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April Pitts


Contact Undergraduate Program at the University of Illinois, BLA Degree 2018 alpitts2@illinois.edu (309) 397-3509

Skills Analysis, Modeling, and Rendering- ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Rhino, and DynaSCAPE Fine Arts- Clay, Pencils, Watercolors, Pen, and Ink Graphic Design, Layout, and Publishing- Illustrator, and InDesign Media- Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter Office/Administrative- Excel, PowerPoint, and Microsoft Word Photography- Photoshop, and Digital Photography

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Content 4-7 Water & the Agricultural Landscape, of Illinois 8-13 Liquid Landscape 14-15 Montessori Naturescape 16-17 Drawings from the Landscape 18-21 Route 66 Re-envisioned 22-23 A Campus Teaching Tool 24-25 Garden of Anticipation 26-27 Site Evolving 28-29 Open Campus Seating 30-33 Professional Works

About This portfolio shows some of the works created in my undergraduate years at the University of Illinois. I have emphasized my passion for detailed design work and digital rendering. In addition to this, I am also very passionate about environmental law and how that plays a role in landscape architecture.

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Water & the Agricultural Landscape, of Illinois 2017 ASLA Student Awards of Excellence: Analysis and Planning

WATER & THE AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE OF ILLINOIS

ILLINOIS POLLUTION CONTRIBUTERS TO THE GULF OF MEXICO

Image made by Layne Knoche

01% INDUSTRIAL POINT SOURCE

02% MUNICIPAL POINT SOURCE

05% DOMESTIC WASTE

09% LEGUME WASTE

TO THE GULF OF MEXICO

30% MANURE

MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN POLLUTION CONTRIBUTERS

51% FERTILIZERS

82% AGRICULTURAL NITROGEN 16% POINT SOURCE NITROGEN 02% URBAN RUNOFF NITROGEN 48% AGRICULTURAL PHOSPHORUS 48% POINT SOURCE PHOSPHORUS 04% URBAN RUNOFF PHOSPHORUS

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LEGEND ESTIMATED SUBSURFACE TILE-DRAINED LAND BY COUNTY

52% - 82% 33% - 51% 17% - 32% 07% - 16% 00% - 06%

WATER STREAMS SENSITIVE AQUIFER

LAND USE AGRICULTURAL LAND

• • • • • •

SMALL CREEKS, RIVER EXTENSIVE CROPLAND LACK OF WETLANDS POOR SOIL DRAINAGE HIGH TILE DRAINAGE PERCENTAGE SMALL COMMUNITY

• • • •

SMALL CREEKS, MAJOR RIVER DAIRY FARMS SENSITIVE AQUIFER SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT

• • • •

MAJOR RIVERS EXTENSIVE IRRIGATED CROPLAND SENSITIVE AQUIFER SMALL TO MEDIUM SIZED COMMUNITIES

• • • • • •

MAJOR RIVER EXTENSIVE CROPLAND SENSITIVE AQUIFER LACK OF WETLANDS POOR SOIL DRAINAGE HIGH TILE DRAINAGE PERCENTAGE

Images made in collaboration with Layne Knoche, Zihao Song, Wei Zeng, and Xiaodong Yang

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ing

Total dollar amount received by farmers throughout Illinois from 1986-2016 (light gray) compared to the average rental payment per acre throughout Illinois (dark grey).

28

W

ild

life

CP -

CP -2 9

CP

s

Softw

oods ‘9 2

‘ 94

’91

ative

‘90 ’89 ‘86 ’8 7 ‘88

5,000 40,000

144,000 $76,000,000 $119 per Acre

Illinois - 1987 Total Rental Payments ($1,962,899)

10,000 80,000

15,000 120,000

llinator CP-42 Po Habitat

5 ‘1 6 4 ’1

0 Acres 0 Dollars

108,000 $150,000,000 $168 per Acre

72,000 15,000,000 200,000

Illinois - 1986 Cumulative Land Enrolled (31,224 ACRES)

9

‘1 ’13

36,000 26,000,000 650,000

National - 1986 Cumulative Land Enrolled(1,929,064 ACRES)

oded 1 Flo CP-4 Wetlands Prairie

‘12

CP-1 Introduced

’0

CP-Misc*

180,000 $2,000,000 $70 per Acre

Illinois - 2016 Average Rental Payment ($167.66/ACRE)

Illinois - 1986 Average Rental Payment ($62.86/ACRE)

20,000 160,000

Illinois - 2016 Total Rental Payments ($135,941,917)

55,000 200,000

55,000 200,000

20,000 160,000

15,000 120,000

10,000 80,000

Boone Brown

rd n n lla

$2,000,000

35

$1,500,000

28

$500,000

2016

2015

2013

2014

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2005

2006

$0

Image made in collaboration with Cameron Letterly, Wei Zeng, and Nathan Burke

Lake LaSalle

Knox

$1,000,000

Total Amount Spent On Fines Each Year

Lee

Number Of Fines Each Year

48 42

Lawrence

51

Macon Logan Livingston

Gr tin e Gr ene un Ha dy mil ton Ha nc o Ha ck He r d in nd ers o He n n Iroq ry uois Jac kso Jas n per Jeffe rson Jers ey Jo D avies s Johns on Kane Kankake e Kendall

lto

Fu

Fr

an

kli

Fo

57

50

Ga

64

63

48 52

pe Po e k Pi t at Pi rry Pe ria o Pe le Og ltrie u Mo gan r ery Mo tgom n Mo e nro Mo er rc Me d nar Me n Lea Mc enry McH ugh ono McD sac Mas n Maso all Marsh Marion Madison n Macoupi

Fines In Illinois From 2005-2016

47

0 Acres 0 Dollars

Will Whiteside White Wayne Wash ington Warr en Wab ash Verm ilion Unio n Taz ewe ll Ste phe nso Sta n rk Sh elb y Sc ott Sc h Sa uyler n Sa gam lin on e St Ro Clair c k Ri Is c Ra hlan land Pu ndo d Pu tna lph las m ki

Bureau

Calhoun ll Carro Cass n paig Cham stian Chri k Clar y Cla ton Clin s le Co ok Co d for w a Cr rland e b lb m Ka t Cu De it W De las ug e Do ag P r Du dga s E rd wa am d h te E g et fin Ef Fay

$2,500,000

5,000 40,000

Woodford Winnebago Williamson

Alexander Bond

$3,500,000

Illinois - 2016 Cumulative Land Enrolled (894,391 ACRES) National - 2016 Cumulative Land Enrolled (23,884,000 ACRES)

Adams

$3,000,000

d an ml tto rees o 1B dT -3 oo CP rdw ird Ha dB lan Up ers fe 33 Buff ildli CP bitat rW s fo Ha cre A te Sta ents -38 CP ancem Enh ted truc ons 39 C CP- nds a tl We

1 ’1

CP-2 N

‘08

et W

0 ‘1

93

9 ‘00 ’01 ‘ 02 ’03 ‘04 ‘ 98 ’ 9 ’05 ’97 ‘06 ’07 ‘96

’95

d

lan

0 -3

ood

Illinois - 2016 Cumulative Land Enrolled 0 per Incentive Program in Acres 37,000,000 1,100,000

Number of acres enrolled in each program showing the most commonly used programs in Illinois.

Bu ffe r

-2 7W etla nd

CP

es Tre

CP No n 2 3 A -Flo odp lain CP Ha -25 R bita are t &D ecli n

ting

CP2 Resto 3 Wetlan d ratio n

CP-23 Wetla n Resto ration d

CP-22 Rip arian Buffers

CP-21 Filter Strips

CP-18 Salinity Reducing Vegetation

ing CP-17 Liv es Snow Fenc

is Ex

d Foo life Plots Wild

-11

r Shelte CP-16 Belts

-12

CP

lif e ild

ardw

National total land enrollment showing the trend from 1986-2016 (light gray) compared to the enrollment of just Illinois (dark gray). Since its inception the amount of land enrolled has gradually increased up until 2007, when it reached its highest enrollment.

s ay w

3A H

W or

Di

er at W

7

ss ra G

P-

s ras gG tin xis

f er at W

-8

|C

ve r Co sion nt s & ro l S Ero CP tru sio -5 ct n Fie ur ld es W ind b CP rea 4-B ks Wil dlif eC orr ido rs CP 4-D Wil dlif eH abit at

CP-3

0E -1

ow all Sh

CP

-6

CP-

CP

-9 CP

CP

ur onto s 15 C CP- ss Strip Gra

CP

Illinois Conservation Reserve Program Statistics

CRP Acres Enrolled per Year and County Fines per County in 2014 - 2016

1986 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 Fines per County 2014 - 2016

Acres Enrolled per County

Fines per each county in Illinois from 2014-2016, showing the number of fines doesn’t relate to the number of acres enrolled in each county. Acres enrolled in each county from 1986-2015, showing the largest increase in enrollment occurred between 1986 and 1990, and has since plateaued.

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This site is located in Tazewell County in Illinois. It lays between the Illinois River and an existing wetland/lake. With a limited amount of trees and vegetation throughout there is not much being done to treat runoff from the agricultural plot. By adding large buffer strips throughout the side the nitrogen and phosphorus will be removed before runoff hits the water. The existing and new wetland will be made accessible to the community. By creating a pedestrian/biking trail along the water, people will be brought closer to the water, along with a boat and fishing rental shop and fishing piers. By creating larger buffer strips and wetlands more types of wildlife will be brought into the site as well. 1 Fishing Piers

5 Bioswale

2 Buffer Strip

6 Existing Farmland

3 Wetland

7 Pedestrian/Bike Trail

4 Boat and Fishing Rental

8 Illinois River

Wetland

Opening the wetland and creating programs for the community to take advantage of.

Buffer Strip

Raised Boardwalk

Remove nitrogen and phosphorus naturally from agricultural runoff

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Runoff will flow under the path into the buffer strips, while pedestrians and bikers will have trails above.

7

6

4

1 Wetland

5 Pedestrian/Bike Trail

2 Fishing Pier

6 Buffer Strip

3 Boat and Fishing Rental

7 Illinois River

4 Existing Farmland

1

5

2

5

6 3

2

7

4

1

3

Native Wetland Plants

Species such as, sweetflag, big blue steam, cattails, buttonbush, panic grass and many others fill the wetlands to filter agricultural runoff and provide habitat.

Habitat

Wetlands are home to birds fish and other small animals.

Fishing Pier

Boardwalk for fishing, biking, and pedestrian use. With access points along the shore of the wetland, members of the community have full access to the water.

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Liquid Landscape

60 ° F

60 in

93 in

Average Annual Temperature

Source: http://www.isws.illinois.edu/

50 ° F

50 in

Sea Islands Hurricane

La. and Miss.

Unnamed Hurricane

Galveston Hurricane

Hurricane

Galveston Hurricane

Miami Hurricane

Labor Day Hurricane

Unnamed Hurricane

Heatwave

Heatwave

Blizzard

Blizzard

New England

Hurricane

Hurricane Carol

Hurricane Audrey

Blizzard

Hurricane Carla

Blizzard Hurricane Betsy

Hurricane Candy

Hurricane Agnes

Hurricane Allen

Hurricane David

77.5 in

Heatwave

Blizzard

Hurricane Hugo

Hurricane Gilbert

Blizzard

Hurricane Andrew

Hurricane Alicia

Heatwave

Hurricane Floyd

Hurricane Ike and Gustav

Heatwave Hurricane Allison

Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Irene

Polar Vortex

Chicago Atmospheric Timeline

Heatwave Heatwave

Hurricane Isabel

Hurricane Fran

Hurricane Reference Hurricane With No Direct Effect on Illinois

40 ° F

40 in

62 in

Blizzard Blizzards Greater than Category 2 Based on RSI Scale RSI Scale

30 ° F

30 in

46.5 in source: http://www.upi.com/Scale-created-to-rank-Northeast-blizzards/88481078870681/

Average Annual Precipitation

Heatwave

Source:http://w2.weather.gov/

20 ° F

20 in

Frequent Dates Averaging Over >100°F

31 in

Hurricane

Saffir-Simpson scale of 1-3

Average Annual Snowfall

Saffir-Simpson Scale

Source: www.weather.gov

10 ° F

10 in

15.5 in

0°F

0 in

0 in

1860

1893 1880

Hurricane

Saffir-Simpson scale of 4-5

1903 1900

1906

1909

1926

1915 1917 1920

Project done in collaboration with Ellen Wilson, and Joanne Chen

1935 1934

1938

1951 1940

1954

1957

1961 1960

1965

1968

1972

1981 1978 1979 1983 1980

1988 1989

1992

1996 1995

1999 2001 2003

2005

2008

2010 2012 2014 2011

source: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshws.php

source: https://www.wunderground.com

2000

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Chicago Park District

Aug

en or Ev ts tdo Ou

projects

purify water system

July

Tour Of Ozinga and Lecture 3:00pm

St or m

n io at m

n n io io at at rm fo

Ice Rink Grand Opening Info Post

Internship Information Post

Internship Information Post

Snow Competion Info Posted

Snowscape Photos Posted

Ice Rink Photos Posted

on

n

July

Participants Overall Activities

Density of Activities

Ozinga Activites Collaboration of Ozinga and Chicago River Chicago Park District Volunteers from CPS and Communities

June

Ea

Events Recap Photos Posted

Feb

C o ns t F r a u ir ct wi io th n Pr Ot Pla he o nt rC in g In Co fo ns rm tr u Fa ct ir io w n ith Pla O n th t in g In Co f ns tu O rc p en t Co Pla nt M in Be eeti Ev forengs en t

Snow Sculpture Competition 1:00pm

Jan

A

Christmas Day

Me eti ng s

Ice A ren a

Aug Internship Application Due

Skating With Santa Post

gs etin Meefore B ents Ev Halloween

SAT

Snow Sculpture Competition Sign Up

Community Planting Day 1:00pm

Snow Sc ulptu re C om pet itio Dec nI nfo rm 2080 at Int io er ns n Snow S hi culp p ture in Co fo mp r eti tio n Int 2060 In er ns form hi Snow S p culp In tur eC om p et Int i ti er 2040 ns h

Oct

Sept

FRI

Stormwater Purification Showcase

on ati rm fo on In ati rm fo In ip

THURS

Movie Night @ Amphitheater 8:30pm

on

WED

Community Planting Day 1:00pm

nt Eve re fo Be s tma ris Ch

TUES

Community Planting Day 1:00pm

Nov

DECEMBER (online) MON

Stormwater Purification Showcase

Online

April

May

SUN

SAT

Feb

Se wa ge

An important aspect to this design was community engagement. Above: Over the next 60 years the proposed activities and organizations involved will continue to grow and expand. Right: A proposed outline for online and in person activity involvement. Based on the season different events will be proposed and volunteers will be needed to engage the community.

St o

June

Mar

Movie Night @ Amphitheater 8:30pm

vents or E do ut O

invest in eco.

FRI

Ozinga Company Fair with Other Companies

te Si

citywide drainage initiative

2080

THURS

Community Planting Day 1:00pm

FB and IG Post About Movie Night

Jan

Se wa ge

Friends of Chicago River

projects

Ice A ren a

WED

r ve Ri

volunteer work

Friends of Chicago River

CPS classes

M Beeeti Eveforengs nt

water purification showcase

volunteer work

invest in eco.

Me eti ng s

Ea s Am ph

fund raising

2060

gs etine Meefornt B ve we E Hallo en

TUES

urification Initiative wi t h C h ater P icag rmw oP Sto ark nd Dis ma tric yte t eS ag on ain ati Dr rm fo of Stormwater Purific In s ation m and es yste es Init ni eS iati gr gag pa v e nw n ain om atio Dr ith m r of ns Ch nfo io ss sI ic at re nie ag og pa o m Pr ge Systemand Stor m raina Co w ns ate of D er tio s rP a ur res n m ifi atio og or ca Pr orm tio Inf ny on pa ati m rm fo In g

fund raising

CPS classes

2040

class programs

Competition lpture Sho Scu wc as e

field trips

CPS classes

Sn ow sc ap e

Co ns tr

se owca n Sh itio pet om eC tur ulp Sc Competition Showcase ture culp &S

AP classes

Sn ow sc

MON Community Planting Day Meeting

&

clubs

class programs

2060

Sept

nt Eve re fo s Be tma ris Ch

field trips

class programs

Ozinga Concrete Company

Ozinga Concrete Company

SUN

on cti tru ns Co

clubs

2040

Ozinga Concrete Company

MAY (in person)

Dec

Sn ow sc ap e

2080

& on cti tru ns Co

clubs

Chicago Public Schools

Oct

open company

open company

open company

n tio uc

Chicago Public Schools

companies

companies

e ap

Chicago Public Schools

field trips

workshops

n io

workshops

Nov

m

workshops

Community Engagement Strategies

In Person

fair with other

fair with other

Before Eve nt ngs eti Me Summe ra nd er ter st itea ph

AP classes

Inter nsh ip

development

AP classes

purify water system

internship program

ibit Interns nies Exh ompa hip tem er C ies and City Pa ys Oth ommunit rks ith nS te, C tio ir w n Si Fa go ica n rif nti Exhibit Pla Pu stem er y s ie n a at nS Intern r Comp w tio ship Othe ica ith rif Communiti ir w Pu es Site and Fa er g on at ntin w Pla rm

plant strategy

pany Com en Op te g on Si ntin Pla

volunteer work

sponge surface install

gs Before Ev e n t etin Me Summ er an r te d r ate ite

plant strategy

development

Mar

April

May

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A’

Prarie Mound

Walking Path

Prarie Mound

Sunken Path

Vertical Axis Turbine

A”

Prarie Mound

Walking Path

Prarie Mound

Sunken Path

Prarie Mound Vertical Axis Turbine

Vertical Axis Turbine

A”

B’

Walking Path Ground Lighting

Lamp Post

Ground Lighting

B”

0

This site was once a steel mill in the north branch industrial corridor of Chicago, IL. After deciding to remove all previous manufacturing from the site, we were then able to turn this space into a teaching tool for local high school students and a testing site for a local concrete company. By having an amphitheater along the Chicago river with a clear view of the downtown skyline, there would be opportunity for community engagement. 10


5. Water Outlet 4. Gravel and Stone Filtration

Windmill Energy Strategy

3. Plant Filtration 2. Rock Filtration 1. Water Inlet

5. Electricity Outflow

Water Outlet

6. Sidewalk

4. Underground Electric Generator

3. Stored Wind Energy Turning into Electricity 2. Wind Mill

1. Wind Flow Throughout Site 5. Purification Pond #2

4. Sidewalk 3. Purification Pond #1 2. Shallow Marsh 1. Detention Pond

Water Inlet

Underground Electric Generator

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Stormwater Purification Strategy 6. Purfied Water Outflow 5. Underground Water Basin 4. Wetland Basin 3. Wetland Basin

Stormwater is a large issue on this site, especially with it being along the Chicago River. To deal with this issue, we have designed wetlands on a large area of the site that will collect, then filter the water into an underground system to be used again. These wetlands are also great to help show students what stormwater is and how it works. On the left is a diagram showing how the underground system will work to filter the water.

2. Shallow Marsh 1. Retention Ponds

Surface Layer

Stormwater Infiltration

Inflow from Chicago River

Underground Layer

Purifed Water Retention Basin

Outflow to Chicago River

13 Adjacent Neighborhoods


Montessori Naturescape Playscapes are designed with the intent of bringing children and people back to nature. By creating a playscape with more elements of the natural environment we can strive to achieve this goal. The first issue to be addressed is the drainage issue that the site is dealing with. The soil in the area is made up mostly of clay and the water has nowhere to drain. By berming the area up around 5’ this will force the water to run down and into the new drains placed around the base that will be tiled into the existing french drain on site. This also will create a new place for the children to play and explore.

New Fence Trees To Be Limbed Up 3-4’

Sedum (TYP) Music Corner

1

To Be Removed Four Square Court

Flagstone Steppers Swingset (TYP)

Tulip Tree Switchgrass (TYP) Daylily (TYP)

Hydrangea (TYP) Slide (TYP) Berm (TYP)

Red Maple

New Drain (TYP)

Karl Foerster (TYP)

4’

5’

Outcropping Steps (TYP) Shade Canopy (TYP)

Climbing Rocks (TYP)

Aster (TYP)

Climbing Logs (TYP)

Reading Corner

Swamp Milkweed (TYP)

Viburnum (TYP)

4

Planter Boxes To Be Relocated

2 Shasta Daisy (TYP)

3

Boxwood (TYP)

Arborvitae (TYP)

Black Eyed Susan (TYP)

Karl Foerster (TYP)

5

To Be Removed

Privet (TYP)

6’ 5’ 4’ 3’ 2’ 1’

5

6’ 5’ 4’ Rudbeckia Black Eyed Susan

Calamagrostis Karl Foerster Grass

3’ 2’ 1’

6’

4

5’ 4’ 3’ 2’ 1’

3

Rudbeckia Black Eyed Susan

Leucanthemum Shasta Daisy

Buxus Boxwood

Thuja occidentalis Emerald Arborvitae

Viburnum dentatum Viburnum

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New Fence

Upper Left: Shaded site plan showing existing and proposed shade trees. Lower Left: Proposed music corner. Outdoor drums and keyboard painted on the ground for the children to explore and learn. Bottom Right: Labyrinth maze using flagstone set in soil surrounded by grasses to create a new type of play space for the children to enjoy.

Trees To Be Limbed Up 3-4’

Sedum (TYP) Music Corner

To Be Removed Four Square Court

Flagstone Steppers Swingset (TYP)

Tulip Tree Switchgrass (TYP) Daylily (TYP)

Hydrangea (TYP)

Red Maple

Berm (TYP)

New Drain (TYP)

Karl Foerster (TYP)

Slide (TYP) 4’

5’

Outcropping Steps (TYP) Shade Canopy (TYP) Reading Corner

Climbing Rocks (TYP)

Aster (TYP)

Climbing Logs (TYP)

Swamp Milkweed (TYP)

Viburnum (TYP) Planter Boxes To Be Relocated

Shasta Daisy (TYP) Boxwood (TYP)

Arborvitae (TYP)

Black Eyed Susan (TYP)

Karl Foerster (TYP) To Be Removed

Privet (TYP)

Tulip Tree

Irregular FLagstone Steppers

Northwind Switch Grass

15


Drawings from the Landscape

16


Left Sheet: University of Illinois Campus focus on metal textures. Upper Left: Focus on how metal interacts with water. (Work in collaboration with Ellen Wilson, Becky Du, and Wei Zeng). Bottom Right: Martha Schwartz, Splice Garden, my interpretation.

17


Route 66 Re-envisioned

In this design studio my group of six members focused on Route 66, running from downtown Springfield, IL to Sherman, IL. This route is part of the larger road

stretching from Chicago, IL to Santa Monica, CA. The length of the road in our design scope is about 9.5 miles in total. This road passes through a very urban downtown, a medical district, many low income neighborhoods, and the Sangamon River.

Project done in collaboration with Yi Yang, Zihao Song, Layne Knoche, Lok Tim Chan, and Kexin Tang

18


A large part of my individual site analysis was looking at the social and economic divide in the area. This map shows the racial divide and the divide of income along the route. We can see that Route 66 itself is almost the dividing line between the different social and economic classes. After observing this data we then found zones for design potential.

19


Left: A developed master plan for the route highlighting six zones to be further designed. ZONE 6

ZONE 5

Right: Zoomed in images of each zone showing green space distribution. As well as composite axons showing design concepts for each zone.

ZONE 4

ZONE 3

ZONE 2

ZONE 1 FEATURE DESIGN ZONES

INDUSTRIAL-UTILITY

MASTER PLAN LEGEND

COMMERCIAL

OFFICE-SERVICE

HIGH DENSITY

LOW DENSITY

PARKS HISTORIC ROUTE 66

20


Below is showing a section cut, site plan, and a perspective for zone 3 specifically. This zone is in a low income neighborhood with three empty lots. Pollinator pockets and a bioswale will help to integrate ecology back into the area. Creating trails and places to sit and gather will help connect people of the community and surrounding areas.

LEGEND TRAIL ROUTE 66 BUILDING OLD TREES NEW TREES FOREST WATER BODIES GRASS ROAD PAVING BIOSWALE POLLINATOR POCKET STATUE BENCH FACILITIES

21


A Campus Teaching Tool

22


In the redesign of Wright Street on the University of Illinois campus, there will be major changes, including cutting out lanes of bus traffic, expanding and designating a bike path, and placing a bioswale down the middle of the street. These changes will turn the street into a teaching tool for many classes to study, and will make the street safer and more open to pedestrians while still allowing bus traffic to pass through.

23


Garden of Anticipation

The theme for the 2015 Chaumont-sur-Loire Garden Festival was Gardens of the Future. This garden drawn is showing a garden of anticipation. The space allows guests to anticipate what is behind every curtain, and around every turn. Anticipation is always around us, and this garden exemplifies that concept. If you choose one door, you will always be wondering what is on the other side, and if you are missing something. This design consists of water and fire behind one curtain and anticipation behind another. With a mix of green space and different ground textures one experiences a garden of the future.

24


In the model image on the right you are able to see the question posed to visitors, “What Are You Missing?� A question to get guests thinking deeper and understand what gardens of the future is about.

25


Site Evolving

Covered Event Space

Restaurant with Green Roof

Retaining Wall

Patio Parking Lot

Overflow Parking

Inn/Event Center

Retention Pond

Project done in collaboration with Jackie Carmona

Rain Garden

26


This site has been redesigned to deal with drainage issues and to accommodate larger events and parties. After adding a road, additional parking, In the first section cut you can see a very small slope because of all the hard surfaces we designed. building The slope is 2% max. Shown is the restaurant andwe patiowere we designed, structures, and trees, ablethetoparking lot, and the space for overflow parking on the east side of the site, and on the west is regradethethe the road surrounding site. site to fix drainage issues. In the second section cut you can see a much large slope from the area that was not graded for hard surfaces. The slope is around 13% max in these areas. Shown is the road to the north, the parking lot, and the rain garden attached to the southern edge of the parking lot.

A Road

Patio

Parking Lot

Overflow Parking

B Road

Parking Lot Section Cuts April Pitts, Jackie Carmona

University of Illinois Landscape Architecture Grading Plan

Rain Garden

27


Open Campus Seating

28


Design of seating structure for open quad. Wooden benches raised by a gabion wall, with room for raised plantings between the two benches. Bottom Left, and Top Right: Model showing structure above and below grade. Bottom Right: Dimensions of bench and types of plantings to be used in the bed. Master plan consists of two identical seating structures evenly spaced along an existing walking path for easy maintenance.

29


Professional Works 2017 Summer Internship Woodstock, IL

On week two of my internship I was taken to an initial client meeting in Arlington Heights. The homeowner had just moved into a newly constructed home and wanted to upgrade the yard. She went over her vision for the space and an initial budget. After drafting up a design I went with my supervisor to present the project.

The first design (above) the client loved but was more than they could spend at this time. After going back to the drawing board I came up with a new design to propose. (Left) Shortly after construction began. It took the crews around two and a half weeks before the project was completed. I was able to travel to the site daily to check up on the crew’s work and shadow the production manager. After the project was complete I took the client on a final walk through. They were extremely happy with the final product.

30


This site is located in the home owner’s back yard surrounded by woods. The area collects storm water and has nowhere to drain. The proposed plan (Right, rendered by A Hinderholtz) shows the bottom grade being raised up and dry creek beds connecting the main water entry points to slow down flow. Once water flows into the creek beds it will be pushed towards a new drain so the base won’t collect water. Also proposed is a flagstone patio at the base and new birch trees, as well as a natural seed wildflower mix to surround the area. Perspective (below) shows all major aspects of the site.

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After presenting a new patio for the homeowners backyard additional changes were made to create a separate space with a fire pit. The client required extra section diagrams to show scale and height of seat walls. There also is a large amount of detail going into both spaces when it comes to a soldier course and extra banding to accent the brick. (Upper Right) Extra section designs to give the customer a better feel and understanding of the space. (Lower Right) Example images of the materials proposed.

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A few of the many hand drawings worked on over the summer. For each of the three projects shown, the existing beds were measured up during a site survey then hand drawings were done and presented to the clients.

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April L Pitts  
April L Pitts  
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