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Issue 06 | January 2017

CHARLOTTE DUJARDIN Get your tickets inside to spend an evening up close with the World Champion.


From the Editor WELCOME TO THE SIXTH ISSUE OF THE DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN Valegromania ruled during December with the media coverage of his pending retirement leading us to Olympia and an emotional but spectacular retirement ceremony for a spectacular team. There has been something extra special about this team. The whole package of print media and television allowed us into their homes and hearts to share their journey. They showed us that a performance based around harmony can and should be the winner. The biggest winner of all was Dressage. It is rare to see a horse (or Prime Minister) retiring at the top of their game. The respect and devotion shown for Valegro only increases our respect for the team behind him. My January editorial is therefore a tribute to team Valegro. Their story highlights the importance of team work at all levels. We all have our own team even if sometimes we think it is just us on our own with our horse. There is always a friend, family member or another rider you can talk things through with. They may not totally understand the issues but sometimes just talking them through can turn on the light. And of course don’t forget your coach. Talking things through outside of the lesson situation is invaluable. Make a plan. Identify your team and treasure them. Valegro Individual Record Since 19 March 2011, Valegro and Charlotte have 67 results recorded on the FEI database. The first record was from Vidauban in France where they scored 73.723 in the Grand Prix. They went on to win 54 of their 67 starts in FEI competition. Their final test was the Freestyle at Rio de Janeiro for 93.857 Olympic Games - Gold Medal 2012 London & 2016 Rio de Janeiro. World Equestrian Games - Winner 2014 Caen Grand Prix, Grand Special & Freestyle. European Dressage Championships - Winner 2013 Herning Grand Prix, Grand Special & Freestyle. Winner 2015 Aachen Grand Prix, Grand Special & Freestyle. FEI World Cup Dressage - Winner 2014 Lyon & 2015 Las Vegas World Records - Grand Prix (87.46%, Olympia 2014), Grand Prix Special (88.022%, Hagen CDI4* 2012), Grand Prix Freestyle (94.3%, Olympia CDI-W 2014) Thank You Team Valegro Valegro - Charlotte - Carl (Trainer/Owner) Alan (Groom) - Rowena Luard & Ann Barrott (Owners) Wishing you all a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year. Start planning and chasing your 2017 goals now.

Cover Image: Olympia horse of the year show 2016 Valegro and Charlotte Dujardin. Photo Credit: Liz Gregg Back Page: Dujardin Charlotte, GBR, Valegro Olympic Games Rio 2016 Photo Credit: Hippo Foto - Dirk Caremans

Wendy. Editor: Wendy Hamerton Email: dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz Design and Production: www.snaffledesign.co.nz Graphic Design: Sarah Gray Email: sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz Sales & Advertising: Jeremy Gardiner Email: jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz Copyright Š Snaffle Design and Dressage NZ 2017

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CONTENT

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Don't miss out on your tickets to the training masterclass with the Olympic & World Champion Charlotte Dujardin...

CHARLOTTE!

FEI WORLD CUP & OLYMPIA REVIEW

QUESTION OF THE MONTH

Read it all here...

Mitavite question of the month, have your queries answered by the best in NZ...

JUDGING THE SCALE

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GRASS

STRENGTH TRAINING

OUT & ABOUT

TRIBUTE TO...

We remember and celebrate the wonderful life of Dressage NZ Stalwart Shirley Watts...

the most expensive and valuable horse feed. Article by Dr Lucy Waldron...

for Dressage Riders, from our resident Personal Trainer Ricki Jacobs...

We catch up with Auckland's finest, Robin Potter...

We have the latest results from all across this wonderful country of ours...

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Christchurch, NZ Hawera, NZ

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Hawera

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NEWS

NEWS LINDA WARREN-DAVEY PROMOTED TO FEI 3* JUDGE December 2016 CDI-W Salzburg was the venue for FEI Course directors Dr Dieter Schüle and Ghislain Fouarge to put a number of national judges through their paces for promotion to FEI 3* judges, and also a stringent test for promotion from 3* to 4*.

requirements of attending clinics, judging at national events, sitting-in and shadow judging during the past year. Congratulations Linda.

NZ’s Linda Warren-Davey was a successful candidate for 3* promotion having travelled many thousands of kilometres to meet the FEI

The promotion exam from 3* to 4* resulted in five new 4* judges. Sarah Pidgley (GBR), Peter Storr (GBR), Eva-Maria Vint Warmington (EST),

Another successful “down under” candidate was Kerri Swan-Bates from Australia

Cesar Torrente (COL) and Lee Tubman (CAN). The exam included a written test, a shadow judging exam during the CDI-W Salzburg and a one on one session with theoretical questions. Peter Storr (GBR) is a regular trainer in NZL and Cesar Torrente (COL) is on the judges panel for the Pacific League World Cup Final at Manfeild in February.

JILL GOULD MEMORIAL GARDEN DEDICATED AT MCLEANS ISLAND Canterbury Championships in early December was an opportunity for South Island riders and officials, and family of the late Jill Gould to gather together and remember Jill through the dedication of a memorial garden at the South Island NEC.

Corporate . Bridal . Individual creations

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Jill’s family were very touched that the South Island riders and Dressage NZ had wanted to do this for Jill, and loved the garden. They said this was exactly the sort of garden Jill would have also loved.

WE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A WONDERFUL NEW YEAR


NEWS

NEWS NZL YOUNG RIDER TEAM TO COMPETE AT BONEO PARK Boneo Park on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula is the venue for the Victorian Under 25 Championships scheduled for 13/15 January 2017

This is a valuable opportunity for these riders made possible by the generosity of Australian owners and organisers.

Melissa Galloway (Marlborough), Kate Tobin (Wellington) and Lucarne Dolley (Waikato), all members of the Dressage NZ U25 Squad, have been selected to ride as a team on borrowed horses.

The tour will be self funded by the riders but supported by Dressage NZ who will fund team manager for the tour, Judy Alderdice. Good luck to this young team. It’s never easy on borrowed horses but we know you will represent us well.

FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE After an apprehensive wait, New Zealand has been pipped at the final halt by Chinese Taipei in the 2016 FEI World Dressage Challenge Team classification Although results published on the FEI website are still provisional, it appears a great performance by Louisa Yeh in the Prix St Georges was the decider. Chinese Taipei Total 410.132 Louisa Yeh - Wintertraum PSG 70.461% 140.921pts Neil Lin - Lucky Lordi PSG 68.224% 136.447pts

New Zealand Total 403.816 Vanessa Way - NRM Andreas PSG 68.750% 137.500pts Melissa Galloway Windermere Johanson W PSG 66.974% 133.947pts Louisa Ayres - Playmate PSG 66.184 % 132.368pts Congratulations to Chinese Tapei and to all other countries for a great contest. You can keep view Team & Individual results as they become final at: http://inside.fei.org/fei/events/feiworld-challenge/dressage/results

Yi-Tsung - Chen Roila PSG 66.382% 132.763pts JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 7


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

FEI GENERAL ASSEMBLY VOTES IN FAVOUR OF OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC RULE CHANGES The FEI General Assembly voted overwhelmingly in favour of the proposed format changes for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo 2020, which will now go to the IOC Executive Board for final approval in 2017. Under the new proposals, the number of athletes in national teams will be reduced to three, and the drop score, which previously allowed for a team’s worst score to be discarded, will be removed. The use of a reserve combination for teams will remain in place, but will be even more important and will be a key element in ensuring horse welfare. “This was a really important vote for the future of our sport if we are to increase universality in accordance with the recommendations of Olympic Agenda 2020”, FEI President Ingmar De Vos said after the vote. “We need to increase the number of participating nations at the Olympic Games but within our existing quota of 200. Reducing team members to three per nation was probably the only way to boost the number of flags. Of course this now has to be approved by the IOC, but it opens the door to countries that previously could only see the Olympics as a distant dream. “There were some National Federations that didn’t agree with the proposal, but that’s all part of the democratic process. Now we need to work together to make this a success.”

The proposed changes are detailed below for dressage. • Teams of three horse/athlete combinations per nation, no drop score • Each directly qualified team may bring a reserve rider/horse combination, or horse only • One individual per nation not represented by a qualified team (no composite teams from the World Rankings) • Determine Team medals solely through results of Grand Prix Special (no longer a combination of Grand Prix and Grand Prix Special scores) • Introduce new “heat system” (including “lucky losers”) for Grand Prix: 18 individuals to qualify from Grand Prix to Grand Prix Freestyle (best two from each of the 6 heats, plus the next 6 with the best overall results) • 8 top teams (24 starters) from Grand Prix to qualify for Grand Prix Special • What does this mean for New Zealand? • New Zealand will have the possibility (subject to qualification) to send one individual or a team. It will no longer be possible to send two individuals • There is no possibility for an individual combination to progress to the Grand Prix Special, which also

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used to be a qualifier for the Freestyle. Only eight teams (24 riders) will qualify for the Special which will be the only test which counts for team medal classification. The 8th place team in 2016 was France who scored an average 71.914% in the Grand Prix • The top 18 riders from the Grand Prix go straight through to the Freestyle for the Individual medal - this will mean a much higher % will be required by any individual New Zealand rider to go through to a second round. The 18th placed horse at Rio scored 75.029%. Even taking out one of the four German combinations (the only nation to have four in the top 18) 74.9% was the top 18 cut off. SO WHAT DO THESE CHANGES MEAN FOR NEW ZEALAND? The Olympic Charter talks about participation. The proposed changes will increase the number of flags in the first round - the Grand Prix. Television, public viewing and popularity of participating sports are also high on the priority for the IOC as they attempt to modernise the Olympics and attract younger audiences. The FEI is very conscious of both factors, participation and popularity. They have come up with a formula that on the face of it seems to satisfy both needs. To


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

increase the number of flags in round one, and to make for better public viewing, increased understanding of how the medals are decided, greater interest because of shorter events, and theoretically more exciting events in the team and individual medal rounds. Horse welfare is also cited as a reason for change, but the 2016 games demonstrated that even with a team of four, riders can feel some pressure to start for the team. Looking at media comment and noting general comments from around the world, it seems the jury is still out on the effect these proposals will have on Olympic equestrian sport across all disciplines after Tokyo. Will this new format see increased television viewing and ticket sales for dressage? Or should we be looking to introducing cheerleading on horseback - cheerleading is being trialled as a new Olympic sport.

And on that slightly flippant note, do we think that any athlete good enough to compete at the Olympics should be called a “lucky loser” in official FEI Olympic documentation? But it seems you can be “lucky loser” and go through to the Freestyle round for the individual medal. Those riders are neither lucky nor losers. The terminology in my humble opinion is a denigration of the achievement of those riders - I wonder how the IOC views “lucky losers”? Eddie the Eagle? It is not only the Olympic standards themselves that impact sport participation at the Olympics, but the support from national Olympic committees and their own expectations and internal qualification criteria. Is participation enough if you qualify? In some countries and some sports - yes. In others - no. But that debate is for another time. Quality, Custom Horse Coach Manufacturers

In the meantime, we need to focus on WEG 2018 and await with interest November 2017 when the 2020 qualification procedures will be confirmed. Timeline for finalisation of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic formats: February 2017 – FEI proposals go to the IOC Executive Board May 2017 – IOC Programme Commission make recommendations to the IOC Executive Board July 2017 – IOC Executive Board decides on events and quotas November 2017 – FEI General Assembly in Montevideo (URU) finalises the proposal for qualification procedures (quota distribution and eligibility).

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JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 9


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

CONVINCING WINS IN FEI WORLD CUP DRESSAGE Germany’s Dorothee Schneider and Showtime FRH were convincing winners of the fourth leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2016/2017 Western European League at Salzburg. From a starting field of 13, the world number three and Rio 2016 Olympic Games gold-medal-winning partnership finished more than five full percentage points ahead of runners-up Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez and Lorenzo from Spain. It was a really strong day for the German contingent with Jessica von Bredow-Werndl who slotting into third place with Unee BB ahead of compatriot Fabienne Lutkemeier and D’Agostini FRH in fourth. However 47-year-old Schneider and her 10-yearold gelding set a whole new standard when posting 85.292 for a fabulous test when fifth-last to go. Despite the fact that this was Showtime’s first start since the Olympic Games in August, Schneider and Showtime won the Grand Prix, appearing to be in a league of their own. “It’s the same Freestyle as Rio, we started doing it in May this year and it’s very perfect for this horse!” said Schneider who believes Showtime has even more to give. “He’s young and needs a little bit more power, but he has so much rhythm and energy and I know we can improve” she said. The FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2017 Final in Omaha, Nebraska (USA) next March is her target, but earning one of the three slots available to German riders is no simple task. “I hope to compete in Amsterdam (NED) and Neumunster (GER) and we just have to see how it works out” she said today.

RESULT: 1, Showtime FRH (Dorothee Schneider) GER 85.292; 2, Lorenzo (Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez) ESP 80.273; 3, Unee BB (Jessica von Bredow-Werndl) GER 79.275; 4, D’Agostino FRH (Fabienne Lutkemeier) GER 78.222; 5, Cennin (Madeleine Witte-Vrees) NED 77.027; 6, Du Soleil (Kristy Oatley) AUS 76.998; 7, Imperio (Hubertus Schmidt) GER 76.131; 8, Finckenstein TSF (Rikke Svane) DEN 74.896; 9, Foco Loco W (Borja Carrascosa) ESP 74.567; 10, Don Gregorius (Inna Logutenkova) UKR 72.857; 11, DSP Rodriguez (Astrid Neumayer) AUT 72.628; 12, Sohnlein Brilliant MJ (Belinda Weinbauer) AUT 72.397; 13, Fuerstano (Juliane Brinkhorst) GER 71.602.

HESTER WINS AND VALEGRO BOWS OUT ON A NIGHT TO REMEMBER AT OLYMPIA On an electrifying night at the London International Horse Show, Carl Hester won the fifth leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2016/2017 Western European League with Nip Tuck. This was a back-to-back double on home ground for the 49-yearold British star and his 12-year-old gelding, but the man who has been largely responsible for placing British dressage firmly on centre stage in recent years had to battle for the limelight, as his victory was quickly followed by an emotional farewell performance by his stable-star, Valegro. After his freestyle win Carl said” My plan is to get to Omaha (for the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2017 Final). I started at Lyon and will next head to Amsterdam and

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keep room in the diary for another one if need be. I last competed in a World Cup Final in 2005 with Escapado.” The Grand Hall at Olympia was packed to capacity as reigning FEI World Cup™ champions, Hans Peter Minderhoud and Glock’s Flirt, filled runner-up spot ahead of Dutch compatriot and 2010 champion Edward Gal in third with Glock’s Voice. A fourth-place finish for Judy Reynolds has promoted the 35-year-old Irish phenomenon to the top of the Western European League going into the next leg of the series in Amsterdam (NED) in February.  Hester, whose own career is filled with major highlights, is the man who created the fairytale partnership between Charlotte Dujardin and the amazing gelding Valegro who, together, have become icons in the sport over the last five years. Breaking world records was all in a day’s work for this sensational duo, but just a few short months after adding to their haul of Olympic gold in Rio, the 14-year-old horse was tonight officially retired from the sport after presenting one last stunning performance of their winning London 2012 Olympic Games Freestyle test. Hester, who trained and mentored the pair, said “it has been a such a joyous occasion – I know everyone wanted it to be sad but how could anyone be sad to see Valegro go out so fit and well and happy – it’s been a happy sad day!”  Dujardin described Valegro as “just the perfect horse, with the biggest heart in the world, he always gave me his very


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

FEI Bureau Member Karoly Fugli (HUN), Dorothee Schneider (GER) with Showtime FRH, President of the Jury Katrina Wuest (GER) and CEO of Horsedeluxe Event Josef Gallner (AUT) and represenative of Glock Horse Performance Center, Christian Clerici (AUT). Photo: FEI/Tomas Holcbecher

best!”, while fellow-Olympian, Richard Davison, put it all in perspective when he said tonight that it was “the alchemy” between Hester, Dujardin and this very special horse that has been key to this extraordinary success story. RESULT: 1, Nip Tuck (Carl Hester) GBR 84.669; 2, Glock’s Flirt (Hans Peter Minderhoud) NED 81.880; 3, Glock’s Voice (Edward Gal) NED 80.467; 4, Vancouver K (Judy Reynolds) IRL 78.269; 5, Rubins Nite (Hayley WatsonGreaves) 77.574; 6, Warlocks Charm (Henriette Andersen) GBR 76.987; 7, Markov (Michael Eilberg) GBR 75.934; 8, Weekend Fun (Emile Faurie) GBR 75.831; 9, Thriller (Katja Gevers) NED 74.963; 10, Rustique (Mai Tofte Olesen) DEN 73.303; 11, Amorak (Stephanie Brieussel) FRA 72.112; 12, Xenofonte d’Atela (Miguel Ralao Duarte) POR 71.116; 13, After You (Ludovic Henry) FRA 69.843.

Great Britain’s Carl Hester won the fifth leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2016/2017 Western European League with Nip Tuck at London Olympia (GBR) Photo: Jon Stroud Media/FEI

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INTERNATIONAL RIDER INTERVIEW

Carl and Vanessa enjoy the moment with NRM KH Arion and NSC Pronto.

CARL HESTER DRESSAGE ROYALTY ON KIWI SAND Article by Wendy Hamerton

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A sunny Taranaki day - a cloudless sky and a great view of Mt Taranaki Could it get better? It became sublime in this order (of time - not of importance!) Watch Carl teach Watch Carl gallop down Oakura Beach on NRM KH Arion Eat whitebait for lunch with Carl (thanks Brooke Hughes)


INTERNATIONAL RIDER INTERVIEW Then it was on to NZL for a holiday - well sort of a holiday. Big thanks to Vanessa Way for inviting me along to watch NRM Andreas and NRM Arawn in action under Carl’s watchful eye. To the uninitiated it doesn’t seem like there’s much going on. There’s a sense of calm and it seems all quite casual when you’re sitting in the coach’s hut. There’s even a bit of time for a bit of chat. But there’s a lot happening out in the arena. In brief because I wasn’t there to report on the lessons step by step:

An early morning start led me to Oakura on the west coast, which really is the heartland of dressage in Taranaki. Who should be there teaching but Carl Hester - the king of dressage. He is dressage royalty without doubt and his subjects adore him. Riders and horses alike. He had just been in Melbourne giving a Master Class courtesy of PDS Saddles and had anticipated around 800 people to attend. But it was standing room only at Werribee with 2,500 ardent fans packing the stands

REPETITION: Not just for the sake of repetition, but to constantly be improving the quality and balance of the work through half halts. and paying attention to the correct positioning of horse in each movements required in the test. EXERCISES: Must be relevant to any problems being encountered and to assist the horse develop the balance, activity, connection and rhythm RIDER: Must sit in balance, give clear aids, and keep the contact soft and elastic. MISTAKES: To ride accurately from marker to marker in training. “Everyone can make a mistake. That’s OK. But it’s how often you make the same mistake” Enough said REWARDS: Rewarding the horses with a break, making sure their gear is comfortable. Basic. Sounds pretty simple really. And that for me was the essence - the simplicity and the basics. No tricks. Carl then was generous enough to have a chat about a few things dressage. I mean, what can you ask him that he probably hasn’t been asked 100 times before? ON THE BIGGEST THREATS FACING DRESSAGE GLOBALLY: We need to increase the popularity of dressage somehow - without it becoming “not dressage”. We lost Hickstead in the UK this year which was extremely sad. Riders have to step up to help more. I am encouraging riders to give seminars and clinics to raise money so we can help get Hickstead back. I have just donated £1,000 from a clinic. Riders must start

to realise these events aren’t just put on for their pleasure. Dressage “eats itself ’ too much. There’s a lot of jealousy. It’s a “bloody hard” sport. People are trying to do it well, but sometimes there’s grandstanding. Most people are trying really hard to do it well and be nice to their horse. Cut them some slack. ON RIDING: Riders need to have more of a duty to ride better. We’ve never had so many seminars - riders should read more books (about training) ON RIO: There was a great atmosphere

between the riders. The “O” (5*) judges were a lovely bunch of people who upheld the principles of the sport. They seemed much more “open” this time. It was a shame there weren’t many spectators, but the athletes and teams were like a big family. ON THE PROPOSED FEI FORMAT FOR FUTURE WEG & OLYMPICS:

Well we do have it make it better for spectators. I am not sure that I agree with the team of 3 with no discard score though. If someone does get eliminated or has to retire it obviously has a huge impact on the other two riders who have worked so hard and sacrificed a lot to be there too. The FEI is working hard to popularise the sport. We do want the best horses there for the public and not lower the standard. ON THE NEW FEI FREESTYLE SYSTEM FOR SCORING FREESTYLES IN THE WESTERN EUROPEAN LEAGUE: It’s been

interesting. I couldn’t figure out how Isabell Werth had a higher mark for Degree of Difficulty than me at a recent event. So we had a chat about it and compared papers and sure enough she was just ahead. The judges really need to know your floor plan well so they can concentrate on marking the test rather than wondering where you’re supposed to be going next. It does make it more technically demanding and difficult for riders as you have to stick to the plan you have submitted - you still have a spare line though. ON THE WORLD CUP FINAL IN OMAHA 2017: Nip Tuck (Barney) has

gone well with a second place at Lyon

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INTERNATIONAL RIDER INTERVIEW

ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUNG RIDERS: I think it is

important that young riders do not specialize too early. They need to learn it’s not enough to ride mistake free - they need to learn a better way of going. Young riders generally don’t ride well enough outside of Holland and Germany. They also need to have a better theoretical knowledge about dressage. ON SUCCESS: When you’re young

on 85 % in the Freestyle and I have two more qualifiers which I think will need to get at least 2nd in to qualify for a place at Omaha. ON THE DOUBLE BRIDLE: I ride just about all my work in a snaffle and I prefer the feel. But I think Kyra Kyrklund is right - there is a bigger skill necessary to ride in a double - more collection - refinement of the aids. I like to compete in the double. That still would be my choice if I had the option ON THE FUTURE OF UK DRESSAGE: We might not be a Gold

you measure everything by success. But you must not feel defeated if you don’t win. When I have a great ride and I know the horse couldn’t have gone any better, it wouldn’t make me feel better if I had won. Not every horse is a perfect specimen. Success is training a horse well with harmony and unison. WHO WERE YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES IN THE EARLY DAYS - DID YOU HAVE A DRESSAGE HERO WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG:

No - not really as I didn’t really get into the competition scene until I was a bit older. But looking back I have to mention Jennie Loriston-Clark. I was 3rd in a Talent Spotting Competition and won a £20 voucher which got me

four £5 lessons with Jennie. I had to ride an hour and a half through the New Forest and back again to have my lessons. She always impressed me with her down to earth attitude - she was the same with everyone no matter who they were. If the arena needed raking, she would be there giving a hand. The other person who had a big influence was Bert Rutten. I had started to do quite well and so I thought that horses would just come my way quite easily. It was a bit depressing when they didn’t. Bert just said “Well, there’s no point in sitting around waiting for success. You have to work for it. You just have to train what you can afford. So I spent my only £4,000 on a young horse and got on with it. We then adjourned to the beach - a typical slightly windswept Taranaki beach day - virtually deserted but suddenly another familiar face - equine artist Rosemary Parcell who was in the area to deliver a beautiful painting to Carl. It was a such treat to watch Carl and Vanessa gallop off down the beach he said it was maybe 30yrs since he’d enjoyed doing that - and watching him disappear around the rocks on the point it could have been any rider in the world - but it was the king of dressage having a blast.

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Melissa Galloway // Watson Equine Photography

Medal team without Valegro as we were in 2012, but Charlotte and I both have very nice young horses and I believe we will still continue to be medal contenders.


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MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH

Do you have a query regarding the care, maintenance or training of your dressage horse? Go to the DressageNZ Bulletin Facebook page and submit your training questions A question will be selected and sent to one of our participating coaches to answer for you! The winning question will receive a bag of Mitavite feed selected by the expert Mitavite team for your horse! Thank you Mitavite – for supporting Dressage NZ Congratulations Angela!

Photo: Libby Law

YOUR MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH QUESTION FROM ANGELA HALES: I have a weak 4 year old horse just starting his dressage training. He was broken in last year and has done some hacking and light work in the arena. What type of exercises will develop his strength and topline, and at what stage do I increase his feed to get the “forward controllable” energy without heating him up?

ANSWER FROM ANDREA RAVES: Thank you for your question Angela Now as a 4 year old you can work your horse a little more intensively in the arena. To help him with the buildup of muscle and his relaxation, I would continue hacking and also lunge him once a week with side reins or side running reins. The lunging will help him with the development of lateral bend, and it also establishes balance and ensures that he works over his back. With a four year old I would like to see that the horse is comfortably working at level 1 and towards level 2. At this stage of his training, and following the “Scale of Training”, we develop Rhythm, Suppleness, Contact, Impulsion and work on Straightness. To strengthen him in his dressage work it is most important that he is going forward and is working over his back. Lots of transitions between the paces, like walk to trot and back/trot to canter and back as well as between working paces and lengthened strides

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will assist your progress re impulsion. Circle work and leg yielding will work towards Straightness. If your horse does an exercise well do not repeat it over and over again as that will tire him out and this could lead to resistance. A 30 minutes session at this level should be enough. Three days maximum of flat work in a row should then be followed the next day by a hack, a lunge session, or day off to help the muscle recovery and the build up of a top line and keep his mind fresh. To answer the second part of your question regarding the feeding: From a training point of view I feel that if you have increased the workload and find that your horse is getting lazy and you cannot get him to go forward without you having to nag him it could be time to feed him more hard feed. Write down any changes you make to your program for future reference. It is always a bit of a trial and error process to find out what works best for each individual horse’s development.

Andrea Raves


MITAVITE EQUINE NUTRITION

LOW SUGAR, LOW STARCH DIETS FOR THE HIGH PERFORMANCE HORSE Article by Gail Sramek BAppSc Agr– Nutritionist to Mitavite

High performance diets have historically been based on a cereal grain ration fed with roughage. The high level of sugar and starches in the grains provide energy for the horse to perform, but it can come with complications. Raw, cracked and rolled grains are poorly digested and can lead to acidosis, laminitis or colic by overloading the digestive tract. Although more modern processing methods such as steam extrusion improve the digestion of grains, owners and trainers are finding not all horses need a high cereal grain diet to obtain the energy they need to compete at elite levels. Well digested, low starch, low sugar, high oil, nutrient dense concentrates are becoming more popular to provide horses with the correct level of energy, protein, vitamins, minerals and electrolytes without the complications of a cereal grain based ration. By feeding a nutrient balancer with no added grains, such as Mitavite® Munga® with a steam extruded rice based energy supplement such as Vitamite® Show Primer® and added oils

and super fibres such as Performa 3® oil and Speedibeet®, sugar and starch levels in the ration may be lowered. This type of ration can have the following benefits: • Improved Behaviour – By keeping sugar and starch levels to a minimum, horses that are easily excited or hard to manage may be kept calmer. Poorly digested sugar and starch in the small intestine can pass through to the hindgut and produce heat, acid and gas that may contribute to agitation and excitability in some horses. • Reduce the Effects of Metabolic Disorders – Poorly digested and high levels of sugar and starch can exacerbate some metabolic disorders. • Minimise Digestive Disorders – Lactic acid, heat and gas are produced in the hind gut when sugars and starches pass through the small intestine undigested. This can affect the delicate pH and balance of microbes in the hindgut, that may lead to disorders such as hindgut acidosis, colic and diarrhoea.

• Provide an Alternative Energy Source – High oil feeds offer an alternative form of energy to a cereal grain based ration. Oils are digested in the small intestine, taking the load off the hind gut, to provide a slow release, cool energy source, providing an alternative to feeding sugar and starch. Cereal grains certainly have a place in some rations, although feeding a ration that provides energy in a cool, well digested form that is low in sugar and starch and balanced for protein, vitamins and minerals can be a favourable alternative for high performance sport horses. For more information on feeding your horse, please visit the Mitavite website at www.mitavite.com .

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 17


JUDGE PROFILE

Robin Potter presenting Betty Brown with her awards at the recent Waitemata Championships. Photo: Nicole Hilder

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JUDGE PROFILE

ROBIN POTTER – JUDGING THE SCALE Article by Jane Hilton

Waitemata Championships was the swan song for Waitemata Dressage committee member Robin Potter as she moves to Pukekohe early next year. Robin was awarded Life Membership of Dressage Waitemata at the Saturday Prizegiving. Waitemata Dressage President Heather Hilder talked of Robin’s commitment to the sport, being an Area Delegate for the past 3 years for Waitemata Area and a Judge Mentor for the past 2 years and a List 2 judge since 2004 plus being a hard working and generous committee member for the last 5 years. Riders will tell you that Robin is a respected judge, who is consistent, fair and writes specific and detailed constructive comments. I asked Robin some questions about her career as a Judge. WHEN DID YOU START JUDGING AND WHY?

I started judging in 1991, primarily because the sport was short of judges - then as it is now - and I enjoyed the challenge. I had been involved with the Waitemata District Horse Society prior to the split into the discipline areas and I just wanted to ride and be involved. We had little formal training in those days but established judges in the area advised and trained me. I had a background in horse breed societies and in breeding that helped. In 2001 I went to Germany and became a Hanoverian Stud Book classifier – I think I have always had a judging mentality – I just like it! WHAT CHANGES HAVE YOU SEEN DURING THAT TIME AND WHAT DO YOU EXPECT TO SEE IN THE FUTURE?

There has been a big change. In those early years, the norm was a percentage mark in the 60’s. These days there are more horses and riders achieving higher marks and the 70

percent barrier no longer exists. We have more horses and riders at Grand Prix level. This is due to more national support, squad training, good regular coaching by trainers who have travelled internationally and superior horses. WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FACING JUDGES IN OUR SPORT?

Understanding the scale of training and being able to judge to the standards set. I will sit with training Judges – discuss discrepancies in marks, discuss and help them understand the scale. WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN A HORSE WHEN THEY ENTER THE ARENA?

The scale of training is foremost in my mind.

Lower levels horses that have good rhythm are active, supple and obedient. As the levels progress so does the demands of the scale. If the horse meets the criteria, they will get good marks. WHAT 3 PIECES OF ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THE AMATEUR RIDER WHO ENTERS THE ARENA?

YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BREEDING. TELL US MORE ABOUT THAT.

I started breeding in 1986 with a Thoroughbred mare to Warmblood stallions available at the time. In 1984 I bought a Hanoverian bred filly that proved to be the foundation mare for my subsequent horses. Some were good and did well but I never bred a superstar!

YOU ARE MOVING FROM NORTH AUCKLAND – WHAT WILL YOU BE DOING NEXT?

I will continue judging in Show Hunter and Dressage. I’ll continue to be a Judge Mentor as long as they still want me! Keep in touch with the equestrian world. I will continue part time with pharmacy work and save to go to WEG in North Carolina in 2018. We may well have a team there and I want to be there to see that! Thank you Robin for your contribution to the sport and particularly your efforts on the Waitemata Dressage committee.

Preparation. Execution. Accuracy. I write those comments a lot!

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Have you ever joked that your horse eats better than yourself? We are very pleased to have Fitfood joining us as monthly contributors, sharing tips and ideas for how we can add that little bit more spark to our training and performances through wholesome, simple nutrition.

HOW TO HAVE A HEALTHY CHRISTMAS It’s that time of the year again, Christmas, the holiday season, that festive time of year when everyone, myself included, indulges a little more than necessary and eats a little more than they should. There are some studies that claim the average Christmas / New Year weight gain is a mere half kilo while others claim it can be as much as 3 kilos of weight gain. Although the jury is out on exactly how much weight is gained there is one guarantee, the scales are more likely to go up rather than down! With all the office Christmas parties and festive merriment our self-discipline and sense of fullness goes out the window. It’s only once a year I hear everyone say, and because Christmas only lasts for a limited period, many of us see it as a green light to overeat and over drink. What we really need to do is break this way of thinking because although Christmas is only once a year there are so many other holidays throughout the year as well such as Easter, birthdays, anniversary days, family BBQs and the like. If we overindulge with every

holiday, BBQ these no longer become one offs but habit forming. Suddenly without realizing that once a year holiday binge is now a twice monthly binge and as we age the weight slowly but surely keeps piling on.

explains why we get bored with eating just one type of food. So, with the Christmas table being abundantly filled with assorted sweet and savory treats it is tempting to keep eating long after we have had enough.

There are a few other reasons as well why we over eat specifically at Christmas, such as how the food is presented, one US study found that using the best glassware and crockery lays promise that the food will be amazing and this study backs the ideal that people feel the taste is greater when presented in this way rather than on a paper plate or napkin, and if something tantalizes your taste buds to this effect you are more likely to go back for a second or third helping. Another problem with Christmas is allowing too much choice of foods thereby further encouraging over indulgence. For instance, we have a traditional turkey, plus a glazed leg of ham, chicken and maybe a roast leg of lamb, not to mention the huge array of desserts on offer. We’re all susceptible to sensoryspecific satiety, a phenomenon that

So, are there ways to try and prevent over indulgence and curb your caloric intake this silly season? Fortunately, there are a few ways to help you enjoy the holidays without ruining all your hard work throughout the year. Let’s look at a few easy ways to keep your waistline from exploding over the holiday break. Don’t feel the need to eat croissants, bacon and calorie filled sugary drinks just because its Christmas. Skip the big brekkie and opt for something light, tasty and satisfying such as Hot Smoked Salmon with scrambled eggs, whole wheat toast and a small glass of fresh cold pressed juice instead. It’s a far healthier option and will keep you fuller for longer and not have you sugar crashing before lunch is even served. On the other hand, don’t skip breakfast for fear of over doing your daily calorie

Fitfood Eat Fit. Live Well.

Health food for busy people. Designed by Nutritionists prepared & cooked by health food specialist Chefs, using free range, organic, wholefoods. Vacuum sealed for freshness. Delivered to your door, or click & collect. Please visit www.fitfood.nz for our menus & full nutritional information.

www.fitfood.nz

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RIDER HEALTH AND NUTRITION

“Suddenly without realizing that once a year holiday binge is now a twice monthly binge and as we age the weight slowly but surely keeps

intake because you will more likely be famished when lunch does finally roll around and hungry people make far worse food decisions. If you are not much of a breakfast eater try a small snack of fruit or yoghurt to take the edge off your hunger and help prevent you from gorging. When you finally sit down to your large buffet style lunch select the foods you want then step away. If food is within an easy reach you will be more inclined to eat mindlessly. Resist the temptation to start filling your plate at one end of the table and continuing to add to it until you reach the other. Remember portion control, this can be extremely difficult for even the healthiest of eaters but before you pick up your plate, stop, and look at what’s on offer, decide what you enjoy the most and then help yourself to only these things instead of filling your plate with everything there is. Another easy

rule to save on hundreds of calories is to not graze at all the nibbles left out for the kids like nuts, crisps, candy canes and chocolate. Christmas lunch or dinner with family and friends often means we spend longer sitting around the table talking, but the longer we linger, the more likely we are to keep eating even if we’ve had enough. Instead clear the table when everyone has finished eating and move into another room to continue the conversation. What about after Christmas? If you are the Boxing Day sales type bargain hunter, ensure you keep an array of healthy snacks on hand to stop you leaning towards high sugar and fat laden café style foods. Healthier snacks also allow for better mental clarity and constant energy to battle through all the other weary shoppers. Think of things like raw, unsalted nuts and seeds that are high in good fats and will keep energy levels constant.

Another big factor that is often neglected when it comes to calories in the holiday season is alcohol. Alcohol is packed with empty calories. Research shows that alcohol not only increases our appetite but also weakens our ability to make good food choices. Add ice to alcoholic drinks to help dilute them and go for lower alcohol drinks such as low carb beer or punch. Finally, earn your treats. This means just because it’s the season to be silly it doesn’t mean it is the season to stop exercising or sit around and do nothing but eat. Exercise will help maintain your weight during the holidays. If the gym isn’t your thing try going for a walk or do an activity like touch football with the whole family because exercise shared makes it easier to do. Aside from that, Happy Holidays, enjoy in moderation and until next year, eat fit and live well.

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IN MEMORIAM

TRIBUTE TO SHIRLEY WATTS

Fissenden Trophy presentation by Karen Trotter Chair of Dressage - 2011

FROM AUCKLAND MANUKAU DRESSAGE GROUP

To our dressage group Shirley was many things – Patron, Life Member, President, Dressage NZ Delegate for over fifteen years, and Fund Raiser extraordinaire. On Friday the 18th of November we said goodbye to Shirley at a service held in her memory. The Auckland Manukau Clubrooms was full to overflowing with her family, friends and associates from numerous walks of her busy life. Shirley was group President for many years including last year when she came “out of retirement” to help get the group back on track. She had a huge passion for dressage, in particular for doing whatever it took to make AMDG “the best” group in the country. We don’t have to look far at

our beautiful grounds at Clevedon to see evidence of Shirley’s work. The two huge all-weather surfaces, outstanding clubrooms, yards and stables are all results of her drive for improvement. At the memorial service, we heard about many of the other parts of Shirley’s life – Mother, Grandmother, Great Grandmother, Racehorse Trainer, Show Jumper, Showie, Showing judge, intrepid international traveller. Shirley competed in dressage until 2012 and was seen out and about on her lovely grey, Craighaven Allanon at Level 5 in that year. The 2017 AMDG Championship show in January has been aptly named the “Shirley Watts Memorial Show” FROM DRESSAGE NEW ZEALAND

Shirley Watts will be remembered for her passionate contribution to both her area group and Dressage New

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Zealand. Shirley‘s enthusiasm and drive left many younger members in her wake. She was a real “people person” and she and her great friend Adrienne Murdoch hosted the FEI World Dressage Challenge judges at Taupo on many occasions, finding the best cafes for lunch time dining and showing them the local sights. The international judges were always charmed by her vitality and hospitality. Organising the annual dressage conference in Auckland was no bother on more than one occasion and it was Shirley at the airport to pick up Dressage NZ officials and take them to the hotel through Auckland rush hour traffic. In 2011, Shirley was awarded the Kaye Fissenden Memorial Trophy for an Outstanding Contribution to Dressage NZ - so very deserved.


Special rates for Equestrian Sport NZ members* To take advantage of our special rates, members can book online at: www.interislander.co.nz/Booking/Group-Bookings.aspx and enter reference FA5399 *Membership card must be presented at check in

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 23


NATIONAL EVENT PREVIEW

NEW ZEALAND TO HOST FEI PACIFIC LEAGUE WORLD CUP DRESSAGE FINAL Dressage Flashback to January 1998 - Fast forward to February 2017

It has been nineteen years since New Zealand hosted the FEI Pacific League World Cup Dressage Final. Held at the Ti Papa indoor arena at Brookby in South Auckland, the event featured the Dressage and Jumping Pacific League Finals, both sponsored by Volvo. There have been many changes since 1998. No longer is there a combined jumping and dressage sponsored final. NZL has its own World Cup Jumping League and the Dressage Pacific League comprises only Australia and New Zealand as a unique event, normally held near Melbourne in December. Under the current FEI PAL rules, NZL has hosting rights every third year if we choose to take up the option. At the 1998 event, there was a small tour comprising a Prix St Georges and Intermediate I Freestyle. The judges included Jenny Atkinson, Rosemary Spence, Jan Bird, Helen Ransom, Graeme McCrostie, Helen Hughes -Keen, Jill Gould, Audrey Campbell (all NZL) and Stephen Clarke (GBR) Christine Weal dominated the twelve strong field on Jessica Maxwell’s Witzwilliam, scoring 65.2% in the PSG and 62.56 % in the Freestyle. Others in the field for those who like to reminisce were Kate Holmes-Bowen (Romanov

& Cassius) Kirsty Davies (Just George), Nicoli Fife (Charlton Clem) Julie Finlayson (Mount Topper) Joanne Wilson (My Drummer Boy), Lisa Reid (Clover Bundaberg Rum), Franzi van Bruggen (Wolfgang Amadeus), Miriam Poot (Retzema), Karen Trotter (Windsor Lad) and Vanessa Fechney (Alabama) The Australians came in force at Grand Prix level sending six horses and five riders. The first competition was an Intermediate II and doubled as a TransTasman Challenge. The NZL team of Kallista Field (Waikare) Cindy Kent (Playskool) and Marcia Bayley (Rubicon) had to settle for second place on a total of 3580pts scoring 3rd, 6th and 10th places. The Australians of course did have the advantage of a NZL bred and trained horse in their team, the iconic Mosaic bred by Eric Ropiha and produced by Sharon Field, winning the class on 69.47%. Mary Hanna had purchased Mosaic as her next Olympic mount. Team mates on this occasion were Rachel Downs on the extravagant moving Yardley Charisma, and Matthew Dowsley on Argentille Gullitt. This trio were 1st, 2nd & 4th for a total of 3841 pts. It would be interesting to see how a team challenge would look in 2017. Yardley Charisma went on to win the

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Grand Prix on 64.8%, but Mosaic won the Freestyle on 66.06% and this win earned them the League Final title. Other combinations who contested the Pacific League Final Freestyle back in 1998 were Mary Hanna on her second horse Londoner (64.96%), Matthew Dowsley (Argentille Gullit - 63.94 AUS) Nancy French (Viking - 63.49 - AUS), Kallista Field (Waikare - 63.36) Louisa Hill (Rumplestiltskin - 61.52), Cindy Kent (Playskool - 60.86), Maurice Bruce (Neversfelde Kensington - 60.66 -AUS), Marcia Bayley (Rubicon - 56.34), Lynley Schollum (Ikandanz - 55.74) and Lesley Matheson (Tankard - 52.61%) Judges included Kathinka de Monchy, Joan Matheson, Linda Zang (USA), Mary Seefried (AUS) and Stephen Clarke (GBR And so to 2017. The increase in numbers of Grand Prix horses on our circuit, the increase in the standard and the change of date of the Bates Nationals were all contributing factors around NZL’s decision to bid for the 2017 Pacific League Final. The final must be held between December and February prior to the FEI World Cup Final, so while the Nationals were being held in March it was never a possibility. It is also not financially viable to run this type of


NATIONAL EVENT PREVIEW

event stand alone without substantial sponsorship. Initially there was a lot of interest from Australian riders who indicated they were keen to come and contest the one place to the World Cup Final in Omaha USA next April, but sadly this interest has waned for a number of reasons. Two of the biggest factors which have transpired are the logistics and cost of getting a single horse from our region to Omaha. The host OC (Omaha) contributes towards the rider air fare and accommodation, but the big ticket item, the horse transport is not covered. It would be interesting to know what arrangements are in place for the European horses. Without them the Final would be a fizzer. Now that more spaces are available in the 2017 Pacific League Final more NZL combinations will have the opportunity to start providing they have earned 64% or more in a Grand Prix Freestyle in a CDI ***, CDIW, or newly added to the qualification list, regional event (RE). It is frustrating that this new qualification could not have been known earlier, but NZL is now looking to give as many riders the opportunity as possible within the bounds of the World Cup requirements.

A national Grand Prix is being scheduled in addition to the CDIW, and the same international panel of Katrina Wuest (GER 5*), Mary Seefried (AUS 5*) Anne Praine (FRA 4*), Cesar Torrente (COL 4*), Sue Hobson (NZL 4*) and Helen Hughes-Keen (NZL 4*) will also judge this national division meaning no Grand Prix combination will be excluded from contesting the Burkner Medal for the NZL Grand Prix Championship Corporate tables which include a three course dinner from Hester Guy catering are available for the Musical Spectacular & Freestyle evening on Saturday 4th February at Manfeild Park Contact dressage@inspire.net.nz. General admission tickets can be advanced purchased on www. ticketdirect.co.nz or at the event office. Treat yourselves and support our own Grand Prix heroes who are taking the sport to a level never seen in NZL before See the February issue of the DressageNZ Bulletin for details of who is lining up.

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RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

MOVE WELL TO RIDE WELL Article by Debbie Rolmanis www.dbmuscletherapy.com

The human body is made up of trillions of cells. These cells rely on the nutrients in our food to survive, but their health is also dependent upon receiving mechanical input that is derived from movement.

are no longer part of our daily menu; the supermarket does not require us to chase and catch our dinner, we travel to most places sitting down and if we do any exercise it tends to be concentrated into a small window of time.

This hasn’t changed over the last thousand years, so our bodies are still designed to resist gravity, move a lot, and have lungs full of oxygen.

Ultimately this means that our Thoroughbred-esque, movement dependent bodies are being treated to a life more suited to a 3-legged mule.

However, our change in lifestyle has meant that these ingredients for a healthy and optimally functioning body

This cycle of minimal movement and habitual movement patterns (when we DO move) leads to a chronic imbalance

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If we believe that we are what we eat, we should also believe that we are how we move, too. The way in which we move our bodies should be considered just as important as the food we put in it.

of ‘movement nutrient’ distribution throughout the body. The human body is designed to work as a functioning unit, a complete, interlinked ‘I can’t work without you’ kind of a set-up. Each joint and muscle has its own job, which compliments every other joint and muscle doing theirs. This is all rather lovely until a structure cannot fulfill its job due to being over nourished with movement and breaking down, or being under nourished with movement; ie not being moved at all.


RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

As with eating an unhealthy diet, this movement imbalance in the body ignites a cycle of dysfunction, which eventually manifests as pain and reduced mobility. If you don’t use it, you lose it If you over use it, you lose it too This scenario is happening to many people. Our modern-day bodies have to endure a lifestyle of restrictive/ compressed postures; driving, sitting, and for our equestrian community, riding.

"If you don't use it, you lose it If you over use it, you lose it too" SITTING IS THE NEW SMOKING, SO WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THE BODY WHEN IT SITS DOWN SO MUCH? Gravity. Gravity happens. In a body that is designed to actively resist gravity by standing upright, sitting down takes the ability to resist it away. Gravity then becomes the boss of the body and starts to compress, collapse and squeeze the it inwards and downwards. The head is pushed out and forward, shortening the muscles of the neck and creating tension at the base of the skull (hello headaches) the shoulders are drawn forwards and downwards, shortening the pectoral muscles of the chest. The ribcage starts to drop and the abdomen becomes shorter (goodbye core), effecting the function of the diaphragm, the expansion of the ribs and therefore the lungs, inhibiting the flow of oxygen into the body and the expelling of CO2 and restricting the

mobility of the thoracic spine. The lumbar (lower back) region then decides it needs to behave differently to help out, so it tries to take on more movement than it should. The lower back is designed to be a power transmitter; a portal of force from the legs via the pelvis to enable forward momentum. It is not designed to have large amounts of rotational mobility like the thoracic region. When it tries to be more mobile, the muscles scramble to stabilize it, creating hypertonicity and irritation, which is then felt as pain.

LOWER BACK PAIN The statistics of riders with LBP is not good, with 78% of riders suffering. The above paragraph tells you a little bit about why, but let’s look at a real-life example of what might be happening; Tacking up probably seems like the easiest job of the day, but imagine your shoulders are a bit ‘sticky’ as you have kept your arms in the same position for most of the day; on the steering wheel/ typing on your computer. To get the saddle on, your arms reach above your head. However, your compressed and stuck shoulder joint cannot do the full movement, so you have to push your ribcage forward and arch your back. This movement deactivates your core and leaves the lower back vulnerable to unsupported movement. You won’t realise this is happening every day, every time you put the saddle on, but at some point you will feel a lower back niggle and before you know it your back says hello

to you every morning as you try and get out of bed. The cycle does not stop there because as soon as there is pain in the lower back, the deep spinal stabilizing muscles switch off completely. This means that you are not able to control each segment of the spine, therefore you cannot control your posture or cope with your horses’ movement or asymmetries. This leads to a lack of horse and rider synchronicity; your horse will have to change how he moves leading to a strengthened asymmetry/ loss of performance/lameness.

IT IS ALL ABOUT AWARENESS Knowing where your own body is in time and space is one of the key elements to great movement and great riding. Knowing how each part of your own body moves, and how it should move, is the cornerstone to moving with less pain and more ease. Poor postural habits are the nemesis to good movement. It is only when our bodies are in the correct posture, which means the body is aligned, that is has a chance of working at it’s best. It is admirable to try and contort your body into the perfect riding position for your lesson, or each time you trot past the mirrors, but it is how you move and conduct every physical task throughout the day that will determine how successful you are at attaining great posture on the horse. This means you need to be finding good posture throughout the day and this all starts with being BODY AWARE.

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RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

TAKE A BODY INVENTORY Check in with your body throughout the day and start to really get to know it; what aches, what is a bit sticky, what hurts like hell. A body inventory consists of scanning your body from head to toe and quietly checking in with each area. You don’t want to judge what you find, you just need to start hearing what your body is saying.

KNOW WHAT GOOD POSTURE FEELS LIKE Quite often we have to ‘feel it to believe it’ and this certainly applies to learning about how your body should be posturally aligned. Our bodies are expert cheats, and what feels correct and normal will quite often be anything of the sort! To conserve energy, the body will always find the path of least resistance in every task it has to do. It has a way of moulding itself around dysfunctional areas, so that over time, sitting crooked, looking over your shoulder instead of rotating your upper back, collapsing a hip, hunching your shoulders, sticking your elbows out etc, all start to feel normal. A normal way to function, a normal way to move the body. These things occur because the body has adapted for a structure that cannot fulfil its role, so they are not at all a normal way to move! Changing your posture has to be felt and practiced, so that it then becomes the new, correct normal. My top tip would be to have some expert guidance when learning what correct posture should feel like. It is very difficult to correct your own without help.

DECOMPRESSING We have seen that our movement habits are generally compressive in nature, so the key is to go through some de-compression sequences to keep things moving more as they should.

The following are a few examples of the key areas that we want to keep mobile:

SHOULDER MOBILITY Starting at the top, by keeping the shoulder joints mobile, we can help to eliminate some of the impact of compressive living. You should always be trying to draw the scapula (shoulder blades) softly together and slightly downwards, in EVERYTHING you do. From this posture, tuck your chin in slightly and have the feeling that you are lifting the back of your skull upwards. Now put your thumbs on your hips; your palms should be facing backwards. Next, trace your thumbs up the sides of your body, keeping the elbows high until you reach your armpits. You should now look a bit like this:

From this position, slide your thumbs over the front of your shoulder joint and take the back of the hands behind your head, like this:

THORACIC MOBILITY Keeping the rib cage and thoracic vertebrae mobile is paramount to spinal health. This is the region that should have most rotational movement, but it is the area that suffers a lot from compressive postures. This can be done in a seated position (at your desk, feet flat on the floor); with correct shoulder blade positioning, and hands on your thighs, keeping the pelvis pointing forward, rotate/turn the shoulders to the left slowly, and then to the right. DO NOT fling your head around to trick your body into thinking it is turning!! This might need to be a very small movement initially. Try to keep both feet flat on the floor as you turn. Take an inventory of how the body feels to the left compared to the right, take notice of where it feels sticky and quietly keep asking it to move. Nourishing the body with controlled movements like these, that are repeated often make a massive difference to the health of your musculoskeletal system. Don’t force anything, just move it to where you feel it can go. As soon as you try to force a movement, you have recruited the wrong structure.

HIP MOBILITY Our hips are like that annoying aunt who we try and forget about most of the time, but who come into our lives periodically, shrieking and protesting about neglect, abuse and over work. As riders, the hips are a crucial part of our ability to sit in the saddle in a dignified way, yet we mistreat and abuse them and only remember about them when they clobber us with debilitating pain.

Finally, extend the arms up above your head, keeping shoulder blades slightly towards each other and down. Take 3 deep breaths here and then relax. You can do these seated at your desk throughout the day so there are no excuses to keeping your shoulders more mobile!!

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The great news is that you don’t have to be a gymnast to achieve hips that function a bit better. The key is small, controlled movements that are performed repetitively. If you can think about movement in nutrition terms, the micro (small) nutrients are the ones that keep the system functioning at its best. Small, controlled movement provides the same nourishment for our joints.


RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS Standing with feet hip width apart and shoulder blades together and slightly lowered, bend one knee and lift it up in front of you to hip height like this: If you struggle to balance on one leg, use a wall for balance.

Debbie Rolmanis, founder of db Muscle Therapy is a fully qualified Personal Trainer, Human Sports Massage Therapist and Equine Sports Therapist. Then take the leg out to the side, like this:

Debbie holds a BSc (Equine), BHSAI, Diplomas in Human Personal Training and Sports Therapy and Equine Sports Therapy, all gained in the UK. Debbie currently works/lives in the UK, with regular trips to clients in Germany including successful Grand Prix rider Hayley Beresford.

Complete the circle, so take the leg behind you and then rest it back on the floor. Try and do this regularly throughout the day, if you have a desk job, aim to do some sort of movement for 10 mins out of each hour. This can be divided up into regular minute breaks or larger chunks of time, depending on how you can make it work. Sometimes it helps to set a reminder on your phone that it is time to move. Implementing change is always easier if it is small to start with, and you will be surprised at how small things do add up to great advantages. You ARE how you MOVE Move Well to Ride Well Next Month; Expansion Breathing! JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 29


GRASS – THE MOST EXPENSIVE AND VALUABLE HORSE FEED Article by Dr Lucy Waldron Equine Research Centre, Massey University

Issues for horse paddocks include soil damage from hooves, poor fertiliser history and inappropriate grass species being grown. With the ever increasing numbers of lifestyle blocks being split off from dairy farms, horses are increasingly exposed to high sugar rye and clover pastures, leading to behavioural problems and diseases such as laminitis. So how should we be maximising the efficiency of grass production for the benefit of our horses and ponies? To start with, we need to look at the soil. The quality of the plants growing in your paddocks is a direct reflection of the soil. Understanding the type of soil you have and what minerals are in it, are important first steps to getting good pasture.

There are many choices of fertiliser to use, ranging from ‘organic teas’ to standard inorganic mineral mixes – it’s really up to you. Many fertiliser companies and laboratories offer soil testing and will send out sampling kits with instructions. They will then send you a report which will identify if your soil has excessive or deficient mineral levels, and can even provide a tailor made plan for what lime and fertiliser is required. If you consider this is too complicated or too costly for the paddocks you have, then there are companies in New Zealand that supply generic fertiliser products formulated to meet the main and most common needs of horse paddock soils. Soil pH (acidity or alkalinity) is important. Many paddocks become

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acidic after years of application of cheap phosphate fertiliser and high nitrogen compounds commonly used on dairy pastures. Incorrect pH changes the electrical charge on the inorganic minerals in the soil, making them essentially unavailable for the roots of the plant to absorb, and so no matter how many extra minerals you apply, the grass cannot use them for growth, and the resulting grass for the horse will be less nutritious. Lime is the most common way of adjusting the soil pH (if it is too acidic) and your soil tester will be able to tell you how much you need to achieve optimum pH for grass growth. The type of grass species you sow is important for horses. They require high levels of fibre to maintain the correct


“With rising house and land prices dominating the news in New Zealand, getting the best out of your paddocks has never been so important”

function of their hind gut, which is how they have evolved to generate energy. Most horse owners are aware of the high endophyte ryegrasses, where the endophyte fungus produces toxins that cause staggers. In addition, high levels of sugar cause all manner of problems, from difficult behaviour to laminitis and insulin resistance. Rye and clover are high in sugar and protein, and are also shallow rooted – so for heavy animals, the soil is more likely to become damaged as the root structures are easily broken through to the lower levels of the ground. This can lead to more ‘pugging’ of heavy use areas (e.g. gateways) and poorer drainage over time. Certain grass species that are high in fibre are also deep rooted, which is good for maintaining the biological activity in the topsoil as well as ‘punching holes’ via the roots into deeper levels, improving drainage and being more resistant to hoof damage. In the last ten years I have been experimenting with various high fibre varieties of grasses, and have come up with a mix that is designed (within biological and climatic limitations) to maximise fibre levels throughout the growing season – and it grows a huge amount of biomass when sown in properly managed pastures. Although such types of grass are more expensive than rye and clover mixes, if done correctly they can pay back well in terms of the amount that grows for fresh forage, hay and baleage. I have just taken 41 large square bales of baleage off 5 acres of paddock, for example, with about 30% of it having seed heads, which is when the plant is at its most fibrous. Weed control is a major issue for any pasture, but especially so for horse

owners. Hoof damage from heavy animals opens up bare ground, which is readily colonised by weeds such as docks. Thistles, buttercup, false dandelion, nightshade, pennyroyal, lupins and ragwort are also common horse paddock weeds, and should be removed or sprayed off early in spring when they are young, actively growing plants to prevent them infesting the grassland. Some weeds are not toxic, but will colonise ground where grass should be growing. Others can be very dangerous to horses, causing nerve and brain damage and attacking the liver. For example, ragwort contains a liver toxin that builds up over time and can lead to liver failure and death of the horse. It is not usually consumed when growing as it has a bitter taste – but is more dangerous in hay and baleage when it is tasteless. Buttercup contains a neurotoxin, which manifests as behavioural issues and lack of coordination. There are many more – but probably more appropriate as a separate article on this topic.

replace such losses. Regular harrowing disperses faecal material and takes out rough areas – and again if you remove dung from paddocks, you are extracting useful organic matter and nutrients which will have to be replaced with fertiliser. Likewise you can ‘top’ the grass to keep growth even, but make sure you chop the grass to leave long stalks, as ‘clippings’ like those from lawnmowers are very dangerous to horses and can easily cause colic.

Getting the best pasture from your expensive land means getting the fertility in the soil right, sowing suitable grasses and then managing the paddocks afterwards to make sure weeds are controlled to allow optimum grass coverage. Rotating paddocks with different animals that graze at different levels (sheep or cattle), as well as ‘resting’ areas and alternating which fields you lock up for hay or baleage is all important in keeping paddocks growing well.

Dr Lucy Waldron holds a PhD in animal nutrition and is a fully registered animal nutritionists with the NZ Nutrition Society. She has worked professionally as a nutritionist in all species since 1995 in 48 different countries. She is a Research Fellow at Massey University, and is involved in practical research on novel feeds and supplements. She works with various feed and ingredient companies as well as individual yards and horse owners, including providing training courses at all levels of scientific know-how.

Remember, all grass that is removed is essentially removing nutrients from the soil that are not being replaced – so the soil will need fertilising to

The bottom line is, getting the most out of your paddocks contributes greatly to the nutrition of your horse, meaning less cost in hard feed and less chance of pasture-related problems.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 31


NATIONAL COMPETITION CIRCUIT

KEY DRESSAGE EVENTS 2016/17 NORTH ISLAND RE, ICH & INT EVENTS 2016/17

Venue

Qualifiers

28 Oct

Pryde’s Easifeed FEI World Dressage Challenge

Manfeild Park

INT

N

28/29 Oct

Kieffer/Equiscan CDIW & Heritage Equine CDIY

Manfeild Park

INT

N

28/30 Oct

Central Districts Dressage Champs

Manfeild Park

RE

Y

11/13 Nov

Dressage Waikato Festival

Kihikihi

RE

Y

12/13 Nov

Wellington Dressage Champs

Masterton

RE

Y

19/20 Nov

Gisborne Dressage Champs

Gisborne

RE

Y

27/28 Nov

Northern Hawkes Bay Dressage Champs

Hastings

RE

Y

3/4 Dec

Southern Hawkes Bay Dressage Champs

Dannevirke

RE

Y

9/11 Dec

Waitemata Dressage Champs

Woodhill Sands

RE

Y

17/18 Dec

Taihape Dressage Champs

Taihape

RE

Y

13/15 Jan

Taranaki Dressage Champs

Hawera

RE

Y

14/15 Jan

Northland Dressage Champs

Whangarei

RE

Y

20/22 Jan

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Champs

Clevedon

RE

Y

21/22 Jan

Wairarapa Dressage Champs

Masterton

RE

Y

1/5 Feb

Bates National Championships CDIW/Y/P

Manfeild Park

NCH/INT

Y

1/4 Feb

Pacific League World Cup Final

Manfeild Park

INT

N

7/12 Mar

Horse of the Year Show

Hastings

1/2 April

Equestrian Entries U25 Youth Champs

Taupo NEC

NCH/INT

Y

NCH

AMS only

SOUTH ISLAND RE, ICH EVENTS 12/13 Nov

Otago Dressage Champs

Mosgiel

RE

Y

19/20 Nov

Ashburton Dressage Champs

Ashburton

RE

Y

3/4 Dec

Canterbury Dressage Champs

McLeans Is NEC

RE

Y

9/11 Dec

Southland Dressage Championships

Gore

RE

Y

21/22 Jan

Malborough Dressage Champs

Blenheim

RE

Y

28/29 Jan

Nelson Dressage Champs

Rough Island

RE

Y

10/12 Feb

Harper Horsecoaches SI Dresssage Champs

Gore

ICH

Y

8/9 April

Festival of Future Stars Championships

Canty Ag Park

RE

QUALIFICATION TERMS

RE (Qualifying scores for NCH but not series finals. Squad eligibility scores) REQ (Qualifying scores for NCH, HOY series finals. Squad eligibility scores) Series = Super 5 League, Zilco Musicals, Prestige Futures, AMS Pony & YR Performance League ICH = Island Championship (also REQ) NCH = National Championship CDIY = International Young Rider Event CDIP = International Pony Rider Event YDH = Elite Equine YDH Championships 4,5,6 yr old horses PAL = FEI Pacific League WC™ PALF = FEI Pacific League WC™ Final

32 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017


NATIONAL COMPETITION CIRCUIT

WHAT’S ON NOVEMBER | NORTH ISLAND 27 27/28

MARCH | NORTH ISLAND

Warkworth Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay Regional Championships

LE

12

Dressage Waitemata

LE

REQ

18

MTDG March Dressage Tournament

LE

19

Horowhenua DG Autumn Tornament

LE

REQ

19

Warkworth Dressage

LE

DECEMBER | NORTH ISLAND 3/4

Southern Hawkes Bay Dressage Championship

10

Dressage Taranaki Christmas Cracker

LE

26

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

9/11

Dressage Waitemata Championships

REQ

26

Taupo Dressage Group

TE

17/18

Dressage Taihape Championships

REQ

26

Gisborne Dressage Autumn Series #1

LE

18

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

JANUARY | NORTH ISLAND 8

APRIL | NORTH ISLAND 1/2

Dressage Waitemata

Equestrian Entries U25 Dressage Champs

NCH

LE

13/15

Dressage Taranaki Championships

REQ

14/15

Dressage Northland

REQ

18

Wairoa Riding Club

LE

14/15

19

Wairoa A&P Show

LE

JANUARY | SOUTH ISLAND Southland Dressage Group

LE

15

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

20/22

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group Championships

REQ

22

Marlborough Regional Show

21/22

Wairarapa Dressage Regional Championship Show

REQ

22

NEG Summer Series Day 3

REQ LE

22

Warkworth Dressage

LE

28/29

Nelson Championship Tournament

31

Dressage Rotorua Anniversary Day Show

LE

28/29

South Canterbury/North Otago Dressage

LE

Canterbury Dressage New Year Opener

LE

FEBRUARY | NORTH ISLAND

29

1/4

FEI Pacific League Dressage WC Final / CDIY

INT

3/5

Bates National Championships & Para Dressage Champs

NCH

5

Tauranga Dressage Group

LE

12

Taupo Dressage Group

TE

12

Northern Hawke’s Bay Grading Day

LE

19

Tobin Equestrian Summer Series

LE

12

Dressage Northland

LE

18

Gisborne Dressage Summer Tournament

LE

23

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

29

Tobin Equestrian Wellington Summer Series

LE

26

Warkworth Dressage

LE

MARCH | NORTH ISLAND 4 7/12

Waikato Equestrian Centre Autumn Show Horse of the Year Show

LE

- INT/HOY, ZILCO FINALS

REQ

FEBRUARY | SOUTH ISLAND 4/5

Dressage Otago Competition

LE

Harper Horsecoaches South Island Championships

ICH

19

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

19

Marlborough Training Event

TE

26

Northern Equestrian Group

LE

10/12

MARCH | SOUTH ISLAND 4/5

Dressage Otago Autumn Championship

LE

5

Canterbury Autumn Series Day 1

LE

19

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

26

NEG Autumn Series Day 1

LE

APRIL | SOUTH ISLAND 8/9

Festival of Future Stars Championships

RE/YDH-ICH

For more details of each event & venue, and contact details go to www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/competition/calendar

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 33


RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

STRENGTH TRAINING FOR DRESSAGE RIDERS Article by Ricki Jacobs

If you were to type the above heading into google there would be hundreds, if not thousands of articles, websites and videos on this topic. Each being different than the last, all with confliciting opinions among them. Sounds like a recipe for confusion rather than answers right? How do I know which program, exercise, rep range is right for me to achieve my goals?

without having to leave the house.

Well, luckily for you it is my job and passion to toss aside the junk and bring you the gold through first hand experience. There are many avenues we can go down on this topic, so as i know most of you may not have traditional strength training equipment or a gym membership, I'm going to show you a basic program with a list of helpful progressions using 5 exercises targeting improved rider strength and stability

If you think about how to move efficiently when riding, more often than not there is never a moment when you are only using one part of your body at a time, everything you do requires a neutral spine, stable core, glutes and adductors engaged all whilst trying to control your upper and lower limbs! With this in mind it is important that your strength training program is predominantly comprised

When we think of strength training, most people think of commonly seen exercises such as bicep curls, leg extentions, crunches etc. While these do have there place in a structured strength training program these are considered " isolation" exercises meaning the load (resistance) is spread over one joint therefore isolating very few muscles at one time.

THE FOLLOWING ARE 5 EXERCISES THAT SHOULD BE PERFORMED 2 - 3 TIMES A WEEK IN A CIRCUIT FASHION...

34 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

of "compound" exercises in which load is distributed across multiple joints therefore recruiting numerous muscles simultaneously. These exercises, alongside strengthening the whole body will also aid in: • Improving kinaesthetic awareness (where your body/limbs are whilst moving ) • Improved core stability and force production • Help improve balance and coordination • Greatly decrease the chances of injury • Create a greater change in body coposition compared to isolation exercises (reduced body fat) As you can see, all these qualities mentioned will not only help you become a better rider but will also help you move and feel better every day.

1. SINGLE LEG ROMANIAN DEADLIFT Stand on one leg, hands out in front, core engaged. Bend the knee slightly and "hinge" at the hips leaning forward maintaining a neutral spine. Return to the starting position by contracting the glutes and keeping the opposite leg off the ground PROGRESSIONS: 1.hands towards floor 2.hands over head 3.holding a weight


RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS 2. PUSH UPS Get down in the prone position, hands directly under your shoulders, feet shoulder width apart, contract your abdominals and glutes whilst keeping your head neutral, control your body to the floor keeping your elbows on a 45 degree angle. Return to the starting position maintaining total body tension PROGRESSIONS: 1. hands elevated. 2. from the floor. 3. feet elevated. 3. SQUATS Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, toes pointing out slightly, keeping heels down, lower into the squat by driving the hips back and keeping knees wide, keep a neutral spine and core engaged throughout, hold hands out for balance return to the start PROGRESSIONS: 1. squat onto box. 2. bodyweight no box. 3. holding a weight on chest. 4. PRONE I,T,Y,W Lie prone with your hands by your side with palms up, keep your back engaged by arching slightly, move hands up and down for 10 reps in each position resembling the numbers I,T,Y and W Focus on retracting (squeezing) and protracting (flaring) shoulder blades whilst performing the exercises PROGRESSIONS: 1. feet down. 2. feet up. 3. move onto some weighted rows. 5. HOLLOW HOLD Lie on your back with your hands over your head in a streamlined postion and feet in the air vertically, press your lower back into the floor, there should be no gap between your lower back and the floor, hold your feet together as if someone was trying to pull them apart, bring your legs down as low as you can without losing tension in the lower back or feet... Hold for 30 seconds PROGRESSIONS: 1. lower your feet to about an inch off the floor. 2. increase time.

Perform these exercises in a circuit fashion 2-3 times a week on non consecutive days e.g Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Perform 10 reps on all exercises with a controlled tempo resting 3 minutes between rounds, perform 4 rounds and slowly decrease

the rest time as your body adapts. This is a basic template incoporating all attributes neccesary to becoming a better rider and a more functional person. As your body adapts, I recommend investing in help from a personal trainer at your local gym

in order to further assist you in your physical endevours. Your body is the greatest machine you will ever operate and with persistance and cosistancy you have the ability to unlock your true potential as a rider and as a human being.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 35


1.

SOUTHLAND DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS AWARDS Wings Cadet Trophy

Hannah Nichol

LJ Snowdance

Sultan Memorial Trophy

Marlene Parkinson

Parkridge Luke

Brenda Ward Memorial Trophy Tyler McKee

Rosari Ringo Star

Roxy Trophy

Sonya McLachlan

Alliarna

L1 OPEN CHAMPION

Hielke De Graaf

Southern Hit

RESERVE

Jeff Hill

Furst Hermes

L2 OPEN CHAMPION

Jackie Thomas

Sartorial Hit SW

RESERVE

Marlene Parkinson

Parkridge Luke

L3 OPEN CHAMPION

Tyler McKee

Rosari Ringo Star

RESERVE

Ann McDonald

Dixie Rose

L4 OPEN CHAMPION

Sonya McLachlan

Alliarna

RESERVE

Kerrie Morrison

Allitation

L5 OPEN CHAMPION

Kristen Anderson-Strang

Florin

RESERVE

Adele ONeill

Luna Rosa

L6 OPEN CHAMPION

Fiona Sharp

Leo Dreams of Gold

RESERVE

Debbie Rutherford

Greta

L9 OPEN CHAMPION

Jude Nickolls

Glenview Caballero

RESERVE

Caitlin Benzie

Rosari Royal Gem

L1 PONY CHAMPION

Hannah Nicol

LJ Snowdance

RESERVE

Kimberley Clearwater

Apsley Just and Image

L2 PONY CHAMPION

Connor Sharp

Moorak Valuer General

RESERVE

Sofia Hiviid

Chatto Creek Sirocco

OVERALL CHAMPIONS

36 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

Photos by Kristel Mack Saunders 1. Prize giving - (From left) Jeff Hill, Tyler McKee, Hannah Nicol, Kimberley Clearwater, Marlene Parkinson, Kerrrie Morrison, Fiona Sharp, Connor Sharp, Jude Nickolls. 2. Sonya McLachlan Level 4 Musical Winner 3. Fiona Sharp and Leo Dreams of Gold with her son Connor and his pony Moorak Valuer General 4. Kerrie Morrison (Allitation) and Marlene Parkinson (Parkridge Luke) 5. Marlene Parkinson and Parkridge Luke with the Sultan Trophy 6. Tyler McKee Rosari Ringo Star (level 3 champ, Brenda ward trophy, Musical freestyle trophy)


OUT & ABOUT

3.

2.

4.

5.

6.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 37


OUT & ABOUT

SOUTHERN HAWKES BAY DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS OVERALL CHAMPIONS Non Graded Champion Reserve L1 Open Champion Reserve L2 Open Champion Reserve L3 Open Champion Reserve L4 Open Champion Reserve L5 Open Champion Reserve L6 Open Champion Reserve L7 Open Champion Reserve L8 Open Champion C1-C2 Amateur Rider Award C1-C3 Amateur Rider Award C1-C2 Amateur Rider Award NZ Hanoverian Society Award L 4-9

Jaclyn Hartridge Sophie Southgate Abbie Deken Gillian Robertson Tania Smith Elisha Wade Sharon Dixon Abbie Deken Renee Etherington Emma Clarke Susan Tomlin Carole Christensen Jacqui Thompson Samantha Jones Louisa Ayres Frankie Webb Julie Pearson Sam Dermer Michelle Middelberg Emma Clarke Renee Etherington

6.

38 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

Roddy Welford Classic Gold Pineridge Pirate Darco Donnerbella II Donneregal Garavani Giuliani BL All By Chance Anacara Reflexions Vollrath Leila Georgio Arento Playmate Northern Ivanthus Zinstar Starlight Delaware Raimondaz Anacara BL All By Chance

5.

Photos by Katie Evans 1. Jacqui Thompson - Georgio 2. Frankie Webb - Northern Ivanthus 3. Cindy Pender - Sherwood Outspoken 4. Sharon Dixon - Garavani 5. Dani Simmons - Mr Champagne Charlie 6. Renee Etherington - BL All By Chance


OUT & ABOUT

1.

2.

4.

3.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 39


Photo: NZ Equine

CANTERBURY DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS Hanoverian Sash

Kirsty Schist

Kintore Romany

Yeti Memorial Trophy

Lorraine Ward-Smith

Fernlea Diamond Day

Ayton Printpak Trophy

Lorraine Ward-Smith

Fernlea Diamond Day

Joy Pearce Memorial Challenge

Sophie Griffith

Hells Bells

Sophie Luddington Memorial

Kirsty Jacomb

Glenmark

Charlie Mears PSG Trophy

Lauren Haig

Westford Lanciano

Giddens Family Cup

Lucy Cochrane

Inspector Gadget

Highest % Pony Musical

Millie Thompson

Rifesyde Prancer

OVERALL CHAMPIONS L1 Pony Champion

Emma Copplestone

Dinky Di Doff

Reserve

Imogen Morrison

River Dance Drummer Boy

L2 Pony Champion

Charlotte Thomas

Farview Free Spirit

Reserve

Georgia Allison

Rookstar

L3 Pony Champion

Lucy Cochrane

Inspector Gadget

L4 Pony Champion

Millie Thompson

Rifesyde Prancer

L1 Open Champion

Sophie Griffith

Hells Bells

Reserve

Philippa McLeod

Jazzman

L2 Open Champion

Lorraine Ward-Smith

Fernlea Diamond Day

Reserve

Jan Morice

Denmark

L3 Open Champion

Rebecca Rowlands

Solo

Reserve

Dani Simpson

Greenmoor Euphoria

L4 Open Champion

Lauren Haig

Grandioso BH

Reserve

Julie Fraser

Arnage Rhumba

L5 Open Champion

Nicola Maley

Astek Galahad

Reserve

Kirsty Schist

Kintore Romany

L6 Open Champion

Lauren Haig

Westford Lanciano

Reserve

Sophie Griffith

Frangelico F

L7 Open Champion

Barbara Chalmers

Rosselini

Reserve

Amelia French

Wolkenblaz

L8 Open Champion

Kirsty Schist

Kinnordy Gambado

Reserve

Siobhan Fauth

Hollywood Superstar

L9 Open Champion

Soo Wells

AJK Carronade

40 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017


OUT & ABOUT

Lorraine Ward-Smith Fernlea Diamond Day Photo: NZEquine

Danielle Simpson Greenmoor Euphoria Photo: NZEquine

Millie Thompson Rifesyde Prancer Photo: NZEquine

NORTH LOBURN EQUESTRIAN CENTRE

SUMMER DRESSAGE SERIES Dressage for everyone

Jan 15th, Feb 19th & Mar 19th // Rangiora Showgrounds download the schedule at WWW.NLEC.CO.NZ | email: info@nlec.co.nz | phone 03 313 1247 A relaxed and friendly atmosphere with classes for everyone, from new partnerships to the more experienced combinations. We welcome junior riders and encourage riders to “Give it a Go” with our judge assisted Training classes available at all of our days.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 41


OUT & ABOUT

1.

2.

WAITEMATA DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS OVERALL CHAMPIONS L1 AMATEUR CHAMPION

David Ringwood

Saatchi PSH

RESERVE

Angelne Lloyd

Bryant on Javeland

L2 AMATEUR CHAMPION

Brina Carpenter

Plutonium Lady

RESERVE

Sharlene Camp

Vollrath Legato

PONY CHAMPION

Bella Small

Kingsland Busy Bee

RESERVE

Grace Farrell

Almost Legal

YOUNG RIDER CHAMPION

Mihi Shepherd

Hot Chocolate MH

RESERVE

Nicole Sweeney

Flute Noir

MASTERS CHAMPION

Sheena Ross

Parkridge Disco SW

RESERVE

Betty Brown

Neversfelde Rupert

L1 OPEN CHAMPION

Wendi Williamson

Don Vito MH

RESERVE

Michael Morton-Beetham

DT Defender

L2 OPEN CHAMPION

Wendi Williamson

Presley MH

RESERVE

Betty Brown

Hot Gossip

L3 OPEN CHAMPION

Sophie de Clifford

Kinnordy Golda

RESERVE

Kelly Pearson

Dan Arian

L4 OPEN CHAMPION

Sophie de Clifford

Alamo BL

RESERVE

Angela Hooper

Surreal BC

L5 OPEN CHAMPION

Nikita Osborne

Dona Frederica Welfare

RESERVE

Hannah Burden

Dante MH

L6 OPEN CHAMPION

Betty Brown

Neversfelde Rupert

RESERVE

Victoria Wall

Letty Lei

L7 OPEN CHAMPION

Toni Louisson

Astute

RESERVE

Alex Matheson

Lingh II

L8 OPEN CHAMPION

Sheena Ross

Parkridge Disco SW

RESERVE

Nikita Osborne

Alcatraz

L9 OPEN CHAMPION

Wendi Williamson

Dejavu MH

RESERVE

John Thompson

JHT Antonello

42 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

Photos by Nicole Hilder 1. Level 6 FEI PSG Hobson Horsecoaches Super 5, Toni Louisson (3rd), Jennifer Sim (stand in), Gayle Draycott (5th), Judith Cunningham 2. Level 9 Zilco Musical, Vanessa Fenemor (stand in), Caitlin Benzie (5th), Diana Edgley (6th) 3. Sophie de Clifford and Noel Murphy. Champion Level 3, Champion Level 4 4. Wendi Williamson and Robin Potter. Champion Level 1, Champion Level 2, Champion Level 9


OUT & ABOUT

3.

4.

TAIHAPE DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS OVERALL CHAMPIONS

AWARDS

YOUNG RIDER CHAMPION

Sofia Letteri

Donnerkiel

RESERVE

Melissa Beech

So Dun

L1 OPEN CHAMPION

Kieryn Walton

Wisdom WDS

RESERVE

Ann Webster

Oranoa Morepork

L2 OPEN CHAMPION

Tania Smith

Donnerbella II

RESERVE

Nicoli Fife

Charlton Baliro

L3 OPEN CHAMPION

Sharon Dixon

Garavani

RESERVE

Samantha Fechney

J K Lucazen

L4 OPEN CHAMPION

Rosie Richards

Ira Hayes

RESERVE

Debbie Barke

RM Limbo

L5 OPEN CHAMPION

Kieryn Walton

Rosari Don Carlos

RESERVE

Susan Tomlin

Reflexions

L6/7 OPEN CHAMPION

Toni Louisson

Astute

RESERVE

Jacqui Thompson

Georgio

L8/9 OPEN CHAMPION

Paula Stuart

Aztec Lad

RESERVE

Karen Trotter

Flamenco G

HANOVERIAN SASH LEVEL 1-4 Sofia Letteri HANOVERIAN SASH LEVEL 5-9 Susan Tomlin

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 43


Taihape Christmas Show Photos by Harry Nicholas 1. Karen Trotter, Grand Prix Freestyle 2. Zilco Advanced Freestyle placegetters (from L) Toni Louisson, Rochelle Speirs, Otilllie Upshall, Jacqui Thompson 3. Judges and Volunteers in true Taihape Christmas spirits 4. Matthews Hanoverians Super 5 place getters (from L) Nicoli Fife, Tania Smith, Kathryn Corry, Ingrid Anderson, Jutta Rosenblatt

Karen Totter Grand Prix Freestyle

1.

4.

3.

44 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

2.


NATIONAL RESULTS

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A DRESSAGE STEWARD Article by Jane Robertson

WHAT DO STEWARDS DO?

The universal Stewards motto of help, prevent and intervene defines the role and expectations of stewarding worldwide at any level of competition. Stewards were introduced in the early 80s when it became apparent that the Ground Jury cannot be everywhere during an event. This group of trained people are responsible for ensuring that the welfare of the horse is respected at all times and that a level playing field is provided for all athletes. (Equine and human). Essentially the stewarding team are the eyes and ears of the Ground Jury. The stewarding team works to support the Organising Committee in the successful running of the event within the rules and regulations. The stewarding team through the Chief Steward works closely with the Ground Jury, Technical Delegate, Veterinarian and the organising Committee. Members of the stewarding team can and will be found anywhere on the grounds. In the schooling and warm-up area they will be monitoring aspects such as, but not limited to: • the footing and surface condition for the horses • ID numbers • correct headgear • illegal tack or other non permitted equipment • the use of spurs and whips • outside interference from other riders, trainers and members of the public • keeping trainers outside the arena • most importantly watching for any type of horse abuse.

It is also the duty of the stewarding team to conduct random patrols through the stabling and truck park areas. The welfare of the horse is foremost; • do they have water? • are they looking healthy and happy? • are the requirements for stallions being adhered to? • ID numbers will be checked • yarding and stables will be checked against the allocation list • A close liaison with the stable manager is maintained Stewards are also always on the watch for dangerous or hazardous situations such as • traffic movement through the horse park • loose horses • loose dogs • changes in the going on surfaces • problems because of the weather, horse /person demarcation areas and so on. Each event brings its own set of challenges. Stewards also assist in veterinary matters including MCP testing, usually as witnesses and support for the riders. Any treatment (on horses) should be reported to the Chief Steward and hopefully observed and supported by a steward, and if required the steward will make sure any necessary paperwork is completed. Stewards are present at prize giving where they assist the Organising Committee to make sure this part of the competition is conducted efficiently and safely. Stewarding is an interesting and

challenging role involving long hours in all weather conditions. Stewards are part of the overall team that strives to provide a fair and successful event. The stewarding team is dedicated to protecting the horses and trying to keep the playing field level for all.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN STEWARDING?

ESNZ Dressage stewards course to be held in conjunction with the AMDG Dressage Festival, 20-22 January at the Clevedon Showgrounds, Auckland Course Facilitator: Murray Anderson FEI L1 This course is for all stewards working toward National Level 1 or for stewards wishing to maintain their Level 1 status.

THEORY SESSION:

Friday 20TH 6.30 pm – 9pm at the Clevedon A&P rooms at the showground (in the main gate and first left – rooms are on the right). There will be a light dinner available, please indicate on the form if you wish to partake. Anyone is welcome to attend this session – riders, judges, officials, and anyone interested

PRACTICAL WORK:

Saturday and Sunday. Only those wishing to become or maintain their status as a steward will be able to take part in the practical sessions. Contact Judy Alderdice j-alderdice@xtra.co.nz Registration form Click Here http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/ dressage/resources/officials/stewardstraining/

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 45


LEADERBOARD RESULTS

PRYDES EASIFEED SOUTH ISLAND PONY & YOUNG RIDER HI-POINTS Canterbury’s Shannon Brien and Amberleigh Remembrance (Level 5) have taken the lead in the Prydes SI Series. With three competitions remaining (Marlborough, Nelson and South Island Champs) it’s looking good for Shannon if she can maintain this form. LEVEL 1

Charlotte Thomas

Te Puke

16

Hannah Johnston

Beechcroft Absolut

16

Hannah Nichol

LJ Snowdance

12

Emily Chamberlain

Trentwood Buzz Off

10

Emma Copplestone

Dinky Di Doff

8

Anya Johnston

Simple Solution

8

Kimberley Clearwater

Apsley Just an Image

6

Brittany Fowler

Apsley Backchat Kid

6

Ruby Thomas

Carnesso Royal Flush

6

Kate Henton

Casino Royale

4

Cassie Anderson

Tough Decision

4

Caitlin Middlemiss

Westford Lexi

2

Jodi Gardner

Zactac Dun-for-fun

24

Shannon Brien

Delago

10

Charlotte Thomas

Fairview Free Spirit

10

Brittany Fowler

Apsley Backchat Kid

6

Lili Barrett-Power

Izabella M

6

Hamish Kerr

LJ Sundance

4

Lucy Cochrane

Inspector Gadget

4

Glenmark

8

Kate Waddell

Vollrath Witchcraft

8

Grace Thomson

Chocolat Moka

6

Millie Thompson

Rifesyde Prancer

8

Amberleigh Remembrance

32

Brampton Gigolo

8

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3 Kirsty Jacob LEVEL 4

LEVEL 5 Shannon Brien LEVEL 6 Hannah Johnston

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz

46 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017


JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 47


NATIONAL CHALLENGE RESULTS

EQUITAK EXCEL AREA TEAM CHALLENGE LEAD CHANGES AGAIN Waikato has regained the lead from Canterbury following Waitemata and Southland Championships in mid-December. Waikato riders have been closely following the results as the series progresses and know they need to continue good form to stay ahead with both northern and southern qualifying events still to come before the final round at the South Island Championships in Gore in next February. Waikato 406 1 Canterbury 367 2 Wellington 331 3 Otago 244 4 Auckland 187 5 Central Districts 183 6 Taranaki 179 7 Waitemata 171 8 NATIONAL SERIES The Super 5 League, Zilco Musical Series, Prestige Equestrian Futures, and the AMS Pony and Young Rider Performance League are all getting to a really interesting stage with some riders now having competed in the maximum number of qualifying events. If they wish to

improve their rankings, they can do so by gaining higher % at shows ahead and discarding points earned for lower % AMATEUR AND MASTERS TOP TEN LEAGUES The results for the Horse Sports Pony & Young Rider Amateur Top Ten League, the All-in-Flex Amateur Top Ten League and the Flying Horse Masters can be followed on www. equestrianentries.co.nz Hielke de Graaf has a massive lead currently in the Flying Horse Masters South Island Hi-Points League on 97pts while Waikato’s Maree Lynch and Don Incendio head the North Island League on 67 Rebecca Rowlands (Canterbury) are already on maximum 100pts in the South Island All-in-Flex Amateur League and being chased hard by Nicki Sunley and Laila Dawn who are leading the way in the North. Top scoring pony in the Horsesports Pony and Young Rider is AD Dennache ridden by Tauranga’s Isabella Chatfield on 70pts and the leading young rider is Canterbury’s Charlotte Thomas on Te Puke on 74pts .w

FOLLOW THE SERIES ON http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/competition/national-dressage-series/series-results/

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz

48 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017


OUT & ABOUT

NORTHERN HAWKES BAY DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS Hanoverian Sash Level 1 - 4

Kieryn Walton

Hanoverian Sash Level 4 - 9

Carol Eivers

Elite Equine Young Dressage Horse 5 year old

Elisha Wade

Elite Equine Young Dressage Horse 6 year old

Laura Brown

Wisdom WDS Parkridge Last Waltz Donneregal Aviance

OVERALL CHAMPIONS Champion CN Rider Non-Graded

Caitlin McGregor

Thrillseeker

Reserve

Alex Naera

Cameo Boy

Champion Open Rider Non-Graded

Michael Morton-Beetham

D T Defender

L2 Amateur Champion

Michael Morton-Beetham

D T Defender

L1 Pony Champion

Katelyn Mason

Royal Park Showtime

Reserve

Anya Peterson

Tairawhiti Lad

L2 Pony Champion

Emma Dunderdale

Alonzo Fanticy

Reserve

Rebecca Mobberley

Zak Smith

L3 Pony Champion

Rebecca Aplin

Woodlands Park Light O Day

L1 Open Champion

Kieryn Walton

Wisdom WDS

Reserve

Zoe Towler

HBS Always

L2 Open Champion

Elisha Wade

Donneregal

Reserve

Anna Williams

Tuahu Gemma

L3 Open Champion

Louisa Ayres

Summerston Hit

Reserve

Nicki Sunley

Laila Dawn

L4 Open Champion

Carol Eivers

Parkridge Last Waltz

Reserve

Lucy Robertshawe

Salute

L5 Open Champion

Kate Tobin

Bradgae Riot Act

Reserve

Louise Duncan

Wolkenstein BC

L6 Open Champion

Rochelle Spiers

Vollrath Latimer

Reserve

Zoe Towler

Winterstern

L7 Open Champion

Franki Webb

Northern Ivanthus

Reserve

Toni Louisson

Astute

L9 Open Champion

Kate Tobin

AJK Carronade

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 49


OVERSEAS RIDER REVIEW

Photos: Lauren James

OVERSEAS RIDER REVIEW ANNA MCINTYRE - UK We have now been UK based for eighteen months, and as 2016 concludes, Phil, Pinkie (Abstract MH) and I are happy, healthy and surviving winter thanks to the indoor and the excellent local pub! We have just moved to Launton in the Oxfordshire area so Phil can commute to London. Pinkie is based at Twyford Mill Equestrian which has wonderful facilities including a surfaced gallop track, water treadmill and all manner of bells and whistles to entertain the equestrian minded. Our last competitive outing prior to leaving New Zealand was the 2015 Bates Nationals where we were Reserve Champion Level 4. A lot of work has

gone in since then. We have been training hard with David (Pincus) and really getting grips with balance and being prepared to do any movement in a split second. He tests me by randomly bellowing out a movement and if we are not in the correct balance to perform it I get a telling off! With a big horse like Pinkie balance and self-carriage are critical, and now we are able to compress and keep the quality of her lovely loose movement. We’ve also been training with Charlotte (Dujardin) who I find to be really inspiring and motivating. I rode on the warmup with Charlotte a few weeks ago as she prepared Florentina for a test. It was a real lesson on how she quietly and steadily puts them in the right balance and the result is spectacular.

50 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

We finally managed to get out to a couple of shows at Advanced Medium to quality for Regionals which start next February. Pinkie is in fine form and very pleased to be out at a ‘party’ again. Her enthusiastic approach to being in the ring was evident, and, as a result we haven’t had a clear round and have used the broad range of marks! But we did have a win in the Silver Section Advanced Medium at Summerhouse Equestrian Centre in late November. It’s such a joy to ride a horse with so much energy and now the plan is to compete her regularly to get her mind on the job at hand so we can start her PSG early 2017. Our next outing is the Addington High Profile show in January. Merry Christmas to all Anna & Pinkie


DRESSAGE DIRECTORY Dressage Area Group Websites and other useful links.

Equestrian Sports NZ/Dressage www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage www.facebook.com/Dressage NZ www.facebook.com/Equestrian Sports NZ www.facebook.com/DressageNZ U25 Championships www.facebook.com/Stable of the Stallions Dressage Bay of Islands www.sporty.co.nz/bayofislandsdressagegroup Dressage Northland www.sporty.co.nz/dressagenorthland

Dressage Central Districts www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagecentraldistricts

Dressage Waitemata www.dressagewaitemata.co.nz

Dressage Taranaki www.dressagetaranaki.co.nz

Dressage Warkworth www.warkworthdressage.webs.com

Dressage Wellington www.dressagewellington.org.nz

Dressage Auckland - Manukau www.amdg.org.nz

Dressage Horowhenua   www.horowhenuadressage.com

Dressage Waikato www.dressagewaikato.co.nz

Dressage Wairarapa www.dressagewairarapa.com

Dressage Morrinsville -Te Aroha www.mtdg.co.nz

Dressage Nelson    www.nelsondressage.webs.com

Dressage Gisborne www.gisbornedressage.org.nz

Dressage Marlborough www.sporty.co.nz/marlboroughdressage

Dressage Bay of Plenty www.dressagebayofplenty.co.nz

Dressage Canterbury www.freewebs.com/canterburydressage

Dressage Eastern Bay of Plenty www.sportsground.co.nz/ebd

Dressage Otago www.dressageotago.webs.com

Dressage Rotorua         www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagerotorua

Dressage Southland www.dressage-southland.com

Dressage Tauranga        www.dressagetauranga.co.nz 

National Equestrian Centres www.nzequestrian.org.nz

Dressage Taupo www.sportsground.co.nz/taupodressagegroup

Tielcey Park Equestrian Centre www.tielceypark.co.nz (Manawatu)

Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagenhb

North Loburn Equestrian Centre www.nlec.co.nz (Canterbury)

Dressage Central Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/chbdressage

Northern Equestrian Group www.freewebs.com/northerneq (Canterbury)

Dressage Southern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/shbdressage

Northgate Lodge www.northgatelodgeequestrian.com (Northland)

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 51


NATIONAL EVENT QUALIFICATIONS

QUALIFICATION FOR NATIONAL EVENTS 2016/17 BATES NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: 2-5 FEBRUARY (OPEN & AMATEUR) Entries Close 16 Dec on Equestrian Entries Qualification Criteria: The following scores must be achieved at a Regional, Island or National Championship or Horse of the Year between 1st January 2016 and 30th January 2017. Levels 1 - 2: One total score of 63% and over Levels 3 - 5: One total score of 60% and over Levels 6 - 9: One total score of 57% and over  (A total score is the final combined marks of all judges) Level 6 - 9, Championships: Grading points at date of close of entry (16th December 2016). Level 6: PSG Championship for horses that have gained not more than 60 points in Level 7 Level 7: Int I Championship for horses that have gained not more than 60 points in Level 8 Level 8: Inter II Championship for horses that have gained not more than 60 points in Level 9 Note: Level 6 & 7 Freestyles at the NCH will be ridden as separate classes. Level 6 horses will be restricted to level 6 movements using the Dressage NZ Advanced Freestyle (ie 3x and 4x tempi changes and canter half pirouettes only). Level 7 will ride the FEI Int I Freestyle. HORSE OF THE YEAR SHOW 7-12 MARCH 2017 Entries Close 24 January on Equestrian Entries HORSES Level 1: Horses must have gained one score of 63% or more in a graded ESNZ test at a Regional, NI or SI Championship or Young Rider Championship show. Level 1 Horses that have qualified in a Zilco Level 2 Musical Freestyle Qualifier may enter either the HOY Level 1 Horse Title OR the HOY Level 2 Title classes. Level 2: 63% (1 score) in a Zilco Musical Qualifier. Level 3 and Level 4: 63% (1 score) in a Zilco Musical Qualifier. Level 5 and 6/7: 60% (1 score) in a Zilco Musical Qualifier. Level 8: 58% in a level 8 or 9 test (not FS) at a RE, ICH or NCH Grand Prix (CDI 3*) 58% in a Grand Prix, or GPS at a RE, ICH or NCH CDIY 60% in Test 6B, PSG/YR, Int I at a RE, ICH, YRCH or NCH PONIES Ponies do not qualify in a Musical Freestyle. Levels 1, 2 & 3 must have gained 60% or more in a graded ESNZ competition since 1 August 2016 at the level they are entering. The Dressage Pony of the Year Title is run under Dressage NZ Article 465 Special Conditions. Ponies with more than 30 Level 5 points or above are eligible. All ponies compete on equal terms. The Dressage Pony of the Year Title will be decided at Level 4 and will be open to ponies that have gained 60% or more in a Level 3 or above graded competition since 1 August 2016. Downgraded ponies are eligible EQUESTRIAN ENTRIES U25 DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS Taupo NEC 1/2 April 2017 New for 2017: The Waldebago Trophy for the NZ Young Rider Championship will be contested at Level 6, not Grand Prix. There will be a new U25 Championship introduced at Grand Prix level. Riders from 16-25yrs may contest the U25 GP level Championship No prior qualification necessary for any class at this event 52 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017


NATIONAL EVENT QUALIFICATIONS

BATES NZ DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS & FEI PACIFIC LEAGUE WORLD CUP FINAL™ 2-5 February 2017 | Manfeild Park – Feilding

Entries Close Friday 16 Dec 2016 on Equestrian Entries: Qualification Period 1 from 1 Jan 2016 • CDIW and Young Rider & Pony International Events (CDIY/P) • Bates All Grade Championships, Super 5 League Finals. • Elite Equine NZ Young Dressage Horse Championship • Amateur Rider Championships and Masters Championships • Para Dressage National Championships • Dressage Musical Spectacular Sat 4th March. Door sales from 5.30pm NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS AT THE BATES NZ DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Amateur Championship at levels 1 to 4 will be run alongside the Bates Open Championship at the Bates National Dressage Championships as separate classes. Amateur Awards will be awarded in higher grades based on Championship points earned in the Open classes. Eligibility is based around rider categories. Qualification for the Championships will be at Regional Events with the same qualification for both championships. The term “Amateur” is connected to rider category status and bears no reference to the term amateur vs professional in terms of earning income in the sport.

HARPER HORSECOACHES SOUTH ISLAND FESTIVAL OF DRESSAGE Gore |10 – 12 February 2017

Entries close on 31 December at www.equestrianentries.org.nz

SI JUDGES CLINIC WITH 4* FEI JUDGE ANNE PRAIN (FRA) Gore|Monday 13th Feb Details SI Festival Dressage Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ SIDressage/?fref=ts&ref=br_tf

SUPER 5 DRESSAGE LEAGUE

The 2016-17 Super 5 League comprises a points series in each island at all graded Levels 1-9 (top 5 points only to count) plus an island final at both the South Island Festival of Dressage and the Bates National Championships. National Super 5 rankings will be determined from % in each level at both these events. Tests used for Super at Regional and National Events: Levels 1 to 5 - C Tests, Level 6 - FEI PSG v 2015, Level 7 - FEI Intermediate I v 2015, Level 8 FEI Intermediate A v 2015, Level 9 Regional Events - FEI Intermediate II or Grand Prix 2015. South Island Festival of Dressage & Bates National Championships SRS Final - FEI Intermediate II 2016.

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 53


NATIONAL SERIES

NATIONAL SERIES ZILCO MUSICAL FREESTYLE SERIES

perform at International Dressage level. The Elite Equine National Young Horse Dressage Championship & Age Group Championships will be held at the Bates National Championships, 2 –5 Feb 2017 at Manfeild Park.

The series includes Levels 2 to 9 (Advanced levels 6/7 combined) With an increasing number of riders competing inter-island the series conditions for 2016/17 have been amended in order not to disadvantage riders competing outside their island of origin

The Elite Equine South Island Young Horse Dressage Championships will be held at the Festival of Futures Stars Championships, Canterbury Agricultural Park, 8/9 April 2017

Only the top 5 points will count • Combinations earn points in their Island of origin Leaderboard regardless of the venue of the competition • The SI Leaderboard will complete at the South Island Championships. • The NI Leaderboard will complete at HoY • South Island based riders can earn points for the SI Leaderboard at any RE or ICH except HoY. • South Island riders will not earn Leaderboard points at HoY, but can be placed in the class. • North Island based riders can earn points towards the NI Leaderboard at any RE, ICH or HoY • North Island Leaderboard points will be attributed to the top 5 placed North Island combinations at HOY. • Scores of 70 plus % - gain 10 points • Scores of 65 to 69.99% gain 7 points • Scores of 60 – 64.99% gain 5 points • Scores of 57 – 59.99% gain 3 points. • Scores less than 57% gain 1 point. • Bonus points will be added at the South Island Festival of Dressage and at Horse of the Year - 2 extra points per placing for scores achieved. ELITE EQUINE YOUNG DRESSAGE HORSE CHAMPIONSHIPS The purpose of the competitions are to select the best young horse which is progressing on the correct way of training, with the potential to capably 54 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | JANUARY 2017

PRESTIGE Equestrian www.prestigeequestrian.co.nz

Ltd.

PRESTIGE EQUESTRIAN DRESSAGE FUTURES PRIZE

The Prestige Equestrian Futures Prize will be awarded to the best performed combination competing in the Super 5 League at Regional & Island events from October 2016 – February 2017 and meeting the following eligibility conditions. 4-10 year old horses competing at Levels 1 - 7 with CN - C7 riders at 1 August 2016 (Riders not to have ever earned grading points at Level 8 or above as at 1 August 2016) AMS SADDLERY PONY & YOUNG RIDER PERFORMANCE LEAGUE

AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League aims to increase participation at a Pony & Young Rider level and to establish a culture where these riders compete against their peers of a similar age and experience. Every Regional Event, the Pryde’s Easifeed South Island Festival of Dressage and North Island Championships will run Pony and Young Rider classes at Levels 1 and 2. The league will culminate at the U25 NZ Pony & Championships in April 2017. Competitors must be 20 years or under at 1 August 2016 to participate. Scores will be taken from Super 5 tests at Level 3 and above. League winner to receive a fabulous dressage saddle.


NATIONAL SERIES

NATIONAL SERIES EQUESTRIAN ENTRIES NZ U25 DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS (PONY RIDERS & RIDERS 16-25 YRS) 1-2 April 2017 | Fiber Fresh

31st March 2017. The competition is open to Category CN - C5 riders aged 21yrs and over as at 1 April 2016 (C5 riders have never earned grading points at any level above Level 5) Riders must be annual competitive members of the ESNZ. All participating horses must be registered and pay start levies for graded competitions.

National Equestrian Centre Taupo

HORSE SPORTS YOUNG RIDER AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE

Featuring the Hyland Pony Championship & Waldebago Young Rider Championship, York Corporation Inter-Island Team Challenge plus the final of the AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League. Classes for riders up to 25yrs and including pony and young rider nongraded section up to 21yrs. No prior qualification required. www.facebook. com/NZ Pony & Young Rider Dressage Championships.

Pony & Young Riders who have never earned points at level 5 or above, and are competing on horses or ponies up to Level 4 at 1/8/16 can compete in the Horse Sports League. All participating riders, ponies & horses must be fully ESNZ registered. Scores from 1/8/16 until 10/4/17 will count towards the Horse Sports League. Level 1 horses & ponies must be competed by riders with no Level 3 or above points, Level 2 by riders with no Level 4 or above points and Level 3 & 4 and above by riders with no points at level 5 and above as at 1/8/16.

FLYING HORSE MASTERS TOP TEN LEAGUE

This competition is designed to promote dressage competition and participation for Masters Riders. The Flying Horse series provides an opportunity for riders to compete against peers at five different levels at all levels of events and competition regardless whether riders compete locally, regionally or nationally. The competition will be open to riders 50 years & over as at 1 April 2016 and is run in five main divisions plus special awards from 1st April 2016 until 31st March 2017. ALLINFLEX AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE

The AllinFlex Amateur Top Ten League extends from 1 April 2016 until

The top 10 scores in graded competitions will count. There will be rosettes for the top placed horse and top placed pony in each area, plus national champions and reserves in all six divisions. PRYDES EASIFEED SOUTH ISLAND YOUNG RIDER HI-POINTS SERIES

Each of the seven South Island Regional Events will offer a Hi- Points Qualifier class with the finals being decided at the  South Island Festival of Dressage in 10/12 Feb in Gore. Riders must be max 20yrs as at 1 Aug 2016. There is no minimum age limit for pony riders. Riders on horses must be at 12yrs in the calendar year 2016

JANUARY 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 55


Dear Valegro Thank you for the memories...

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 6

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 6