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Issue 16 | November 2017

KYRA KYRKLUND - Equidays review

FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE

EQUITANA The timetable and so much more


EDITORIAL

FROM THE EDITOR WELCOME TO THE ISSUE SIXTEEN OF THE DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN

The DressageNZ Bulletin is the official magazine of Dressage NZ - a discipline of Equestrian Sports NZ

Editor: Wendy Hamerton E: dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz Design and Production: www.snaffledesign.co.nz Graphic Design Sales & Advertising: Sarah Gray Email: sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz Copyright © Snaffle Design and Dressage NZ 2017 Cover Image: John Thompson and JHT Antonello Photo Credit: Pip Hume, Dark Horse Photography Back Image: Abbie Deken and KH Ambrose Photo Credit: Amy-Sue Alston

The new season of qualifiers and regional championships is well underway with four Back on Track Premier League events completed and many riders who are aiming for key events, safe in the knowledge they have qualifying scores safely tucked away. I was lucky enough to attend the Central Districts Championships at Manfeild last weekend. The first big show of the season seemed like a family reunion, taking the chance to catch up and chat with many “out of area” friends that I hadn’t seen since the big shows in the autumn. It’s really fun seeing the progress that their horses have made over the winter, to be introduced to the new ones in their team, and to sit back and view the potential we have in the sport. It sure is way more fun than being at home doing the ironing - or any other domestic drudgery that you care to name. As the week has unfolded however, the question of responsibility has arisen on two levels. Firstly the rider’s responsibility around show entries. Gone are the days we filled out all the forms, wrote the cheque, put it in the post and let the secretary deal with bundles of envelopes, paper work and cheques to process. Now there is a plethora of emails too close to closing date, bank accounts to be checked daily, reminders about non current horse and rider registrations. So think about it. For every payment not made by the closing date, the secretary must check daily to see if it has arrived yet. Then they need to contact the rider to remind them, sometimes to find out the rider has now scratched so then they have to chase them for the online entry fee.... multiply this by ten or fifteen and they could have had the ironing finished.... . The sport is privileged to have volunteers to organise events. Mostly it’s not that these folk have more time than anyone else – it’s because they go the extra mile. So this is a plea for riders to truly respect the time volunteers give and make their lives as easy as possible. Make sure your registrations are up to date and make sure you pay entry fees promptly. Feedback suggests this is a common issue and that OC’s are about to get tough so be warned, or you too may be faced with domestic drudgery. Secondly is our responsibility around the use of social media – so valuable but can be so destructive. In fact today British Dressage has announced new rules around the use of their forum pages because of the inappropriate actions of members. Let us all use social media wisely so it adds value to our sport – it’s a quick and easy way to communicate. Let us use it wisely.

Wendy. 2 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


CONTENTS

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KIWIS FLY AT BONEO PARK

CONTENT

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DNZ AND ESNZ RULES

EQUIDAYS REVIEW

KYRA KYRKLUND

and take home some of the silverware...

Find out the latest amendments...

We reflect on all of the special moments...

Get your notepad ready for these incredible tips...

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FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE

MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH

AEROBIC FITNESS

NORTH ISLAND TID SQUAD

We preview the event and riders selected...

Giving the reins...

for your mental performance with Personal Trainer Ricki Jacobs...

we were there to witness this inspiring training camp sponsored by Pryde's Easifeed...


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

KIWIS FLY AT BONEO PARK Their hooves and feet barely touched the ground after the Freestyle at Equidays before the indomitable chestnut duo, Steiny and Ambrose, accompanied by the equally indomitable flaxen duo of Julie Brougham and Abbie Deken were literally flying to Boneo to contest the Australian Championships and CDIW at Boneo Park on the Mornington Peninsula near Melbourne. This was the first year Boneo Park had hosted the championships and it did not disappoint. The main outdoor arena was transformed into European style with a number of public and corporate marquees making for intimate viewing (and shelter from the rain at times). Julie noted that although the crowd was quite close, they were very respectful of the competitors. Abbie quipped “I went to Melbourne to get away

Abbie Deken and KH Ambrose had a stunning debut across the ditch Photo: Amy-Sue Alston

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from the NZL rain but it seemed to follow me�. It was her first off shore experience with her own horse having competed on a borrowed horse in the Sydney CDI derby a number of years ago. There was a good contingent of NZL supporters including coaches Andrea Raves and Vanessa Way. Helen Hughes-Keen was a member of the ground jury alongside foreign judges Evi Eisenhardt (5*GER) and Francis Verbeek (5*NED).


INTERNATIONAL NEWS Julie Brougham and Vom Feinsten in full flight on Australian soil. Photos: Stephen Mowbray Insert Right: Julie pictured with the Crown Law Trophy

John Thompson was nabbed for the “Aussies Off Shore Challenge” on borrowed horses – they do like to claim our greats – pavlova, Phar Lap and now JT. It was a light hearted competition at Prix St Georges level proving to be a great crowd pleaser as the riders made commentary through their tests. Holly Leach was quoted as saying “Well I might be a bit biased, but I’m sure John was the winner” The Grand Prix was first up. Julie and Steiny drew number three the in the first group as they had not competed internationally since Rio so had no current FEI WDRL points. But that soon changed as they scored 68.74% for third place. “It was hard going from number three but he still came through for me” His canter work was a real highlight for Julie. “It’s just not difficult for him. We still have some improving to do in the piaffe - passage but we know we can do that. He is strong in every other area, so we are pretty comfortable with that.” While she had been hoping to break through the elusive 70%, Verbeek (NED) and Seefried (AUS) had them oh so close and in first place. The eventual winner was Judy Dierks

aboard the classy Diamond Star on 69.3% followed by Brett Parbery on DP Weltmieser 69.06%. Abbie KH Ambrose scored 64.4% in their first up Australian experience. Coach Vanessa Way was very pleased with their efforts in a very strong class, and said it was all part of growing, learning and being braver in big atmospheres. “There is a lot more to come from these two,” said Way. “Abbie rode a little conservatively because she wanted to be safe, and overall it was very positive. It is all part of the sport. This is a horse she has produced herself through to Grand Prix and that was a very strong class. He travelled very well but is just a little flat and Abbie isn’t used to him being like that. That is horses – it is a hard game and this is demonstrated by the fact there were just 21 in the field from across Australia and New Zealand.” Both riders qualified for Freestyle the following day and a really harmonious and fun test resulted in a strong second place for Julie and Steiny. Their 73% looked effortless in a hugely competitive field. “I am particularly pleased when you consider this is just his second show back after six months of rehab . . . it is pretty awesome,” said Julie. Vom NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 5


INTERNATIONAL NEWS L to R in the Grand Prix Special Championship Holly Cutler, Lesley Anne Taylor, Brett Parbery, Abbie Deken, Alexis Hellyer and Julie Brougham. Photo: Stephen Mowbray

Feinsten fairly floated his way around the arena, drawing plenty of praise from commentators and fans. “Everywhere we went people had something nice to say. I do think the Boneo surfaces really suit him, he just springs out.” Stand-outs for Brougham and her coach Andrea Raves were Vom Feinsten’s canter pirouettes, changes, passage and piaffe. “I don’t think there was anything to grizzle about. It all came together very well.” The pair held the lead right until the end when old time rivals Brett Parbery and DP Weltmieser scored a very creditable 74.54% to sneak away the lead. Abbie was much happier with Ambrose's freestyle finishing on 67.225%. “I was disappointed with our mistakes in the twos, which was costly, but there were certainly improvements on the Grand Prix” she said. “I rode with more energy, which is what I needed to do. He took in the atmosphere really well and the surface out there is just to die for. It is a great experience to be in that arena.” And so to Sunday’s Grand Prix Special. This was a national class but pre-approved by ESNZ High Performance as a WEG qualifier for the kiwi riders. And what a thrill it was to see them at number one and three on the podium. Julie rode a super test to take the win on 69.53%, with Abbie third on 66.941%.   6 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017

John Thompson & Simone Pearce Photos: Stephen Mowbray


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Julie was also presented the Crown Law Trophy for the Grand Prix Special Australian Championship, although it did take a little while for organisers to make sure it could be awarded to a ‘foreigner’. A great finale for the NZL combination that had been on the podium throughout the event. Abbie acknowledges the amazing experience and has come home determined to push ahead and take all the positive learnings from the trip. From heartbreak on the opening day of the

champs to the podium on the final day; “Every day is a roller coaster of emotions but that is the sport,” she said. “It was nice to finish with a better one.” She was frustrated to have a couple of mistakes in the special but was pleased KH Ambrose had again improved on the previous day. “I wanted to be trying to do personal bests,” she said. “That wasn’t achieved in Boneo, there was a whole different load of pressure with travel and big competitive fields.” All Photos on spread: Stephen Mowbray

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1. Judy Dierks and 'Diamond Star' with 69.3% took the win in the Grand Prix 2. Elliot Patterson and 'Bluefields Berlin' score 73.590% to win the Medium 2 class 3. Daniella Dierks and 'Solo Feliz' score 72.395% to win the Prix St Georges 4. Great Britain’s Spencer Wilton visited during the 2017 Australian Dressage Championships at Boneo Park, delivering not only a masterclass but also two terrific performances in the Grand Prix CDI-W and Grand Prix Freestyle CDI-W riding Mary Hanna’s horse Umbro.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL RESULTS

http://equiscore.com.au/?page_id=3859#.WfuxTLZ7FE4

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NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 7


NEWS

DNZ & ESNZ NEWS FEI DRESSAGE TESTS Recently there has been some confusion about the number of course errors a rider is allowed when riding at FEI tests under National rules. The FEI rules, and the tests sheets for these FEI level tests, state that a rider is eliminated on his or her second course error.  Our National rules however state that a rider is eliminated on the third course error.  There is no specific rule within our rule book which states that our national rule of 3 course errors applies when riding an FEI level test at a National, Regional or Local competition.  The norm has been to apply the FEI rule of elimination on the second course error in FEI tests consistent with what is stated on the test sheet.  The computer system used by most shows for scoring is set up consistent with this to only allow input of 2 course errors on FEI tests. To clarify any confusion, the current FEI tests at levels 6 and above are to be scored consistent with the test sheet which states that a rider is eliminated

on the SECOND course error. All other national rules apply. For FEI young horse tests, children, pony riders and Junior tests the FEI rule is consistent with our national rule and elimination will only occur after 3 course errors. Please note also that the FEI rule regarding course errors does not prohibit the Judge from allowing the rider to complete the test after elimination as our National rule does.  As such the C judge has the discretion to allow the rider to complete the test after the SECOND course error notwithstanding that the rider is eliminated.” Scott McKenna – Technical Officer, Dressage NZ Board

ESNZ GENERAL REGULATIONS ESNZ has issued an updated version of the General Regulations These can be found at http://www. nzequestrian.org.nz/esnz/about/ruleshttp://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/esnz/about/rules-regulations/esnz-rules/

regulations/esnz-rules/ An important update for all dressage events: In addition to the current medical requirements for all levels of events Art 153 2. During the event: 2.1. A doctor or an ambulance manned by an Ambulance Officer of at least Intermediate Grade/class must be available within 30 minutes of being called. ** NEW para 2.1 2.2. A holder of a first aid certificate must be on the grounds at all times, with appropriate first aid kit/gear.

ESNZ CLEAN SPORT Did you know that $4 of your horse registration fee goes to the ESNZ National Clean Sport Testing Fund? Make sure you keep up to date with all changes to Clean Sport Rules http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/esnz/ programmes/esnz-clean-sport/horsestesting/ http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/esnz/programmes/esnz-clean-sport/horses-testing/

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EVENT PREVIEW

THE SPOTLIGHT IS ON EQUITANA Photo by Libby Law

It’s tough to make a ‘short’ list of what not to miss at EQUITANA Auckland, but we’re going to have a shot at it – be warned though, this is just the short list. There are four days to be filled with shows, shopping, sessions, signings, displays, clinics and more, so make sure you do just that – fill your boots! Star presenter Jonny Hilberath (GER) needs little introduction. He the coach of the world’s best riders, works with world leaders of the sport, and has something to share with everyone. Be sure to make time to see at least one of the sessions with the coach of the Rio Olympic Games gold medal-winning German team. Hilberath will conduct a two-hour dressage masterclass on Sunday afternoon as part of the Super Sunday of Dressage, which will also feature the EQUITANA New Zealand Open Grand Prix competition. He is also scheduled to run two education sessions over the rest of the event. Hilberath is sure to be a huge highlight for any dressage aficionado. Top competitor and trainer Brett Parbery (AUS) has three times been short-listed for the Australian team for the Olympic Games, has a top 10 World Equestrian Games to his credit and is the current Australian National Dressage Champion. As a coach, he knows exactly what a competitor needs. He’ll be doing a number of dressage clinics during EQUITANA Auckland, so mark it on your programme. Parbery is also one of the invited riders that will be taking on the kiwis in Friday night’s ATEED Dressage Freestyle to Music. Rozzie Ryan is a celebrity in the world of Australian dressage. She’s colourful and talented, and knows exactly what she is talking about. Ryan has won many awards, including the Pacific League World Cup Final in Australia, represented her nation at European Championships and was a member of the first Australian dressage team to the World Equestrian Games. Her dressage clinics will be well worth watching. Ryan will join Parbery as part of the Australian team that will contest for the title of Friday night’s unmissable elite competition showcase.

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MARK THESE IN YOUR PROGRAMME . . . THURSDAY Dressage demystified with Brett Parbery – Demonstration Arena 11am FRIDAY Education session with Jonny Hilberath – Demonstration Arena 12.15pm Dressage familiarisation for top competitors – Premier Indoor Arena 1.30pm ATEED Dressage Freestyle to Music Open – Premier Indoor Arena 7pm SATURDAY Star presenters forum with Jonny Hilberath – classroom 12-noon Signing session with Jonny Hilberath – main foyer 3pm Education session with Jonny Hilberath – Mitavite Arena 4pm Flying changes and pirouettes with Rozzie Ryan – Demonstration Arena 11am SUNDAY Kubota Dressage Grand Prix – Premier Indoor Arena 9am Equitak Excel Dressage Masterclass with Jonny Hilberath – Premier Indoor Arena 2.30pm Tickets for EQUITANA Auckland start at just $35, with the Jonny Hilberath Dressage Masterclass ticketed separately at $125 for the full day. Limited corporate tickets are also still available through https://www.equitanaakl.co.nz/ticketing/ corporate-packages WHAT: EQUITANA Auckland WHEN: November 23-26, 2017 WHERE: ASB Showgrounds, Auckland MORE INFO: www.equitanaakl.co.nz


EVENT PREVIEW

Jonny Hilberath with pupil Andrea Bank (NZL) and the dressage stallion Doringcourt at Jonny's professional yard in Germany.

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 11


NATIONAL NEWS

Alyssa & Mike Lobb from Wade Equine Coaches with John Thompson and JHT Antonello Photo Credit: Equidays

NEW NATIONAL GRAND PRIX RECORD CREATED AT EQUIDAYS John Thompson and JHT Antonello’s score of 71.9% is the highest on record at this level of show in New Zealand. Although not a CDI, the class was judged by an experienced international panel who were unanimous in their decision placing the combination in first place with scores of 70.7 (Brown) 72.6 (Wessels) 72.4 (Hobson). This score is indicative of hard work and dedication and is an exciting achievement for both John and the sport as we head towards WEG 2018. Congratulations John & AJ

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NATIONAL NEWS

THE WADE EQUINE COACHES FESTIVAL OF DRESSAGE EQUIDAYS 2017 Article by Jess Roberts

Now in its seventh year, Equidays provided dressage enthusiasts with a feast of competition, clinics and masterclasses. The Festival of Dressage, generously sponsored by Wade Equine Coaches, was held in the stadium at Mystery Creek on the Thursday – the relative calm before the storm prior to the event proper opening the following day. The charged indoor atmosphere gave riders a valuable opportunity to expose their horses to an intense competition environment.

The three classes started at the sharp end of the stick with a Prix St Georges, Level 8, and Grand Prix. Local rider Irena Smith (18) and Glamour Star did a tidy job of kicking the PSG competition off at midday, after drawing the unenviable short straw of first-to-go. Next up was Northland pair Julie Flintoff and Belladonna MH who had taken out the L5 title at HOY this year. They showed they were more than ready for the step up, with a few to-beexpected green moments but presenting a lovely overall picture, earning themselves 66.535 and third place. Fresh back from her trip to the UK and the European Championships (this year held in Gothenburg, Sweden) with Carl Hester, Vanessa Way expertly piloted the bouncy NRM KH Arion for a score of 70.526, which would prove to be the winning test. “I was really pleased with him, because he was

petrified!” recalls Way. “I kept talking to him and reassuring him and the more I did that, the more confident he became. For how green he is [this was only his 3rd PSG], he was super. I was stoked with him.” Way was followed by Waikato combination Tessa King and Campion KSNZ, the stallion a little unsettled (as were many others) in the floodlit indoor arena but kindly managed by his rider. Next up was Melissa Galloway and her chestnut powerhouse Windermere J’Obei W – current L4 National title holders – who showed some extraordinary work, though it did look like a challenge to keep a lid on his exuberance at times! They posted 66.579, pipping Flintoff and Belladonna’s score by a micro-fraction, which put them into second place. Te Awamutu’s Christine Weal and the impressive FIS Lucifer put 60.219

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NATIONAL NEWS on the scoreboard, with Greg Smith and his Anamour gelding Avante Garde finishing just slightly ahead on 62.939. Penultimate combination in the 9-strong field was Robyn Coupe and Besonders, with South Islander Harriet Redmond last to go on the elegant Corlando gelding Teodoro. Harriet is currently based as a working pupil with Christine Weal. Just six started in the L8 (Intermediate A), after a late scratching by Sheena Ross and Parkridge Disco SW. The class was won by Julie Brougham and her very beautiful Furst Fellini (68.750). The 10-yearold gelding looks to have a steady, generous character, and Brougham says he loves shows. “He is very sociable, loves company and making new friends and never stops eating; he always puts weight on at a show!” She was delighted with his performance: “He hasn’t competed in a long while due to our Olympic campaign but he is such a good competitor,” she says. “The venue and doing Inter A for the first time didn’t faze him – and it really was for

the first time as I had learned Inter B!” Second went to current HOY and National Champs L6 title-holders Vanessa Way and NRM Andreas. Though green to this level the big bay Anamour showed huge power in his trot work and commands a strong presence in the arena (67.361). Way says Andreas was amazing in the warm-up outside but was very nervous when he came indoors. “His whole body locked up and I thought, ‘oh s**t!’ because he gets like a bolting billygoat! As soon as the canter [work] came, we were off - he thought he was doing the Caulfield Cup!” she laughed, keeping her characteristic sense of humour. “He’s only been out doing dressage for two years and he’s a horse that needs more miles so it was a great learning experience anyway.” Bay of Islands veterinarian Nikita Osborne did a super job with Alacatraz (who can also name wakeboarding as one of his summer pursuits, towing his owner through the Northland surf – not something many dressage horses can lay claim to!), their 66.806 score

was knocking on the door of the big guns for third place, and looked well on the way to Osborne’s aim of riding Grand Prix. “I was over the moon with Alfie’s test,” she says. “We are both still new at this level and to have our first competition back since December 2016 and get our personal best – at L8 – really showed that all the hard work and lessons over the winter have paid off.” Victoria Wall and Letty Lei went into fourth after a countback, as their score tied with Paula Stuart and Aztec Lad, both combinations finishing on 63.75. Sixth went to Nicky Pope and Saskatoon. The Grand Prix, while not being an FEI competition, was still a preapproved event for riders working toward WEG qualification. To be selected for Tryon next year, combinations must be members of the NZ High Performance Squad. The squad currently has three members: Julie Brougham, John Thompson and Wendi Williamson, all of whom are shortlisted for WEG. To gain entry to the High Performance Squad, two

Julie Brougham and Furst Felleni - winners of the Intermediate A Photo Credit: Dark Horse Photography

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NATIONAL NEWS scores of 69% or higher at a CDI 3* or above or pre-approved event are necessary. The judges for all classes were Isobel Wessels (FEI5*, GBR), Sue Hobson (FEI4*, NZL) and Betty Brown (FEI3*, NZL). John Thompson and JHT Antonello positively owned their test, the Anamour gelding – now 16 years old – blooming. There were many highlights, including some flawless piaffe-passage transitions. The pair received huge applause after their final halt, and were the deserving winners with 71.90%. Julie Brougham and Vom Feinsten put up 68.70, this being their first big competition since they represented NZ at the Rio Olympics last year. “As we anticipated, Steiny was not quite back to best competition form, but it will come,” Brougham acknowledged. “He needs outings to get him mentally competition fit. He has already stepped up a notch at this show (Brougham is speaking from the Australian Nationals, which she and Steiny flew to straight after Equidays where they won the Grand Prix Special National Championship) and there is a lot more we can easily improve on.” An uncharacteristic course error cost Wendi Williamson second place, the expensive 2% penalty dropping her score to 68.567. The Waitemata rider and Dejavu MH have recently returned home after competing in the World Cup Finals in Omaha, USA and campaigning successfully in Europe. “DJ and I were a little rusty,” admits Williamson. “His fitness took much longer to get back from quarantine than I thought.” The De Niro gelding

Wendi Williamson and Dejavu MH Photo Credit: Dark Horse Photography

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NATIONAL NEWS certainly wasn’t suffering from jetlag at Mystery Creek, showing his usual starry form. “He came out firing, and while we made lots of mistakes because he was so full on, he really felt great,” says Williamson. “Pleasing that he had so much expression. We just need to get the halts and walk under control!” Local combination William Millar and Raukura Satori MH were a firm favourite with the crowd and also showed some super work for their 67.10 and fourth place. The 69% benchmark stayed just out of reach for reigning HOY champion Abbie Deken (66.30); she and KH Ambrose flew to the Australian Nationals at Boneo Park, Melbourne the following day to continue chasing WEG qualification. Vanessa Way took sixth place and the final spot for the Friday Nightshow Freestyle aboard NRM Arawn, who executed a nice test. “I was really pleased with him,” says Way. “We did little mistakes that were costly but the quality I thought was super, and I had heaps of positive feedback about him.” Jody Hartstone and Ali Baba put a solid 64.60 on the board, the Lusitano stallion’s last centreline of passage and piaffe particularly impressive. After a disastrous winter, which saw both horse and rider out with broken bones, Hartstone says “I honestly was just happy to be back riding him again. His prognosis was bleak and my own leg has taken many months to start feeling right, so I was excited to be back out there.” Ali Baba was too, by the sounds, being

very full of himself and excitable on the showgrounds. “We had to drive him up the road to a school car park just to plait him!” says Hartstone. “But once in the arena he did his very best, as always.” Newly hatched Grand Prix combination Melissa Galloway and Windermere Johanson W did a laudable job of this big step up, despite the chestnut gelding becoming a little hot at times. Scott McKenna nursed a fragile Regent Diamond through his test, while Kate Tobin made the decision to retire I Like It in the early stages of their test after it became clear it was not his day. The top six in the Grand Prix went through to the freestyle, which was held on Friday night. A big crowd packed the stands and made for an electric atmosphere, which proved rather overwhelming for KH Ambrose – “he was really nervous, so I was just trying to coax him through it,” Abbie Deken said after her test – and for NRM Arawn, who also had to deal with small children behind the judges’ car. “We survived!” joked a relieved Vanessa Way afterwards. “It’s all experience – next time we’ll hope for a bit more relaxation.”

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After a slightly rough start William Millar rode a well-timed musical and received thunderous applause from his Waikato fans watching on. Again Wendi Williamson (with a new, more classical soundtrack) and Julie Brougham tussled it out for second and third place. This time Williamson nudged ahead with 69.63 over Brougham’s 69.54, Dejavu MH showing some incredible height and suspension in his passage and piaffe. But again it was John Thompson and JHT Antonello all the way, winning by over four percent with a whopper score of 73.875. John’s partner Holly Leach says the combination has been working really hard over winter, and that AJ is feeling absolutely 100%. “It’s all sort of coming together, they’ve been a partnership for three years now and the fact that it’s getting stronger is a pretty cool reflection of what’s happening between them – his passage and piaffe tour has never looked so dynamic.” AJ didn’t have the best lead-up to the event as he had two abscesses in his front feet and needed four weeks off, leaving just two weeks to prepare for Equidays – it didn’t seem to affect his two amazing tests! “No!” laughs Holly. “John said he felt like AJ was with him the whole time he was in the ring, and it felt like a beautiful ride. And there were two major mistakes in the freestyle so [the score] could have been even more if it had been a clean round.” JHT Equine have WEG firmly in their sights now, and Holly say if all goes to plan they’ll head over to Europe in June next year. “We will base ourselves either in Holland or Germany. We keep in constant conversation with Wendi [Williamson] and Julie [Brougham] all the time because we all want to base together, so we are looking at several options at the moment. We’ll do some shows there and then, I’m assuming about four weeks out, head to Tryon.”


NATIONAL NEWS

Vanessa Way and NRM KH Arion, winners of the Prix St Georges Photo Credit: Dark Horse Photography

PRIX ST GEORGES

GRAND PRIX

1 Vanessa Way/NRM KH Arion – 70.526

1 John Thompson/JHT Antonello – 71.90

2 Melissa Galloway/Windermere J’Obei W – 66.579

2 Julie Brougham/Vom Feinsten - 68.70

3 Julie Flintoff/Belladonna MH – 66.535

3 Wendi Williamson/Dejavu MH – 68.567

4 Greg Smith/Avante Garde – 62.939

4 William Millar/Raukura Satori MH – 67.10

5 Christine Weal/FIS Lucifer – 60.219

5 Abbie Deken/KH Ambrose – 66.30

6 Tessa King/Campion KSNZ – 59.649

6 Vanessa Way/NRM Arawn – 65.83

7 Irena Smith/Glamour Star – 59.649

7 Jody Hartstone/Ali Baba – 64.60

8 Robyn Coupe/Besonders - 57.412

8 Melissa Galloway/Windermere Johansen W – 63.48

9 Harriet Redmond/Teodoro – 57.412

9 Scott McKenna/Regent Diamond – 54.1 10 Kate Tobin/I Like It – RET

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NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 17


MASTERCLASS

DRESSAGE WITH THE PROFESSOR KYRA KYRKLUND Article by Jess Roberts

This is the first time dressage great Kyra Kyrklund has ever been to New Zealand, and she didn’t disappoint. Her jam-packed evening masterclass enjoyed the attention of an audience that was all ears from start to finish.

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MASTERCLASS Long considered one of the world’s best dressage trainers, Finland’s Kyra Kyrklund (66) has a list of achievements as long as your arm. She’s competed at six Olympic Games, and coached at four of them. In 1990 she claimed silver at the World Equestrian Games and in 1991 won the World Cup Finals in Paris: a wildcard entry aboard Matador II. Her book, Dressage With Kyra, has been translated into six languages and printed over 28,000 times. She has produced 14 horses to international Grand Prix level and worked at Sweden’s Flyinge Stud from 1991-1998. During that time she had 13 young dressage riders come to train and work there: nine of them have since ridden in CDIs at Grand Prix level, seven in national teams at the European or World Championships, and five at the Olympic Games. She is a Professor of Equitation at the University of Agricultural Sciences in Sweden, and was the Swedish dressage team supervisor from 2011-16. Kyra has lived in West Sussex, England with her husband Richard White (who was also a visiting clinician at Equidays in his own right), since 1998. She holds lecture demonstrations all over the world including Norway, Poland, Austria, Denmark, Japan, the United States and Australia. Four lucky combinations took part in her evening Masterclass. Kyra combined her concise, thorough training, vast knowledge – including impromptu lectures on conformation and horse anatomy – and dry humour to provide the audience with two hours of dressage gold.

THE RIDER’S WEIGHT AND POSITION – Alex Matheson and

Lingh II Alex is a familiar face on the dressage scene, and is based in Waikato. He currently holds both the Open and Amateur L7 National Championship titles, and was reserve Advanced Champion at HOY this year aboard Prestige Sporthorses lovely Dutch stallion Lingh II. Kyra silently observes the combination warming up for several minutes before calling them over. “This horse is quite hot, and he’s going quite a bit forward, but I would like him to carry Alex a bit better,” she says. She then asks Alex – as she will do with the following three riders – to shorten his stirrups several holes. “You don’t only ride dressage because you have long stirrups!” she jokes. “The horse is still like a barrel – he is round. So somewhere you have to be able to give with your hip, or the hip joint has to move – if you have too long a stirrups [you can’t do this]. The hip is really the bumper, or makes the bump softer.” She uses ‘bump’ to describe the ‘sit’ part of rising and sitting trot. “To be able to come near the horse with the underside of your leg, if you have straight legs then to get any sort of contact with the horse the rider has to bring their leg back where the horse is fat. But when the leg is too far back, the rider tips forward. So I say for the men, they should end up sitting on what I don’t have! So it’s a lot like balance, the rider must learn to balance himself on top of the horse without having to use the leg or use the hand.” “So, we are talking about collection a

little bit later, but for now we’re talking about having a frame, like a painting. The young horse has a big frame [to work in] and then the more you come up towards Grand Prix, the shorter the frame gets. So somewhere you have to be able to [set] the length of the frame you want. Then he has to accept going within that frame. This one, he wants to go a bit long all the time. When the horse challenges you in front, you have to be able to say no, this is like a side-rein, and this is my leg. When he gets strong, you have to be able to resist him.” She then takes the reins and asks Alex to resist the pressure she puts on them. “What happens there is, you get very tight in your arm. And what happens is, he is then lifting you up in the saddle, and then you try to squeeze yourself down instead. So what I want you to do is to really think of your elbows,” she says, putting her hand behind Alex’s elbow and asking him to push back into it. “Then you can be strong here but totally relaxed. Lots of trainers say have a soft hand, but it’s not only the fingers - it’s the whole wrist. Somewhere you almost have to feel that you have the horse in your elbows, the hand just like a hook that holds the rein. When your horse gets strong he pulls you forward, almost like the whole front of your body goes forward and you end up more at the withers, instead of sitting behind the withers so the horse can come up there instead.” Kyra then gets Alex to change the speed of the trot by just using his weight and the ‘bump’. “Bump a little slower, or a little quicker. So you don’t stop him with the hand, you just influence him with your weight. Not too much leg, and not a strong leg – you want to feel

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MASTERCLASS that he relaxes. That’s the step control – you have a certain energy in the step; if we only go forward and let the horse choose what kind of step he wants to do, normally he will take a longer step, or if you have a horse that doesn’t have a lot of trot, he will take a quicker, faster step so then you have difficulties with extended or medium trot,” she explains. “Many times, when you want more energy you want a smaller step, instead of just the step getting longer. The energy should go up, and that’s why the step gets shorter. So that’s why if the rider is just using the hand too much to stop the horse then instead of the energy going up it just goes like this,” she says, demonstrating a flat line with her arm. “Then the bounce in the horse goes away too.” Alex and Lingh then come down to walk. “Don’t try to push him forward with your seat,” Kyra corrects. “Many times when the trainer says ‘use your seat’, that ends up with the rider pushing the horse forward. But when you ride a bicycle it doesn’t go faster unless you pedal faster! And it doesn’t go faster because you rub the seat! So it

is important that the rider stays on the same spot [in the saddle], because the horse has to step more under himself to do the collection, and if the rider is going back and forth on the saddle, the horse doesn’t know where to step under,” she explains. “Think of the back of your belt, Alex, that it’s attached to the back of the saddle – feel that you can really carry yourself.” Kyra then moves on to a conversation about the outside rein. “How many of you have been shouted at ‘more contact on the outside rein’?” she asks the audience. “Be honest! This saying to keep the contact on the outside rein is because you want the neck of the horse fairly straight. So you don’t want to just pull on the inside rein but you cannot turn by pulling and keeping the contact on the outside rein. I do quite a lot, instead of just patting on the inside with the inside hand, patting the horse on the outside,” she says. “And that’s not because horses like to be patted! It’s more that when you pat, you can’t pull. So the horse can relax and then you can take a new half halt on that rein. Until you can feel you have the same in both

reins and you’re not using the outside rein backwards - it’s important for the rider to be able to say to the horse ‘ok, it’s this length’ and then give the space to the horse. It’s not that you throw the reins away, but you have to see that you don’t pull more back. Because the horse is then going to say ‘but I gave, and it’s still bloody uncomfortable!’” She finishes the session with some thoughts on collection. “It’s not that collection is either on or off, collection is something that is compressing all the time, already from the 3-year-old horse all the way up to Grand Prix,” Kyra states. She notices Alex correct Lingh quickly when he drops out of canter. “Don’t be too quick. Let him do mistakes, because if you don’t let him do mistakes you start to do more than what he does. Good,” she praises. “And then think a little bit slower in the canter, without having to stop him with the rein – just do half halts with the outside rein and pat him, half halt and pat. Now bring him back to shorter steps but keep that length of rein. And your aid shouldn’t be any more than what you use to go into canter: that’s why you work all day and pay the rent and food and training! So that he works for one hour!” she jokes. “He has to carry you.”

FLYING CHANGES

– Christine Weal and Schindlers List Te Awamutu based Christine rides the 9-year-old Lessing gelding Schindlers List, who has recently started L5. Kyra works through several exercises with Christine and Schindlers List before they begin work on the changes. She starts with an observation of some of the tests she saw earlier in the day. “One thing that I’ve seen here is that the flying changes… the timing is not very good, of the rider. And the forwardness is not very good. I think the aids are a bit in a muddle. The riders just give an aid and then hope that the horse is doing the change.” She goes on to methodically explain her preparation for the movement. “When you canter, when you prepare to do a change, say from right to left, the main aid is your right leg. So it’s important that your 20 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


MASTERCLASS right leg doesn’t do too much work beforehand, because when you come to your change you have to use even more.” “So,” she says, addressing Christine, “ make him sharp for your outside leg, and do a little bit of forward and back, forward and back with the outside leg only. Half halt, pat him, then on again.” Kyra asks her to do a change across the short diagonal. “Only if you need, you may ask for impulsion with your left leg. You need impulsion so that the horse can jump up into the change, but then you cannot just stop him with the rein. When the horse comes into the change, somewhere you need to be able to say to the horse, no, don’t run away. And to get him to change uphill, you have to stop him with the old inside rein. In the change, you don’t pull on the left rein, you almost give on the left rein,” she iterates. “You have to see, when you come into the change, that he is not leaning. You want him to be straight and carrying himself. Then if you need more energy, you do it with the left leg so that you only have to touch him with the right leg for the change.” Kyra then outlines how she rides a flying change. “I usually count the change in three steps. Every three strides, one two three. One, I just sit around the horse, two I move my leg, and on three the horse can do the change. So don’t try to do the change in the same step that you change your aid. It’s one, two, three. One, move, change,” she says, finishing with praise for Christine’s 9-year-old Lessing gelding. “He gets a little bit against you in the change, but he moves very well – if you can just get that quality into the canter work then you will have a nice horse!”

COLLECTION

– Jody Hartstone & Ali Baba Well-known rider and trainer Jody has won Grand Prix HOY titles on the stallions Landioso and Whisper. She is based in Raglan, and now competes another stallion Ali Baba, a Lusitano imported from Portugal. Kyra opens the session by mentioning that she has worked with many Lusitanos, and can see collection is

quite easy for Ali Baba due to his strong work ethic. “But to keep that sort of energy, it easily becomes a nervous energy instead of a relaxed energy. So I thought that with him, we would talk about what collection really is. Because that’s one of the big things in riding.” “You know, one says ‘collect more’. Yes, but how? And what am I really looking for with collection?” she queries rhetorically to the audience. “The first time you get on a 3-yearold, already he has to collect himself somehow so that he is able to carry the rider on top of him. Then during the education you have more and more movements that require more collection. In the trot, the biggest collection is piaffe, and in the Spanish Riding School, or the old classical school, the next step from piaffe is levade. I go quite a lot to Portugal, and they want to see that if you could collect the horse a bit more that he actually would take the whole weight on the hind legs,” she says, acknowledging that there are a lot of different kinds of piaffe that are used in training. “There is a piaffe where the

horse is more horizontal and he is going more like a passage on the spot, but for me the real collection in the piaffe has to be sitting, and it has to be the stage just before the horse actually could lift the whole forehand off the ground and keep the weight on the hind legs.” She then moves on to the biggest collection in canter, the pirouette. “The horse must be able to canter on the spot and still turn. I think it’s important to know a little bit about the conformation of the horse too. Because what he has to do in the collection is bend all the joints, and turn the pelvis so that he can step a little bit more underneath himself. But when he does that, he has to raise himself in front. So as a rider, you almost feel that the wither is coming up.” She describes how tension physically restricts the horse. “The hind leg is attached to the body by the hip joint. The shoulders are attached only with muscles. So if the horse is tense, and he has tense muscles, he will not be able to raise or lift himself up between the shoulder blades. So it’s important, first of all, that the rider really sits behind the wither. And it’s only when

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 21


MASTERCLASS the horse comes up in front of you that the rider can really feel that he is in front of the leg, not afraid of the leg.” “But at the same time when we are talking about collection of the legs, it’s also collection of the frame, so what you have to think of is that you have a topline on the horse, going from the nose to the hind leg, but then you also have an underline which goes underneath, connected through muscles, to the hind leg.” Kyra gets the audience to stand up and asks them to lift up one knee – first with an arched back, and again with a rounded back, which was much easier. “So you can see with a lot of riders, they try to fiddle the head down and make the topline longer, instead of trying to get the underline shorter. Then the topline will get longer. Then you can feel that instead of sitting in a hammock, the horse will arch himself upwards and suddenly you sit on top of the horse instead of in or underneath him. Feel the tummy of the horse, he has a lot of guts, and they are heavy,” she reminds everyone. “So if you can engage the horse from the underline then he can really use his tummy muscles to carry the whole package.” “So, with him,” says Kyra, turning back to Ali Baba, “he is quite hot, it’s a bit difficult to use the leg on him, so not

a strong leg but somewhere you have to be able to engage this whole underline. You cannot only ride the hind leg more and more under, if the back is gone – you have to try to engage the underline before you try to engage more hind leg. Especially with these Lusitanos or PRE horses, they easily start to go very quick,” she observes. As the pair is walking around, Ali Baba shows off with a few steps of Spanish walk, which doesn’t bother Kyra in the least. “I use this quite a lot with teaching the horse that doesn’t trot very well to lift the front leg. I think it’s easier to teach him to do that instead of riding 252 extended trots and hoping that they learn it before they have to go to the vet because they’re lame!” She begins to talk about the double bridle, the purpose of the two bits, and why she is asking Jody to ride ‘3+1’, which means holding three of the reins in one hand, and one bridoon rein in the other. “How do you use your reins? Most people start riding with the bridoon, and then they chuck the curb in and cross the reins and then they go! They don’t think how does the curb influence the horse, how does the bridoon influence the horse. In principle the curb keeps the head down and the frame short, and the bridoon can take him up. If you only ride with

22 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017

the same pressure on the curb all the time they can learn to hang on it. They are not allowed to hang on the curb. They have to accept and back off the curb if you need. “So what I want Jody to do is only have one bridoon rein in one hand, and keep the other hand very still with 3 reins in it. Then it keeps the curb very still and the rider can feel ‘what is he doing to my hand’, not ‘what am I doing to his mouth’. Then this makes the rider use the weight to turn the horse, and correct with the leg, instead of just trying to take the whole forward goingness away.” They then begin some impressive pirouette work, with transitions between canter, walk and piaffe. “Use the whip on the shoulder to help him turn,” Kyra calls out. “Think head down, front leg up. Good, good.” She speaks once more to the audience. “Here again it’s not that I want the horses to go here [she mimics very low head carriage], but when I’m going into the pirouette and I feel the horse gets tense and comes up with the neck, then he stops going forward. Then it doesn’t help if I use more and more leg, I have to get him to relax in that sort of collection. So,” she says to Jody, “somewhere I think you have to play with that, so he thinks it’s a secure place. Otherwise


MASTERCLASS you’re just trying to survive the pirouette, it just gets uncomfortable for him. Ok, when you’re at a show, you have to do what you have to do but at home, play with it. With the canter you have to work a lot more with the collection so that you can ride out from the true collection.” Jody says taking part in Kyra’s masterclass was a dream come true. “She, for me, is a modern day Master, not only one of the world’s best riders, but also one of the world’s best trainers, with a methodical and horse-friendly approach that can be very rare these days. She understands horses so well, and particularly the Lusitano horse. I thought she had great exercises,” she praises, “not only to help my wonderful horse but also to show the audience some of what he is capable of.”

HEAD AND NECK CARRIAGE

– Wendi Williamson & Don Amour MH Grand Prix rider Wendi is finally home after competing at the World Cup Final (USA) and throughout Europe with Dejavu MH. She rides Don Amour MH, who is also working at Grand Prix level. This session starts with a discussion on conformation. “All horses are built in different ways, but there are some things that you really want in a dressage horse,” Kyra states. “That they have good angles behind, and that it’s easy for them to come under with the hind leg. And then another thing that I’m always looking at is how are they connected here between the head and the neck. If you have a horse that is built downhill and is very thick here [she points to where the cheek meets the neck] then it’s going to be physically impossible for that horse to come up and come in. So the harder it is for the horse, the more he is going so say ‘urgh, this is a bit too much work, I don’t know if I want to do it’. “Then the other one we talked about is the topline and the underline. With this one,” she notes, patting Don Amour, “you have a bit of a difficult neck, because he is a bit like a periscope when he wants to look at something. What?” she asks when Wendi says something. “You said giraffe! I was

nicer! With him, he has nice gaits but the thing with him is to get this under neck up. So I just thought - as I like my gadgets - one thing that might be helpful for you is to ride with a neck strap.” “Because he is a bit like this in the mouth,” Kyra notes, shaking her hand about, “you would like him to be a bit more calm in the mouth, and really dare to go into the hand and suck forward into the hand.” She ties a little rope neck strap around Don Amour. “Then we see where he best reacts to this – some horses like it better here at the base of the neck, some horses like it a little bit higher up. So if you just keep one hand in the strap. So instead of pulling his mouth, you pull on the strap.” She pauses for a moment. “It’s almost as

though you want to have an eye on his chest, and that eye must start looking upwards, not downwards. So what he does is put the head up, but the chest looks down. When he goes forward or down, he has to go with that lower neck carriage. “The strap here is to show the rider that they must sit with the hands still. Let him look for your hand. When they get a bit tense, you can’t force a horse to relax, you just have to wait,” she points out. “Pat him on the neck – so you dare to let loose. In a way, yes, if you want to be able to ride Grand Prix you have to be able to teach them the piaffe and passage and pirouettes and one time changes, but then if you cannot trot on a circle and influence easily the gait or the outline and how they carry

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MASTERCLASS

“...‘If you always do what you always did, you’ll always get what you always got.’ If you are not happy with what you are getting, you have to change what you are doing.”

themselves, then somewhere you are going to meet that same awful problem and you can’t just try to carry them through it. You always have to back down to the basic things.” They begin working on lengthening and shortening the trot steps and then start to work with some travers. “What do you need for a travers? The horse has to yield to the leg. But many times when the rider doesn’t feel a yield from the leg they start bending the neck more and pushing more forward with the outside leg. It’s the inside leg that keeps the energy in him, and the outside leg takes the hindquarter to the inside,” Kyra says. “What you can’t do with short steps, you won’t be able to do with longer steps. They first have to be relaxed and you have to be able to get the right line. Then when you feel it’s good, then you ride a bit forward.

“The halfpass is the same movement as the travers. And its so easy when you ride a halfpass you just think sideways instead of controlling where the front legs are. So I do a lot of travers on the long side until I have almost like a tram – where the front legs have to move on train tracks. Then I play [with how much to move the hindquarters], for example in the Grand Prix it’s quite steep, so the horse needs to be quite bent in the body, or can I move just a little bit. So here on the long side, the best is if you have a big mirror at the end of the long side,” she says, adding “if you think of how the horse is built, he has big joints in the neck; the neck bends easily, and the back has many small joints and actually they don’t bend at all, they rotate. So if you bend the neck too much then the hind legs are going to go out and it’s even more

difficult for the horse to rotate his body.” Wendi says it was a treat to be able to meet and receive help from such an icon of dressage. “I loved my demo rides with Kyra. She added so much to Don Amour, helping me to get his neck into a place that allowed the back to activate properly. The neck rope helped give both of us the right feeling and she had some really interesting ideas that helped with both horses.” And that was that – after a big thankyou and round of applause for the demo riders, everyone got to their feet, ready to leave. “Wait! I just want to tell you a saying that we have in England,” Kyra said. “It is this: ‘If you always do what you always did, you’ll always get what you always got.’ If you are not happy with what you are getting, you have to change what you are doing.”

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MASTERCLASS

THOUGHTS FROM KYRA KYRKLUND

USING THE WHIP – “If you need to

use the whip in canter, always use it on the outside. If you have it on the inside and you use it on the hind leg, you just teach them to put the hind leg down quicker. If you use it on the outside, the horse has time to step through with the inside, and also you can use it on the outside shoulder.” CHANGING BAD HABITS – “When

you have made something automatic, it’s like a child starting to learn how to walk, he has to train a lot of times. In gymnastics they say it’s about 100,000 repetitions before you have made something automatic in the brain. And it is like nerve patterns; it starts with a little path in the forest and then ends up with a motorway. But when you have learned something maybe wrong or something that you want to change, you have to do 5,000 repetitions to break that automatic thing, and then you have to do another 100,000 times to make the new thing automatic. And in a stress situation – bang! You are back with what you learned in the beginning. So it’s not like students don’t want to change – change is difficult. It’s important to try and find one thing that you want to change and then nag about that and then you can form a new, good, better habit. I use a lot of my time on riders seat and position because then they are better able to influence the horse.”

THE BASIC AIDS – “And then one can

of course ask what are the aids that the rider uses? You have the basic aid of the rein that stops or turns the horse, and the leg is either forward or sideways. And then you have a combination of the rein and the leg. Then you have the weight, it’s not the seat I think: it’s more the weight. And for me the weight is the most important thing. Because it influences all the time. The rider doesn’t need to pull all the time and he doesn’t need to use the leg all the time – but the weight is there all the time. So if you can’t centre yourself in the middle of the horse, if you always have the weight a little bit to the left for instance, then the horse is always going to go a little bit to the left. If you are not aware of that, then you start steering him with right rein and left leg and then you have already used turning aids instead of just fixing your weight.” GETTING GOOD SCORES – “Every

horse should get 70% provided it’s not lame – a seven is only ‘fairly good’!” HER BEST RIDE EVER – “Well, it

doesn’t happen every day, but now and then it happens. And then it’s a miracle when it happens in a competition. I think mine must have been with Edinburgh in Barcelona, in the Special. Even if he had a mistake there but it was like, he went in, and everything just happened and you thought you didn’t do anything.”

WHY RIDING IS LIKE STRAWBERRY JAM – “The problem with riding is

that feeling is a sense, a bit like smell or hearing. You have to experience it before you can feel it. Even if I say sometimes ‘that’s good’, it doesn’t mean that it’s 100% or even 60% good, but that you are starting to feel the right thing in the horse. I usually say it’s a bit like strawberry jam: if you never have tasted strawberry jam and I try to explain how strawberry jam tastes, I can say that it’s red and it has small pips and its sweet but it’s also a little bit sour; you still don’t know anything more about strawberry jam! But once you have tasted it, then you say ah! This tastes like strawberries. Then you know that you are on the right way. Then [as you learn] you can say, aha! This is strawberry. But it’s nothing that [happens] very quickly.” TRAINING – “Even if you don’t have a

mirror, at least everybody has a video in their phone, so ask anybody to film you, and then really have a look at it, daily. And nowadays at least you have access to the internet and you can look at the best [combinations], so really look at that more and say, what’s the difference? Where am I compared to them?”

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 25


EVENT PREVIEW

LIVAMOL FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE Forty two combinations have been given the selectors nod to contest regional rankings in the NZL leg of the FEI World Dressage Challenge supported by naming rights sponsors Livamol and section sponsors Exclusively Yours, Zilco NZ, Hatton & Lilly Horse Floats and Syncroflex. Special permission has been granted by the FEI to increase the number of competitors to 42 from the standard 40 given the popularity of the competition this year. The Exclusively Yours Youth Challenge has attracted a strong field of 12-16 year olds. Canterbury riders are out in force, many fresh from the Pryde’s Easifeed Talent ID camp. The Zilco NZ Senior Challenge (which equates to approx L3/4 NZ) will be hotly contested by thirteen combinations from across the South Island. This class comprises an interesting mix of some very experienced riders and some World Challenge newcomers all on quality horses. The Hatton & Lilly Horse Floats Senior II, which is the equivalent of Level 5, also looks to be a very even field of eleven with some of the most consistent South Island combinations looking to take away this title.

Just seven starters will line up in the Syncroflex Prix St Georges but the class comprises a wealth of experience; three riders and one horse have competed previously at Grand Prix level so it will be a spirited challenge for the Fetterman Trophy donated by Andrea Raves and Helen Hughes-Keen to the winner of this class. Riders with two horses or ponies nominated in the same class must choose one but can present their second one at the horse inspection so they have a reserve available if necessary, or if spaces become available nearer to the event, it will be permissible for riders to compete two horses in the same class. It’s the first time an Intermediate I Challenge has been on the programme in the south and lead sponsor representative, Kerrin Beatson, is thrilled that Livamol has the opportunity to support the event and this particular class. Again it’s a mixture of youth and experience, but that’s what the World Challenge is all about. It’s about developing riders in the more remote parts of the world and giving them the have the opportunity to compete against riders in their regional group. This is a change from 2016 when the results were world wide.

Australia is back in the World Challenge after many years absence, Hong Kong, New Zealand, South Africa and Taipei complete Group 8. Helen Hughes-Keen judged the Australian competition which was held at Boneo Park at Labour Weekend. Maria Schwennessen (5* judge AUS) will officiate in Christchurch alongside NZL List 1 Sue Harris (Gisborne). Mary Seefried who was to judge has been seconded to a test event at the Asian Games and is no longer able to join us. THE LEADERS FROM THE AUSTRALIAN LEG TO DATE ARE YOUTH: Isabelle Luxmoore (LINUS WK) 68.333%. In 2nd place was a pony rider with NZL nationality, Jasmine Haynes (STEENDIEKS CHAMP OF GLORY) on 67.167%   SENIOR I: Monica Bird (Bourgogne) 68.359% SENIOR II: Sidney Hoffman (FREEDOM C) 66.5% PSG: Sara Price (CHEVAL DE LUXE) 67.434% INT I: Jamie Mita WESTEWIND 67.697% (Jamie was a member of the Victorian Young Rider team who competed at the NZ U25 Nationals in Taupo earlier this year)

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GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEA!


EVENT PREVIEW

List of starters: the draw for all classes is to be confirmed. EXCLUSIVELY YOURS YOUTH CHALLENGE RIDERS 12 – 16YRS GE Prides Dreamcatcher Lovely Rita or Inspector Gadget Dinky Di Doff Buckton Denniston Farview Free Spirit or Te Puke Rifesyde Prancer

SYNCROFLEX FEI PRIX ST GEORGES CHALLENGE Florin Windermere JObèi W Westford Lanciano Rakaunui Embracing Caithness Masquerade Profile Lexas NZ

Georgia Allison Lucy Cochrane Emma Copplestone Meila Picard Charlotte Thomas Millie Thompson

ZILCO NZ SENIOR I CHALLENGE Delphine Fernando MH Delta Rose First Choice Lavetta Gymnastik Gift Rhein or Lavante Solo Greenmoor Euphoria TL Latanya Gurteens Velvet Katja KP Dexter

Davina Anderson Nicki Ford Louisa Kerr Robert Kofoed Kerryn McLean Rhiannon Moss Rachael Powell Rebecca Rowlands Dani Simpson Sharon Templeton Rachel Thomas Bev Uttridge Diane Wallace

Frangelico F Il Divo Leo Dreams Of Gold Faemoss BW Gammon KS

Kristen Anderson-Strang Melissa Galloway Lauren Haig Jude Nickolls Anna Terrell Diane Wallace Sarah Gray

Sophie Griffith Gael Kofoed Fiona Sharp Sarah Wadworth Joy White

Best Presented Award

Shannon Brien Anna Gale Nicola Maley Sonya McLachlan Adelle O'Neill Seija Parkkali-Glew Penny Rieter Rebecca Rowlands Janelle Sangster-Ward Nicola Sim Grace Thomson

LIVAMOL FEI INTERMEDIATE I CHALLENGE

HATTON & LILLY SENIOR II CHALLENGE Amberleigh Remembrance Walk The Line Astek Galahad Alliarna Luna Rosa Lodestar Jive Thyme Southwell Rendevouz Isle of Mystique Chocolate Ice Chocolat Moka CM

Stable Art by Belinda has generously donated quality aluminium ESNZ 200mm hanging for the winner of the Best Presented at the WDC Horse inspection. Available also in a larger 50mm size, these will be available for sale or to order at the WDC making great Christmas gifts for any horse enthusiast. Stable Art by Belinda supporting the Dressage NZ WEG fundraising campaign.

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NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 27


NEWS

SUCCESSFUL NATIONAL SQUAD TRAINING AT EQUIDAYS The decision to run Squad training sessions at Equidays proved to be a popular initiative. Having many of the riders already targeting attendance there meant it was a fairly logical step to get them together and utilise resources. Squad members were able to take part in the Wade Equine Festival of Dressage competitions, Judges and Coaching clinics, personal development sessions and of course lessons with Isobel Wessels. Many of the riders also put themselves forward as demo riders for Kyra Kyklund, Richard White and Isobel Wessels clinics over the weekend. The inclusion in the wider ESNZ performance program that followed on from the event created a positive “team” vibe. ESNZ High Performance enabled us to “share” Isobel which had huge benefits for us in regards to costs and timing but more importantly it meant that all squads were exposed to the same level of training and along the same lines. Isobel was happy to approach the training sessions in either her capacity as a trainer or as a judge which meant the riders didn’t have to make the choice to use a different trainer but could still benefit from the sessions.  Many of the squad riders had been judged by Isobel at the Equidays competition and were able to discuss their test sheets with her and take part in video reviews if they wished.  The uptake for this was very good and the feedback from the riders was very positive.  It is important that our riders have access to good trainers and judges who are active in the international dressage “world”.  It is often difficult for them to measure how their results here fit in to the bigger picture.  Isobel also had useful advice for those riders contemplating heading offshore.  I don’t think it is possible for us to develop our sport without the help of people like Isobel and we are very fortunate to have her “on board”. Also “piggy-backing” on to the ESNZ HP program we were able to use Sport NZ Director of Athlete Performance Support, Victoria Underwood. Victoria has an impressive background in athlete support programs at the English Institute of Sport and as head of Performance Services for Team GB in their preparation for the London Olympics. Victoria conducted two sessions with riders and left them positive and buzzing! I was heartened by the “buy in” from squad members and the willingness of ESNZ HP to enable this. Judy Alderdice Dressage NZ Training & Development Officer 28 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017

SOAKING UP THE KNOWLEDGE Squad member Marlborough’s Melissa Galloway made the Mystery Creek trip with two horses to soak up the knowledge and competition opportunities on offer, finishing up at the Bay of Plenty Championships to test it all out. “I was really pleased with how both horses coped with Equidays. I really threw Johanson in the deep end with the Grand Prix and I thought he handled it so well; he is so young and we are both very very new to Grand Prix so I was thrilled with him. However, having discussed his development with Isobel, we have taken her advice and have decided to step him down to Level 8 for a while to give him the chance to get stronger in his work as he is only nine years old and was Prix St Georges last year. J’Obei has a tendency to be quite spooky so I was quite nervous that he would spook in the test which made me ride him a lot tighter than usual which caused a few issues at the beginning and end of the test, so although I was happy that we got through it, it wasn’t our best work, but experiences like this with that sort of atmosphere is exactly what I need to do more of so I am so happy we made the trip up and I’m sure we will be doing it again. The venue was great; it very much resembled what it would be like to ride at the big shows in Europe which is exactly what we need here in NZ! The plans for the rest of the season are just to get both horses stronger and more consistent in their work, but I am really happy with their progress as they are both very young for their level and have stepped up a lot from last season. So I am definitely taking care with their training and making sure they have a lot of variety in their work and well deserved days off.”


PROFILE

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MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH GO TO THE DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN FACEBOOK PAGE AND SUBMIT YOUR TRAINING OR MAINTENANCE QUESTIONS.

YOUR MITAVITE QUESTION OF THE MONTH "GIVING THE REINS"

It's important not to confuse the two movements pictured above. Photo courtesy of Eurodressage.com

QUESTION BY: ANDREA HAMMOND

"Giving the reins" in a test - what is expected by a judge? There is a huge variation seen from riders, from a subtle movement forward of the hands to some almost touching the horse's ears! The test book doesn't define it except under "Release", but is that a definition for all levels? Is a degree of self carriage expected from level 1 onwards, even though it isn't actually referred to in the "Purpose of" each level until Level 8/9?

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Each month one question will be selected and sent to one of our participating coaches/experts to answer for you! The winning question will receive a bag of Mitavite feed. Thank you Mitavite for supporting Dressage NZ. Congratulations Andrea, we hope you enjoy your Mitavite products!

Sue Hobson and Mitavite rider Jody Hartstone

ANSWER BY: SUE HOBSON - 4* INTERNATIONAL JUDGE Introduced in Dressage NZ level 1 tests are two movements that should not be confused THE FIRST IS: Give and take the reins in trot If you refer to the USDF Glossary of Terms in the Dressage NZ Test Book you will see listed under Foreign Terms the German word Überstreichen; a German word that has no easy English translation. It is pronounced “oober shtry khen,” and should be included in your equestrian vocabulary. So now you are guided to refer back to the USDF definition of “RELEASE” which states: “As used in the tests, the brief release of the contact, wherein the rider in one clear motion extends the hand(s) forward along the crest of the horse’s neck, then rides for several strides without contact. Its purpose is to demonstrate that even with loose rein(s) the horse maintains its carriage, balance, pace and tempo” The rider then retakes the rein and the contact The purpose of the exercise is to show if the horse is correctly on the aids and balanced at trot or canter. The Dressage NZ tests ask for both reins to be “given” or “released” THE SECOND MOVEMENT IS: Letting the horse gradually take the reins out of the hands and then gradually take up the reins The horse is allowed the freedom to lower and stretch his head and neck forward and down while the rider maintains a light contact through the reins. The horse should continue to trot/canter in the same rhythm, with suppleness of the back and self carriage. The purpose of this movement is to demonstrate the willingness of the horse to take the contact forward and down and the willingness to accept the contact back whilst maintaining the balance and quality of the trot.


NUTRITION

MITAVITE NUTRITION

KEEPING YOUR HORSE COOL & CALM Fizzy or nervous behaviour by your horse can make a competitive performance unpleasant and disappointing. Patience, good handling, education and experience can often settle the fizzy, nervous horse but if an unbalanced, incorrectly fed diet has contributed to the fizzy nature of the horse then adjustments can be made.

One of the most important things we need to do when feeding a fizzy horse is to feed a balanced diet. It is important that we assess the two main components of the ration. The concentrate and the roughage.

CONCENTRATE Feed moderate to low levels of starch For a fizzy horse we don’t want to feed excess levels of starch. High starch meals can cause disproportionate exchanges in the blood glucose and insulin levels after feeding that contribute to highs and lows in energy utilisation. A high starch, low fibre ration may also be a contributing factor to digestive and metabolic disorders. We therefore want to feed a horse with a fizzy behaviour a ration that has a moderate to low starch level. This can be achieved by feeding a ration based on Mitavite® Xtra-Cool® or Mitavite® Munga®. Match the energy level of the ration with the workload of the horse The amount of energy fed in the ration should match the workload given to the horse each day. If the energy given is greater than workload then excessive weight and fizzy behaviour can occur. Maximise digestion of nutrients in the small intestine Feeding a more effective energy source that is primarily digested in the small intestine will lower the amount of heat, acid and gas produced by products in the large intestine that can contribute to fizzy behaviour. Steam-extruded or a combination of steam extruded and roasted and rolled feeds such as XtraCool® and Munga® are ideal feeds for the fizzy horse.

Add cool energy sources if more condition or energy is needed OILS - Oils are an excellent energy source for horses that have a fizzy disposition. Oils do not contain sugar or starch and are predominantly digested in the small intestine. It will provide more cover on your horse without the fizz. 50-200mls of Vitamite® Performa 3 Oil® can be fed if more condition or cover is needed. This will provide the most favourable Omega 3: Omega 6 ratio.

ROUGHAGE Don’t underestimate the importance of feeding roughage. Not feeding adequate levels of roughage can disrupt the balance of microbes in the hindgut. If the hindgut isn’t happy the caecum can become too acidic causing an imbalance that may contribute to fizzy behaviour. All horses need a minimum of 1-1.5% of their bodyweight of roughage in their diet per day. This could be pasture, hay, chaff and super fibres. If your horse is a good doer and you don’t need to feed high levels of concentrate you may need to feed more roughage to make sure your horse’s requirements are being met. It is also important to feed the right ratio of roughage. We suggest approx. 1/4-1/3 lucerne and 2/3-3/4 grass or cereal roughage. Feeding too much lucerne may be a contributing factor to fizzy behaviour. Lucerne is very high in calcium and if lucerne is fed as the only roughage source it can impact on the calcium:magnesium and calcium:phosphorous ratio. This may impact on fizzy behaviour.

You may have heard of super fibres such as SpeediBeet®. Super fibres have a low sugar and starch level and are really well digested in the hindgut, helping to keep the hindgut in the right balance. 0.5-1kg of SpeediBeet® (wet down prior to feeding) can be fed in your horse’s ration to provide a well digested, cool, safe energy source to your horse.

SUPPLEMENTS There is a range of supplements on the market making claim to quieten and calm horses. Remember when you are feeding supplements that you don’t want to upset the correct balance of nutrients. Too much of a nutrient can be just as bad as not feeding enough of a nutrient. Mitavite feeds provide the right amount of nutrients when fed to suggested levels with the correct ratios of roughage, helping to keep your horse cool and calm. For more information try our diet analysis service at www.mitavite.com and get a personally tailored diet for your horse. BY GAIL SRAMEK BAPPSC (AGR) – CONSULTING NUTRITIONIST TO MITAVITE

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RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

AEROBIC FITNESS FOR YOUR MENTAL PERFORMANCE Article by Ricki Jacobs

RICKI JACOBS IS A QUALIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER AND THE HEAD TRAINER AT THE RANGIORA FITNESS CENTRE, AS A FORMER SEMI PROFESSIONAL RUBGY PLAYER, RICKI NOW SPECIALIZES IN HELPING ATHLETES TO IMPROVE THEIR MOVEMENT QUALITY AND PHYSICAL PERFORMANCES. 32 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


RIDER HEALTH AND FITNESS

Your brain is no different than every other muscle in your body, it needs rest and needs fuel. People often talk about sleeping, relaxing or "switching off" to allow for your brain to rest and recover however, there is alot to be said for exercise and the boost it gives not just your physical game, but mental game too. Here are 4 reasons why exercise will improve your mental performance DECREASE STRESS LEVELS

IMPROVED COGNITIVE ABILITY

Aerobically fit individuals generally will suffer less from stress or anxiety before, after and even during exercise or competition. This is because the more aerobically fit you are, the less rapid spikes in heart rates you will experience which in turn lowers levels of adrenalin and anxiety. For a competitive rider this can have a huge impact on pre-competition nerves and decreased arousal levels which will improve mental clarity whilst riding and competing.

Studies have shown that regular aerobic exercise actually develops a part of the human brain called the hippocampus which is part of the limbic system in your brain. This is responsible for all brain functions of memory, emotions, and motivation. This part of our brain has been shown to shrink in late adulthood and therefore increase the risk of memory loss conditions such as dementia and alzheimers. Aerobic exercise has been proven to be highly effective at reversing the onset of these conditions and promoting growth of the hippocampus! If that alone isn't enough motivation to engage in regular exercise then I'm not sure what is.

IMPROVED MEMORY

The brain, just like any other muscle in the body requires oxygen to function optimally. When your aerobic system is well developed your ability to export oxygen to the brain and muscles improves which in turn increases the ability to fuction in an optimal state. During work, exercise or competition as your body starts to fatigue and your ability to utilise this oxygen decreases, many of us experience short term memory loss or what some call "brain fog" where the normal ability to remember or execute a movement is lost because the body struggles to provide enough oxygen to the brain. I'm sure each of you have hit a wall under pressure where you've felt that you've tapped into a physical 'survival' state instead of 'riding with your mind'. My tip to each of you would be to get your heart rate elevated through weekly exercise (off horse), to a state where your body is requiring a heightened amount of oxygen to function... then recite to yourself a dressage test or and notice how much harder it is than when you are in a fresh or relaxed state.

IMPROVED MOOD AND CONCENTRATION

This last one is a tip you can implement straight away to notice the benefits. Small bouts of exercise during the day (around 10 minutes at a time) have been shown to improve; your mood, concentration, ability to multitask and process information. This is due to the increased blood flow and oxygen to the brain. Short breaks from work or the task at hand can also aid in mental clarity. If you find yourself feeling tired or unmotivated during your day, take a ten minute break to get moving. Simply walk for 10 minutes, stretch, play a game or go through some light bodyweight movements to get blood and oxygen moving throughout your body. This doesn't need to be vigirous exercise or make you sweat profusely, but enough to make you feel warm and take your mind off the task at hand for a few moments, You will notice enhanced productivity upon your return to whatever you were doing beforehand. So there you have it, exercise not only makes you look and feel better, but today you've unlocked the relationship between the mental and physical performance of a Dressage rider and why your Aerobic fitness is the key to thriving instead of just surviving... your horse will thank you for it!

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NEWS Kristi Salonius (corrective exercise specialist) with Natasha Wedzinga

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NEWS The North Island TID squad members and supporters of 2017

PRYDE’S EASIFEED SUPPORTING THE FUTURE OF DRESSAGE Photos by Nicola Felton

The Pryde’s Easifeed NZ and Dressage NZ’s TID North Island clinic was a September highlight at the Fiber Fresh National Equestrian Centre, Taupo for twenty Under 21’s from Waitemata in the north to Horowhenua in the south. Although the weather did disintegrate slightly on Sunday, Saturday had dawned brisk with bright blue skies. Riding sessions kicked off at 7am on both days, riders being lucky enough to have sessions with all coaches enabling everyone to have the biomechanics experience, complete with Franklin balls and beans!

Andrea Raves has a long affiliation with TID clinics and was back to encourage and motivate. Her concise and experienced instruction generated positive results all weekend and the tried and true German Training Scale sessions were of much benefit to riders. As well as lessons, Andrea provided the one-on-one reviews with rider’s videoed tests and an entertaining evening’s discussion with her recollections of the European dressage scene and Rio Olympic Games experiences. Nicola Felton was a dynamic addition to the TID clinician line up and her experience in personal development, wellness and motivation was presented with authentic panache! In both group and pair sessions, Nicky’s experiences as a digital community manager and life coach, translated to practical

relatable advice. Sessions focused on sponsorship, communications, mindset and sports psychology and in the few breaks in the timetable she was busy with camera in hand. Training and Development manager for Dressage NZ, Judy Alderdice had a very full day with group discussions reviewing the rules, the ins and outs of Dressage NZ, online access, Performance Pathway and most importantly for our attendees this year the Pryde’s Easifeed Scholarship.  The Scholarship is a very exciting development for TID 2017. For the winners of course there is a fantastic line up of products and prizes, however the journey to meet the criteria should hopefully give all riders valuable skills and development. Judy judged 19 tests starting with

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NEWS Morgan Beere’s young Furstenball mare Redwood Furst Affair and finishing with Amy Sage and Madison Schollum showing good form in the Prix St Georges with RM All About Me and Amadour. There were chats immediately on the completion of tests which was a fabulous opportunity for riders to have feedback from such an experienced judge and national selector. All videoed tests were uploaded at the completion of the clinic so going forward riders have a baseline for reference Julie Malcolm and Kristi Salonius worked in tandem all weekend, with Julie taking the lead in the riding sessions and Kristi likewise in the workshop groups.  Julie is a passionate advocate of giving riders the tools and the “how” to become aware of how the way they sit on the horse and how the changes they make can positively affect the way the horse goes. Franklin balls and beans made their way into the ridden sessions. These were highly interactive sessions and the improved outcomes for riders apparent in short periods of time

The premise of the balls and the beans is that they help communicate the horse’s movements more clearly to the rider and in turn, improve seat and body awareness. It’s all about employing dynamic neuro-cognitive imagery to use the brain to improve body function and it all led to giving many new learning experiences and a few very

humorous moments Kristi is a registered NZ Chiropractor, a massage therapist and a corrective exercise specialist so we were very fortunate to have her join the camp for the weekend.  In the Charisma Hall biomechanics sessions covered common issues, riders positions were discussed further and explained, in Andrea Raves and Georgia Gibbons discussing progress and training tactics

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE DRESSAGE NZ PATHWAY GO TO:

http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/recognition/dressage-squads/dressage-performance-pathway/ 36 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


NEWS combination with exercises. These were relevant to each rider’s situation, specific but simple self release techniques and strengthening exercises were prescribed. Sometimes there were further recommendations for body work, as either preventative or maintenance homework for the rider. On Sunday Pryde’s Easifeed Hayley-Jane Malcolmson presented a thoroughly educational nutritional lecture on all things feed. There was much knowledge to be gained on topics like what actually makes up the protein value, how quality can be judged, where ingredients are sourced from, how that information on the feedbag tells you about what you are actually paying for, the science behind extruded feed and answers to a myriad of queries – like how well does my ponies gut handle peas?! Riders then had the opportunity of individual sessions with Hayley-Jane to answer questions, go over feed plans and receive product which is all part of the very generous sponsorship that Pryde’s has given our TID Young Riders this year Big thanks to our sponsors Pryde’s Easifeed NZ and Hayley-Jane Malcolmson, Dressage NZ, NEC team, Andrea Raves, Julie Malcolm, Kristi Salonius, Nicola Felton, Teena Terrill (meals and video) parents and support crews and our awesome Young Riders. To finish with a few quotes from the riders “I really enjoyed this camp. We had fantastic lessons, the fitness seminar was really interesting and goal setting was helpful for the season ahead. The session and consultation from Pryde’s

Easifeed was very informative. Overall the camp was an awesome preparation for the upcoming season!” “The lessons were amazing; there were so many simple tips that made giant leaps forward in my riding. Loved every minute of the camp”. “Thanks to all involved I have taken away so much my brain is bursting”. “If anyone ever has the chance to take part in any squad training please do do do it!”

NORTH ISLAND TID Alena Dorotich Astek Ginsling Alyssa Harrison Da Vinci Code Amy Sage RM All About Me Anna Wilson Pepee Bella Small Kingslea Busy Bee Brina Carpenter Plutonium Lady Emma Dickons Sir Oakridge SF Emma Dunderdale Alonzo Fanticy Georgia Gibbons LSH Constantine Grace Farrell Vollrath Luigi Isabella Chatfield AD Dennache Madison Schollum Amador McKenzie Sim Pioneer North East Morgan Beere Redwood Furst Affair Natasha Wedzinga Argentina Star Paige Tholen My Questionaire Rebecca Aplin Woodlands Park Light O Day Samantha Belsham Gypsy Gold Tayla McDonald Don Qudos

Off horse theory was also a big component of the camp.

OF RS E T OR Z! UPP E IN N S UD AG PRO DRESS

WE SEND FLOWERS LOCALLY, NATIONALLY & INTERNATIONALLY! For flowers, plants and gift hampers for every occasion... use Ilam Florist.

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 37


INTERNATIONAL NEWS

DUFOUR DELIGHTS DANISH HOME CROWD Danish fans had everything to shout about when their home-grown superstar partnership of 25-year-old Cathrine Dufour and her wonderful 14-year-old gelding, Atterupgaards Cassidy, claimed victory at the opening leg of the FEI World Cup™ Dressage 2017/2018 Western European League in Herning (DEN). Although the 14-strong field included Isabell Werth who took triple-gold at the Longines FEI European Championships in Gothenburg, the 48-year-old German rider wasn’t competing her number one ride, the great mare Weihegold. So the reigning FEI World Cup™ Dressage champion had to settle for runner-up spot with Don Johnson FRH ahead of Sweden’s Patrik Kittel and Delaunay OLD in third, mirroring exactly the results of the Grand Prix. There was a huge sense of achievement for Dufour. “The last time I competed in a World Cup was two years ago, and we finished secondlast! So I wanted to improve on that for sure! Isabell has beaten me the whole season, but yesterday and today my horse was so relaxed and easy. And yes, I did smile during the Freestyle, because if you practice something at home and finally bring it into the ring then you feel really good about it!” Cathrine Dufour (DEN) Going sixth of the 14 starters, Sweden’s Tinne Vilhelmson Silfvén and Paridon Magi posted a leading mark of 76.320 but were overtaken by another of Denmark’s rising talents, 23-year-old Anna Zibrandtsen who held the advantage with Arlando at the halfway break when putting 76.945 on the board. And the standard just kept rising as the last six took their turn, Agnete Kirk Thinggaard, a member of the Danish silver medal winning team in Gothenburg alongside Zibrandtsen, Dufour and Anna Kasprazak, scoring 78.500 with Jojo Az before Werth changed the whole tempo of the competition when posting 83.755. The sometimes naughty “Johnny”, as Don

Johnson is better known, was clearly on top form, throwing a buck before entering the arena and then producing a really fluent Freestyle, full of power and collection. Werth knew she had thrown down the gauntlet to the remaining four left to go, but, secondlast into the the ring, Dufour didn’t flinch. A high degree of difficulty in the early stages of their floorplan suggested a big score might well be on the way. And so it was, with the loveliest walk included in their beautifully executed test for the massive winning mark of 85.945, all five judges putting the pair in pole position and the crowd rising to their feet in sheer delight. Swedish showman, Patrik Kittel, gave it his best when last to go, and his mark of 81.095 pinned Denmark’s Daniel Bachmann Andersen and Blue Hors Zack back into fourth spot, but the Danish party had already begun. And now Dufour is having a whole new re-think about her competition programme over the coming months. “I didn’t plan to do the World Cup season, but of course I’m getting a bit hungry after this!” Dufour also earned Grand Prix Special and Freestyle bronze at this summer’s Europeans. She wants to do her best by the wonderful Cassidy however, who has been her loyal partner since she was competing at Junior level. “I didn’t train with him since Gothenburg until the last few days before coming here to Herning. My end goal is always to take care of him, so I better go home and make a plan and discuss things with my coach. We will see….” Herning certainly provided a great start to the new season, and Ground Jury President, Denmark’s Susanne Baarup, couldn’t hold back her emotion about a day of fantastic sport. It wasn’t just the home win that brought tears to her eyes. “When it came down to the last five riders I almost had to take some tissues out! It was really an honour to judge such good riders, and Cathrine’s win was well deserved. This has been a fantastic show for her”

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS

L to R: Ulf Helgstrand (president, The Danish Equestrian Federation), Anna Kasprzak (ECCO), Cathrine Dufour and Atterupgaards Cassidy, Susanne Baarup Christensen (president of the ground jury) and Jens Trabjerg (Organizer World Cup Herning) Photo FEI/Everhorsephoto.com

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BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE ROUND UP L to R: Rachel Stock on Chuck Taylor (Para Gd IV), Karlene Roberts on Pasodoblay (Amateur L1), Jo Jackson on JD Flash Para Gd V), Kellie Hamlett on Astek Geronimo (Open Level 1), Gaylene Lennard on Jax Johnson (Level 4), Melissa Galloway on Windermere JObèiW (PSG), Caitlyn Benzie on Rosari Royal Gem (Grand Prix), Samantha Belsham on Gypsy Gold (Amateur L2)

BAY OF PLENTY CHAMPIONSHIPS Photo by Take the Moment Photography

Two Back on Track Premier League events in each island to date have got the new season underway on a really positive note. The Bay of Plenty Total Industrial Solutions Championships were held over Labour weekend at the Fiber Fresh National Equestrian Centre. Sadly the new indoor arena wasn’t quite ready for use, so all classes were held in the beautifully prepared arenas outside, including the specialist new “dressage only” grass area. Despite the recent extremely wet conditions that had been experienced, the grounds were in excellent condition, and over the weekend the main issue ironically was in fact trying to put enough water on the sand areas to keep the dust down in the strong winds. Competitor numbers were at their usual high 40 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017

levels, with many classes reaching the limit of 30 some weeks prior to the show. Judges gathered from all over New Zealand, as well as two from Australia who were invited as part of an exchange programme between Dressage NZ and Dressage. The standard of competition was very good, with some new combinations showing their talents, as well as some established ones making their debuts at higher levels. Major sponsors Total Industrial Solutions have already confirmed their involvement for the 2018 show, and the BOP Committee are extremely grateful for the ongoing support from them and all of the fantastic sponsors that the show attracts.


BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE ROUND UP

MCDREAMY TROPHY BOP MEMBERS Kellie Hamlett & Astek Geronimo

LEVEL 1 AMATEUR CHAMPION

Champion Karlene Roberts & Pasadoblay Reserve Danielle Peck & Tui's Keepsake

LEVEL 2 AMATEUR CHAMPION

Champion Samantha Belsham & Gyspy Gold Reserve Georgia Gibbons & LSH Constantine

LEVEL 3 AMATEUR CHAMPION

Champion Briana Carpenter & Plutonium Lady Reserve Nicole Sweeney & Flute Noir

LEVEL 1 OPEN CHAMPION

LEVEL 6 OPEN CHAMPION

Champion Melissa Galloway & Windermere JObèi W Reserve Julie Flintoff & Belladonna MH

LEVEL 7 OPEN CHAMPION

Champion Rochelle Speirs & Vollrath Latimer Reserve Fiona Craig & Aphrodite

LEVEL 8 OPEN CHAMPION

Champion Nicky Pope & Saskatoon Reserve Melissa Galloway & Windermere Johanson W

LEVEL 9 OPEN CHAMPION

Champion Caitlin Benzie & Rosari Royal Gem Reserve Catherine Tobin & I Like it

Champion Kellie Hamlett & Astek Geronimo Reserve Debbie Barke & RM Suzie Q

PARA GRADE I

LEVEL 2 OPEN CHAMPION

PARA GRADE III

Champion Tracy Smith & Real Flirty RE Reserve Kallista Field & Sayonara FE

Champion Aimee Prout & Laghmor Reserve Chontelle Honour & Chuck Taylor

LEVEL 3 OPEN CHAMPION

PARA GRADE IV

LEVEL 4 OPEN CHAMPION

PARA GRADE IV

Champion Kayleigh Ryan & NRM Land Zea Reserve Wendi Williamson & Bon Jovi MH Champion Gaylene Lennard & Jax Johnson Reserve Betty Brown & Hot Gossip

Champion Jodie Thorne & San Mateo Tech Effects

Champion Rachel Stock & Chuck Taylor Reserve Rachel Stock & HPH Benedict Champion Jo Jackson & JD Flash

LEVEL 5 OPEN CHAMPION

Champion Sophie de Clifford & Alamo BL Reserve Sharlene Royal & Sonic Spirit

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BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE ROUND UP RESULTS

SYNCROFLEX MARLBOROUGH CHAMPS YOUNG RIDER AWARD

L1 OPEN CHAMPION

FAIRCLOTH TROPHY MARLBOROUGH RIDER MOST POINTS

L2 OPEN CHAMPION

Riley Mcmeekin

Katie Stadler

CHAMPION YONG DRESSAGE HORSE Jan Morice and Denmark

BEST PRESENTED AWARD Tracey Heywood

HIGHEST % MUSICAL Amanda Scott-Bates

L1 NON GRADED CHAMPION

Amalita Hay and Calypso Reserve Courtney Morgan and Rustic Riley

L1 AMATEUR CHAMPION

Vanessa Baxter and Jazzaway Reserve Sioban Harnett and Jed

L2 AMATEUR CHAMPION Katie Stadler and Colton Reserve Carys Gale and Mf Zanbuck

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Rilee McMeekin and Solitar Storm Reserve Kate McDermid and Look Again Honey Laurel Carre and La Dolce Vita Reserve Amanda Scott Bates and I Walk The Line

L3 OPEN CHAMPION

Tracey Heywood and Vollrath Fuerst Patrick Reserve Rachel Thomas and Gurteeens Velvet

L4 OPEN CHAMPION

Jan Morice and Denmark Reserve Dani Simpson and Greenmoor Euphoria

L5 OPEN CHAMPION

Julie Fraser and Arnage Rhumba Reserve Dani Simpson and Integrities Promise

L6 OPEN CHAMPION

Anna Terrell and Caithness Masquerade

L7 OPEN CHAMPION

Sarah Wadworth and Faemoss BW Reserve Nicky Hedley and A Dellamour


BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE ROUND UP

CENTRAL DISTRICTS CHAMPIONSHIPS YOUNG RIDER AWARD

Lucarne Dolley and Ardmore

HANOVERIAN AWARD L1 – L3

Louisa Ayres and Stoneylea Farrah

HANOVERIAN AWARD L4 & above Vanessa Way and NRM Arawn

CENTRAL DISTRICTS MEMBER Level 1 or 2 Tui Gower and JHT Wheres Wally

HIGHEST PERCENTAGE (79.42%) Molly Lumb and Griffindor MH

L1 AMATEUR CHAMPION

L6 OPEN CHAMPION

Vanessa Way and NRM KH Arion Reserve Lucarne Dolley and Ardmore

L7 OPEN CHAMPION

Rochelle Speirs and Vollrath Latimer Reserve Rosanne Rix and Lindisfarne Laureate

L8 OPEN CHAMPION

Vanessa Way and NRM Andreas Reserve Toni Louisson and Back on Track Astute

L9 OPEN CHAMPION

Vanessa Way and NRM Arawn Reserve Susan Tomlin and Dancealong

Jennine Stretch and Feather Reserve Kerry Shearer and Cardonald Deliver

L2 Amateur Champion

Geraldine Managh and Rosies Prince Charming Reserve Jenny Clarke and Mon Bleu Ciel

L3 Amateur Champion

Tania Smith and Donnerbella II Reserve Ingrid Anderson and Blanchview Whimsical

L1 OPEN CHAMPION

Molly Lumb and Giffindor MH Reserve Debbie Barke and RM Suzie Q

L2 OPEN CHAMPION Kallista Field and Sayonara FE Reserve Mandy Littlejohn and Dolce Vita RB

L3 OPEN CHAMPION

Louisa Ayres and Stoneylea Farrah Reserve Ann Webster and Oranoa Morepork

L4 OPEN CHAMPION

Renee Etherington and BL All By Chance Reserve Zoie Gray and FIS Santo

L5 OPEN CHAMPION

Vanessa Way and NSC Pronto Reserve Sophie de Clifford and Alamo BL

Sophie de Clifford and Alamo BL Photo: Emily Shepherd @emsh.photography

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 43


NATIONAL COMPETITION CALENDER

WHAT’S ON NOVEMBER 2017 | NORTH ISLAND 4

Morrinsville/Te Aroha Dressage Group

L

Waihou Showgrounds

5

Dressage Waitemata

L

Woodhill Sands

9

Central Hawke’s Bay Dressage Group

L

Waipukurau Show Grounds

11/12 Dressage Wellington

Back on Track Premier League

Solway Showgrounds Masterton

12

Dressage Auckland-Manukau

L

Clevedon A & P Showgrounds

16

Egmont A & P Show - Taranaki

L

Egmont A & P Showgrounds

18/19 Dressage Gisborne

Back on Track Premier League

Gisborne Showgrounds

19

Bay of Islands Dressage Group

L

Kaikohe Showgrounds

19

Warkworth Dressage Group

L

Warkworth A&P Showgrounds

-

ASB Showgrounds

23/26 Equitana 25/26 Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay 26

Dressage Northland

Back on Track Premier League

Hawkes Bay A & P Showgrounds

L

Dargaville Racecourse

L

Waihou Showgrounds

DECEMBER 2017 | NORTH ISLAND 2

MTDG December Open Dressage Tournament

2/3

Southern Hawkes Bay Championships

Back on Track Premier League

Dannevirke A & P Showgrounds

8/10

Waitemata Championships

Back on Track Premier League

Woodhill Sands

9

Dressage Taranaki Christmas Cracker

L

Egmont A & P Showgrounds

16/17 Northland Championships

Back on Track Premier League

Barge Park Showgrounds

16/17 Taihape Xmas Championships

Back on Track Premier League

Taihape A & P Showgrounds

17

Dressage Auckland-Manukau

L

Clevedon A & P Showgrounds

For more details of each event & venue, and contact details go to www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/competition/calendar

44 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


NATIONAL COMPETITION CALENDER

WHAT’S ON NOVEMBER 2017 | SOUTH ISLAND 4/5 5

Dressage Nelson

L

Rough Island Equestrian Park

Dressage Canterbury

L

McLeans Island NEC

11/12 Dressage Otago 15

Back on Track Premier League

Canterbury A & P Assn

18/19 Dressage Ashburton

L Back on Track Premier League

Otago Taieri A&P Showgrounds Canterbury Agricultural Park Ashburton A & P Showgrounds

19

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

L

Rangiora A & P Showgrounds

26

Northern Equestrian Group

L

Harrs Road

DECEMBER 2017 | SOUTH ISLAND INT

McLeans Island NEC

2/3

1

Livamol FEI World Dressage Challenge (NZL) Canterbury Championships

Back on Track Premier League

McLeans Island NEC

8/10

Southland Championships

Back on Track Premier League

Gore A & P Showgrounds

16

Nelson Christmas Cracker

Training

Rough Island Equestrian Park

17

NLEC Christmas Dressage

Training

Rangiora A & P Showgrounds

SOUTH ISLAND BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE EVENTS 11/12 Nov

Otago

Taieri SG – Mosgiel

18/19 Nov

Ashburton

Ashburton SG

2/3 Dec

Canterbury

Christchurch NEC

9/10 Dec

Southland

Gore SG

13/14 Jan

Nelson

Rough Island Equestrian Park

27/28 Jan

SI Championships

Christchurch NEC

NORTH ISLAND BACK ON TRACK PREMIER LEAGUE EVENTS 11/12 Nov

Wellington

Solway SG - Masterton

18/19 Nov

Gisborne

Gisborne

25/26 Nov

Northern Hawke’s Bay

Hawkes Bay SG - Hastings

2/3 Dec

Southern Hawke’s Bay

Dannevirke SG

8/10 Dec

Waitemata

Woodhill Sands

16/17 Dec

Taihape

Taihape SG

16/17 Dec

Northland

Barge Park - Whangarei

13/14 Jan

Taranaki

Egmont SG - Hawera

19/21 Jan

AMDG Festival & NI Championships

Clevedon SG

20/21 Jan

Wairarapa

Solway SG - Masterton

27/28 Jan

Waikato Festival of Dressage

Taupo NEC

15/18 Feb

Bates National Championships CDI 3*/Y

Manfeild Park - Feilding

13/18 Mar

Horse of the Year Show CDI 3*/ Y

Hawkes Bay SG - Hastings

21/22 Apr

NZ U25 Dressage Championships

Taupo NEC

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 45


SERIES LEADERBOARDS SOUTH ISLAND SUPER 5 LEAGUE LEADERS Included: SCNO & Marlborough D’Malia

Jane Crichton

7

Jazzaway

Vanessa Baxter

7

Solitar Storm

Rilee McMeekin

7

Sisters II Mrs Robinson

Kaye Blundell

7

Sisters II Whitney H

Wendy Butler

7

Farloe Gretel

Danielle Simpson

5

Look again Honey

Kate McDermid

5

Mahogany N Ice

Karthryn Blackwood

5

MATTHEWS HANOVERIANS LEVEL 2 Belvoir

Linda Cocks

10

Corundum

Vivienne Young

10

Bugsy Malone H

Helen Trotman

8

I Walk The Line

Amanda Scott-Bates

7

La Dolce Vita

Laurel Carre

7

Primo

Sue Rudler

7

Blytheburn Santana

Sharon Inwood

5

HERITAGE EQUINE LEVEL 3 Fernlea Diamond Day

Lorraine Ward-Smith

10

Gallivonte

Laurel Carre

7

Gurteens Velvet

Rachel Thomas

7

Little Miss Independent

Sylvia Clark

7

Vollrath Fuerst Patrick

Tracey Heywood

7

Black River Baroness

Cherie Pearson

5

My Te Koko

Wendy Smith

5

Te Puke

Charlotte Thomas

5

Thornfield Rhyan

Rachel White

5

DUNSTAN HORSEFEEDS LEVEL 4 Greenmoor Euphoria

Danielle Simpson

14

Denmark

Jan Morice

10

Buckton Denniston

Meila Picard

7

Donna Lilly

Deborah Rutherford

7

Golden Promise

Morgan Irvine

7

Katja

Beverly Uttridge

7

Rifesyde Prancer

Millie Thompson

7

Solo

Rebecca Rowlands

7

Integrities Promise

Danielle Simpson

10

Arnage Rhumba

Julie Fraser

7

Grandiosie

Janna Greene

7

Lodestar

Seija Parkkali-Glew

5

Southwell Rendevouz

Rebecca Rowlands

5

Amberleigh Remembrance

Shannon Brien

3

FIBER FRESH LEVEL 5

46 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


SERIES LEADERBOARDS HOBSON HORSECOACHES LEVEL 6 Windermere Jobei W

Melissa Galloway

10

Caithness Masquerade

Anna Terrell

5

Mangatarata

Angie Chaffey

3

CUSTOM LOGISTIC LEVEL 7 A Dellamour

Nicky Hedley

5

Faemoss BW

Sarah Wadworth

5

ANDREA RAVES FETTERMAN LEVEL 8 Rossellini

Barbara Chalmers

Windermere Johanson W Melissa Galloway

5 5

SOUTH ISLAND ZILCO DRESSAGE TO MUSIC SERIES LEADERS Included: SCNO & Marlborough

LEVEL 4

Greenmoor Euphoria

Danielle Simpson

14

LEVEL 2

Denmark

Jan Morice

7

I Walk The Line

Amanda Scott-Bates

10

Donna Lilly

Deborah Rutherford

7

Belvoir

Linda Cocks

7

Rifesyde Prancer

Millie Thompson

7

Gepptto

Holly Merritt

7

Solo

Rebecca Rowlands

5

La Dolce Vita

Laurel Carre

7

LEVEL 5

Bugsy Malone H

Helen Trotman

5

Grandiosie

Janna Greene

10

Colton

Katie Stadler

5

Integrities Promise

Danielle Simpson

10

LEVEL 3

Southwell Rendevouz

Rebecca Rowlands

7

Fernlea Diamond Day

Lorraine Ward-Smith

10

Lodestar

Seija Parkkali-Glew

5

Little Miss Independent

Sylvia Clark

7

Weltmeister AF

Frances Dick

5

Three Aces

Tiffany Ottley

7

LEVEL 6/7

Vollrath Fuerst Patrick

Tracey Heywood

7

Caithness Masquerade

Anna Terrell

7

Gallivonte

Laurel Carre

5

Windermere Jobei W

Melissa Galloway

7

Gurteens Velevt

Rachel Thomas

5

Faemoss BW

Sarah Wadworth

5

Mardi Gras

Sarah Collins

5

My Te Koko

Wendy Smith

5

LEVEL 8

Thornfield Rhyan

Rachel White

5

Vinehills Patience

Sarah Davidson

5

Windermere Johanson W Melissa Galloway

7

Rossellini

Barbara Chalmers

5

Leo Dreams of Gold

Fiona Sharp

3

PRESTIGE EQUESTRIAN DRESSAGE FUTURES (4-10 YR OLD HORSES)

Includes: SCNO, Marlborough, Bay of Plenty & Central Districts Astek Geronimo

Kellie Hamlett

20

Alamo BL

Sophie de Clifford

17

Greenmoor Euphoria

Danielle Simpson

14

Integrities Promise

Danielle Simpson

10

Griffindor MH

Molly Lumb

10

MF Candy Crush

Anna Cole

10

Reuben CHS

Karla Tarr

10

Belvoir

Linda Cocks

10

Fernlea Diamond Day

Lorraine Ward-Smith

10

Denmark

Jan Morice

10

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 47


SERIES LEADERBOARDS HOBSON HORSECOACHES LEVEL 6

NORTH ISLAND SUPER 5 LEAGUE LEADERS Included: Bay of Plenty & Central Districts VETPRO LEVEL 1  

NRM KH Arion

Vanessa Way

10

Ardmore

Lucarne Dolley

7

Astek Geronimo

Kellie Hamlett

20

Vollrath Leila

Carole Christensen

7

Dolce Vita RB

Mandy Littlejohn

20

Belladonna MH

Julie Flintoff

5

RM Suzie Q

Debbie Barke

20

FIS Lucifer

Christine Weal

5

MF Candy Crush

Anna Cole

10

Hapsburgh PSH

Liz Hutson

5

Griffindor MH

Molly Lumb

10

Leo Donna

Alicia Zeludko

5

Libretto

Caitlin Benzie

10

RM All About Me

Amy Sage

5

Reuben CHS

Karla Tarr

10

Stoneylea Lancelot

Jennifer Sim

5

MATTHEWS HANOVERIANS LEVEL 2

CUSTOM LOGISTIC LEVEL 7

Sayonara FE

Kallista Field

20

Vollrath Latimer

Rochelle Speirs

14

Real Flirty RE

Tracey Smith

17

Lindisfarne Laureate

Rosanne Rix

7

First Lady DHU

Nicole Bours

7

Aphrodite

Fiona Craig

5

Gypsy Gold

Samantha Belsham

7

Besonders

Robyn Coupe

5

MEL Lewis

Sean Bignell

7

Donnerubin

Jacinda Younger

5

Nico

Sharon Field

7

FIS Lucifer

Christine Weal

5

Salvete FE

Greg Smith

7

New World Frankie J

Sharlene Royal

5

Ruanuku R

Angela Lloyd

5

HERITAGE EQUINE LEVEL 3 Bon Jovi MH

Wendi Williamson

7

ANDREA RAVES FETTERMAN LEVEL 8

Don Arion

Kelly Pearson

7

NRM Andreas

Vanessa Way

7

Donnerbella II

Tania Smith

7

Saskatoon

Nicky Pope

7

NRM Land Zea

Kayleigh Ryan

7

Back on Track Astute

Toni Louisson

5

Rustic Challenge

Ann Wester

7

Centurion III

William Millar

5

Stoneylea Farrah

Louisa Ayres

7

Playmate

Louisa Ayres

5

Winiata

Jacqui Grannetia

7

Georgio

Jacqui Thompson

3

SUPERIOR RUBBER SURFACES - LEVEL 9

DUNSTAN HORSEFEEDS LEVEL 4 Felix Westfalia FE

Kallista Field

10

NRM Arawn

Vanessa Way

7

Jaz Johnson

Gaylene Lennard

10

BL About Time

Penny Castle

5

Susan Tomlin

5

Dantelegro

Julie Evans

7

Dancealong

FIS Santo

Zoie Gray

7

Don Amour MH

Wendi Williamson

5

Garavani

Sharon Dixon

7

I Like It

Catherine Tobin

5

HF Bespoke

Emily Lawrie

7

Rosari Royal Gem

Caitlin Benzie

3

Hot Gossip

Betty Brown

7

Luminate SH

Kim Coghlan

7

Sir Oakridge SF

Emm Dickons

7

Summerstone Hit

Louisa Ayres

7

Alamo BL

Sophie de Clifford

17

Schindlers Liszt

Christine Weal

14

NSC Pronto

Vanessa Way

7

Ataahua Of Glenrose Friesians

Fiona Craig

5

Mercury Arisen

Carol Bloomfield

5

Sonic Spirit

Sharlene Royal

5

Surreal BC

Angela Hooper

5

SWE First Romance

Hannah Best

5

FIBER FRESH LEVEL 5

48 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


SERIES LEADERBOARDS NORTH ISLAND ZILCO DRESSAGE TO MUSIC SERIES LEADERS

LEVEL 6/7

Included: Bay of Plenty & Central Districts LEVEL 2 LSH Constantine

Georgia Gibbons

10

Sparkling Galaxy

Julie Wylie Parkinson

10

Daimler Benz

Eleisha Walls

7

Kingslea Busy Bee

Bella Small

7

Mon Bleu Ciel

Jenny Clarke

7

Real Flirty RE

Tracey Smith

7

Rosies Prince Charming

Geraldine Managh

7

Salvete FE

Greg Smith

7

Shadowhunter

Wendy Hamerton

7

Soren

Rebecca Wilson

7

Donnerbella II

Tania Smith

14

Bon Jovi MH

Wendi Williamson

10

Stoneylea Farrah

Louisa Ayres

10

Blanchview Whimsical

Ingrid Anderson

7

HNS Chrialka Glenah

Bryar Kirkeby

7

HPH Phelix Phelicious

Nicky Pope

7

NRM Land Zea

Kayleigh Ryan

7

Oranoa Morepork

Ann Webster

7

Rustic Challenge

Ann Webster

7

Alpha Beta

Willa Aitken

7

Andante

Chelsea Sinnamon

7

Astek Robina

Alix Campbell

7

BL All By Chance

Renee Etherington

7

FIS Santo

Zoie Gray

7

Hot Gossip

Betty Brown

7

Kinnordy Ravel

Cate Wilson

7

Luminate SH

Kim Coghlan

7

Thumbellina II

Sarah Scott

7

Alamo BL

Sophie de Clifford

20

SWE First Romance

Hannah Best

12

NSC Pronto

Vanessa Way

10

Ataahua Of Glenrose Friesians

Fiona Craig

7

Parkridge Donnamour

Peter Barke

7

Schindlers Liszt

Christine Weal

7

Sonic Spirit

Sharlene Royal

7

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 4

Vollrath Latimer

Rochelle Speirs

14

Ardmore

Lucarne Dolley

10

NRM KH Arion

Vanessa Way

10

Aphrodite

Fiona Craig

7

Belladonna MH

Julie Flintoff

7

FIS Lucifer

Christine Weal

7

Lindisfarne Laureate

Rosanne Rix

7

Vollrath Leila

Carole Christensen

7

Back on Track Astute

Toni Louisson

8

NRM Andreas

Vanessa Way

7

Saskatoon

Nicky Pope

7

Georgio

Jacqui Thompson

5

Playmate

Louisa Ayres

5

Neversfelde Rupert

Betty Brown

3

BL About Time

Penny Castle

7

Dancealong

Susan Tomlin

7

Don Amour MH

Wendi Williamson

7

NRM Arawn

Vanessa Way

7

I Like It

Catherine Tobin

5

Rosari Royal Gem

Caitlin Benzie

5

Draachen

Rebecca Wilson

3

LEVEL 8

LEVEL 9

LEVEL 5

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 49


SEASON PREVIEW

NEW SEASON UNDERWAY BATES NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 15 -18 February 2018 Join us at Manfeild for this fabulous celebration event and anniversary party following the Saturday night Musical Spectacular Entries will close Friday 19th January 2018 on www.equestrianentries.co.nz No entry will be accepted unless payment is recorded in the Dressage NZ account by Monday 22nd January. This rule will be strictly enforced for 2018. No payment reminders will be issued It is also the rider responsibility to ensure that all rider and horse regos are current until 18 February. It is recommended that these are current to at least that date at the time entry. Riders competing in CDI***/**/Y/P should ensure their horse and rider 2018 FEI registrations and horse passports where required are also current at time of entry and have these processed in plenty of time via ESNZ office The schedule and qualifications will be available by 10th November HORSE OF THE YEAR SHOW Hastings 13 -18 March 2018 Qualifications will be on the website www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage by 10th November SI FESTIVAL OF FUTURE STARS NEC Christchurch 14/15 April 2018 Hosted by Dressage Canterbury – schedule to be advised NI FUTURE STARS FESTIVAL Taupo 19/22 April 2018 Incorporating the Elite Equine Young Horse Festival, the 2018 FEI World Dressage Challenge and the Equestrian Entries U25 National Dressage Championships Schedules to follow EQUESTRIAN ENTRIES NZ U25 NATIONAL DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS April 21/22 2018 - Taupo NEC Featuring the Hyland Pony Championship & Waldebago Young Rider Championship, York Corporation Inter-Island Team Challenge and the final round of the AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League.. No prior qualification required. Entries only on www.equestrianentries.co.nz 50 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


SEASON PREVIEW SUPER 5 DRESSAGE LEAGUE The 2017-18 Super 5 League comprises a points series in each island at all graded Levels 1-9 (top 5 points only to count) plus an island final at both the South Island Festival of Dressage and the Bates National Championships. National Super 5 rankings will be determined from % in each level at both these events. Tests used for Super 5 League at Premier League Events: Levels 1 to 5 - C Tests, Level 6 FEI PSG v 2017, Level 7 - FEI Intermediate I v 2017, Level 8 FEI Intermediate B v 2017, Level 9 Regional Events - FEI Intermediate II or Grand Prix 2017. South Island Festival of Dressage & Bates National Championships SRS Final - FEI Intermediate II 2017. Points table managed directly by Dressage NZ ZILCO MUSICAL FREESTYLE SERIES The crowd pleasing Zilco Musical Freestyle Series will be a feature again this season. The competition comprises two Island Series contested at Premier League Events (Top 5 scores to count). The North Island Series completes at the Horse of the Year Show and the South Island Series completes at the South Island Festival of Dressage. The series includes Levels 2 to 9 (Advanced levels 6/7 combined). Points table managed directly by Dressage NZ. Note: If events choose to split the 6/7 musicals into separate classes because of large numbers, then Leaderboard points may be awarded for each division subject to there being a minimum 15 starters in each class. If not the 5 highest % across both classes will be awarded points. ELITE EQUINE YOUNG DRESSAGE HORSE CHAMPIONSHIPS The purpose of the competitions are to select the best young horse which is progressing on the correct way of training, with the potential to capably perform at International Dressage level. The Elite Equine National Young Horse Dressage Championship & Age Group Championships will be held at the Bates National Championships 15 –18 Feb 2018 at Manfeild Park. Elite Equine are also naming rights sponsors of the Young Horse Festival at Taupo NEC 19/20 April to be held in conjunction with the 2018 FEI World Dressage Challenge PRESTIGE EQUESTRIAN DRESSAGE FUTURES PRIZE The Prestige Equestrian Futures Prize will be awarded to the best performed combination competing in the Super 5 League at Premier League Events from October 2017 – February 2018 and meeting the following eligibility conditions. 4 -10 year old horses competing at Levels 1 - 7 with riders who have no grading points in Level 8 or above on any horse. The prize is a fabulous Prestige Saddle. (Riders may only win the saddle prize once) Points table managed directly by Dressage NZ AMS SADDLERY PONY & YOUNG RIDER PERFORMANCE LEAGUE AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League aims to increase participation at a Pony & Young Rider level and to establish a culture where these riders compete against their peers of a similar age and experience. Every Premier League Event, will run Pony and Young Rider classes at Levels 1 and 2, plus scores will be taken from Super 5 tests at Level 3 and above. The league will culminate at the U25 NZ Pony & Championships in April 2018. Competitors must be 20 years or under at 1 August 2017 to participate. AMS League winner to receive a fabulous dressage saddle prize generously sponsored by AMS Saddlery (Auckland). Points table managed directly by Dressage NZ

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 51


SEASON PREVIEW

NEW SEASON UNDERWAY ...Continued FLYING HORSE MASTERS TOP TEN LEAGUE This competition is designed to promote dressage competition and participation for Masters Riders. The Flying Horse series provides an opportunity for riders to compete against peers at five different levels at all levels of events and competition regardless whether riders compete locally, regionally or nationally. The competition will be open to riders 50 years & over as at 1 January 2017 and is run in five main divisions plus special awards from 1st August 2017 until 30th April 2018. View full conditions and enter on www.equestrianentries.co.nz Entries only on www.equestrianentries.co.nz ALLINFLEX AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE The AllinFlex Amateur Top Ten League id held from 1 August 2017 until 30th April 2018. The competition is open to Category CN - C5 riders aged 21yrs and over as at 1 August 2017 (C5 riders have less than 15 Level 6 or above points) Riders must be annual competitive members of the ESNZ. All participating horses must be ESNZ registered and have an annual dressage for Dressage. View full conditions and enter on www.equestrianentries.co.nz Entries only on www.equestrianentries.co.nz

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz

HORSE SPORTS YOUNG RIDER AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE Pony & Young Riders who have earned less than 15pts points at level 5 or above, and are competing on horses or ponies up to Level 4 at 1/8/17 can compete in the Horse Sports League. All participating riders, ponies & horses must be fully ESNZ registered and horses and ponies must have an annual start for dressage. Scores from 1/8/17 until 30/4/18 will count towards the Horse Sports League. Level 1 horses & ponies must be competed by riders with less than 15 Level 3 or above points at 1/8/17, Level 2 by riders with less than 15 Level 4 or above points and Level 3 & 4 and above by riders with less than 15 points at level 5 and above as at 1/8/17. The top 10 scores in graded competitions will count. In the event of a tie, the ave Top 10 score will win. There will be rosettes for the top placed horse and top placed pony in each area, plus national champions and reserves in all six divisions. View full conditions and enter on www.equestrianentries.co.nz Entries only on www.equestrianentries.co.nz

52 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017


DIRECTORY

DRESSAGE DIRECTORY Dressage Area Group Websites and other useful links.

Equestrian Sports NZ/Dressage www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage www.facebook.com/DressageNZ www.facebook.com/EquestrianSportsNZ www.facebook.com/DressageNZU25Championships www.facebook.com/StableoftheStallions Dressage Bay of Islands www.sporty.co.nz/bayofislandsdressagegroup Dressage Northland www.sporty.co.nz/dressagenorthland

Dressage Central Districts www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagecentraldistricts

Dressage Waitemata www.dressagewaitemata.co.nz

Dressage Taranaki www.dressagetaranaki.co.nz

Dressage Warkworth www.warkworthdressage.webs.com

Dressage Wellington www.dressagewellington.org.nz

Dressage Auckland - Manukau www.amdg.org.nz

Dressage Horowhenua   www.horowhenuadressage.com

Dressage Waikato www.dressagewaikato.co.nz

Dressage Wairarapa www.dressagewairarapa.com

Dressage Morrinsville -Te Aroha www.mtdg.co.nz

Dressage Nelson    www.nelsondressage.webs.com

Dressage Gisborne www.gisbornedressage.org.nz

Dressage Marlborough www.sporty.co.nz/marlboroughdressage

Dressage Bay of Plenty www.dressagebayofplenty.co.nz

Dressage Canterbury www.canterburydressage.co.nz

Dressage Eastern Bay of Plenty www.sportsground.co.nz/ebd

Dressage Otago www.dressageotago.webs.com

Dressage Rotorua         www.sporty.co.nz/dressagerotorua

Dressage Southland www.dressage-southland.com

Dressage Tauranga        www.dressagetauranga.co.nz 

National Equestrian Centres www.nzequestrian.org.nz

Dressage Taupo www.sporty.co.nz/taupodressagegroup

Tielcey Park Equestrian Centre www.tielceypark.co.nz (Manawatu)

Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay www.sporty.co.nz/dressagenhb

North Loburn Equestrian Centre www.nlec.co.nz (Canterbury)

Dressage Central Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/chbdressage

Northern Equestrian Group www.freewebs.com/northerneq (Canterbury)

Dressage Southern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/shbdressage

Northgate Lodge www.northgatelodgeequestrian.com (Northland)

NOVEMBER 2017 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 53


54 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | NOVEMBER 2017

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 16 | November 2017