we also welcome help from all other members who wish to participate. This is a great way to meet other members and to participate in the activities of the club. The Duty roster is published using a web-based system called Dutyman (see next page) which can be accessed via the club web site. All prospective race organization volunteers will be contacted before the racing season and invited to volunteer for duties. FINDING CREW/SKIPPERS Please contact the Sailing Committee, Facebook page, or other members to offer or seek crewing places, arrange sailing in company, look for advice etc. FORTH YACHT CLUBS ASSOCIATION www.fyca.org.uk RFYC is a member of the Forth Yacht Clubs Association (FYCA), formed in 1969 by the sailing clubs in the Forth area to coordinate activities, represent clubs’ interests and further the interests of sailing on the Forth. FYCA organise the annual Forth Yacht Club Championship. Once every three years FYCA organises East Coast Sailing Festival (formerly East Coast Sailing Week). The ECSF website describes it as “A four day event of varied sailing that will appeal to both racing and cruising folk – as will the variety of social events planned”. See page 12. Member Clubs cover the entire Forth area and their interests vary widely. It is the aim of FYCA to offer as broad a support framework as possible.


FYCA represents the member clubs in matters relevant to recreational sailing by liaising with other bodies in matters concerning the sport’s organisation, the environment, shipping, coastal protection and safety. To those ends it has a formal committee position with RYA (Scotland), British Waterways, Clyde Yacht Clubs Association and Forth Forum. Activities of the FYCA include arranging publication of the Forth Pilot Handbook, organisation of the Forth Inshore Group (FIG) and Forth Offshore Group (FOG) races, maintenance of the local yacht handicap system, compilation of an area events programme, and award of the FYCA Yacht Championship trophy. SAFETY ON THE WATER Competitors are reminded that safety whilst on the water is the responsibility of the skipper. The following safety guidelines apply to all RFYC events: Dinghies – RFYC Dinghy Racing safety procedures www.rfyc.org/wp-content/uploads/RFYC-Racing-safetyprocedures.docx Yachts / Keelboats – Forth Yacht Club Association safety guidelines. www.rfyc.org/wp-content/uploads/fycasafetyregsiss3. pdf Safety boats must be on the water for dinghy racing and dinghy training. Safety cover is not provided by the club at other times or for other events. RIBs may be on the water for yacht & keelboat events but their purpose is to assist the race officer (mark laying etc) and they are not intended to provide safety cover for yacht & keelboat crews. The presence of RIBs does not diminish the responsibilities of the yacht skipper.

DUTYMAN WEBPAGES DutyMan website provides our up-to-date duty roster, so members can volunteer for duties or swap duties. The process for setting up the Duty roster is as follows: 1. An E-mail is sent to members showing who is available and qualified for duties and requesting any additions / removals from the list. 2. The Duty Calendar will be set up on Dutyman and published in March. In a two week window, members may VOLUNTEER for specific dates duties that suit them; to reduce the amount of swapping later. 3. New volunteers added to Dutyman will be sent an automated e-mail which will contain your login details, and also an e-mail from the Club office. Members already on Dutyman use existing login details. 4. Any remaining duties will be ASSIGNED to members by the Sailing Secretary. Dutyman will send you an e-mail detailing your assigned duties. 5. You must use the DutyMan system to either CONFIRM that you are able to do a duty or to swap duties. Please remember to confirm so that we don’t have to chase you. 6. DutyMan sends a reminder email to you one week before your duty. 7. You turn up on time to do your duty and have a great time participating in club activities! Please: a. Ensure that the club office has your correct email address. b. Try to remember that you are on duty and turn up on time. In general for club racing you should be at the club AT LEAST ONE HOUR before the race start time and earlier for open events. c. Contact the Sailing Secretary if you have any problems. d. Remember that this system is run by volunteers who rely on members to make the system work. The Sailing Committee cannot function without your support.

45


FACILITIES AND CHARGES  Summer 2017 Use of Clubhouse, moorings, boats, pontoons, slipways, boat yard, crane, and other facilities. Members and non-members using the Club services and facilities will be deemed to have read and accepted the terms and regulations regarding the use of moorings, yard and crane. Current regulations are detailed in the Club Rules. It is a condition of being offered the use of any of the facilities of the Royal Forth Yacht Club, that the Club will not be liable for any injury or loss howsoever caused which may be sustained by you or any person on your craft using the Club’s facilities or for any damage of whatever nature sustained by your craft in using any of these facilities under the Club’s control and the Club will accept no responsibility for any such injury, loss or damage to persons or property however it may have been caused.Insurance You must have appropriate insurance for all eventualities which may occur, on the basis that your use of the Club facilities is entirely at your own risk. All yachts using the Club moorings, yard or facilities, including the Edinburgh marina pontoon must carry a minimum of £3,000,000 Third Party Liability POLICIES When racing, yachts and keelboats should comply with FYCA Yacht Safety Regulations, Category 4R. For details see http:// www.fyca.org.uk/racing.htm For dinghy events (racing, training or cruising) organized by the Club there must be at least one rescue boat afloat, with two crew on board. Rescue boats must carry the appropriate safety equipment as displayed on the notice board and inside Mickery.

• •

46

GENERAL GUIDELINES To ensure safe, enjoyable use of our facilities please: Maintain a low and considerate speed in the harbour and be aware of the pilot boats, based on the east side of the Middle Pier, which may enter or exit the harbour mouth at speed at any time. When going afloat ensure that someone on shore knows where you plan to go. A means of communication with the shore is recommended. All sailing vessels should have an alternative means of propulsion. Dinghy sailors should wear a personal flotation device. “Joy riding”, in any type of boat, is not permitted amongst the moored yachts. When sailing to the harbour mouth only the minimum passage for effective transit should be amongst the moorings.

• • • • •

CLUB BOATS Sailing dinghies: The club owns an RS Feva and a number of Toppers. These were purchased for Club training & development and their main use is on training nights. They may be used by members, principally for Club events, with prior agreement from the Sailing Committee. Club dinghy equipment is kept in the container and should be treated with respect – please put it back in its proper place and advise a Flag Officer, the Training Officer or the Sailing Secretary of damaged, broken, unserviceable or missing equipment. Royal Forth (Club committee boat) should be driven only by those who are suitably qualified. Instruction on using Royal Forth is provided by the Club.


RIBs – The club owns 2 RIBs. They should be used only to support Club racing & training activity and other Club events. RYA Powerboat Level 2 or above is required to drive the Club RIBs. Suitable training is provided at RYA certified establishments such as Port Edgar. From time to time the Club may arrange for members to attend RYA Powerboat & Rescue Boat courses, on the understanding that such members contribute to RIB and Rescue Boat duties. SUMMER AND WINTER MOORINGS Yachts of full Ordinary Members may have moorings in Granton Harbour. Summer and winter moorings must be applied for separately; one does not guarantee the other. Moorings will be allocated by the Moorings Secretary and are subject to availability. Applications should be submitted to the Moorings Secretary on forms available from the Club Office. Allocated moorings are not transferable. Summer mooring fees include a maximum of 3 days yard storage free of charge. Yacht owners should check their mooring pennants, chain & shackles periodically. The Club cannot accept liability for any damage caused by vessels breaking loose. A limited number of moorings may be available for visiting yachts. Club Launches are used by the Club Boatman to provide a ferry service to and from yachts in the harbour only. Please co-operate with the boatman at all times. No more than 12 persons may be carried at one time in any of the Club boats, including Royal Forth. Moorings Charges (summer season) (rounded up to nearest 0.5m LOA inc bowsprits > 1.5m) East Harbour per metre LOA Yacht £92 Multihull £92 Small Boats Area £52 Sailing Dinghies & Tenders afloat £112 (per season) West Harbour Yachts, power craft etc

per metre LOA £114

YARD STORAGE Members may apply to use the yard for the storage of boats, trailers and / or cradles, which must be marked with the boat’s name. Applications are to be submitted on forms available from the Club office.

• •

• Yard space will be allocated according to availability. • Allocated yard spaces are not transferable. • Please park with consideration. • Debris from hull preparation and other maintenance must be removed.

• Paint spraying is not permitted unless adequate screens are in place.

• Shot blasting is prohibited. • Use of the electric towing vehicle is limited to qualified and authorised personnel.

• Power cables should not be left plugged in when unattended. Storage Charges (summer season) (rounded up to nearest 0.5m LOA inc bowsprits > 1.5m) per metre LOA Yachts, power craft etc £77 Multihulls £94 Day Boats (lifting keel), motor boats & RIBs £47 Dinghies (including trailer) £20 Tenders & dinghy trailer (without dinghy) £15 Trailer or cradle storage in RFYC yard £118 (per season) PILLAR CRANE Members who have been trained to do so may use the pillar crane. Usage must be booked (diary in the Boatman’s office). Payment must be made to the Club office in advance. Members using the pillar crane are asked to limit each use to a maximum of 30 minutes Hard hats must be worn and your attention is drawn to the other operating conditions displayed. Members are asked to ensure their boats are fully prepared for lifting before taking up position under the crane. Priority should be given to boats participating in races.

• •

Crane Charges Members single lift in or out £48 Assisted single lift (i.e. use of bosun) £64 Season Ticket Boats with RFYC mooring £197 Boats in RFYC yard £306 Use of the manual block and tackle, for instance to step or un-step a mast, is free.

47


EDINBURGH MARINA LTD Edinburgh Marina welcomes visitors to use pontoons. Arrival: On entering the harbour mouth, the pontoon is directly south of you, approx 3 cables (600m). Have mooring warps and fenders ready, and in busy periods, prepare to raft alongside another boat. Water depth at harbour approach – minimum is 0.9 metres below chart datum at low water. Water depth at pontoons – 2m below chart datum (within two boatlengths of the pontoon and no further south than the end of the pontoon). Seabed – soft mud throughout the harbour. Dredging has been done at the pontoons to improve access, and updates on progress are available at www.rfyc.org Slipways: a public slip immediately south of the pontoon enables drying out for immediate maintenance. The club has a further slipway on site. Craneage: available at the Club for boats up to 4.5 tons (with certain restrictions). For details, please contact the RFYC Office. Access to the pontoon from land is by key pad, with the number available on payment of berthing charge. Maximum stay is 14 days except by prior arrangement. Key pad access to clubhouse will usually allow entrance 0900 to 2100 all week. These hours may vary for operational reasons. Volunteers visit the pontoon every day, and information sheets are at the head of the access ramp. To check availability, give advance notice or for information, please contact the RFYC office. The company, owned on a 50:50 basis by the Royal Forth Yacht Club and the Forth Corinthian Yacht Club, was created in 1996 to manage the pontoon berthing facility in the East Harbour at Granton. (Each club also has a directly held 50% interest in the infrastructure.) From its inception the company has been collecting berthing fees on behalf of the two clubs and is currently styled as a nontrading entity. There are five directors, two from each Club, and the fifth director, the chairman, is appointed by mutual agreement. Four managers, two from each Club, undertake the daily running of the pontoons, on a voluntary basis. Users are requested to co-operate with the duty manager to ensure smooth running of the facility. The marina is a valuable amenity for leisure sailing based in a drying-out harbour. The company’s long term objectives include provision of full marina 48

facilities at an affordable price and to help sustain both clubs in the future. Royal Forth Yacht Club and Forth Corinthian Yacht Club (the “Owners”) and The Edinburgh Marina Limited (the “Managers”) accept no liability for any loss or damage suffered by any user to their vessel or property thereon howsoever arising including any loss or damage arising out of the Owners’, their Managers’ or their respective servants’ or agents’ negligence. Pontoon Rules and Conditions of Use 2015 are posted on the notice board at the top of the gangway, and in both clubhouses. Marina charges With the aim of achieving a meaningful contribution towards ongoing repairs and maintenance of the facility, the following rates have been agreed. Please pay at the RFYC bar or office, or the bar of FCYC, and the receipt should be displayed conspicuously on the vessel, which must itself be clearly named.


Daytime (06:00 to 22:00 hrs) RFYC/FCYC boats (day permit visible from pontoon) Free Visitors up to 2 hours Free more than 2 hours £5 flat rate Overnight (22:00 to 06:00 hrs and up to 24 hours) RFYC/FCYC boats - £1.20 per metre LOA** Visitors £2.40 per metre LOA** **rounded up to nearest half metre of overall boat length. There is a rate card in the clubhouse to assist calculation of overnight charges, both for 24 hours, and a reduced rate for 7 days (viz. 6 times the above daily rate) which will only apply if pre-arranged and pre-paid.

A members’ discount table for day permit holders re most Sunday to Thursday (5) nights inclusive, is available in the clubhouse. When it applies, this discount replaces the ‘7 for 6’ reduction above. Boat owners wishing to moor at the pontoons for 2 days or more should make prior arrangements with the managers before taking

up position on the pontoons, to facilitate best use of space. Pontoon dues fall to be paid immediately after mooring on the pontoon. Overdue fees will be invoiced to the owner and will incur an additional £5 administration charge. 14 days is the maximum continuous period that any vessel may stay on the pontoons during the sailing season, without specific agreement of the directors (for reasons such as bad weather, awaiting spare parts, etc.) Boats must be moored securely, about one metre apart, using suitable mooring ropes (viz. springs as well as bow and stern lines), leaving usable space for others. The pontoons are for the exclusive use of leisure vessels, except where specifically detailed by the company. An access fob for the gate to the pontoons can be obtained by submitting an application form through RFYC Hon. Secretary. Please ensure the gate is never left open while unattended.

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RFYC SAILING CALENDAR 2017 BOATMAN

DATE

START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

DATE

BOATMAN START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

Apr 17 Mon

15:05-23:05

19:12

May 20 Sat

9:00

14:00

05:20-14:00

10:05

Early Saturday Series 4,5

1030

Apr 18 Tue

03:10-11:25

7:27

May 20 Sat

19:00

21:00

18:55-03:05

23:05

Apr 18 Tue

15:50-00:20

20:02

May 21 Sun

9:00

15:00

06:45-15:00

11:15

Apr 19 Wed

03:40-12:35

8:20

FIG Div 1&2 JPR 1 FCYC/RFYC Inchkeith Trophy 1030 start

Apr 19 Wed

16:45-01:50

21:10

May 22 Mon

9:00

16:00

08:05-15:50

12:25

Apr 20 Thu

04:30-13:50

9:30

May 23 Tue

9:00

16:30

09:10-16:40

13:25

Apr 21 Fri

05:50-14:50

10:50

May 24 Wed

10:00

17:30

10:10-17:25

14:20

Apr 22 Sat

07:30-15:45

12:02

May 25 Thu

11:00

18:30

11:05-18:15

15:12

Apr 23 Sun

08:45-16:30

13:02

May 26 Fri

12:00

19:00

12:00-19:00

16:05

Apr 24 Mon

10:00

17:00

09:45-17:10

13:57

Lift In

May 27 Sat

13:00

20:00

12:50-19:50

16:52

1400

Apr 25 Tue

10:30

18:00

10:40-17:50

14:47

Back-up lift in

Apr 26 Wed

11:30

18:30

11:30-18:35

15:37

Sail,Row,Run; Anstruther weekend cruise 1/6 (Anstruther Muster/Scottish Series)

Apr 27 Thu

12:30

19:30

12:15-19:20

16:22

May 28 Sun

13:30

21:00

13:40-20:45

17:40

13:00

20:00

13:05-20:05

17:07

Anstruther weekend cruise return 1/6

Apr 28 Fri Apr 29 Sat

14:00

21:00

13:50-20:55

17:50

May 29 Mon

14:30

21:00

14:30-21:40

18:27

Apr 30 Sun

14:30

21:00

14:35-21:55

18:35

May 30 Tue

15:30

21:00

15:25-22:45

19:17

May 01 Mon

15:30

21:00

15:30-23:00

19:27

May 31 Wed

9:00

11:00

03:20-11:00

7:30

May 02 Tue

9:00

11:30

03:35-11:20

7:42

May 31 Wed

16:30

21:00

16:15-23:55

20:15

Early Evening Points 3/8

1900

May 02 Tue

16:30

21:00

16:25-00:20

20:30

Training Registration

1900

Jun 01 Thu

9:00

12:00

04:05-12:10

8:25

May 03 Wed

9:00

12:30

04:25-12:35

8:47

Jun 01 Thu

17:30

21:00

17:15-01:20

21:17

1900

May 03 Wed

17:30

21:00

17:35-01:50

21:42

Practice Races Session 1/4

1900

Early Evening Points 4/8 (Open Sailing 17:45)

May 04 Thu

9:00

14:00

05:25-13:55

10:00

Jun 02 Fri

9:00

13:30

05:00-13:25

9:32

May 05 Fri

9:00

15:00

06:45-15:10

11:20

Jun 02 Fri

18:30

21:00

18:20-02:35

22:27

Joint Friday White Sail SC 2/8

1900

May 06 Sat

9:00

16:00

08:00-16:05

12:25

Opening Regatta/Early Sat Series 1,2,3

1100

Jun 03 Sat

9:00

14:30

06:05-14:30

10:40

Neilson Plate/Early Sat Series 6

1100

May 07 Sun

9:00

17:00

09:05-16:50

13:17

(FIG Div 1&2 PEYC Bosuns Locker)

Jun 04 Sun

9:00

15:30

07:15-15:30

11:45

Jun 05 Mon

9:00

16:30

08:20-16:20

12:40

(Helgoland Race starts)

Jun 06 Tue

9:30

17:00

09:15-17:00

13:30

Jun 07 Wed

10:00

17:30

10:05-17:40

14:15

Helgoland Arrivals

Jun 08 Thu

11:00

18:30

10:50-18:15

14:55

Helgoland Arrivals

Jun 09 Fri

11:30

19:00

11:30-18:50

15:32

Helgoland Arrivals

Jun 10 Sat

12:00

19:30

12:10-19:30

16:07

Early Sat Series 7,8

1400

Jun 11 Sun

13:00

20:00

12:50-20:05

16:45

Jun 12 Mon

13:30

21:00

13:25-20:45

17:20

Helgoland Return Race?

Jun 13 Tue

14:00

21:00

14:05-21:25

17:57

Training on Water

1830

Jun 14 Wed

14:30

21:00

14:40-22:10

18:37

Early Evening Points 5/6

1900

Jun 15 Thu

15:30

21:00

15:25-23:05

19:22

Early Evening Points 6/6 (Open Sailing 17:45)

1900

Jun 16 Fri

9:00

11:30

03:10-11:15

7:30

Jun 16 Fri

16:30

21:00

16:15-00:05

20:15

Dinghy Racing 2/4 Joint Fri White Sail C 3/8

1900

Jun 17 Sat

9:00

12:00

03:55-12:10

8:25

JPR 2 West Cup (FCYC Wilson); (Mudhook Regatta)

1100

Jun 17 Sat

17:30

21:00

17:15-01:05

21:15

(Mudhook Regatta)

Jun 18 Sun

9:00

13:30

04:55-13:15

9:27

Cruise in Company 2/6

Jun 18 Sun

18:30

21:00

18:20-02:10

22:20

Jun 19 Mon

9:00

14:30

06:10-14:20

10:37

Jun 20 Tue

9:00

15:30

07:30-15:20

11:50

Jun 21 Wed

9:00

16:30

08:40-16:15

12:55

Jun 22 Thu

10:00

17:00

09:50-17:10

13:57

May 08 Mon

10:00

17:30

09:55-17:30

14:05

May 09 Tue

10:30

18:00

10:40-18:05

14:45

May 10 Wed

11:30

18:30

11:20-18:35

15:22

May 11 Thu

12:00

19:00

11:55-19:10

15:57

May 12 Fri

12:30

20:00

12:30-19:45

16:30

May 13 Sat

13:00

20:30

13:05-20:20

17:02

(Kip Regatta)

May 14 Sun

13:30

21:00

13:40-21:00

17:37

Push the Boat Out

May 15 Mon

14:30

21:00

14:15-21:45

18:15

May 16 Tue

15:00

21:00

14:55-22:35

18:55

Training on Water

1830

May 17 Wed

15:30

21:00

15:40-23:40

19:40

Early Evening Points 1/8

1900

May 18 Thu

9:00

12:00

03:20-11:50

7:52

May 18 Thu

16:30

21:00

16:30-00:50

20:40

Early Evening Points 2/8 (Open Sailing 17:45)

1900

May 19 Fri

9:00

13:00

04:10-12:55

8:50

May 19 Fri

17:30

21:00

17:40-02:05

21:50

Dinghy Racing 1/4 Joint Fri White Sail C 1/8

1900

EP = Evening Points JPR = Joint Passage Race FIG = FYCA Forth Inshore Group Lounge bar open for Regattas, evening races and 1200-1800 every Saturday & Sunday from lift-in to lift-out 50


DATE

BOATMAN START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

Jun 23 Fri

11:00

18:00

10:50-18:00

14:55

Jun 24 Sat

12:00

19:00

11:45-18:50

15:47

Crombie Cup (FCC Fife/ LBSC Dinghy Regattas)

1400

Jun 25 Sun

12:30

19:30

12:40-19:40

16:37

(FIG Div 1&2 DBSC Gavin Adamson)

Jun 26 Mon

13:30

20:30

13:30-20:30

17:27

Jun 27 Tue

14:30

21:00

14:20-21:25

18:12

Training on Water

1830

Jun 28 Wed

15:00

21:00

15:05-22:20

18:57

Late Evening Points 1/7

1900

Jun 29 Thu

16:00

21:00

15:55-23:20

19:47

Late Evening Points 2/7; (Open Sailing 17:45; PEYC 707 Nationals starts)

1900

DATE

BOATMAN START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

Jul 30 Sun

9:00

12:00

03:50-11:55

8:07

Cruise in Company 4/6 (FIG Div 1&2 BSC Mazzoni)

Jul 30 Sun

17:00

21:00

16:45-00:45

20:47

Jul 31 Mon

9:00

13:00

04:30-13:00

9:00

Jul 31 Mon

17:30

21:00

17:30-02:00

21:42

Aug 01 Tue

9:00

14:30

05:20-14:15

10:00

Aug 01 Tue

18:30

21:00

18:25-03:15

22:47

Training on Water

1830

Aug 02 Wed

9:00

15:30

06:25-15:25

11:12

Aug 03 Thu

9:00

16:30

07:45-16:20

12:20

Aug 04 Fri

9:00

17:00

09:00-17:05

13:17

Jun 30 Fri

9:00

11:30

03:45-11:35

7:57

Aug 05 Sat

10:00

18:00

10:00-17:45

14:07

Late Sat series 4,5

1400

Jun 30 Fri

17:00

21:00

16:45-00:30

20:40

Joint Friday White Sail SC 4/8

1900

Aug 06 Sun

11:00

18:30

10:50-18:15

14:50

JPR 4 Jubilee Cup (RFYC to start)

1300

Jul 01 Sat

9:00

12:30

04:30-12:40

8:52

Aug 07 Mon

11:30

19:00

11:35-18:50

15:32

Jul 01 Sat

17:30

21:00

17:35-01:40

21:40

Aug 08 Tue

12:30

19:30

12:15-19:25

16:10

Jul 02 Sun

9:00

14:00

05:15-13:50

9:50

JPR 3 Marsh and Surrey Cup

1200

Aug 09 Wed

13:00

20:00

12:55-19:55

16:47

Practice Races Session 2/4

1830

Jul 02 Sun

18:30

21:00

18:30-02:55

22:40

Aug 10 Thu

13:30

20:30

13:30-20:30

17:22

1900

Jul 03 Mon

9:00

15:00

06:15-14:55

10:52

Practice Races Session 3/4 (Open Sailing 17:45)

Jul 04 Tue

9:00

16:00

07:25-15:50

11:57

Aug 11 Fri

14:00

21:00

14:10-21:10

18:00

Joint Friday White Sail C 7/8

1900

Jul 05 Wed

9:00

16:30

08:35-16:40

12:55

Aug 12 Sat

15:00

21:00

14:45-21:55

18:40

Crew Race

1630

Jul 06 Thu

9:30

17:30

09:30-17:20

13:42

Aug 13 Sun

15:30

21:00

15:30-22:45

19:22

Jul 07 Fri

10:30

18:00

10:25-18:00

14:30

Aug 14 Mon

9:00

11:00

03:25-11:10

7:35

Jul 08 Sat

11:00

18:30

11:10-18:35

15:12

ASC Aberdour Regatta

Aug 14 Mon

16:30

21:00

16:15-23:45

20:12

Festival Series

1900

Jul 09 Sun

12:00

19:00

11:50-19:10

15:50

Cruise in Company 3/6 (BSC Burntisland Regatta)

Aug 15 Tue

9:00

12:30

04:15-12:15

8:30

Aug 15 Tue

17:00

21:00

17:10-00:55

21:10

Festival Series

1900

Jul 10 Mon

12:30

20:00

12:30-19:45

16:30

Aug 16 Wed

9:00

13:30

05:20-13:35

9:40

Jul 11 Tue

13:00

20:30

13:10-20:20

17:07

Training on Water

1830

Aug 16 Wed

18:00

21:00

18:15-02:15

22:25

Festival Series

1900

Jul 12 Wed

14:00

21:00

13:50-21:00

17:42

Late Evening Points 3/7

1900

Aug 17 Thu

9:00

15:00

06:40-14:55

11:00

Jul 13 Thu

14:30

21:00

14:25-21:40

18:20

Late Evening Points 4/7 (Open Sailing 17:45)

1900

Aug 18 Fri

9:00

16:00

08:10-16:05

12:25

Aug 19 Sat

9:30

17:00

09:25-17:00

13:32

JPR 5 Crawford Cup/ FCYC Scott Shield

1100

Jul 14 Fri

15:00

21:00

15:10-22:25

19:00

Joint Friday White Sail C 5/8

1900

Jul 15 Sat

16:00

21:00

15:55-23:20

19:45

Coronation Cup

1700

Aug 20 Sun

10:30

18:00

10:30-17:50

14:32

Cruise in company 5/6

Jul 16 Sun

9:00

11:30

03:40-11:40

7:57

Aug 21 Mon

11:30

18:30

11:25-18:30

15:22

Jul 16 Sun

17:00

21:00

16:45-00:20

20:40

Aug 22 Tue

12:00

19:00

12:10-19:10

16:10

Jul 17 Mon

9:00

12:30

04:35-12:40

8:55

Aug 23 Wed

13:00

20:00

12:55-19:50

16:50

Jul 17 Mon

18:00

21:00

17:45-01:30

21:42

Aug 24 Thu

13:30

20:30

13:35-20:30

17:27

Late Evening Points 7/7

1830

Jul 18 Tue

9:00

14:00

05:40-13:50

10:05

Aug 25 Fri

14:00

20:30

14:10-21:15

18:02

1830

Jul 18 Tue

19:00

21:00

18:50-02:35

22:55

Dinghy Racing 4/4 Joint Fri White Sail SC 8/8

Jul 19 Wed

9:00

15:00

07:00-15:00

11:20

Aug 26 Sat

15:00

20:30

14:45-21:55

18:37

Late Sat Series 6,7

1600

Jul 20 Thu

9:00

16:00

08:20-16:05

12:35

Aug 27 Sun

15:30

20:30

15:15-22:45

19:12

Jul 21 Fri

9:30

17:00

09:35-17:00

13:42

Aug 28 Mon

9:00

11:00

03:15-11:10

7:22

Jul 22 Sat

10:30

18:00

10:40-17:55

14:42

Royal Eastern Regatta (3 races)/ Late Sat Series; (FCC Regatta)

1200

Aug 28 Mon

16:00

20:30

15:50-23:45

19:50

Aug 29 Tue

9:00

12:30

03:50-12:15

8:10

Aug 29 Tue

16:30

20:00

16:25-00:55

20:40

Jul 23 Sun

11:30

18:30

11:35-18:40

15:37

(FCC Regatta)

Aug 30 Wed

9:00

13:30

04:25-13:35

9:05

Jul 24 Mon

12:30

19:30

12:25-19:25

16:25

Aug 30 Wed

17:00

20:00

17:05-02:25

21:45

Practice Races Session 4/4

1830

Jul 25 Tue

13:30

20:30

13:15-20:15

17:12

Training on Water

1830

Aug 31 Thu

9:00

15:00

05:25-15:05

10:22

Jul 26 Wed

14:00

21:00

14:00-21:00

17:55

Late Evening Points 5/7

1900

Sep 01 Fri

9:00

16:00

07:00-16:10

11:45

East Coast Sailing Festival

Jul 27 Thu

14:30

21:00

14:40-21:50

18:35

Late Evening Points 6/7 (Open Sailing 17:45)

1900

Sep 02 Sat

9:00

17:00

08:25-16:50

12:50

East Coast Sailing Festival (DBSC Dinghy Regatta)

Jul 28 Fri

15:30

21:00

15:25-22:40

19:15

Dinghy Racing 3/4 Joint Fri White Sail SC 6/8

1900

Sep 03 Sun

9:30

17:30

09:35-17:25

13:42

East Coast Sailing Festival (DBSC Dinghy Regatta)

Jul 29 Sat

9:00

11:00

03:15-11:00

7:25

(West Highland Week starts)

Sep 04 Mon

10:30

18:00

10:30-17:55

14:30

East Coast Sailing Festival

Jul 29 Sat

16:00

21:00

16:05-23:40

19:57

Sep 05 Tue

11:00

18:30

11:10-18:25

15:10

51


DATE

BOATMAN START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

BOATMAN

DATE

START

END

>2.4M TIDE

HW

EVENTS

START

Sep 06 Wed

12:00

19:00

11:50-18:55

15:50

Oct 01 Sun

9:00

16:30

07:50-16:30

12:17

Sep 07 Thu

12:30

19:30

12:30-19:30

16:27

Oct 02 Mon

9:00

17:00

09:05-17:00

13:12

Sep 08 Fri

13:00

20:00

13:05-20:05

17:02

Oct 03 Tue

10:00

17:30

10:00-17:25

14:00

Sep 09 Sat

14:00

20:00

13:45-20:45

17:40

Single Handed

1500

Oct 04 Wed

11:00

18:00

10:45-17:55

14:42

Sep 10 Sun

14:30

19:30

14:25-21:25

18:17

Oct 05 Thu

11:30

18:30

11:25-18:25

15:22

Sep 11 Mon

15:00

19:30

15:05-22:15

18:57

Oct 06 Fri

12:00

18:30

12:05-19:00

16:05

Sep 12 Tue

16:00

19:30

15:45-23:20

19:47

Oct 07 Sat

13:00

18:30

12:45-19:40

16:40

Autumn Series 1/4

1400

Sep 13 Wed

9:00

12:00

04:05-12:00

8:15

Oct 08 Sun

13:30

18:30

13:20-20:20

17:20

Sep 13 Wed

16:30

19:30

16:35-00:35

20:45

Oct 09 Mon

14:00

18:30

14:00-21:05

18:00

Sep 14 Thu

9:00

13:30

05:10-13:30

9:30

Oct 10 Tue

14:30

18:30

14:40-22:00

18:40

Sep 15 Fri

9:00

15:00

06:35-15:00

10:57

Oct 11 Wed

15:30

18:30

15:25-23:00

19:27

Sep 16 Sat

9:00

16:00

08:05-16:05

12:17

Late Sat series 8,9

1100

Oct 12 Thu

9:00

12:00

04:00-11:55

8:05

Sep 17 Sun

9:30

17:00

09:20-16:55

13:27

Cruise in company 6/6 (FIG Div 1&2 PEYC Queen Margaret)

Oct 13 Fri

9:00

13:30

05:10-13:25

9:17

Oct 14 Sat

9:00

15:00

06:35-15:00

10:50

Autumn Series 2/4

1100

Oct 15 Sun

9:00

16:00

08:00-16:00

12:10

Oct 16 Mon

9:00

17:00

09:10-16:50

13:12

Oct 17 Tue

10:00

17:30

10:05-17:25

14:02

Oct 18 Wed

11:00

18:00

10:45-18:00

14:42

Possible lift out date?

Oct 19 Thu

11:30

18:00

11:25-18:30

15:22

Back-up lift out

Oct 20 Fri

12:00-19:05

15:57

Oct 21 Sat

12:30-19:35

16:27

Autumn Series 3/4

1400

Oct 22 Sun

13:00-20:10

16:57

Oct 23 Mon

13:30-20:45

17:27

Oct 24 Tue

13:55-21:25

17:57

Oct 25 Wed

14:25-22:15

18:30

Oct 26 Thu

14:50-23:05

19:10

Oct 27 Fri

03:30-12:05

7:45

Oct 27 Fri

15:20-00:20

20:00

Oct 28 Sat

04:25-13:45

8:55

Autumn Series 4/4

1000

Oct 29 Sun

04:40-14:10

9:15

Sep 18 Mon

10:30

17:30

10:20-17:40

14:20

Sep 19 Tue

11:00

18:30

11:10-18:15

15:07

Sep 20 Wed

12:00

19:00

11:50-18:55

15:47

Sep 21 Thu

12:30

19:00

12:30-19:30

16:25

Sep 22 Fri

13:00

19:00

13:05-20:05

17:00

Sep 23 Sat

13:30

19:00

13:35-20:40

17:30

Pennel Trophy

1500

Sep 24 Sun

14:00

19:00

14:05-21:20

18:00

Sep 25 Mon

14:30

19:00

14:35-22:00

18:32

Sep 26 Tue

15:00

19:00

15:00-22:50

19:05

Sep 27 Wed

9:00

11:30

03:15-11:30

7:25

Sep 27 Wed

15:30

19:00

15:30-23:55

19:47

Sep 28 Thu

9:00

13:00

03:55-12:50

8:20

Sep 28 Thu

16:00

19:00

16:00-01:20

20:45

Sep 29 Fri

9:00

14:30

04:45-14:40

9:35

Sep 30 Sat

9:00

16:00

06:15-15:55

11:07

Late Sat series 10,11

1100

GMT (+1:00)

Leith – MAY 2017

TIDE TABLES 2017 01

00:27 06:55 Mon 12:55 19:28

07 01:11 07:02 Sun

4.8m 1.7m 13:20 4.9m 19:25 1.2m

GMT (+1:00)

02 01:19 07:45 Tue

1.4m 5.0m 13:54 1.3m 20:29 4.7m

08

01:57 07:47 Mon 14:06 20:06

13 04:47 10:39

14 05:18 11:13

Sat

Sun

5.3m 1.0m 17:04 5.2m 22:53 1.2m

5.0m 1.5m 5.1m 1.1m

5.2m 1.1m 17:38 5.1m 23:27 1.4m

03

02:23 08:47 Wed 15:05 21:43

5.2m 1.3m 14:47 5.2m 20:42 1.0m

15

05:50 5.1m 11:49 1.3m Mon 18:14 4.9m

19 02:32 08:53

20 03:44 10:05

21 04:56 11:17

Sat

Sun

2.1m 4.5m 15:17 1.7m 21:52 4.3m

2.2m 4.5m 16:28 1.6m 23:04 4.5m

1.8m 4.7m 1.5m 4.5m

09 02:37 08:25 Tue

Fri

2.0m 4.7m 17:35 1.4m

04 03:40 10:02

05 05:00 11:20

06 00:16 06:09

Thu

Fri

Sat

2.1m 4.5m 16:24 1.6m 23:04 4.5m

10

03:12 09:00 Wed 15:23 21:16

1.6m 4.9m 12:29 1.4m 18:54 4.7m

22

00:10 06:01 Mon 12:24 18:34

25 02:53 08:41

26 03:41 09:29

27 04:27 10:17

28 05:13 11:06

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.7m 0.7m 15:14 5.9m 21:06 0.4m

01:06 07:31 Wed 13:41 20:15

1.4m 5.1m 1.1m 4.8m

5.9m 0.5m 16:04 6.0m 21:53 0.4m

6.0m 0.4m 16:53 5.9m 22:40 0.5m

5.3m 1.2m 5.3m 0.9m

16 00:03 06:24 Tue

Thu

31

52

1.1m 5.4m 1.0m 5.1m

Leith - May 2017

4.8m 1.7m 5.0m 1.1m

5.9m 0.4m 17:41 5.7m 23:26 0.8m

2.1m 4.5m 17:38 1.6m

4.6m 1.9m 12:26 4.7m 18:37 1.4m

11 03:45 09:33

12 04:16 10:06

Thu

Fri

5.4m 1.1m 15:58 5.4m 21:49 0.9m

17

00:43 07:04 Wed 13:14 19:42

1.8m 4.7m 1.6m 4.5m

23 01:09 06:58 Tue

29

5.1m 1.3m 13:25 5.3m 19:27 0.8m

05:57 5.7m 11:53 0.6m Mon 18:28 5.5m

5.4m 1.0m 16:31 5.3m 22:21 1.0m

18 01:32 07:52 Thu

2.0m 4.6m 14:10 1.7m 20:41 4.3m

24

02:03 07:51 Wed 14:21 20:18

30 00:12 06:41 Tue

5.4m 1.0m 5.6m 0.6m

1.1m 5.5m 12:45 0.8m 19:19 5.1m


Leith - June 2017

GMT (+1:00)

Leith – JUNE 2017

GMT (+1:00)

01 02:03 08:27

02 03:11 09:32

03 04:22 10:41

04 05:29 11:46

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

1.7m 4.9m 14:44 1.4m 21:20 4.6m

07

02:02 07:55 Wed 14:15 20:13

4.9m 1.5m 4.9m 1.3m

13 05:32 11:33 Tue

5.2m 1.1m 18:00 4.9m 23:45 1.5m

19 04:14 10:39

1.9m 4.8m Mon 16:56 1.4m 23:32 4.7m

25 04:10 10:04 Sun

5.9m 0.4m 16:40 5.8m 22:24 0.7m

2.0m 4.6m 15:52 1.6m 22:29 4.5m

2.1m 4.5m 17:00 1.6m 23:36 4.5m

2.0m 4.6m 17:59 1.6m

05

00:32 06:25 Mon 12:41 18:49

08 02:41 08:33

09 03:17 09:10

10 03:51 09:45

11 04:25 10:21

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.1m 1.4m 14:55 5.1m 20:50 1.2m

14

5.2m 1.2m 15:33 5.1m 21:25 1.2m

5.2m 1.1m 16:10 5.2m 21:59 1.2m

4.6m 1.9m 4.7m 1.5m

5.3m 1.1m 16:46 5.2m 22:33 1.2m

06 01:20 07:13 Tue

4.8m 1.7m 13:31 4.8m 19:33 1.3m

12

04:58 10:56 Mon 17:22 23:08

06:08 5.1m 12:12 1.2m Wed 18:38 4.8m

15 00:23 06:45

16 01:09 07:31

17 02:03 08:25

18 03:04 09:27

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

20 05:24 11:49

21 00:34 06:27

Tue

1.7m 5.0m 18:00 1.2m

26

04:57 10:52 Mon 17:28 23:11

5.9m 0.4m 5.7m 0.8m

1.6m 5.0m 12:55 1.3m 19:23 4.7m

5.0m 1.4m Wed 12:56 5.2m 18:59 1.0m

27 05:41 11:40 Tue

5.8m 0.5m 18:14 5.5m 23:56 1.0m

1.8m 4.9m 13:46 1.4m 20:16 4.6m

1.9m 4.8m 14:44 1.5m 21:16 4.5m

1.9m 4.8m 15:48 1.5m 22:23 4.6m

22 01:33 07:26

23 02:29 08:22

24 03:21 09:14

Thu

Fri

Sat

5.3m 1.1m 13:58 5.5m 19:55 0.8m

28

06:25 5.6m 12:28 0.7m Wed 19:01 5.2m

5.6m 0.7m 14:56 5.7m 20:47 0.7m

5.8m 0.5m 15:49 5.8m 21:37 0.6m

29 00:44 07:10

30 01:35 07:59

Thu

Fri

Leith - July 2017

1.3m 5.3m 13:18 1.0m 19:50 4.9m

5.3m 1.1m 5.1m 1.3m

1.6m 5.0m 14:12 1.3m 20:43 4.7m

GMT (+1:00)

Leith – JULY 2017

GMT (+1:00)

01 02:31 08:52

02 03:31 09:51

Sat

Sun

1.9m 4.7m 15:08 1.5m 21:40 4.5m

07 02:11 08:08

08 02:51 08:48

09 03:28 09:26

Sat

Sun

4.9m 1.5m 14:30 4.9m 20:25 1.4m

5.0m 1.3m 15:12 5.0m 21:03 1.3m

2.1m 4.4m 1.8m 4.4m

5.2m 1.1m 15:51 5.1m 21:39 1.2m

04 05:40 11:58 Tue

2.1m 4.5m 18:10 1.7m

10

04:05 10:03 Mon 16:30 22:15

13 05:50 11:53

14 00:03 06:28

15 00:45 07:10

16 01:33 07:59

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.4m 1.0m 18:21 5.0m

19

04:51 1.7m 11:21 4.9m Wed 17:33 1.4m

25 04:41 10:38

GMT (+1:00)

03

04:37 10:55 Mon 17:12 23:44

Fri

Tue

Leith – AUGUST 2017

2.0m 4.5m 16:09 1.7m 22:42 4.4m

5.9m 0.4m 17:12 5.7m 22:54 0.8m

31 01

02:38 09:00 Mon 15:15 03:40 21:43 10:02 Tue 16:20 22:50

2.0m 4.5m 1.8m 2.2m 4.3m 4.3m

07

5.2m 1.1m 5.2m 1.2m

03:07 09:06 Mon 15:33 21:20

2.0m 4.2m

13 00:23 06:52 Sun

1.2m 5.4m 12:55 1.0m 19:24 5.0m

1.4m 5.3m 12:34 1.0m 19:02 4.9m

21 01:11 07:10

22 02:12 08:09

23 03:05 09:02

Sat

Sun

26

05:25 11:22 Wed 17:55 23:35

5.8m 0.5m 5.5m 1.0m

5.1m 1.2m 13:43 5.3m 19:40 1.0m

5.7m 0.6m 15:37 5.7m 21:23 0.8m

4.7m 1.7m 13:44 4.7m 19:44 1.5m

12

05:15 11:16 Wed 17:43 23:25

1.8m 4.8m 16:21 1.5m 22:55 4.7m

24

03:55 09:51 Mon 16:26 22:09

27 06:04 12:04

28 00:17 06:44

29 01:00 07:24

30 01:46 08:08

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.7m 0.7m 18:36 5.3m

1.2m 5.4m 12:47 0.9m 19:16 5.0m

Leith - August 2017

1.5m 5.1m 13:32 1.3m 19:59 4.7m

5.4m 0.9m 5.1m 1.3m

18 03:37 10:05 Tue

Thu

02

04:51 11:12 Wed 17:26 23:54

2.2m 4.3m 2.0m 4.3m

5.8m 0.4m 5.7m 0.7m

1.7m 4.8m 14:20 1.6m 20:47 4.5m

08 03:45 09:43 Tue

5.4m 0.9m 16:12 5.3m 21:56 1.1m

14

01:09 07:37 Mon 13:45 20:13

1.4m 5.2m 1.2m 4.8m

5.3m 0.9m 14:34 5.4m 20:22 1.0m

03 05:58 12:20

04 00:54 06:56

05 01:42 07:44

06 02:27 08:27

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

2.1m 4.4m 18:28 1.9m

09

04:22 10:20 Wed 16:49 22:31

1.6m 4.9m 14:43 1.5m 21:13 4.6m

21

02:52 08:50 Mon 15:25 21:10

26 06:13 12:12

27 00:23 06:47

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.5m 0.9m 18:38 5.1m

5.5m 0.7m 5.4m 1.0m

15 02:03 08:32 Tue

25 05:38 11:34

2.3m 4.1m 16:39 2.3m 23:06 4.1m

5.4m 0.8m 14:43 5.5m 20:33 0.9m

1.7m 4.9m 1.4m 4.6m

06 01:27 07:24 Thu

GMT (+1:00)

20 01:58 07:59

31 03:56 10:24

17

02:31 08:57 Mon 15:13 21:45

Fri

4.9m 1.5m 12:35 5.0m 18:39 1.2m

Sun

Thu

5.4m 0.9m 17:07 5.2m 22:50 1.2m

20 00:06 06:04

19 00:56 07:00

5.7m 0.6m 18:04 5.4m 23:46 1.1m

1.6m 5.0m 14:12 1.3m 20:43 4.7m

4.5m 1.9m 4.6m 1.6m

11 04:41 10:39 Tue

Thu

Sat

5.0m 1.2m 13:34 5.1m 19:29 1.3m

1.5m 5.2m 13:20 1.1m 19:48 4.8m

5.3m 1.0m 5.2m 1.2m

05

00:40 06:36 Wed 12:55 18:59

5.6m 0.6m 5.6m 0.9m

1.3m 5.2m 12:49 1.2m 19:13 4.8m

4.4m 1.9m 13:18 4.5m 19:18 1.8m

4.7m 1.6m 14:08 4.7m 20:03 1.6m

4.9m 1.3m 14:53 5.0m 20:42 1.4m

01 02:31 08:52

02 03:31 09:51

Sat

Sun

1.9m 4.7m 15:08 1.5m 21:40 4.5m

07 02:11 08:08

08 02:51 08:48

Fri

Sat

4.9m 1.5m 14:30 4.9m 20:25 1.4m

13 05:50 11:53

14 00:03 06:28 Fri

5.4m 1.0m 18:21 5.0m

19

31 01

02:38 09:00 Mon 15:15 03:40 21:43 10:02 Tue 16:20 22:50

2.0m 4.5m 1.8m 2.2m 4.3m 4.3m

07

5.2m 1.1m 5.2m 1.2m

03:07 09:06 Mon 15:33 21:20

11 05:33 11:33

12 06:11 12:12

13 00:23 06:52

Sat

Sun

16

03:10 09:42 Wed 15:55 22:25

1.7m 4.7m 1.6m 4.6m

22 03:40 09:37 Tue

5.8m 0.4m 16:11 5.7m 21:53 0.8m

28 01:01 07:24

1.6m 4.9m Mon 13:30 1.6m 19:53 4.5m

12:35 18:39

26

5.9m 0.4m 17:12 5.7m 22:54 0.8m

Fri

5.6m 0.8m 18:41 5.2m

Thu

25 04:41 10:38 Tue

12:34 19:02

20 00:06 06:04

04:51 1.7m 11:21 4.9m Wed 17:33 1.4m

10 04:58 10:56

5.6m 0.7m 18:02 5.3m 23:42 1.1m

15:12 21:03

Thu

Thu

5.6m 0.7m 17:25 5.4m 23:05 1.0m

16:09 22:42

05:25 11:22 Wed 17:55 23:35

02

04:51 11:12 Wed 17:26 23:54

2.0m 4.2m

08 03:45 09:43 Tue

16:12 21:56

14

1.2m 5.4m 12:55 1.0m 19:24 5.0m

01:09 07:37 Mon 13:45 20:13

17 04:29 11:03

18 05:51 12:25

19 00:56 07:00

20 01:58 07:59

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

1.7m 4.7m 17:13 1.7m 23:44 4.7m

23

04:23 10:18 Wed 16:51 22:32

29 01:47 08:10 Tue

5.9m 0.4m 5.7m 0.8m

1.9m 4.5m 14:19 1.9m 20:42 4.3m

1.6m 4.8m 18:27 1.5m

5.0m 1.2m 13:34 5.1m 19:29 1.3m

14:34 20:22

24 05:02 10:57

25 05:38 11:34

26 06:13 12:12

Thu

Fri

Sat

5.8m 0.5m 17:29 5.6m 23:09 0.9m

30 02:43 09:07

2.1m 4.3m Wed 15:21 2.2m 21:46 4.1m

5.7m 0.6m 18:04 5.4m 23:46 1.1m

31 03:56 10:24 Thu

2.3m 4.1m 16:39 2.3m 23:06 4.1m

53

18:38


Leith - September 2017

GMT (+1:00)

Leith – SEPTEMBER 2017

GMT (+1:00)

01 05:18 11:45

02 00:14 06:24

03 01:11 07:17

Fri

Sat

Sun

2.2m 4.2m 17:52 2.2m

4.3m 2.0m 12:51 4.4m 18:50 1.9m

04

4.6m 1.6m 13:44 4.7m 19:38 1.7m

01:59 08:02 Mon 14:30 20:19

07 04:00 09:56

08 04:37 10:33

09 05:15 11:11

10 05:54 11:50

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.7m 0.5m 16:27 5.6m 22:08 0.8m

13

5.8m 0.4m 17:04 5.6m 22:45 0.8m

14 02:53 09:29

01:44 08:16 Wed 14:21 20:47

1.5m 4.9m 1.6m 4.6m

Thu

19

5.5m 0.7m 5.5m 1.0m

03:21 09:16 Wed 15:50 21:32

Tue

02:35 08:34 15:08 20:53

25 1.9m

15:38 22:07 4.5m Tue

5.7m 13 0.5m 5.6m 07 0.8m

20:47 4.6m Wed 14:21 1.6m 08:16 4.9m 01:44 1.5m

Thu

Fri

25

06:14 5.2m 12:10 1.3m Mon 18:32 4.9m

20:53 1.0m 15:08 5.5m 0.7m 5.5m

19 08:34 02:35

20 26

Tue

00:24 06:47 12:46 19:06

15 04:21 10:58

1.7m 4.6m Mon 18:32 4.9m 12:10 1.3m 06:14 5.2m

22:08 0.8m 16:27 5.6m 09:56 0.5m 04:00 5.7m

17:52 2.2m 4.2m 2.2m

11:45 01 05:18

1.4m 4.9m 1.6m 4.6m

5.9m 0.5m 17:42 5.6m 23:23 0.8m 1.7m 4.5m 28 1.9m 23:30 4.6m

19:06 4.6m 12:46 1.6m

19:49 4.3m Wed 13:29 1.9m 07:28 4.5m 01:04 1.7m

Fri4.9m 26 06:47 00:24 1.4m

Tue

27 17:04

21:32 0.8m Wed 15:50 5.6m 09:16 0.5m 03:21 5.7m

Thu

20

22:08 0.8m 16:26 5.7m 0.5m 5.8m

21 09:54 04:00

21

04:00 15 09:54 Thu 16:26 09 22:08

Thu

22:07 4.5m 15:38 1.9m 09:29 4.6m 02:53 1.7m

Fri

23:30 4.6m 17:04 1.9m 10:58 4.5m 04:21 1.7m

Fri

22:45 0.8m 17:04 5.6m 10:33 0.4m 04:37 5.8m

Sat

23:23 0.8m 17:42 5.6m 11:11 0.5m 05:15 5.9m

Sat

18:50 1.9m 12:51 4.4m 2.0m 4.3m

Sun

19:38 1.7m 13:44 4.7m 1.6m 4.6m

14 08

06:24 02 00:14

27

07:17 03 01:11

20:47 4.1m 14:26 2.2m 08:21 4.2m 01:55 2.0m

Fri

Fri

22:42 0.8m 17:00 5.6m 0.5m 5.8m

Sat

22 10:30 04:37

5.8m 16 0.5m 5.7m 10 0.8m Sat

18:19 1.7m 12:20 4.7m 05:43 1.6m

Sun

18:19 5.4m 11:50 0.6m 05:54 5.8m

20:19 1.4m Mon 14:30 5.0m 08:02 1.3m 01:59 4.9m

04

01:04 1.7m Leith - September 2017 07:28 4.5m Wed 13:29 1.9m 19:49 4.3m GMT (+1:00)

5.8m 0.6m 18:19 5.4m

16 05:43 12:20

Thu

22:08 4.0m 15:46 2.4m

09:37 4.1m 29Sat 03:04 2.2m 23:14 1.0m 17:30 5.4m 0.7m 5.7m

23 11:03 05:10

22

Sun

17

19:21 1.4m 13:28 5.0m 06:52 1.3m 00:44 4.8m

18:59 5.2m Mon 12:31 0.9m 06:34 5.6m 00:03 0.9m

Fri

11

Tue

20:56 1.1m 15:11 5.3m 0.9m 5.2m

08:41 05 02:42

28

Thu

4.9m 1.3m 5.0m 1.4m

1.6m 4.7m 1.7m

Sat

23:30 4.2m 17:11 2.3m 4.1m 2.2m

Sun

23:49 1.2m 18:01 5.2m 0.9m 5.5m

30 11:07 18:19 04:31

05 02:42 08:41 Tue

11

00:03 06:34 Mon 12:31 18:59

5.8m 0.5m 5.6m 0.8m

20:09 1.2m Mon 14:22 5.3m 07:48 0.9m 01:46 5.2m

Tue

19:48 4.9m 13:20 1.3m 07:19 5.2m 00:48 1.2m

21:32 0.9m Wed 15:50 5.5m 09:19 0.7m 03:21 5.5m

0.9m 5.6m 0.9m 5.2m

17 00:44 06:52 Sun

24 11:35 05:41

04:37 18 10:30 17:00 12 22:42

5.2m 0.9m 15:11 5.3m 20:56 1.1m

4.8m 1.3m 13:28 5.0m 19:21 1.4m

06

03:21 09:19 Wed 15:50 21:32

12 00:48 07:19 Tue

1.2m 5.2m 13:20 1.3m 19:48 4.9m

18

01:46 07:48 Mon 14:22 20:09

23 05:10 11:03

24 05:41 11:35

Sat

Sun

5.7m 0.7m 17:30 5.4m 23:14 1.0m

5.5m 0.7m 5.5m 0.9m

5.2m 0.9m 5.3m 1.2m

5.5m 0.9m 18:01 5.2m 23:49 1.2m

06

01:55 08:21 14:26 20:47

2.0m 4.2m 2.2m 4.1m

29 03:04 09:37

30 04:31 11:07

Fri

Sat

2.2m 4.1m 15:46 2.4m 22:08 4.0m

2.2m 4.1m 17:11 2.3m 23:30 4.2m

Leith - October 2017

GMT (+0:00)

Leith – OCTOBER 2017

GMT (+1:00)/GMT (+0:00)

01 05:47 12:19 Sun

2.0m 4.3m 18:17 2.1m

07 04:18 10:10

08 04:57 10:49

Sat

Sun

6.0m 0.3m 16:43 5.9m 22:25 0.5m

GMT (+0:00)

Leith – NOVEMBER 2017

4.5m 1.6m 4.7m 1.8m

6.0m 0.4m 17:21 5.8m 23:05 0.6m

03 01:25 07:30 Tue

4.9m 1.2m 14:01 5.0m 19:49 1.4m

09

05:39 11:30 Mon 18:00 23:48

13 02:43 09:21

14 04:11 10:51

15 05:32 12:10

Fri

Sat

Sun

1.6m 4.5m 15:23 2.0m 21:50 4.5m

1.7m 4.5m 16:52 2.0m 23:15 4.6m

5.9m 0.6m 5.6m 0.7m

1.5m 4.7m 18:06 1.8m

04

02:12 08:12 Wed 14:44 20:28

5.6m 0.9m 18:41 5.3m

16

00:26 06:37 Mon 13:13 19:06

19 02:57 08:52

20 03:35 09:28

21 04:10 10:01

22 04:42 10:33

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.5m 0.7m 15:24 5.5m 21:09 0.9m

25

06:19 4.9m 12:11 1.6m Wed 18:32 4.8m

Tue

17:26 05:52 23:44 12:25 Wed 18:13

01

1.6m 4.6m 1.8m 1.2m 4.8m 5.0m 1.5m

07 04:25 10:13 Tue

5.9m 0.6m 16:44 5.7m 22:37 0.6m

13

04:09 10:47 Mon 16:41 22:59

1.5m 4.6m 1.9m 4.7m

19 02:44 08:35 Sun

5.4m 0.9m 15:03 5.4m 20:52 1.0m

5.6m 0.6m 15:58 5.6m 21:43 0.9m

4.8m 1.3m 4.9m 1.6m

5.5m 0.8m 17:00 5.4m 22:47 1.0m

06 03:36 09:30

07 04:18 10:10

08 04:57 10:49

Fri

Sat

Sun

5.6m 0.6m 15:24 5.6m 21:07 0.8m

11

00:36 07:08 Wed 13:03 19:29

5.1m 1.0m 14:04 5.2m 19:52 1.3m

23

05:13 11:04 Mon 17:29 23:20

28 02:22 08:54

29 02:38 09:16

Fri

Sat

Sun

2.0m 4.1m 14:51 2.4m 21:10 4.2m

1.0m 5.2m 1.3m 5.0m

17 01:27 07:30 Tue

27 01:20 07:47

1.8m 4.3m 13:43 2.2m 20:02 4.3m

Leith - November 2017

5.4m 1.0m 5.2m 1.1m

2.1m 4.1m 15:14 2.4m 21:32 4.2m

5.8m 0.4m 16:04 5.8m 21:46 0.6m

02 00:35 06:38

03 01:25 07:22

04 02:12 08:05

05 02:57 08:47

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

08 05:11 10:58

5.6m 1.0m Wed 17:26 5.5m 23:25 0.8m

14 05:12 11:47 Tue

1.4m 4.8m 17:39 1.7m 23:58 4.9m

20

03:18 09:07 Mon 15:33 21:25

25 06:23 12:11

26 00:48 07:18 Sun

5.4m 1.0m 5.4m 1.0m

1.7m 4.3m 13:08 2.2m 19:27 4.4m

5.6m 0.6m 13:57 5.7m 19:41 0.8m

5.9m 0.4m 14:39 5.9m 20:24 0.5m

6.0m 0.3m 15:21 5.9m 21:06 0.4m

13 02:43 09:21

14 04:11 10:51

Fri

Sat

1.3m 4.8m 14:04 1.7m 20:29 4.7m

18

02:14 08:13 Wed 14:46 20:32

5.3m 0.8m 5.4m 1.1m

24 05:45 11:36 Tue

5.1m 1.3m 17:59 5.0m 23:54 1.3m

30 03:57 10:34

1.9m 4.3m Mon 16:28 2.2m 22:44 4.5m

06

03:41 09:29 Mon 16:03 21:51

10 00:24 06:59

11 01:33 08:11

12 02:51 09:32

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

15

06:04 1.2m 12:37 5.0m Wed 18:28 1.5m

21 03:51 09:39 Tue

5.3m 1.1m 16:04 5.3m 22:00 1.1m

27 01:53 08:28

1.8m 4.2m Mon 14:19 2.3m 20:37 4.4m

1.2m 4.8m 12:51 1.7m 19:15 4.8m

1.4m 4.6m 14:05 2.0m 20:28 4.6m

16 00:48 06:48

17 01:30 07:26

18 02:08 08:01

Fri

Sat

22

04:25 10:13 Wed 16:36 22:35

28 03:05 09:41 Tue

5.1m 1.3m 5.1m 1.2m

1.8m 4.3m 15:33 2.2m 21:51 4.5m

5.2m 0.9m 13:56 5.3m 19:44 1.1m

5.3m 0.9m 14:31 5.4m 20:19 1.0m

23 05:00 10:47

24 05:37 11:25

Thu

Fri

4.9m 1.5m 17:08 4.9m 23:12 1.4m

29 04:12 10:47

1.6m 4.6m Wed 16:38 1.9m 22:57 4.8m

4.7m 1.8m 17:45 4.7m 23:56 1.6m

30 05:11 11:46 Thu

6.0m 0.4m 5.9m 0.4m

1.6m 4.5m 15:28 2.1m 21:49 4.6m

Thu

5.1m 1.0m 13:19 5.2m 19:08 1.3m

17:21 23:05

12 01:33 08:06

09 05:59 11:49

5.2m 1.3m 18:15 5.1m

6.0m 0.3m 16:43 5.9m 22:25 0.5m

Thu

GMT (+0:00) 5.2m 0.9m 13:12 5.3m 18:58 1.1m

02

00:33 06:44 Mon 13:14 19:06

05 02:54 08:51

Thu

1.6m 4.6m 12:52 1.9m 19:10 4.5m

2.0m 4.3m 18:17 2.1m

Thu

26 00:34 06:58

Sat

4.5m 2.0m 18:30 4.6m

5.6m 0.7m 16:30 5.5m 22:16 0.9m

5.2m 0.9m 5.4m 1.1m

10 06:21 12:13 Tue

Thu

31 05:00 11:35

54

02

00:33 06:44 Mon 13:14 19:06

01 05:47 12:19 Sun

1.3m 4.9m 17:36 1.5m 23:59 5.1m

1.6m 4.5m 15:23 2.0m 21:50 4.5m

16:52 23:15

19 02:57 08:52

20 03:35 09:28

Thu

Fri

5.5m 0.7m 15:24 5.5m 21:09 0.9m

25

06:19 4.9m 12:11 1.6m Wed 18:32 4.8m

31 05:00 11:35 Tue

1.6m 4.6m 17:26 1.8m 23:44 4.8m

15:58 21:43

26 00:34 06:58 Thu

12:52 19:10


Arbroath Harbour Arbroath Harbour

Arbroath Harbour

‘‘Arbroath harbour floating pontoon berths with security serviced with electricity and fresh water to accommodate all types of leisure craft. Half height dock gates with a walkway are located between the inner and outer harbours, which open and close tide, maintaining a minimum of 2.5m ofare “Arbroath Harbour hasat59half floating pontoon berths security which ‘‘Arbroath harbour has floating pontoon berths with with security entrance electricity and fresh fresh water water to to accommodate accommodateall alltypes typesofofleisure leisurecraft. craft. serviced with electricity water in the inner harbour.

height dockgates gates witha walkway a walkway are located between inner outer Half height dock with located between thethe inner and and outer “Arbroath has 59 floating floating pontoon berths with security entrance which are ‘‘Arbroath Harbour harbour has pontoon berths withare security harbours, which which open openand andclose closeatathalf half tide, maintaining a minimum of 2.5m tide, maintaining a minimum of 2.5m of of Other facilities the harbourand include free parking, toilets and showers, fueling facilities, laundry withatelectricity electricity fresh water to accommodate all types leisure craft. serviced fresh water accommodate all types ofofleisure craft. water in in the inner innerto harbour. water the harbour. facilities anddock boat yard. Half height dockbuilders’ gateswith witha walkway a walkway are located between inner and outer height gates located between thethe inner outer Other the harbour include free parking, toilets and showers, fueling Other facilitiesare inatthe harbour include free partking, toilets andand showers, a crew facilities, aofhalf nearby chandlery shop andamenities boat builders’ yard.builders’ facilities, a nearby chandlery yard. which open andclose close athalf tide, maintaining aand minimum of 2.5m The town ofwhich Arbroath alsoand offers a room, variety social and sporting toboat visiting crews and harbours, open atfueling tide, maintaining a shop minimum of 2.5m of a of The town of Arbroath also offers a variety of social and sporting amenities to visiting a variety of social sporting amenities to visiting water inofthe the inner harbour. numberin quality pubs, restaurants, the famous twelfth century Abbey andand Signal Tower Museum water inner harbour.

Step aboard The Queen’s former floating palace. Explore five decks with our free audio tour and discover the heart and soul of this most special of Royal residences. www.royalyachtbritannia.co.uk Tel: 0131 555 5566

number of ofquality qualitypubs, pubs,restaurants, restaurants,the thefamous famous twelfth century Abbey crews and and aa number twelfth century Abbey

are located close to the harbour. The railway and bus stations are only 1km from the harbour with

and Signal SignalTower TowerMuseum Museum located close the harbour. railway and bus and arearelocated close to to theand harbour. TheThe railway and bus Other facilities inatthe theharbour harbour include free parking, toilets showers, fueling Other include free partking, toilets and showers, aconnections.” crew stations are only only 1km fromthe theharbour harbour withdirect directnorth northand andsouth south connections.’’ direct north and south connections.’’ stations are 1km from with facilities, a nearby chandlery shop and boatshop builders’ yard.builders’ yard. room, fueling facilities, a nearby chandlery and boat

Arbroath Harbour Harbour

town Harbour of Arbroath a variety variety of social and sporting amenitiestotovisiting visiting Arbroath . Harbour . aArbroath DD11 1PD The also Office offers social and sporting Harbour Office.of Arbroath DD11 1PDamenities Office .. Arbroath .. DD11 1PD crews and number of qualityHarbour pubs,restaurants, restaurants, thefamous famous twelfth century Abbey Harbour Bruceof Fleming crews andMaster: aa number quality pubs, twelfth century Abbey Harbourmaster: Master: Brucethe Fleming Tel:Signal 01241Tower 872166 .Museum Fax: 01241 878472 and Signal TowerMuseum located close harbour. railway and bus 872166 Tel: 01241 close 872166 and areare located to to thethe harbour. TheThe railway and bus Fax: 01241 878472 878472 Email: harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk stations are only only1km 1kmfrom fromthe the harbour withdirect directnorth northand andsouth south connections.’’ stations are harbour with connections.”

Port Edgar Marina, Edinburgh

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Email: harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk

Arbroath Harbour Harbour Harbour Office Office .. Arbroath Arbroath .. DD11 DD111PD 1PD Harbourmaster: Harbour Master: Bruce Fleming Tel: 01241 872166 872166 Fax: 01241 878472 878472 Email: harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk

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Royal Forth Yacht Club Yearbook 2017  

Information and dates about the Royal Forth Yacht Club

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