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Issue 21 | April 2018

Our monster Horse of the Year wrap up

Ashleigh McLean FEI WORLD CHALLENGE LINE UP

NI Festival of Future Stars Preview


EDITORIAL

FROM THE EDITOR WELCOME TO ISSUE TWENTY ONE OF THE DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN

The DressageNZ Bulletin is the official magazine of Dressage NZ - a discipline of Equestrian Sports NZ

Editor: Wendy Hamerton E: dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz Design and Production: www.snaffledesign.co.nz Graphic Design Sales & Advertising: Sarah Gray Email: sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz Copyright © Snaffle Design and Dressage NZ 2018 Cover Image: John Thompson and JHT Antonello Photo Credit: Libby Law Back Image: Wendi Williamson and Dejavu MH Photo Credit: Libby Law

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Change is in the air. There is so much we take for granted and perhaps do not fully appreciate what really goes on behind the scenes in our sport. This applies at both local and national level, and this week I have been following a number of threads on Facebook. Good old Facebook. A wealth of information and misinformation! One topic that particularly took my eye was that of local group membership. The question was asked “What value is it to me being a member of my local group?” The general thought process seems to have been “Well I can compete without being a member of my local group so what’s the point?” Let’s take this a step further. Who organizes the competition? The local group of course... If members do not see any value in contributing to their local group, the next step is... no local group = no competition. So for riders asking themselves about the value of being a member and contributing to your local area group – that’s it in a nutshell really. Local groups need your support in order that you may continue to have a competition to go to. Most people who have horses are time poor for one reason or another. But if everyone who wants to compete can contribute something, our sport will continue to thrive. If competitors get more involved then perhaps you can to start to make a bigger difference about the things you would like to change, and ongoing discussions about the calendar is a good example of that. Perhaps it’s not what can your local group do for you – it’s what you can do for your group to ensure you continue to have competitions. The event management environment has changed hugely over the past few years – gone are the days of putting up an arena and assuming nothing will go wrong. There are Health & Safety requirements, legal and financial considerations, more demands for better facilities… the list goes on. I started with change is in the air.. The end of the financial year will see the retirement of Sara Bright as Finance Officer extraordinaire on the Dressage NZ Board. Her contribution to the sport has been enormous. Thank you Sara from us all. We look forward to continuing to see you at events in your other role as scoring super star. National Championships Event Manager Celine Filbee has also called time. Celine has been instrumental in taking the event to a new level over many years. To increase sponsorship and support of our sport our events need to provide the means to entertain and offer an “event experience” not just for competitors but for sponsors, owners, supporters and fans. A lot to think about….


CONTENTS

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6

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16

CONTENT

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6

WE REMEMBER DEJAVU MH

ASHLEIGH MCLEAN

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FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE

MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH

A salute to the national sweetheart and dressage star DJ...

We head south to Wanaka to catch up with Ashleigh and her new mount San Tiero...

We reveal the starter list...

Your horses diet now that the days are shorter...

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37

38

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HOY 2018

SOUTH ISLAND TEAM

SERIES LEADERBOARDS

WHAT'S ON

The show that was, Jess Roberts covers all of the levels and title winners...

Set for round two at the U25 Dressage Championships...

Who, what where? we cover the final results of the Zilco leaderboard...

The calender of upcoming events on the NZL dressage circuit...


IN MEMORIAM

DÉJÀ VU MH THE FINAL HALT AND SALUTE

I

t is a privilege to have managed, trained and competed such a huge hearted, generous and special, “once in a life time” horse”. DJ brought power, energy and a sense of excitement to the competition arena. Travelling DJ to Europe to compete on the international stage was an experience and challenge that I am forever grateful for” Sadly his career, which was really only in its early days as a thirteen year old international Grand Prix horse, came to a halt over the Easter break when he suffered another bout of colic. He came to prominence at Grand Prix level in 2016 and quickly gave notice to the sport that they were not there to make up numbers. Here was the handsome black horse, oozing his own charisma, combined with spectacular movement and natural talent for piaffe and passage, all so elegantly presented by Wendi – he was the total package. He travelled thousands of kilometres and took NZ dressage and breeding to the world. He was the first NZL representative at the FEI World Cup Final in 2017, and although they did not progress to the Freestyle, the dressage world was

aware of what was happening down under. The same year he won the Burkner Medal for the NZ Grand Prix Championship. Wendi’s husband Jon also had a special bond with this horse. In his younger days DJ was described as being a bit “feral”. He wasn’t altogether easy at events early in his career and Jon was often on the end of a lead rope preventing an impromptu escape. This led to a relationship between the pair that existed throughout DJ’s lifetime so Jon also feels a huge sense of loss. It was all about team. “DJ suffered with colic his whole life but this time he just couldn’t improve” and so it became a heartbreaking decision for Wendi and Jon to make when it became clear that if he was to have any chance, he would have to undergo further colic surgery. “But we couldn’t do that to him again”. And he was put to rest – the final halt and salute. Thank you to Matthews Hanoverians for breeding this wonderful horse. Thank Team Williamson for the inspiration that you bought to our sport through your avid performances and adventures with DJ.

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4 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018

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New Zealand Grand Prix rider Wendi Williamson had to say goodbye to her number one mount, Dejavu MH. The 13-year old New Zealand bred Hanoverian succumbed to colic on 2 April 2018.


IN MEMORIAM

Photo: Astrid Appels

Wendi and DJ captured hearts and realised dreams during their FEI World Cup Final performance in 2017

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 5


RIDER PROFILE

FATE INTERVENES FOR

Ashleigh McLean

A single lesson with German licensed dressage trainer Maggie Broekman back in 2013 was a defining moment in Ashleigh McLean’s dressage destiny.

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M

aggie was based in the USA and had been convinced she should come and teach in NZL back in 2011, albeit she admits “New Zealand was never on the list of places I absolutely had to visit. It’s rather remote, and for me—a German-born dressage trainer who has been living and working in Southern California for the past 20 years—it always seemed kind of remote, and in no way a nexus of equestrian sport”. But her thinking was to change and she fell in love with beautiful natural terrain and many other aspects of our equestrian lifestyle and wide range of horses we were breeding. Ashleigh attended a clinic in Queenstown and after just the first lesson, Maggie offered her a position as her ‘assistant’ in the US. “I stopped competing after that lesson and decided to take myself and my horse to all of her clinics in the South Island so I could learn as much as possible as I couldn’t afford to do competitions as well as clinics” In June 2014 after she finished school, Ashleigh was soon on a US bound flight to base with Maggie at the biggest Friesian horse stud in North America. She had the opportunity to train and compete there under Maggie’s tutelage as well as perform on the farm’s top stallions at the Equine Affair events held in Massachusetts and Ohio. She was given the ride a stallion (Folbert) to

RIDER PROFILE prepare for the stallion testing and then had the amazing opportunity to ride him for the performance testing itself where he scored 9’s & 9.5’s for the dressage and jumping phases “It was a very cool experience”! When Maggie sustained an injury while breaking in a youngster and needed to go home to LA to recuperate, Ashleigh ended up staying on at the stud for an additional year and then accepted a job in the UK with Nicola McGivern, European Champs bronze medalist and Athens Olympian. But before she headed off to the UK, she decided to visit Maggie in LA for some more training and this is where the story really begins. “Maggie had imported a 5yo Oldenburg gelding, San Tiero (Sir Donnerhall II /Haupstutbuch Finestra/Londonderry) from Germany. From the very first moment I sat on him I knew he was special and felt an instant connection with him that I’d never felt before with any horse. I had the biggest smile on my face, I’d never ridden a horse with so much power yet so balanced. Sadly I had to leave him and Maggie for the UK but I never forgot what it felt riding him - and never felt that on any other horse since. I was originally intending on basing myself in England long term and making my career over there. Maggie and I even talked about sending San Tiero over to the UK yard for me to train and compete. Sadly this was never was able to happen. I just had to accept the fact that it just wasn’t meant to be as Maggie was also intending to sell him. Ten months into my UK stint, my whole life plan came crashing down after I dislocated my right knee and I was forced to return home to have a knee reconstruction. I was pretty much ready to throw in the towel at that point and give up on my Olympic dreams after the heartbreaks and disappointments overseas. During my nine month rehab I had to seriously re-evaluate my life. I realized that I didn’t want to go back overseas but this pesky voice at the back of my head kept telling me that San Tiero, Maggie and I needed to be APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 7


RIDER NATIONAL PROFILE NEWS

Ashleigh attended a clinic in Queenstown and after just the first lesson, Maggie offered her a position as her ‘assistant’ in the US. “I stopped competing after that lesson and decided to take myself and my horse to all of her clinics in the South Island so I could learn as much as possible as I couldn’t afford to do competitions as well as clinics” In June 2014 after she finished school, Ashleigh was soon on a US bound flight to base with Maggie at the biggest Friesian horse stud in North America. She had the opportunity to train and compete there under Maggie’s tutelage as well as perform on the farm’s top stallions at the Equine Affair events held in Massachusetts and Ohio. She was given the ride a stallion (Folbert) to prepare for the stallion testing and then had the amazing opportunity to ride him for the performance testing itself where he scored 9’s & 9.5’s for the dressage and jumping phases “It was a very cool experience”! When Maggie sustained an injury while breaking in a youngster 8 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018

and needed to go home to LA to recuperate, Ashleigh ended up staying on at the stud for an additional year and then accepted a job in the UK with Nicola McGivern, European Champs bronze medalist and Athens Olympian. But before she headed off to the UK, she decided to visit Maggie in LA for some more training and this is where the story really begins. “Maggie had imported a 5yo Oldenburg gelding, San Tiero (Sir Donnerhall II /Haupstutbuch Finestra/Londonderry) from Germany. From the very first moment I sat on him I knew he was special and felt an instant connection with him that I’d never felt before with any horse. I had the biggest smile on my face, I’d never ridden a horse with so much power yet so balanced. Sadly I had to leave him and Maggie for the UK but I never forgot what it felt riding him - and never felt that on any other horse since. I was originally intending on basing myself in England long term and making my career over there. Maggie and I even

talked about sending San Tiero over to the UK yard for me to train and compete. Sadly this was never was able to happen. I just had to accept the fact that it just wasn’t meant to be as Maggie was also intending to sell him. Ten months into my UK stint, my whole life plan came crashing down after I dislocated my right knee and I was forced to return home to have a knee reconstruction. I was pretty much ready to throw in the towel at that point and give up on my Olympic dreams after the heartbreaks and disappointments overseas. During my nine month rehab I had to seriously re-evaluate my life. I realized that I didn’t want to go back overseas but this pesky voice at the back of my head kept telling me that San Tiero, Maggie and I needed to be a team and we needed to be here in Wanaka. I called Maggie to voice all my thoughts after stewing over it all for months. Throughout it all Maggie had always remained my friend and mentor even when I was no longer working with her, and throughout


NATIONAL NEWS all the years when things had fallen apart overseas she had always suggested that maybe I’m not meant to be over there right now and to reconsider setting something up back home in NZ. She was pretty shocked when I told her my thoughts, because as it turned out she had been quietly wishing the whole time that I would take San Tiero back to New Zealand and that we could all be a team here!” While Ashleigh was rehabbing after knee surgery, Maggie was rehabbing from spine surgery. San Tiero had been sent to a sales barn but it didn’t work out. He was returned home to Maggie with some issues to be sorted. “Long story short – it was an absolute disaster” says Ashleigh and she was on another plane back to the US to ride him again as soon as she was fit enough. “Despite everything he threw at us in those ten days, I still felt the same connection with him and Maggie and I still believed wholeheartedly in him. So we took a gamble and flew him out to NZ in October last year. Since he has been in NZ, he has been a different horse. It has been the most rewarding risk I have taken and we are so excited for his future. 2020 Olympics are in our sights. We believe in our team and despite the fact that we have a lot of work to do over the next two years, we know we have made the right decision taking the chance to try. With the exciting developments that are happening in Wanaka and Queenstown in the equestrian world, it certainly has made us confident we are on the right path. We have our first competition together in April, which will actually be his first ever competition, so I’m very excited that I can debut him with Maggie here in New Zealand. Maggie has absolutely changed my life and I owe her everything. She was the one who got my foot in the door overseas, has always been there over the years even when I wasn’t working under her and never stopped believing in me and encouraging me when I was ready to give up. She has gifted me San Tiero to give me the opportunity to achieve my dream and I don’t believe I could ever repay her for everything she has done for me”

NZ FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE - SELECTED RIDERS CLASS 1: EXCLUSIVELY YOUR’S YOUTH Mackenzie Sim Rebecca Aplin Meila Picard Bella Small Alyssa Harrison Isabella Chatfield Tayla McDonald Emma Dunderdale Res 1: Sachleen Kaur

Pioneer North East Woodlads Park Light O Day Buckton Denniston Kingslea Busy Bee Da Vinci Code AD Dennache Don Qudos Alonzo Fanticy HPH Levitate

CLASS 2. EQUISSAGE SENIOR I Gaylene Lennard Zoie Grey Brina Carpenter Hannah Burden Madison Schollum Renee Etherington Tessa Van Bruggen Rachel Stock Ellen Mitchell Rebecca Donovan Brooke Harris

Jax Johnson FIS Santo Plutonium Lady Decadance MH Kinnordy Golda BL All By Chance Fiorenza HPH Benedict or Chuck Taylor Donnerstar CDS Antoinette Furstango

CLASS 3. RIVER PARK FARM SENIOR II Christine Weal Jacqui Thompson Anna Gale Jayna Dinneen Alison Addis Debra Cowen Belinda Caminada Henrike Puketapu

Schindlers Liszt Galileo Walk the Line Sansibar Whistledown Kristopha Double Magic Donatello MH Alexander M

CLASS 4. SYNCROFLEX PRIX ST GEORGES Vanessa Way Melissa Galloway Lucarne Dolley Julie Flintoff Catherine Tobin Alicia Zeludko Christine Weal Paula Brown Chanel Flyger Liz Hutson

NSC Pronto Windermere JObei W Ardmore Belladonna MH Bradgate Riot Act Leo Donna Stoneylea Lord Locksley Vollrath Le Vivre Hot Chocolate MH Hapsburg PSH

CLASS 5. LIVAMOL INTERMEDIATE I Victoria Wall Vanessa Way Kieryn Walton Franzi Van Bruggen Mandy Littlejohn Lucarne Dolley

Letty Lei EDH NRM KH Arion Rosari Don Carlos Fortunato Sparks Will Fly Devils Chocolate

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 9


NATIONAL NEWS

IT'S ALL ABOUT THE FUTURE 19/22 April | Fiber Fresh National Equestrian Centre - Taupo Photo by Eye Witness Images

T

he original initiative was to quite simply to run the Livamol FEI World Dressage Challenge in the autumn alongside the U25 Championships to maximise resources but the event has morphed into something much bigger. It’s now become a four day juggling act including a luminary line up of four to seven year olds in the Elite Equine Nutrition Young Horse & Pony classes, a field of nine Grand Prix combinations in the Way to WEG CDI 3* supporting our WEG riders campaign and featuring the Equine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Centre Grand Prix on Thursday, Grand Prix Special on Saturday and Freestyle on Sunday. A strong field of 43 combinations in the Livamol FEI WDC, add to this a 25% increase and record entries for the Equestrian Entries Under 25 Championships and it’s like a giant puzzle with four different events and 230 horses and ponies converging on the Fiber Fresh Taupo NEC. The new indoor arena will be used throughout the four days.

TIMETABLE THURSDAY: CDI 3* and FEI WDC Horse Inspections Equine Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Centre Grand Prix Round 1 Future Stars

FRIDAY: Livamol FEI World Dressage Challenge Round 2 Future Stars

SATURDAY: CDI 3* Grand Prix Special Equestrian Entries U25 Championships

SUNDAY: CDI 3* Grand Prix Freestyle Equestrian Entries U25 Championships

Go to www.equestrianentries for rider times and more news on the website www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage and Dressage NZ Facebook page. 10 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018


NATIONAL NEWS

NEWS 2018 DRESSAGE NZ PLANNING FORUM The Planning Forum will receive remits for rule changes and other topics for discussion. Remits which are passed at the Forum will go back to areas and come forward again to conference for ratification. A link to the Remits can be found here https://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/disciplines/dressage/resources/member-information/

2018 DRESSAGE CONFERENCE & COMMITTEE MEETING The 2018 Dressage Conference & Committee meeting will be held at the Distinction Palmerston North Hotel (Cuba St) on 30th June & 1st July Conference will begin at 9.30am on Saturday followed by the Awards Dinner. Committee meeting will commence 9am Sunday and complete no later than 3.45pm. Booking details to follow.

DRESSAGE NZ BOARD APPOINTMENTS & ELECTIONS 2018

DRESSAGE NZ NATIONAL JUDGES OFFICER & JUDGES SUB-COMMITTEE The role of Judges Officer PD 2018 is available by election for a three year term. Sue Hobson has completed her two year tenure 2016-18 and is eligible to stand for a further three year term. Sue has indicated her availability for re-election. The link to the National Judges Officer Position Description https://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/DNZ-Finance-Officer-PD-2018.pdf

A Nomination form can be downloaded here https://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/disciplines/dressage/resources/member-information/

There are no vacancies by rotation on the Judges SubCommittee in 2018. Linda Warren-Davey is scheduled to stand down by rotation in 2019 and Judith Cunningham in 2020. This procedure as outlined in the Terms of Reference assists succession planning and continuity of expertise.

FINANCE OFFICER – POSITION APPOINTED TO THE DRESSAGE NZ BOARD

NORTH ISLAND YOUNG RIDER ISLAND CONVENOR

Do you know someone with a passion for Dressage, accounting qualifications & skills and some time and expertise to dedicate to Dressage NZ? The position of Finance Officer for Dressage NZ becomes available by rotation at the beginning of the financial year (1 June 2018) Sara Bright who has given the sport many years of outstanding service in the role has indicated she will not be seeking reappointment for a further three year term. The good news is, we will still see her at key events in the role of Scorer Extraordinaire. The current Position Description can be found at

Owing to increased work commitments, Jo Telfer has advised that she will not be seeking reappointment as NI Young Rider Convenor for 2018. This is a rewarding role working with the pony and young riders, organising young rider training camps, being involved with the Under 25 Championships and working with the Dressage NZ Performance Committee. For further information please contact Judy Alderdice, Chair of the Performance Committee j-alderdice@xtra.co.nz

https://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/DNZ-Finance-Officer-PD-2018.pdf

The PD and terms may possibly be subject to variation and therefore any persons interested in part or in whole of the role should express an interest. Enquiries can be made to the Chair, Lynda Clark dressagechair@nzequestrian.org.nz in the first instance, to the Dressage Sport Manager dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz  or to the current Finance Officer bright.sara@xtra.co.nz

IMPORTANT REMINDER FOR RIDER & OC’S FEI TESTS From 1/1/2018, all FEI tests, whether ridden under Dressage NZ national rules or FEI rules at CDI events will use the FEI version valid 1/1/2018. These can be downloaded at no cost from http://inside.fei.org/fei/your-role/organisers/dressage/tests The only exception to any directive on the tests, is that when run under Dressage NZ rules, a permitted snaffle bridle may be used instead of a double bridle. APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 11


IN MEMORIAM Prestige Equestrian Dressage Futures 2016, L to R: Massimo Bertola, Export Manager Prestige Italia from Italy, Susan Tomlin with her new Prestige Dressage saddle, Laurence O’Toole Director

A TRIBUTE TO..... LAURENCE O’TOOLE

- a passionate supporter of our sport Laurence had a vision to support the future of Dressage NZ. The Prestige Equestrian Dressage Futures Series developed from this vision and the winner’s prize, a brand new Prestige Dressage saddle, became the target of riders across New Zealand.

L

aurence recognised that it wasn’t just about rewarding riders who had already become successful in their chosen discipline. He wanted to inspire and encourage the hardworking rider who maybe didn’t have a lot of resources to improve, to aim high, to set goals they thought may be forever beyond their reach. The absolute delight he showed when at the 2017 Horse of the Year Show, he presented the saddle to Lorraine Ward-Smith from South Canterbury

was something to remember. Lorraine had made the long journey to Hastings with a float in tow and was sleeping in a tent. At the presentation she said “I could never ever afford to buy this sort of kit for my horse. It’s the first new saddle I have ever owned”. That said it all really. That day epitomised his vision. He loved to chat about training horses, about dressage judging, about all things equestrian. His keen interest spanned all the Olympic disciplines and he was incredibly proud of all “his” riders. As you

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chatted to him, you could not help but realise his depth of knowledge and passion to see equestrian sport in New Zealand prosper. Laurence was sadly taken from us too soon, just two weeks after the Horse of the Year Show where he had been again advocating strongly for “middle earth” equestrians, making sure there was some inspiration and encouragement for all levels of riders. Dressage NZ offers deepest sympathy to his wife Stephanie, their son Nicholas, and wider family.


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MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH

Your Mitavite Question of the Month FEEDING TIPS FOR THOSE SHORTER DAYS WHERE TRAINING IS REDUCED. QUESTION FROM LUCA SWALE (QUEENSTOWN): "Daylight saving has ended and it makes it just that much more difficult to keep my horse in regular work. She has built up nicely over the season and I’d like to maintain this condition through the winter without overfeeding and causing other problems – such as too much energy and galloping around the paddock. Can you suggest what I can feed him please and still have her looking great?" ANSWER FROM DR CATHERINE DUNNETT BSC, PHD, R.NUTR CONSULTANT NUTRITIONIST TO MITAVITE: egular riding and training performs an important function in terms of muscle development. Muscle is made up from amino acids arranged into muscle protein. Muscle protein turns over slowly, as part of a damage and repair cycle that occurs continuously through life and the process of exercise training increases micro damage. It is important that repair processes keep pace with ongoing micro damage to maintain muscle mass and function. Exercise is one of the most potent stimulators of muscle protein synthesis and so helps to maintain muscle integrity. This is easy to appreciate in horses on box rest or limited exercise where top line often declines, as muscle mass decreases. Diet too has a part to play in maintaining muscle form and function, as it delivers those important amino acids needed as building blocks for

R

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DO YOU HAVE A QUERY REGARDING THE CARE, MAINTENANCE OR TRAINING OF YOUR DRESSAGE HORSE? Go to the DressageNZ Bulletin Facebook page and submit your training questions. One question will be selected and sent to one of our participating coaches to answer for you! The winning question will receive a bag of Mitavite feed!

Thank you Mitavite – for supporting Dressage NZ Congratulations Luca!


MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH

Luca Swale and Everton Hara Z

muscle protein synthesis. There are also particular amino acids including L-leucine, which may help stimulate muscle protein synthesis. Ensuring that your feed provides good quality protein with a horse appropriate balance of amino acids is key. And, of course the protein contained within feed ingredients must be easily digested and in this respect cooked ingredients will enhance this digestibility. During periods of reduced work, it is important to match energy intake and output accordingly and this may mean a reduction in feed. Access to pasture or forage should always be maintained and not reduced as a first step, as this allows a horse to eat and behave as nature intended. Instead, any reduction in feed should be made from the concentrate portion of the diet. This may simply mean a reducing the quantity fed of a concentrate feed, or in some cases it may require switching to a more concentrated product. The key information here, is the level at which your current feed is designed to be fed and as long as you are feeding at or higher than the minimum recommended intake that’s ok. If on the other hand, you find that reducing your feed to accommodate the reduction in exercise takes you under the minimum recommended amount, then a more concentrated feed makes sense. This is important to ensure adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals are supplied by the diet.

"...Diet too has a part to play in maintaining muscle form and function, as it delivers those important amino acids needed as building blocks for muscle protein synthesis."

As the days shorten, access to pasture is also likely to reduce and not only will this influence energy and protein intake, but will also reduce the intake of healthy omega 3 fatty acids and vitamin K1. Green pasture is a rich source of vitamin K 1 and Linolenic acid. Linoleic acid is a parent omega 3 fatty acid that can be slowly converted to the metabolically active longer chain omega 3 fatty acids, such as DHA and EPA. These longer chain omega 3 fatty acids have an important role to play in moderating inflammation in the body and maintaining various body systems including the respiratory system and immunity. Ingredients such as linseed and canola have a higher linolenic acid content and some algae and oils such as salmon oil are a naturally rich source of DHA and EPA. Horses that have less access to actively growing green pasture and spend more time stabled have been shown to have a lower circulating level of activated osteocalcin, which is essential deposition of calcium into bone appropriately, which is paramount to maintaining bone density and strength in working horses. The key activating micronutrient is vitamin K 1, which is found in fresh green growing pasture. Unfortunately, cut forage as hay or haylage has a very low level of vitamin K 1 as it is very sensitive to light and decomposes rapidly. It is possible to counteract this by providing a supplemental form

stabilized form of K1, which is not the synthetic K3 form found in most feeds and supplements. In summary, the shorter days and longer periods of stabling for competition horses may require some adjustment to both the energy intake and nutrient balance of the diet, which I have summarised below. • Maintain adequate forage intake. • Reduce concentrate feed if less feed is required to maintain condition. • Check whether a more concentrated feed is needed at this time • Choose a feed that delivers quality protein that is digestible and delivers an appropriate balance of amino acids • Consider supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids and vitamin K1 to offset that lost from pasture. MITAVITE TIPS 1. Mitavite Munga and Athlete are both concentrated feeds designed to deliver quality protein and plenty of vitamins and minerals within a lower daily intake. 2. Performa 3 Oil – delivers omega 3 fatty acids including DHA and EPA 3. Bonafide – Patented form of vitamin K1 to support bone strength and integrity in stabled horses and especially when actively growing green pasture is lacking.

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 15


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

Super models and super talents; NSC Pronto and HP Fresco

Text Photo: Libby Law Photography

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

HOY 2018 THE SHOW THAT WAS... The weather was beautiful, as were the exceptional Dressage horses and their polished riders. We take great pride in presenting to you this wrap up of the Horse of the Year Show performances...

Thank you JESS ROBERTS LIBBY LAW PHOTOGRAPHY NZEQUINE PHOTOGRAPHY

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THOMPSON TRIUMPHANT 1.

Article by Jess Roberts Photos by Libby Law Photography

GRAND PRIX ROUNDUP Article by Jess Roberts | Photo by Watson Equine Photography

Deken delivers a split decision freestyle finale

presents We are exclusive stockists of Cavallo, quality German riding apparel. For personalised, friendly service anywhere in NZ, please contact us today. www.classicequestrian.co.nz e: info@classicequestrian.co.nz | p: +64 21 627 082

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Photo Watson Equine Photography

HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

John Thompson’s fear that he was to be forever the bridesmaid was not to be overcome until the second day when he showed up producing stellar rides that earned much praise from German FEI 4* judge Henning Lehrmann.

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s a result, the sometimes spirited JHT Antonello can now add a third Dressage Horse of the Year title to his already impressive CV and a second one for his rider. To add to the star studded list, the 71.34% in the Grand Prix Special was a personal best for John and set new international record for NZ in this test. The big Anamour gelding had only a ride or two before the show after slight bruising to his feet saw him resting for a nearly a month. “Which obviously says a lot for my training – don’t ride it, it goes better!” jokes John about his less-than-ideal lead-up. The pair have grown together more and more, this year mastering that oh-sodelicate balance between tension and harmony, expression and relaxation. It was a delightfully mixed field this year, not only a competition but a celebration of personal achievement – from horses having their first taste of Grand Prix at CDI level with riders who have produced them from scratch, to our World Equestrian Games team members having another opportunity to improve their scores on NZ soil. Newcomers Sheena Ross and Parkridge Disco SW improved their scores over the course of the three tests to finish with a solid 65.975 in the freestyle. Sheena said after the Nationals, where judge Ricky McMillan gave her some great feedback, she completely changed her floorplan and her passage music. “Plus at Manfeild I had a nightmare with my piaffe in the Special so this show I backed off and was hoping to just ride half steps and build his confidence in it. That all went to plan, which was very pleasing, however, half steps don’t score well so we got a few low marks.” Sheena didn’t mind this in the least, instead placing more importance on the big picture and looking forward to next season “where I think we will have a much better piaffe in place.

In the other work he got some very pleasing marks, including a 9 and some 8’s from the international judges.” Australian FEI 5* judge Maria Schwennesen gave them a 68.5 score for their musical. Debbie Barke was just happy to be out and about on her lovely chestnut Lucrative SW, after a minor intermittent lameness saw him sidelined for 18 months. She said her sponsors Dunstan and Zilco stood by her in the down times, and “to have him out competing is amazing, he is such fun and so talented but most of all it’s just so nice that after the disappointment, the teamwork – vets, farriers, and the attention to detail in Luke’s rehab – paid off.” The Gisborne-bred gelding by Glenbrae Luca (this stallion is a full brother to Sheena Ross’s previous Grand Prix horse Glenbrae Ivanhoe, who last competed in 2008) is the second that Debbie has taken from Novice through to Grand Prix. “He initially came to me as a sensitive type, and he thrives on praise - preferably food related!” jokes Debbie. “I am sure his overachieving, try hard personality really comes from his belief that if he does it well and fast the next meal is going to be there quicker!”

In what was their first season for both horse and rider, Waikato’s Paula Stuart and Aztec Lad did a super job, especially in the Grand Prix. “I felt we did the best we’ve done this season in that particular test. It was pretty mistake-free but now have to start adding a bit more power to get the higher marks,” she reflects. “There were a few mistakes in the Special and I think the nerves kicked in for the musical freestyle, I didn’t ride it very well which was disappointing after Nationals where we nailed it. But that’s horses and I’m still so proud we did it.” Jody Hartstone’s lead up proved a challenge when her partner, groom, and support team Daryl broke his shoulder the day before the show, and she was up at 5am every morning to organising the NZ Warmblood Association tour. “And I’ve hardly been able to ride this year after a foot injury sidelined me, so I literally picked Ali Baba up from Christine Weal’s and brought him to the show. I must say my mind was not on the job at all.” Fortunately they were able to pull one out of the bag in the Kur on Sunday, setting themselves a new personal best of 68.925. It was a treat to see the talented Don

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

Jody Hartstone and Ali Baba Winner of the Intermediate II

Amour MH back in the arena this year with Wendi Williamson. He was L8 Champion at HOY in 2016 but Wendi took advice from one of the world’s best and didn’t compete him last season. “Charlotte Dujardin, who has coached me on him during her visits to NZ, said I needed to take some time with him away from the pressure of competition. So his first CDI was at the Nationals last month,” says Williamson. “At both Nationals and HOY we had a really great response from the international judges, and Johnny Hilberath the German National Coach who was here at Equitana was also very positive about him, so I am starting to get pretty excited about his prospects!” The pair chalked up some good scores – including 69.850 in the freestyle – especially for a green horse “still making lots of expensive mistakes. The Special wasn’t so good but it’s a very busy test; his trot and piaffepassage work I was really happy with. He can be a hot horse but has settled quite a bit, although there’s still more relaxation and focus needed on me to really get higher marks.” Sadly last year's winners, KH

Ambrose and Abbie Deken were not there to defend their title as Abbie had made the decision to sell Ambrose to reinvest in her future team. "He's given me so much, but I am determined I will train more horses to this level. It's been a fantastic experience" said Abbie. Julie Brougham was very happy with her musical freestyle on the final day. “Steiny really tried his heart out and did a mistake free test,” she says. “Two of the international judges recognised our high degree of difficulty that included an extended canter to fan piaffe and double canter pirouettes on the centreline.” These earned the pair two 9’s and an 8 from the German FEI4* judge. “New musical freestyles are a work in progress – David and I can already see how our new Hans Zimmer freestyle can be even better.” Julie was thrilled to see the wave of up-and-coming combinations starting in the Grand Prix. “Aren’t we lucky that we’ve got riders prepared to take up the challenge? Grand Prix is difficult. Less than one percent of horses that start at Level One go all the way to the Grand Prix,” she reminds. “It takes you five or six years to get there, and almost that long

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again to get really good at it.” After watching the Kur, Australian FEI5* judge Mary Seefried said that our WEG team is looking strong as they prepare for Tryon in September. “Those tests were well ridden, they had great music and were well put together – it’s very, very possible to see those freestyles in an international arena.” DRESSAGE HORSE OF THE YEAR 2018 1: John Thompson (JHT Antonello) 2: Julie Brougham (Vom Feinsten) 3: Wendi Williamson (Don Amour MH) 4: Debbie Barke (Lucrative SW) 5: Jody Hartstone (Ali Baba) 6: Sheena Ross (Parkridge Disco SW) 7: Paula Stuart (Aztec Lad)


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

JULIE BROUGHAM NEWEST MEMBER OF HOY HALL OF FAME Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

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ulie had absolutely no idea her name was about to be unveiled as the 2018 inductee to the Hall of Fame. Her husband David and several other people knew and had been tasked with getting her to the evening presentation. “There was a bit of a conspiracy going on behind the scenes which I was oblivious to, I don’t usually take cocktail type clothes to an equestrian event”, she laughs. She did get a quiet heads-up before the announcement was made. “At the end of the day I had to make a speech so I guess they didn’t want me to be overcome by emotion and loss of words,” she says, adding seriously, “I was completely blown away – it’s a huge honour and I feel very humble to be among those people that are already on the board.” She’s quick to point out that behind every athlete is a strong support crew. “Usually family, especially in equestrian because there’s so much that needs to be done. It’s family in my case that’s enabled me to do it all and helped me so much,” she says, acknowledging her husband David. “Along with those big experiences like Aachen CHIO comes a lot of stress as well – I’ve been very lucky that he’s hung in there with me and been prepared to give me the chance to follow my dreams.” David also helps Julie with her training at home. “He’s actually very knowledgeable about dressage, he’s never had any difficulty understanding it, about how a horse should move and everything else. He helps me every weekend, watches me ride, we discuss a huge amount – I’d be absolutely lost without him, that’s for sure. It’s a pretty lonely game on your own.” Whilst she’s had a long career in dressage studded with national titles and great horses, it’s her pocket-rocket Rheinlander, Vom Feinsten, that has propelled her to international and Olympic heights. The pair still hold the Australasian record for a CDI Freestyle (76.02%) at HOY in 2015, and then repeated in 2016 with 76.30%.

“He is extraordinary,” she says simply, although the irony of winning this Horse of the Year accolade isn’t lost on her as it is Steiny’s most extreme show. “The atmosphere is electric and that does affect him, and often not advantageously!” With WEG on the horizon and qualification safely in their pocket, Julie (63) and Vom Feinsten (almost 15) aren’t ready to slow down yet, though there’s still a way to go yet before they can be sure of touching down in Tryon. She’s keen to head to Europe to compete a bit first – “I feel that we all need to get up to speed, it’s very different competing there compared to being up against seven other Grand Prix combinations in NZ” DNZ extends a huge congratulations to Julie on her induction to the Hall of Fame, a deserved recognition of her success and contribution to dressage.

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

KELLIE HAMLETT COLLECTS LEVEL ONE TITLE Article by Jess Roberts Photo by NZEquine

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e’s had a fantastic season, he’s been so consistent and just a pleasure to train and work with,” says Kellie Hamlett of her Level One Horse of the Year, Astek Geronimo. “He’s been an amazing horse to have. And he’s becoming a bit of a crowd favourite because he’s such a sweetie.” The super-consistent pair never went below 70% across their four tests and finished on a high of 74.464 in the 1D title class. Gerry is a 5-year-old gelding who Kellie bought from Vanessa Way. He was bred in the South Island by Sue Fowler of Astek Stud, and is a half brother to Sue’s stallion Astek Quatermaster. Based in Rotorua, Kellie been competing in dressage for over five years now but full time work in her own business means she just competes one horse at a time. She trains with Vanessa Way and Debbie Barke. “Debbie is local and she’s supported me for years now – it’s probably her that got me into dressage to be honest, she converted me!”

…AND HER FABULOUS PRESTIGE EQUESTRIAN FUTURES PRIZE The icing on the cake for Kellie was being presented with her brand new Prestige Equestrian X-Breath DK saddle for her win in the Prestige Equestrian Futures series, where she sailed into first place on maximum points. “When you receive something like that it makes you realise just how generous the sponsors are and what an amazing support to our sport they are,” she says, adding “And the other thing I think is, as an amateur – and I’d class myself as a serious amateur, I’m not a weekend rider and I take my sport quite seriously – it’s an amazing prize to win because often it’s the professionals that you see winning big prizes so to have had the opportunity to win [the saddle] is overwhelming.” Prestige have been sponsoring dressage for the last decade, and after doing the maths - this saddle retails at $6,312 – you can see they’ve made an enormous contribution to the sport.

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Sadly Prestige Equestrian managing director Laurence O'Toole suddenly passed away before we went to print, but he had this to say at HOY. "The thinking behind this series was to give the average, everyday dressage riders something to aspire to and a stepping stone in the road to reaching longterm goals. It was put in place to allow these riders a chance to shine in a series not dominated by professional, full-time riders. We are thrilled with how successful it has been thus far. With around 200 riders with points on the board this season, we couldn’t be happier.” Kellie is very excited about having her first ride in her new saddle. “We just unpacked the truck this morning and we were looking at it and I was like wow! I can’t believe it. I can’t remember the last time I bought a new saddle. I was going to give Gerry a break after HOY but I’m going to have to ride him a few times so I can see what the saddle is like!”


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

From R to L: Horse of the Year Level 2 title winner Penny Castle and Lord Alexis, Geraldine Managh and Rosies Prince Charming, Sarah Stone and Thornfield Amazing Grace.

PENNY CASTLE TRUE TO FORM FOR LEVEL TWO

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enny is feeling super positive about her 5-year-old gelding Lord Alexis. “He’s a lovely horse, very athletic, great work ethic and I think he has everything there,” she says. The two rose to the top of a very competitive L2 field filled with professional riders and prefixed horses, winning their musical on a score of 76.406. Castle bought Lord Alexis from Wendi Williamson as a

3-year-old fresh from the breaker’s yard; he is by Lingh II (who holds Elite Stallion status) out of a Littorio mare. She plans to produce him up the levels and says he’s showing all the signs of being a top horse. “You don’t know for sure for a couple of years, but he’s ticking all the boxes so far.” Although Penny was kept busy at HOY with the eventers in her role as ESNZ Eventing Performance Leader,

she did miss being in the Grand Prix line-up, and is looking forward to rejoining the ranks next season with BL About Time. The lovely chestnut Anamour gelding took home the Advanced title in 2015 and “he will be definitely coming out next year in Grand Prix. He’s doing all the work, I’m just waiting for him to be stronger.”

Equine Physiotherapy/Chiropractic Care Dry Needling Kinesiotape available South Island wide

Nicolett Geldermann

LIVING ANATOMY OF THE HORSE

MEd, Equine Physiotherapist DIPO

027 923 5440 www.livinganatomy.co.nz

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

A WELCOME RETURN: HAYDEE WELLS-PARMENTER TOPS THE LEVEL 3 Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

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his was Haydee’s first HOY for several years; while she was busier than ever with full-time riding and teaching, having a young family saw her take a step back from the competition scene. “I did try competing a client’s horse when my youngest was two months and my oldest was two [they’re now four and six] but that was just insane! I decided to leave it until we could do it all well.” Haydee rode to a high level both in NZ and overseas in her early riding career, competing to Advanced in NZ before taking her gorgeous imported gelding Rubinstar with her to Australia, where she trained with Clemens Dierks for two years. After twelve months back at home she then left for Europe in 2005, again with Rubinstar, basing herself in Germany with Jean Bemelmans in Krefeld (near Cologne). At the end of her time there she was preparing to return to NZ when she was offered the ride on

Dr Britta Schoefman’s two horses. One of those horses was the mare La Pizolina, who would eventually give Haydee her first experience at Grand Prix, and saw her stay on for a further two years in Germany. As luck would have it, her current team of horses are all mares (which she loves), and, after researching stallions this year, is planning to breed them via embryo transfer next year. “We’re going to use frozen semen [from Europe] so it takes a bit of research to work out what’s best – the ones that are competing and winning are not always the ones that produce amazing progeny,” she notes. This plan includes her Level 3 title winner Royal Dream, and, as with the others, they’ll use a surrogate so that she can keep pushing forward with her training. “Yes, well now I’ve finished my breeding I can focus on hers!” she jokes. She says she’s very lucky to have her trainer Louisa Hill just up the

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road. “She’s one of my best friends, as well as mentor. She’s trained me since I was 13, so it’s amazing to have someone that knows you so well, it’s a major support. And a team effort.” The Wells-Parmenter’s Clevedon property was previously owned by showjumper John Cottle so has a super-sized arena which is great for riding the young horses in. Her children go off to school and kindergarten during the week so “I’ve got six hours [during the day]! I jump from horse to horse to horse every 45 minutes - it is really busy but it’s my passion.” And it’s looking like the horse bug is going to stay in the family: “Yesterday my four-year-old daughter was riding her pony in the arena and said ‘Mum, I really would like Louisa to come and give me a lesson’,” she says, amused. “And then Lou texted today saying ‘what time is Sophia riding tomorrow, I’ll pop down and give her a hand’!”


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

LEVEL 4 TITLE GOES TO THE DEEP SOUTH WITH SOLO AND REBECCA ROWLANDS Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

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fter a disastrous warm-up test which saw them finish at the bottom of the field, Rebecca Rowlands and her Salutation gelding Solo turned their luck around, fending off some really serious competition to take the HOY title. The field included the very on-form Gaylene Lennard and simply stunning Jax Johnson, who had to settle for runner up. Rebecca and Solo won both title tests, putting up a fabulous 73.167 score in their freestyle. She says on the first day “the wind picked up and the tents were banging and flags flapping and he just freaked out. He can be a bit cheeky but this particular time he was petrified,” she says. “About three quarters of the way through he took a deep breath and realised he was coping. So the end of his test had some good marks – which stopped us from being in the 40s where I thought we were going to be!” Rebecca moved from Canterbury to Southland (located between Queenstown and Gore) just after Christmas, which meant getting up to the North Island was a three-day travel-a-thon. They competed at Nationals, where she says Solo went very well but felt a little flat after the big trip. Fortunately he was able to stay at Christine Weal – who she trains with – between this event and HOY and so was back to his usual self by the time they travelled to Hastings. At home Rebecca takes in outside horses for breaking and schooling, and also has another horse at L5, Loretta Tate’s showhorse-turned-dressage-queen Southwell Rendezvous. She hopes to have Solo out at level 5 next season and is working on getting trainer Christine to the depths of Southland. “I’m in the throes of convincing her she needs to come down here!” she says, and adds how appreciative she was of her support and help with warming up at HOY. “She’s amazing, Christine is, she’d give you her right arm if she could – she’s incredible.”

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

WAY UNDER THE WEATHER BUT STILL UNSTOPPABLE Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

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onsidering I was dying of the flu! Not kidding, I was really ill, if I’d been at home I would have been in bed,” recounts Way, after winning who won the Level 5 and Level 8 titles on NSC Pronto and NRM Andreas respectively. “How I managed to ride I don’t know, I was so sick. I just about couldn’t ride the Level 8 – my horses did all the work!” Both horses were unbeaten during the show; they’ve always been in the ribbons on their way up the levels (NRM Andreas was L3 Champ in 2016 and L6/7 Champ in 2017) and came to HOY fresh off the back of a successful campaign at Nationals where NSC Pronto was runner-up in the L5, and NRM Andreas the L8 champion. “I’m very, very lucky,” she says. “I’m really pleased – I mean there’s always homework to do but it’s nice to just go out and be so consistent really. It’s nice to have several different horses [across the levels], it just means that the systems are all in place. And it’s a massive thanks to Carl [Hester] for teaching me in a nice correct way that the horses enjoy.” Way is looking forward to stepping both of them up for next season. “Pronto’s already done one Prix St Georges at Bay of Plenty. I just thought I’d risk it and go up, he got a bit cheeky with the changes but he is very cool,” she says. The next stop for NRM Andreas is Grand Prix: he was a stand-out in the L8 field and his passage and piaffe is already

impressive. “That’s his little party piece! He’s not been easy but he really excites me and I can’t wait to do the Grand Prix on him now.” She almost had the L6/7 title on NRM KH Arion (current L7 National Champion) after winning the Prix St Georges and Inter I but he “freaked out” in the freestyle. Way is philosophical about it. “That’s life. He just shut down. I just have to find a way to get his confidence, really. He just gets scared – he’s usually a really hot horse but when he gets scared he goes inward. Plus I didn’t put his ears on and we went during Pony of the Year!” This combination wasn’t the only one to have some interesting moments during the spontaneous

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eruptions of applause from the neighbouring showjumping arena. This winter Way is making her annual pilgrimage over to mentor and friend Carl Hester’s yard to train for three weeks and is then lucky enough to be travelling with Hester and the British team over to the World Equestrian Games. Post-HOY though, she’s already straight back into work, having flown to Sydney the very next day for three days of solid teaching. Then it was on to Tasmania, where I’ve just finished catching up with her on a hasty lunch break. “Anyway,” she says, munching on a quick sandwich, “I better go torture my next victim!” I can hear her grinning down the phone.


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

“They’ve got no terms and conditions on that,” says John, “and see them as real performance horses that can help push the sport further.” As far as the logistics of keeping three stallions at their Gordonton base goes, Holly says they’re pretty blessed. “Fresco is a very well-rounded stallion and just takes everything in his stride,” she says. “So is Chemistry. He’s the kind of guy that would open the car door for you, and you’d come home to a clean house and a bunch of roses!” JHT Anatomy is a bit more of a ‘stallion’ but has settled in as part of the team. “We did spend the first six months very much putting his basics in on the ground, as a stallion, and making him part of the barn and not letting him be isolated – without taking risks, of course –and he’s become very rideable and manageable,” observes Holly. With John home just two or three days of week, Holly will ride six or seven horses a day when he’s away teaching. When he’s home, they train together and have a warm-up or swap of each other’s horses. “I’m a part-timer!” laughs John. “Holly is great, she is as good as me on their backs and it’s great to come home to horses feeling as good as what I left them – it’s rare to have a partnership like that,” he says. “Plus she does all the mares and stallions and planning and invoicing – she’s superwoman!”

FROM TOP 2. Holly Leach - JHT Replay. 3. John Thompson - JHT Chemistry 4. John Thompson - JHT Anatomy

Photo: NZEQUINE

1. Holly Leach - HP Fresco.

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Photo: NZEQUINE

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or the very first time Young Dressage Horse Classes were offered at Horse of the Year Show. Sponsored by Village Green Cafe (Judge & Breeder Carol Eivers) and with trophies supplied by enthusiast Linda Warren-Davey the classes attracted some real quality, potential international horses. With three stallions at the show, Team JHT (John Thompson and Holly Leach) were kept on their toes. “We had eleven tests on one day,” says Holly, who, with the current Young Dressage Horse and L5 National Champion HP Fresco, rounded off her season with the HOY 6-year-old title. The pair very nearly took out the L5 too, coming runner-up to Vanessa Way and NSC Pronto. It’s notable that in each season of competing this stunning stallion has had an 80%+ score at a show; so often you see fantastic young horses starting out and getting amazing scores but not maintaining them up the levels. “Every time you jump up a level, to get an 80 in that bracket shows you the training is working,” says John. JHT Anatomy (by Apache) won the 5-year-old title with John, whilst his stablemate JHT Chemistry (by Connoisseur) finished fourth on the Level 2 title table. These two stallions were imported from Europe, arriving in NZ at the end of 2016. John and Holly are in the enviable position of having them brought in by generous sponsors whose aim is not to train and sell – as so often happens - but to see them go as far as they can.

Photo: Libby Law Photography

JHT EQUINE DOMINATE YOUNG DRESSAGE HORSE CLASSES


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

DOLLEY TAKES BOTH THE YOUNG RIDER & ADVANCED TITLES CDI-Y winner Lucarne Dolley and Ardmore are presented with the Pam Weal Memorial Trophy by Christine Weal

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urrent National Young Rider champion Lucarne Dolley made a clean sweep of her three CDI-Y tests to take her second HOY Young Rider title, this time aboard her chestnut Anamour gelding, Ardmore. For good measure, she also took out the Advanced championship on her other YR mount Devils Chocolate. 19-year-old Lucarne and her stationbred mare “Tilly” now plan to cross the Tasman at the beginning of May, where they’ll throw their hats into the Young Rider ring at the Sydney CDI. She has represented NZL in Australia on a borrowed horse team, but this will be her first experience of travelling and competing her own horse. Before going to Sydney, she will take both horses to the U25 Championships in Taupo later this month. She will also be making the big move back up to her family home

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Lucarne and her advanced champion Devils Chocolate


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW Article by Jess Roberts Photos by Libby Law Photography

in Cambridge after spending almost two years in Taranaki as a working pupil for Vanessa Way. “I’ve just got too many horses in work now,” she explains. She’s got another 4-year-old ready to be brought back in to work and a 3-year-old that will be sent off to the breakers’ shortly. But she still intends to make regular trips over Mt Messenger back to Taranaki to train with Vanessa at her idyllic stable spot in Oakura. Auckland’s Amy Sage and RM All About Me were hot on Lucarne’s heels to take reserve, while Canterbury combination Grace Thomson and her dapper Hanson gelding, Chocolat Moka CM, did a fabulous job in the Individual and Team tests for her first CDIY, just falling short of the qualifying score needed to go through to the Freestyle. This pair is staying on at JHT Equine for some intensive training before going on to the U25 Championships at Taupo.

Amy Sage and RM All About Me

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

Millie Thompson and Rifesyde Prancer celebrate their win

MILLIE THOMPSON AND RIFESYDE PRANCER WIN PONY OF THE YEAR TITLE Article by Jess Roberts Photos by Libby Law Photography

The premier title, Dressage Pony of the Year (held at level 4), was captured by Millie Thompson and her Andalusian pony, Rifesyde Prancer. It was the perfect end to a successful season, as they had previously won the 2017 youth section of the World Dressage Challenge as well as being part of the winning NZ team. 30 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

The 16-year-old Christchurch student said there was a really supportive atmosphere amongst the pony riders. “There were a few there that I knew, but it was good to get to know everyone,” she says. Millie trains with Sally Field-Dodgson, Andrea Raves and Christine Weal, and is also a member of the Springston Pony Club. Runners-up for the title were Emma Dickens and Sir Oakridge SF. Emma also won the special Zilco prize for the best performed pony on the NI Zilco Freestyle to Music Leaderboard. As the final round is held at HOY, the schedule does not allow ponies to compete against the horses and earn more Leaderboard points so this additional prize was a great surprise, and reward, for Emma’s consistent performances at Premier League shows during the season. There were healthy numbers in the pony classes with almost 50 entries across the levels, making for some great competition. There were lots of gorgeous new combinations lining up, as well as the worth-their-

weight-in-gold ponies who have given a generation of young riders a successful HOY experience - such as Ngahere Romeo, now 20, who added the L2 title to his far-reaching collection with rider Olivia Robinson. Runner-up went to Brittany Fowler and Apsley Backchat Kid, who were just half a point behind. Laura O’Hare and Zen E Bear took out the L1, with Caitlin Rennie and Eastdale Foxtrot a close reserve. From well-known Canterbury stud Eastdale Riding Ponies, Foxtrot is by the (now deceased) imported Australian pony stallion Falconhurst Flashdance, who won the Pony Breeders National Sire Rating every year from 2006 – 2011. Last year’s L1 champions Bella Small (Auckland) and Kingslea Busy Bee did it again, this time wearing the L3 title rug after a great win in the freestyle. Canterbury’s Charlotte Thomas and Farview Free Spirit. It is incredibly encouraging for the sport to see so many riders on quality ponies pushing each other to increased levels of performance.

Bella Small and Kingslea Busy Bee

The Dressage Pony of the Year line-up

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HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

1.

L to R: Dave Mee Director of SMC Event Management, Briar Burnett-Grant and John Thompson

WINNING, WEDDINGS AND THE WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

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ell it’s not as exciting as the red jacket over here!” Thompson quips at the press conference as people line up to congratulate him, before turning to showjumper and HOY title winner Briar-Burnett Grant. “Yours is way more exciting, why did I have to be good at the slow circles!” It doesn’t take long before conversation turns to his up-coming marriage to fiancé Holly Leach, and there’s a whisper that the ceremony could be at the world-class Takapoto Estate (which held its inaugural showjumping show and WEG fundraiser recently), but Thompson is keeping his cards close to his chest. “They have very kindly offered, so it could be…” And have

you set a date? “Well, maybe January. I’ll leave it at that before my family reads some article somewhere that I’ve got a wedding and they haven’t been invited!” he laughs, before adding “it’s very exciting and I’m very lucky to have Holly.” Then it’s down to business and Thompson is fielding questions about NZL representation at WEG and the two travelling options to Tryon for the horses. "We want to travel as a team but it's not yet confirmed if that is possible" says Thompson. “We bounce off each other, like I’ll go get my test paper and show Julie the video, Wendi will come ask me [questions], we’re really good like that. It’s unique and we want to keep it that way. We want to travel as a

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team but it's not yet confirmed if that is possible. Option A means travelling to Europe in June, just three months away, and spending some time competing in Europe. Option B is to leave straight for North Carolina in August, where the Games are being held at the Tryon International Equestrian Centre beginning officially on 10th September. There are pros and cons for both. “Option B, the challenge is that it’s winter, AJ isn’t the best-looking at the best of times let alone when he’s got a coat like a yak! But he goes best fresh and he’s a bit older so less mileage is a pro point for me. If we leave early, it’s harder to keep them eating. But then, if we go early to Europe, and do


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

Photos: JS Design

Photo: Libby Law Photography

well [the plan is to compete at some of the big shows like Aachen and Verden], you get in a good ‘band’.” A ‘band’ means riders are loosely structured according to their competition scores – the 67-70 band, or 70-73 band, for example. These bands influence the draw order (from the FEI World Dressage Rider Rankings) for the Olympics or WEG, so if you’ve had a successful lead-up, you’re already in a good ‘band’. So going straight to America, you’re kind of leaving that out of it.” Thompson says Clarke Johnson (eventing Olympian and HOY title winner) has been very helpful in sharing his experiences of managing horses and travel. “He’s been talking to us about horses [competing overseas], when they peak and how they go. Pretty much everyone’s gut feeling is you’ve got a six-week window once you get there, after that they start going lower and lower and don’t bounce back for a while.” “I think for us, to have a really good preparation is going to be about clever management,” Thompson says. “But as I said, we want to go as a team and lean on each other, it’s way better than going as individuals and with a bit of luck we’ll have a successful campaign and push the sport a little bit further.” With bottles of champagne on the table and cameras clicking away it’s easy to forget all the hard work that goes on day in and day out behind the scenes: but here’s how Thompson’s next week is looking. “I’m teaching in Melbourne at 10.30 in the morning tomorrow. So now I am driving home to Hamilton, putting my ponies in bed, I’m packing my bag and I’m driving to the airport to then teach fifteen or sixteen lessons per day for a few days for a private clinic, and then I warm up students at Dressage With the Stars which is a CDI over there.” Young Briar Burnett-Grant pipes up. “And I thought school was bad!”

ALI BABA – MASTER OF VERSATILITY

W

hile most dressage horses were probably practicing their test moves in their lead up to HOY, Grand Prix stallion Ali Baba and Jody Hartstone took a bit of time out from dressage training to compete at a Working Equitation competition. Working Equitation is a sport growing around the world and it is particularly popular in Europe and North America. At its highest level the competition consists of 4 phases. A Dressage phase ridden one handed, an ease of handling phase over obstacles, followed by a speed phase over the same obstacles. The last phase (not yet seen in NZ) is the cattle handling phase. “Lusitanos like Ali Baba are well suited to Working Equitation as they are very agile and learn quickly” says Jody. Ali Baba’s cross training clearly was not detrimental to his HOY performance, finishing fourth in the Grand Prix Freestyle with a personal best score for the combination of 68.925%

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 33


RIDER PROFILE

RED, BLACK AND YELLOW – WAIKATO’S PAULA STUART WAVES A FLAG OF ENCOURAGEMENT FROM THE TOP “This makes me want to go home and ride my horse!” This was just one of the positive comments overheard in the officials’ tent while Paula Stuart and Aztec Lad performed their charming Grand Prix. And what better reaction could you ask for, both personally and for dressage as a sport? The pair have become unintentional but inspiring ambassadors for the everyday, non-professional rider, proving that you can get to this level and do it in style.

Photo: Libby Law Photography

W

hilst it’s incredibly exciting to have our first WEG team waiting in the wings, it’s also important to have the majority represented so well: the rider with the full-time job, one horse that they love, with dressage as their chosen sport; quietly working away and getting to the top. “It was a fantastic feeling riding in the CDI at HOY and Nationals against the best horse and rider combinations in the country,” says Stuart. “It’s always a buzz to ride in the Oval at HOY, but even more so at Grand Prix.” Stuart has had her dark bay Anamour gelding since he was two, and brought him up through the grades, “pretty much one level per season”, until they got to L6/7. The combination spent several seasons there, “not really even thinking about Grand Prix as that was in the ‘too hard basket’!” she says. “The two-time tempis were solid and established but I had never even ridden one time tempis before and decided they were just too hard. “It wasn’t until I started training with John Thompson that I started to think we could actually do this. He told me that Billy would be a much better Grand Prix horse than Prix St Georges as his talents are the piaffe and passage – he made me believe that we could actually do it.” She acknowledges the juggling act that comes with being not being a full-time rider. “Yes, it’s hard! Trying to fit riding and training in around a full-time job and everyday life isn’t easy. But it’s definitely possible to do it, and if I can do it, anyone can.”

34 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018


NATIONAL NEWS

Photo: Tony Parkes

TAKING FLIGHT: THE LOGISTICS OF GETTING TO THE GAMES FROM DOWNUNDER

N

either of the two possible routes – NZ-Europe-USA or NZUSA – are direct, says Tony, and both see the horses spending an almost identical amount of time in the air. To go to Europe on the way, there’s a weekly service that goes to the UK/Europe via Singapore and the United Arab Emirates, and takes around 34 to 36 hours. Then, once ready to leave for the States, the horses can get on the weekly charter from Amsterdam. Jess Roberts chats with Tony Smith from IRT’s NZ office… To go straight to the US, the scheduled flight means the horses would leave New Zealand in the early hours of a Friday and arrive at 7.30 that morning in Sydney. At that point they’re offloaded and stay in Sydney until departing mid-evening the following day. “That aircraft goes via Shanghai, Anchorage (Canada) and then into New York,” says Tony. “So I know it sounds bad but if you discount the first leg where they get off the plane and have 24 hours there, your actual flight time from Sydney to New York is around 32 hours.” There have been no direct flights to the States for seven or eight years now, “ever since the share market crash, basically,” explains Tony. “While we used to have a direct flight that went in 10 hours from Auckland to LAX (Los Angeles), there’s now just not enough freight out of New Zealand or Australia to warrant that.” And the situation is exactly the same for the Aussies travelling to WEG; those are the only choices they have, too. “Every airline that comes down here knows that if they go back up via either Singapore, Hong Kong or Shanghai, whatever they’re light on they know they’ll pull out of there absolutely chocker, full to the gunnels. So that’s the economic reasoning behind the airlines,” Tony clarifies. “Either way [Tryon] is not a helluva easy destination to get to!” Ironically, getting back home won’t be a problem. “One good thing is that we do have a flight that comes down from the States, returning to New Zealand, and the quarantine for that starts one week after WEG finishes, so there is an option of getting home reasonably quickly,” says Tony. “You do quarantine in Kentucky, fly out of Chicago – the plane does go via LA – and then here to NZ. So in this particular instance it’s easier to get home than to get there, which is not normally the case.”

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 35


NATIONAL NEWS ESNZ logo 500mm

TEAM CHALLENGE TO TEST RIDERS AT NATIONAL U25 DRESSAGE CHAMPS

Stable Art by Belinda. Supporting the Dressage NZ fundraising efforts towards the World Equestrian Games 2018.

Queensland fields strong team for Taupo ALISTAIR SCHRAMM (19) is currently studying

his final year in a Bachelor of Paramedicine and actively works as a medic for sporting events and large scale construction sites. He has been in partnership with his 14 year old Thoroughbred (Sweeny) for 6 years progressing from Prelim to Small Tour together over this time. He has been a member of the Dressage Queensland Young Rider Squad for three years and was recently selected onto the 2018 Australian Young Rider Squad. He has ridden across all disciplines however in 2016 he changed his focus from eventing to Dressage and has become relatively successful in his newfound passion.

DAISY FIELDING (18) is from the Gold Coast.

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ressage Queensland is coming to Taupo with a very strong team of Young Riders set to challenge NZL. Although they will be on loan horses so generously offered by NZ owners, the Queensland team is full of talent and experience set to take on the home side. The NZ team will be announced nearer to the event when the levels of the loan horses are confirmed. 36 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018

She has ridden for most of her life but only has been competing in Dressage for about 4 years. She currently competes at Advanced level with her 10 year old warmblood gelding, Vinnie, and is in her second consecutive year on the QLD Dressage Young Rider Squad. Daisy is currently studying Sports Management at Bond University on the ADCO Sports Excellence Scholarship and is hoping to use her studies to help raise the profile of Dressage as a sport in Queensland. Daisy is greatly looking forward to representing QLD at the NZ Young Rider Dressage Championships.

ELIZA CULLEN (20) is a university student majoring in Business Marketing and Public Relations at the University of the Sunshine Coast. Of the 16 years she has been riding horses, 9 of those years have been devoted to Dressage. Eliza is currently campaigning in small tour on her Dutch mare Dobria de Jeu (Bria) and training a four year old Charmeur filly. Eliza has partnered Bria for 5 years, progressing Prelim to Small Tour. She has been a member of the Queensland Young Rider Squad and community for the last 8 years and in her final year on the squad, wishes to raise awareness of comradery and teamwork in the youth dressage community. All riders are very excited to have the opportunity to compete in New Zealand U25 Championships and to be a part of the inaugural QLD vs NZ Young Rider Challenge.


NATIONAL NEWS

SOUTH ISLAND TEAM ALL SET FOR ROUND TWO

I

n round one they took a 27.25 point lead on their own horses, but the odds are evened up in round 2 when it will be their turn to ride loan horses. Millie Thompson will be the anchor having also been on the team in round one. The North Island team will be announced when the loan horses are confirmed for the SI team.

SOUTH ISLAND TEAM MANAGER – Christine Lovelady

The second and final round of the 2018 York Corporation Inter-Island Challenge will be a feature at the U25CH. The South Island took a commanding lead in the first round at the SI Festival in January so the April team will have the weight of the trophy on their shoulders hoping to retain their lead and take the trophy south.

JESSIE FRASER (15) from Wanaka has been competing at level three this season on Littoria GNZ and Just Jackson. Sadly her horse was injured due to a paddock incident early this year but she was offered two ponies to compete in L1 & L2 dressage and showing. Jessie represented Otago/ Southland at the 2018 NZPCA Dressage Championships, winning the Intermediate Championship title, and also won the Dressage Southland Holyport Young Rider Trophy (U21) in 2018

SOPHIE GRIFFITH (21) from Canterbury has been

riding since she was 5, focussing on dressage around the age of 14 when she trained her first pony to level 4 (Rifesyde Prancer). At that time she began training her first horse (Frangelico F) which she took to FEI PSG Young Rider and Intermediate I level. Sophie has trained a number of other horses, some for sale and some she has kept to produce further.

MILLIE THOMPSON (16) from Canterbury currently

holds the NZ Pony of the Year title with Rifesyde Prancer. She really loved meeting the North Island competitors in round one and considers the two round competition to be a great concept, a cool way to meet new people, to watch different riders and most of all experience the young rider nationals. Riding a loan mount will be an amazing opportunity to test her riding skills in a new and challenging environment.

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 37


NATIONAL SERIES RESULTS

MUSIC IS IN THE AIR WITH ZILCO Article by Jess Roberts Photo by Libby Law Photography

win and fifth place on the level 3 Leaderboard. Vanessa Way enjoyed another outstanding Zilco season. Not only is Zilco one of her sponsors, but she won the level 5 on NSC Pronto for proud owners NSC saddles, won the Advanced on NRM KH Arion and was fourth on NRM Andreas in level 8 having had limited starts since Equidays back in October. Vanessa again showed great sportsmanship, gifting Arion’s rug to Advanced runner-up, Rosanne Rix on Lindisfarne Laureate. “I have one or two of these already, it’s nice to be able to see other hardworking riders rewarded and enjoy one of these gorgeous rugs” Back on Track Astute and Toni Louisson have competed throughout the North Island in the Level 8 Zilco gaining valuable experience as they head towards Grand Prix and they could not be overtaken by runner up Jacqui Thompson on the Gym Bello gelding Georgio who have now become well established at this level. The Grand Prix Leaderboard was very strong this year with newcomers Susan Tomlin and Dancealong holding off a challenge from another

38 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018

Zilco sponsored combination, Debbie Barke & Lucrative SW. Thanks to the generosity of Zilco, two new awards were presented this year. At HOY, ponies and young riders in the CDIY classes cannot contest the open Zilco Finals. This is different situation to the SI Finals contested at the SI Festival. Therefore to recognise the achievements of both pony riders and young riders on the leaderboards, a separate Zilco rosette and $200 voucher was awarded to these categories. Winners were Lucarne Dolley with Ardmore and Emma Dickons on Sir Oakridge SF A huge thanks to Zilco for another amazing season of musical freestyles. Ann Webster with Zilco's Robert Kofoed

Photo: W Hamerton

N

I Zilco Freestyle to Music bonus points were up for the taking at the final round at the Horse of the Year Show. Ten of thirteen North Island areas were presented in the top 5 placings across levels and a total of 207 combinations scored Leaderboard points indicating the popularity of the series. All the series winners with the exception of Betty Brown and Hot Gossip (Level 4) lined up at HOY looking to gain more points, but Betty and her six year old Australian imported gelding (Lets Kiss & Tell / Go Like Magic /Salute) had the level 4 all sewn up without leaving Karaka. Kieryn Walton has burst back on to the scene with a win in Level 2 on the classy homebred Whisper gelding, Wisdom WDS, and a third in Advanced on Rosari Don Carlos (Don Frederico / Anastasia / Anamour). Wairarapa’s Ann Webster has dominated many level 3 Premier League Championships with her two horses, the six year old warmblood x, Oranoa Morepork by Middleburg, bred by Northland’s Janet Fox, and the thoroughbred Rustic Challenge. This consistency earned her a


New Zealand NATIONAL SERIES RESULTS

When every note counts, choose...

Check out our website LEVEL 2 www.zilco.net Wisdom WDS

Kieryn Walton (Bay of Plenty)

42

1

Mon Bleu Ciel

Jenny Clarke (Central Districts)

39

2

Don Vito MH

Wendi Williamson (Waitemata)

32

3

JHT Chemistry

John Thompson (Waikato)

32

4

Aroha MH

Hannah Burden (Northland)

30

5

Oranoa Morepork

Ann Webster (Wairarapa)

46

1

Donnerbella II

Tania Smith (Taranaki)

43

2

Royal Dream

Haydee Wells-Parmenter (Auckland)

42

3

Bon Jovi MH

Wendi Williamson (Waitemata)

42

4

Rustic Challenge

Ann Webster (Wairarapa)

35

5

LEVEL 4

Hot Gossip

Betty Brown (Auckland)

41

1

BL All By Chance

Renee Etherington (Taranaki)

33

2

Sir Oakridge SF

Emma Dickons (Central Districts)

33

3

Jax Johnson

Gaylene Lennard (Waikato)

29

4

Laila Dawn

Nicki Sunley (Northern Hawke’s Bay)

24

5

LEVEL 5

NSC Pronto

Vanessa Way (Taranaki)

42

1

Schindlers Liszt

Christine Weal (Waikato)

40

2

HP Fresco

Holly Leach (Waikato)

32

3

Parkridge Donnamour

Peter Barke (Bay of Plenty)

30

4

Wolkenstein BC

Louise Duncan (Central Districts)

28

5

LEVEL 6/7

NRM KH Arion

Vanessa Way (Taranaki)

39

1

Lindisfarne Laureate

Rosanne Rix (Wellington)

35

2

Rosari Don Carlos

Kieryn Walton (Bay of Plenty)

33

3

Vollrath Leila

Carole Christensen (Wellington)

31

4

Vollrath Latimer

Rochelle Speirs (Central Districts)

28

5

LEVEL 8

Back on Track Astute

Toni Louisson (Central Districts)

35

1

Georgio

Jacqui Thompson (Wellington)

29

2

Donnerheim

Vanessa Fenemor (Auckland)

27

3

NRM Andreas

Vanessa Way (Taranaki)

26

4

Letty Lei EDH

Victoria Wall (Waitemata)

21

5

LEVEL 9

Dancealong

Susan Tomlin (Central Districts)

35

1

Lucrative SW

Debbie Barke (Bay of Plenty)

31

2

Don Amour MH

Wendi Williamson (Waitemata)

30

3

Aztec Lad

Paula Stuart (Waikato)

27

4

I Like It

Catherine Tobin (Wellington)

24

5

LEVEL 3

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 39


NATIONAL COMPETITION CALENDER

WHAT’S ON APRIL 2018 | NORTH ISLAND 7/8

Kaitaia Tournament

Local

Kaitaia A&P SG

8**

Horowhenua Dressage Autumn Tournament

Local

Foxton Racecourse

8

AMDG Autumn Series Day 2

Local

AMDG

8

Nth Hawkes Bay Autumn Series Day One

Local

Equestrian Park

8

Morrinsville/Te Aroha Ribbon day

Training

Waihou reserve

14/15

Rotorua DG Wendy Richards Memorial

**RE

Taupo NEC

15

Dressage Waitemata Local Day

Local

Woodhill Sands

19

Livamol FEI World Dressage Challenge

INT

Taupo NEC

19/20

Elite Equine Nutrition NI Future Stars

YD Horses & Ponies

Taupo NEC

21/22

Equestrian Entries U25 Championships

U25NCH/Para

Taupo NEC

22

Gisborne Dressage Autumn Series #2

Local

Gisborne SG

22

Warkworth Dressage Group Local Day

Local

Warkworth A&P SG

28

Dressage Taranaki ANZAC Event

Local

Egmont A & P SG

29

Solway Dressage Autumn Ribbon Day Series #1

Training

Solway SG

MAY 2018 | NORTH ISLAND 5/6

Dressage Central Districts

Local

Manfeild Park

6

Dressage Northland

Local

Barge Park SG

6

AMDG Autumn Series Day 2

Local

Clevedon

6

Waikato EC Day 1

Training

WEC

13

NHB Autumn Series Day Two

Local

HB Equestrian Park

13

Dressage Horowhenua Ribbon Day (TR)

Training

Waikanae Park

20

Northland Circuit finals

Local

Barge Park SG

20

Waitemata Dressage

Local

Woodhill Sands

20

Gisborne Autumn Autumn Series No 3

Local

Gisborne SG

20

Morrinsville Te Aroha Ribbon Day (TR)

Training

Waihou SG

For more details of each event & venue, and contact details go to www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/competition/calendar

40 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018


NATIONAL COMPETITION CALENDER

WHAT’S ON APRIL 2018 | SOUTH ISLAND **2

Dressage Canterbury Autumn Series Day 1

CANCELLED

McLeans Island NEC

**2

NLEC Autumn Dressage

Local

Rangiora A & P SG

7/8

Dressage Southland Autumn

Local

Gore A & P SG

8

SCNO Graded & Training

Local

Winchester SG

14/15

Dressage Central Otago Autumn Tournament

Local

Cromwell Racecourse

14/15

ZILCO Festival of Future Stars

Local

McLeans Island NEC

22

Dressage Ashburton Autumn Series

Training

Ashburton A & P SG

29

NEG April Day

Local

Harrs Road

MAY 2018 | SOUTH ISLAND 6

Canterbury Dressage Autumn Series Day 3

Local

McLeans Island NEC

20

NLEC Autumn Dressage

Local

Rangiora A & P SG

20

Dressage Ashburton Group

Training

Ashburton A & P SG

27

Northern Equestrian Group

Local

Harrs Road

Pony Levels 1-4, Young Rider Levels 1-9 Non Graded 12 Years & Under, Rider Equitation Classes Para Equestrian Under 25 Championships entries close on 31st March at www.equestrienentries.co.nz

Fiber Fresh National Equestrian Centre, Taupo 21 - 22 April 2018 www.nzequstrian.org.nz/dressage Find us on Facebook Dressage NZ U25 Championships

Go in the draw to win one of 3 free event t shirts APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 41


HORSE OF THE YEAR REVIEW

1.

2.

1. Hannah Burden Fanfare MH 2. Lorraine Ward-SmithFernlea Diamond Day 3. Jane Chrichton D'Malia 4. John Thompson JHT Chemistry

4.

3.

Photos & Video On Demand quality photos and video on demand. 42High | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018 Receive ALL the photos from your test (30-50) - never have to choose again! Videos of all World Dressage Challenge Tests are available to purchase now. Email: john@nzequine.co.nz for further details. 


NZ Equine Photography John and Rhiannon Moss
 Phone: 027 693 7846
 Email: john@nzequine.co.nz Facebook: nzequine


DIRECTORY

DRESSAGE DIRECTORY Dressage Area Group Websites and other useful links.

Equestrian Sports NZ/Dressage www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage www.facebook.com/DressageNZ www.facebook.com/EquestrianSportsNZ www.facebook.com/DressageNZU25Championships www.facebook.com/StableoftheStallions Dressage Bay of Islands www.sporty.co.nz/bayofislandsdressagegroup Dressage Northland www.sporty.co.nz/dressagenorthland

Dressage Central Districts www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagecentraldistricts

Dressage Waitemata www.dressagewaitemata.co.nz

Dressage Taranaki www.dressagetaranaki.co.nz

Dressage Warkworth www.warkworthdressage.webs.com

Dressage Wellington www.dressagewellington.org.nz

Dressage Auckland - Manukau www.amdg.org.nz

Dressage Horowhenua   www.horowhenuadressage.com

Dressage Waikato www.dressagewaikato.co.nz

Dressage Wairarapa www.dressagewairarapa.com

Dressage Morrinsville -Te Aroha www.mtdg.co.nz

Dressage Nelson    www.nelsondressage.webs.com

Dressage Gisborne www.gisbornedressage.org.nz

Dressage Marlborough www.sporty.co.nz/marlboroughdressage

Dressage Bay of Plenty www.dressagebayofplenty.co.nz

Dressage Canterbury www.canterburydressage.co.nz

Dressage Eastern Bay of Plenty www.sportsground.co.nz/ebd

Dressage Otago www.dressageotago.webs.com

Dressage Rotorua         www.sporty.co.nz/dressagerotorua

Dressage Southland www.dressage-southland.com

Dressage Tauranga        www.dressagetauranga.co.nz 

National Equestrian Centres www.nzequestrian.org.nz

Dressage Taupo www.sporty.co.nz/taupodressagegroup

Tielcey Park Equestrian Centre www.tielceypark.co.nz (Manawatu)

Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay www.sporty.co.nz/dressagenhb

North Loburn Equestrian Centre www.nlec.co.nz (Canterbury)

Dressage Central Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/chbdressage

Northern Equestrian Group www.freewebs.com/northerneq (Canterbury)

Dressage Southern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/shbdressage

Northgate Lodge www.northgatelodgeequestrian.com (Northland)

APRIL 2018 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 43


44 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | APRIL 2018

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 21 | April 2018

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 21 | April 2018