Page 1

Issue 02 | September 2016

Rio Olympic Games


From the

EDITOR

Wendy Hamerton

WELCOME TO THE SECOND ISSUE OF THE DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN What a difference a minute can make. August has certainly been a month of roller coaster emotion, not just for New Zealand equestrians, but for the 11,551 athletes who competed in 306 events in 28 sports at the Rio Summer Olympics . I share with you in congratulating the two New Zealand based riders who qualified for Rio. John and Julie bought a new era of expectation and performance to dressage in New Zealand. To Julie and Steiny, our congratulations on scoring the highest mark achieved by a New Zealand dressage competitor at the Olympics. The competition you encountered at Rio was at an unprecedented level. You have raised the bar for the future. The road was long and arduous. You did us proud. Our eventers were just so close to that gold medal and we shared their immediate anguish on the final day of jumping after such an outstanding cross country display. Sir Mark Todd said “We are allowed one day to sulk and then we just have to get on with it”. The highs and lows of top level sport. But these same highs and lows are not just experienced by top level sportspeople. All competitors, regardless of the level they are competing at, love the feeling of achieving a personal best, the feeling when you have been the best in the class – taking home the ribbon. All is suddenly well with the world. The fact that the stables and paddocks still need mucking out, hopefully someone else has cleaned up the mess the cat made, its pouring with rain and you’ve got a million other things to do doesn’t seem to matter anymore. The six hour drive home takes no time at all. Equally, the feeling when it has not gone to plan can really affect the way the way you view what you need to do next. It’s raining, the stables are filthy still, the cat’s been sick in the porch, I’ve got far too much to do and it’s still a blimmin six hour drive home.... we’ve all been there. Dressage NZ takes this opportunity as we enter the new competition year to thank all the sponsors who have signed up their support. We have a wonderful range of sponsors who have ensured there is something for every rider to aim for. We have sponsors who have been with us for 32 years – so a notable mention here for Hobson Horsecoaches. Welcome back to all sponsors who have pledged further support and a special welcome to those who have joined our team for the first time. It’s been said before, but as we go into the new season, let’s make sure we support each other through the highs and lows. Dressage can be a lonely sport, especially for the one horse, one rider team who does all the work on their own. Let us make the 2016 – 2017 season the season of team spirit.

Editor: Wendy Hamerton Email: dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz

Wendy.

Design and Production: www.snaffledesign.co.nz

Copyright © Snaffle Design and Dressage NZ 2016

Graphic Design: Sarah Gray Email: sarah@snaffledesign.co.nz

Cover Image: Dressage Individual medalists.

Sales & Advertising: Jeremy Gardiner Email: jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz

2 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

Gold: Charlotte Dujardin GBR. Silver: Isabell Werth GER. Bronze: Kristina Broring-Sprehe GER. Photo Credit: Arnd Bronkhorst


4

14

20

44

50

CONTENT

4

6

14

22

JULIE MAKES HISTORY

REFLECTING ON RIO with New Zealand coach Andrea Raves...

HORSE HEAVEN ON THE HORIZON

10 TIPS FOR SOUNDNESS

We take a look at Equidays...

UK based Debbie Rolmanis gives us some logical insight into maintaining a sound horse...

30

32

46

52

WATCH OUT, SPRINGTIME!

FIOTINI - THE WORLD CHAMPION

NICOLA FRENCH

NEW SEASON SERIES

Julie Brougham rides Vom Feinsten into the Dressage NZ Olympic History Books...

Vetpro help bust the myths on why your horse might be fresh with the spring grass growth...

reporting from Ermelo...

comments on competitions, ponies and young rider training in Germany...

find out about the latest series and sponsors to come on board for the best season yet!...

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 3


JULIE BROUGHAM RIDES VOM FEINSTEN INTO THE DRESSAGE NZ OLYMPIC HISTORY BOOKS It’s not always easy to compare statistics when the sport is subjective and the competition format has changed since New Zealand first competed in Olympic Games dressage in Sydney sixteen years ago. There are also those long time enthusiasts who still consider NZL should have been there earlier than 2000 and perhaps that NZL should have been brave enough to nominate Marcia Bayley and Kentucky for Seoul in 1988. Statistics can be studied and manipulated, but one thing is for sure, the standard of dressage worldwide is on the rise.

At just 22 years of age, Kallista Field was the youngest dressage competitor in Sydney on the NZL bred mare Waikare (Witzbold/Rocklyn/Rocky Mountain) who was bred by Marie Pyke, mother of current ESNZ Board Chair, Nick Pyke. Kallista’s achievement was the catalyst for a new era of the sport. It became “cool” to ride dressage. That was the inspiration then. Sixteen years later NZL (and Julie) can take pride that our sole dressage representative has again provided inspiration for thousands of riders worldwide. Getting to the Games for the first time some four decades later in life than Kallista, Julie’s achievement has been well recognised on many global websites including that of the FEI.

Photo: Libby Law

4 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

The road to the Games for Julie and Kallista is remarkably similar and different. Both riders sold horses, and both had tremendous support from their local community. But one of the significant differences is that back in 1999, NZL could qualify an individual rider directly through the FEI World Dressage Challenge in NZL. Now the road for an individual is much longer, lonelier and uncertain with riders having to compete off shore to gain world ranking points and head off other riders in Olympic Group G who are also chasing a spot for their nation. The cost for NZL to have contested a team place in Europe was prohibitive and even if the finances had been found, and we had won a team place, there was no guarantee of a team going to Rio. In 2000, Kallista scored 66.4% finishing in 21st place to qualify as one of the 25 individuals from 47 starters to go into the second round. The scores ranged from 54.00 to 76.32 for the winner (Isabell Werth and Gigolo). Team medals were decided on the Grand Prix alone. In 2004 & 2012 Louisa Hill represented NZL scoring 62.708 on Gabana in Athens (Ulla Salzgeber and Rusty won the Grand Prix on 78.208) and in London 2012 aboard Antonello, scored 65.258 (Charlotte Dujardin and Valegro won on 83.66)


Rio 2016 saw a different competition format to previous years. Sixty combinations including eleven teams started in the Grand Prix, and then the top six teams plus the eight top placed individuals not qualified as a team went through to the Special (31 starters). The Grand Prix and the Special both counted for the team medals. Julie and Steiny drew number 14 on the first day, last to go before the lunch break. The rest is history. A happy, lively test for 68.543%, consistent with performances throughout their campaign, and close to their personal best. Julie does admit “I would have loved to have broken the 70% barrier at the Games” The stunning smile from Julie at the end of the test said it all - and NZL fans were smiling with her. So the roller coaster ride that took this combination across three continents, eight countries and some 68,000km by the time our favourite chestnut “pocket rocket” returns home is coming to an end. Quarantine regulations mean Steiny will go into quarantine on 6th October in UK ready to catch his flight to Melbourne on 29th October and then he will be based with Brett Parbery in Sydney for another month or so until NZL quarantine time is up and he is allowed to return to his home base at Longburn in the Manawatu. Julie will return home to two horses, Fellini at Prix St Georges level, and an exciting youngster by Donnerubin out of Golda (who is now competing with Sophie Clifford). Already she is thinking ahead to the FEI Pacific League World Cup Final at Manfeild next February. The winner will represents the PAL in Ohama (USA) next April and that is on the radar....

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 5


ANDREA RAVES

Reflecting on Rio

What an amazing experience. From qualifying “Vom Feinsten” at the Horse of the Year Show to being at the Rio Olympics was surely a long road, but I wouldn’t have wanted to miss a minute of the journey. To have been amongst all these fantastic horses, riders and trainers has been the highlight of my life. It was fascinating just walking through the alley ways of the stable complex and seeing all these famous horses in their stables or out grazing! And then in the dining hall, Carl Hester and Co basically sitting next to you having lunch and everyone is just so friendly. Pinch me in the arm moments! The atmosphere in the stables was positively electric. Seeing the three disciplines at work was interesting. There is Eventing – grooms very busily organised to perfection. Dressage – grooms quietly organised to perfection and Showjumping – grooms a bit more talkative organised to perfection. Everyone was working together happily and friendships were made. The complex was situated in a Military Zone and the number of soldiers in and around the centre was unbelievable. They made me feel safe even though we had two stray bullets land in our area!

I used every possible chance to watch all the nations train on the days before the Dressage competition. Different styles of training were used. The Dutch clearly had their horses rounder, used lots of flexion and rode lots of very collected transitions. Great Britain and especially Charlotte Dujardin rode their horses round but not too deep. Charlotte always had Valegro’s head and neck in the middle of the chest. Germany had slightly different styles within the team. Isabell Werth for example had her horse longer and rounder in training and used lots of bending exercises and changes of flexion. Everyone though had their own set of difficulties somewhere and worked through them one way or another. To see these riders then put it all together in a test a few days later was a treat! The warm up went well for Julie, and Steiny handled the atmosphere very well. We were happy with the overall performance and I am proud to have been part of Team Brougham. To me, the team competition looked to be a contest of four realistically in the running for a medal. Germany looked the favourite for gold after the CHIO in Aachen. They had four great horses in the team and three riders that had been

Photos: Libby Law

6 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

to previous Olympics. Twenty one year old Sonke Rothenberger got his first team call up. An interesting fact was that none of these horses had been on a plane before! But that presented no problems they were all in fantastic form. Great Britain had “Valegro” as their outstanding horse and the USA “Legolas” and ‘Verdades”. The Netherlands had an evenly weighted team but then “Parzival” had become ill due to an insect bit on his face and Adelinde had to retire during the Grand Prix. This of course did put huge pressure on the other three riders. The Grand Prix Special was phase two of the team competition and most of them improved on their performance from the previous days. However for some of them this was not the case. Charlotte was one of those who had to follow Isabell’s fantastic ride on Weihegold and the crowd was going wild. This upset Valegro a little, then the gate keepers forgot to open the gate and Charlotte had to ride another circle before she could enter and made it just in time into the arena before her 45 seconds allowed to enter ran out. Two mistakes in her test cost her dearly and she was just beaten by Isabell. Without the mistakes she would have clearly won the Grand Prix Special as well. As mentioned Isabell’s ride in the GPS was fantastic. The improvement of Weihegold since Aachen CHIO was amazing to watch! But then we are talking about Isabell Werth here – this lady can produce top horses and top tests when it counts! As predicted Germany won Gold with Britain winning Silver and the USA the Bronze Medal. After a good Grand Prix, Steffen Peters and Legolas had some hiccups in their Special but Laura Graves on Verdades did a great job and secured Bronze for the USA ahead of the Netherlands.


Where did this leave us for the individual Medals? Charlotte for Gold and then the Germans for Silver and Bronze?? But one never knows with horses. After two rest days it was the Freestyle for individual gold. 18 riders went through to this “Ballet on Horseback” spectacular. We saw good performances in the first group of six riders but also mistakes sneaking in and the percentages ranged from 75.69% for Judy Reynolds to 79.33% for Steffen Peters, Hans-Peter Minderhoud and Johnson broke the 80% barrier and then came Carl Hester on “Nip Tuck”. He rode everything possible out of this big horse. Fantastic choreography and music gave him 82.55% and he led after the second group. The third group was amazing to watch! Do I agree with the end result – no. “Desperados” was first up but I have to say his test did not grab me like it normally does. He got 87.14% and I thought that this was a little on the high side. She ended up with the Bronze Medal. Charlotte’s test was Dressage to perfection and her 93.85% was well deserved. It was foot perfect – no doubt about this Gold Medal winning performance. This is undoubtedly an outstanding combination Showtime was quiet tense and made a few mistakes which took Dorothee out of the Medal contention. This was a shame as he showed some fantastic work as well. Then there was our Spanish friend Lopez Jurado on Lorenzo. Just as he did at Aachen he had us all cheering him on down the centre line, a great dynamic test but understandably the technical side of things kept his percentage lower. The crowd was pretty unhappy with his mark booed the judges big time after his performance.

“How would it work if there was a totally random draw? Isabell and Charlotte earlier on maybe? Would it change the percentages?” also made themselves heard again when the judges left their huts at the end of the competition. Last but not least it was Isabell’s turn. Her test looked a little underpowered in places especially after Laura’s test. It was a good test no doubt but was it worth 89.07% and the Silver Medal – I am not so sure. Laura deserved the Silver or Bronze Medal in my opinion, but hey that is Dressage! The judges’ would have had their reasons for the order they put the riders in. We do not sit down there by the arena and judge every movement but sometimes it is a bit hard to understand where the marks for some performances come from compared to others. As I always say to my pupils when they are not happy with some judging – “That is Dressage and if you cannot accept the judging go Showjumping”. Judges do give their time to do their job to the best of their ability and without them we would not have a sport. The judges for this competition judged together at the CHIO in Aachen and had workshops to ensure that they were all on the same page. There were no great discrepancies at either Aachen or Rio and that is a good start.

So as predicted, a Brit and two Germans on the podium. Reflecting on the big competitions I have recently observed, I consider that it does make a difference if a rider competes earlier or later in these competitions. The first draw at the Olympics was based on the world ranking of the combination. So one expects that the performances will get better as the competition progresses. Fair enough, but sometimes that is not the case and I felt the marks did not always reflect the actual performance in Rio or at the CHIO in Aachen. Riders with clearly not so good performances later in the competition got higher percentages than riders with good tests earlier on. How would it work if there was a totally random draw? Isabell and Charlotte earlier on maybe? Would it change the percentages? One needs to try it to know the answer. Bringing all these memories back with me to New Zealand has me chomping on the bit and ready to go! Let’s carry on and work towards a team representation for the World Equestrian Games in two years time. It is possible – let’s do it.

I thought Laura Graves on Verdadas rode an equally foot perfect test as Charlotte. The three “P’s” – piaffe, passage and pirouettes were very good and the test flowed. She ended up on 85.19% and that was too low in my opinion! It was clearly not as good as Charlotte’s but I thought she deserved more marks. The crowd was again very unhappy with the judges’ decision and SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 7


Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games

8 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARND BRONKHORST

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: 1. Laura Graves USA. 2. Dorothee Schneider GER. 3. Luiza Tavares de Almeida BRA. 4. Isabell Werth GER. 5. Kristina Broring-Sprehe GER. 6. Dressage team medals presentations - Gold: Germany. Silver: Great Britain. Bronze: United States of America. 7. Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez ESP. 8. Fiona Bigwood GBR. 9. Soneke Rothenberger GER. 10. Charlotte Dujardin GBR. 11. Dressage Individual medalists Gold: Charlotte Dujardin GBR. Silver: Isabell Werth GER. Bronze: Kristina Broring-Sprehe GER.


SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 9


Olympic Equestrian Centre

Equestrian

Hipismo / Sports équestres

Centro Olímpico de Hipismo

Dressage Team

Centre Olympique d´Équitation

Adestramento por equipes / Dressage par équipes FRI 12 AUG 2016

Results Summary

Resumo dos resultados / Résumé des résultats

Ground Jury:

Rank NOC

K - BAARUP Susanne (DEN) E - CLARKE Stephen (GBR)

Horse Athlete No.

H - de WOLFF van WESTERRODE Eddy (NED) C - ROCKWELL Gary (USA), President M - HOLLER Peter (GER) Horse

B - ALONSO Maribel (MEX) F - LANG Thomas (AUT)

GP %Score

Rk

%Score

GPS Rk

Total %Score

1 GER - GERMANY 235 ROTHENBERGER Sonke 236 SCHNEIDER Dorothee 234 BRORING-SPREHE Kristina 237 WERTH Isabell

81.295 (1) # 77.329 80.986 82.257 80.643

82.577 # 76.261 82.619 81.401 83.711

(1)

81.936

COSMO SHOWTIME FRH DESPERADOS FRH WEIHEGOLD OLD

2 GBR - GREAT BRITAIN 232 WILTON Spencer 229 BIGWOOD Fiona 231 HESTER Carl 230 DUJARDIN Charlotte

79.252 (2) # 72.686 77.157 75.529 85.071

77.937 # 73.613 74.342 76.485 82.983

(2)

78.595

SUPER NOVA II ORTHILIA NIP TUCK VALEGRO

3 USA - UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 264 BROCK Allison M. 266 PERRY-GLASS Kasey 267 PETERS Steffen 265 GRAVES Laura

76.971 (3) # 72.686 75.229 77.614 78.071

76.363 73.824 # 73.235 74.622 80.644

(3)

76.667

ROSEVELT DUBLET LEGOLAS 92 VERDADES

4 NED - NETHERLANDS 247 CORNELISSEN Adelinde 248 GAL Edward 250 van SILFHOUT Diederik 249 MINDERHOUD Hans Peter

76.043 (4) # RT 75.271 75.900 76.957

74.991 # 73.655 76.092 75.224

(4)

75.517

PARZIVAL VOICE ARLANDO JOHNSON

5 SWE - SWEDEN 262 HENDELIOWITZ Mads 260 RAMEL Juliette 258 KITTEL Patrik 261 WILHELMSSON SILFVEN Tinne

75.319 (5) # 71.771 74.943 74.586 76.429

74.370 # 71.681 72.045 73.866 77.199

(5)

74.845

JIMMIE CHOO SEQ BURIEL K.H. DEJA DON AURIELLO

6 DEN - DENMARK 214 DAHL Anders 217 KIRK THINGGAARD Agnete 215 DUFOUR Cathrine 216 KASPRZAK Anna

74.276 (6) # 69.900 72.229 76.657 73.943

74.346 # 71.232 72.465 76.050 74.524

(6)

74.311

SELTEN HW JOJO AZ CASSIDY DONNPERIGNON

7 ESP - SPAIN 219 222 221 220

ALCAIDE GRANDIOSO LORENZO DELGADO

74.029 (7) # 69.814 70.829 76.429 74.829

8 FRA - FRANCE 225 HENRY Ludovic 224 BRIEUSSEL Stephanie 227 VOLLA Pierre 226 TEBAR Karen

AFTER YOU AMORAK BADINDA ALTENA DON LUIS

71.914 (8) 69.214 # 65.114 71.500 75.029

9 AUS - AUSTRALIA 202 HEARN Suzanne 201 HANNA Mary 204 OATLEY Lyndal 203 OATLEY Kristy

REMMINGTON BOOGIE WOOGIE 6 SANDRO BOY 9 DU SOLEIL

69.576 (9) # 65.343 69.643 70.186 68.900

CASTILLA RUIZ Claudio MARTIN DOCKX Jose Daniel JURADO LOPEZ Severo Jesus FERRER-SALAT Beatriz

EQX401000_74DT 1.1

10 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

Report Created SAT 13 AUG 2016 11:32

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Olympic Equestrian Centre

Equestrian

Hipismo / Sports équestres

Centro Olímpico de Hipismo

Dressage Individual

Centre Olympique d´Équitation

Adestramento individual / Dressage individuel MON 15 AUG 2016

Final Results

Resultados finais / Résultats finaux

Ground Jury:

Rank

K - ROCKWELL Gary (USA) E - HOLLER Peter (GER)

H - BAARUP Susanne (DEN) C - ALONSO Maribel (MEX), President M - LANG Thomas (AUT)

NOC Horse Athlete Code No. Horse

1 GBR

2 GER

3 GER

4 USA

5 ESP

6 GER

7 GBR

8 SWE

9 NED

10 ESP

11 NED

12 USA

13 DEN

14 DEN

15 USA

16 SWE

17 GBR

18 IRL

230 DUJARDIN Charlotte VALEGRO 237 WERTH Isabell WEIHEGOLD OLD

B - de WOLFF van WESTERRODE Eddy (NED) F - CLARKE Stephen (GBR)

--------------------- Technical/Artistic & (Rank) --------------------E H C M B

K

Tech/Art F

%Score

Art

90.750

(1)

87.000

(1)

90.250

(1)

94.000

(1)

87.750

(1)

92.500

(1)

87.750

(1)

97.000

(1)

97.000

(1)

99.000

(1)

99.000

(1)

97.000

(1)

97.000

(1)

98.000

(1)

Art

84.000

(3)

84.000

(3)

87.250

(2)

83.250

(3)

83.500

(2)

90.000

(2)

85.000

(2)

91.000

(3)

92.000

(2)

96.000

(2)

92.000

(3)

93.000

(2)

94.000

(2)

92.000

(3)

84.750

(2)

84.500

(2)

82.500

(3)

85.250

(2)

79.750

(4)

85.750

(3)

83.500

(3)

Art

93.000

(2)

89.000

(3)

90.000

(3)

94.000

(2)

88.000

(3)

87.000

(4)

93.000

(2)

265 GRAVES Laura VERDADES

Tech

231 HESTER Carl NIP TUCK

Art

83.000

(4)

82.000

(4)

80.500

(4)

82.500

(4)

80.000

(3)

82.500

(5)

83.250

(4)

91.000

(3)

87.000

(4)

87.000

(7)

88.000

(5)

88.000

(3)

86.000

(6)

92.000

(3)

Tech Art

77.250

(8)

80.250

(7)

79.250

(6)

79.500

(7)

79.000

(6)

81.750

(6)

82.750

(5)

85.000

(6)

87.000

(4)

89.000

(4)

88.000

(5)

84.000

(8)

87.000

(4)

91.000

(5)

Tech Art

78.000

(6)

80.000

(8)

78.250

(7)

79.000

(8)

79.250

(5)

85.000

(4)

77.750 (12)

84.000

(7)

85.000

(8)

85.000

(8)

86.000

(7)

88.000

(3)

89.000

(3)

87.000

(6)

Tech Art

79.250

(5)

77.000 (11)

79.500

(5)

81.500

(5)

79.000

(6)

77.750 (11)

79.750

(6)

89.000

(5)

82.000 (11)

88.000

(5)

90.000

(4)

87.000

(6)

80.000 (10)

86.000

(7)

(4)

77.250

(8)

78.000

(9)

77.250

(8)

79.000

(8)

78.250 (10)

Art

84.000

(7)

86.000

(7)

88.000

(5)

86.000

(7)

83.000

(9)

82.000

(7)

84.000

249 MINDERHOUD Hans Peter JOHNSON

Tech

(9)

Art

76.000 (10)

79.250

(9)

77.250

(8)

80.500

(6)

75.500 (11)

78.750 (10)

78.750

(8)

83.000 (10)

83.000

(9)

83.000 (10)

85.000

(9)

83.000

81.000

84.000

(9)

(9)

(9)

Tech Art

74.000 (13)

80.500

(6)

75.750 (10)

76.250 (12)

76.250

(9)

79.000

(8)

76.500 (14)

(5)

79.607 86.286

(6)

79.107 86.000

(7)

78.393 84.714

(8)

78.000 83.143

(9)

(4)

83.625 (5)

82.946 (6)

82.553 (7)

81.553 (8)

80.571 (10)

80.000 (12)

87.000

(4)

85.000

84.000 (10)

85.000

(7)

80.000 (10)

83.000 (13)

(8)

80.161 76.893 83.429

(11)

77.214 81.857

(10)

76.500 82.286

(12)

75.000 81.286

(13)

74.821 79.143

(14)

74.464 77.857

(15)

73.750 78.286

(17)

74.179 77.857

(16)

72.250 79.143

(18)

(9)

79.875 (10) 77.500 (13) 77.875 (12) 80.750 (10) 78.875 (11) 79.625 (9) 82.250 (8) Tech Art

77.750

(7)

76.000 (13)

74.750 (12)

77.500 (10)

75.750 (10)

79.250

(7)

79.500

(7)

82.000 (11)

79.000 (14)

81.000 (11)

84.000 (10)

82.000 (11)

80.000 (10)

85.000

(8)

79.535 (12)

80.000 (9) 80.375 (10) 77.625 (13) 80.125 (11) 78.500 (12) 78.000 (13) 81.125 (10) Tech Art

76.000 (10)

77.750 (10)

74.250 (13)

77.250 (11)

75.000 (12)

77.000 (12)

78.250 (10)

84.000

83.000

81.000 (11)

83.000 (12)

82.000 (11)

79.000 (14)

84.000

(7)

(9)

(9)

79.393 (11)

75.000 (16) 78.875 (12) 78.000 (11) 79.375 (13) 77.250 (13) 79.125 (11) 79.375 (14) 73.000 (16)

76.750 (12)

75.000 (11)

75.750 (14)

73.500 (15)

76.250 (14)

74.750 (17)

Art

77.000 (15)

81.000 (12)

81.000 (11)

83.000 (12)

81.000 (13)

82.000

84.000

216 KASPRZAK Anna DONNPERIGNON

Tech

EQX001101_73DD 1.0

79.964 87.286

85.196

77.000 (12) 83.750 (6) 80.375 (9) 80.125 (11) 80.625 (8) 79.500 (10) 79.750 (13)

Tech

239 REYNOLDS Judy VANCOUVER K

(4)

(3)

79.500 (11) 81.125 (9) 80.125 (10) 82.750 (7) 79.250 (10) 79.875 (8) 81.375 (9)

215 DUFOUR Cathrine CASSIDY

229 BIGWOOD Fiona ORTHILIA

81.964 88.429

87.142

80.500 (8) 84.000 (5) 82.625 (7) 82.000 (9) 80.125 (9) 80.500 (7) 81.125 (10) 82.000

258 KITTEL Patrik DEJA

(3)

(2)

84.125 (5) 79.500 (11) 83.750 (5) 85.750 (4) 83.000 (6) 78.875 (12) 82.875 (6)

(9)

264 BROCK Allison M. ROSEVELT

83.714 90.571

89.071

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77.000

267 PETERS Steffen LEGOLAS 92

(2)

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Tech

250 van SILFHOUT Diederik ARLANDO

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261 WILHELMSSON SILFV. DON AURIELLO

220 FERRER-SALAT Beatriz DELGADO

(1)

88.875 (2) 86.750 (3) 86.250 (3) 89.625 (2) 83.875 (4) 86.375 (4) 88.250 (3) Tech

236 SCHNEIDER Dorothee SHOWTIME FRH

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74.250 (12)

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Report Created MON 15 AUG 2016 13:35

Total %Score 93.857

93.875 (1) 92.000 (1) 94.625 (1) 96.500 (1) 92.375 (1) 94.750 (1) 92.875 (1) Tech

234 BRORING-SPREHE Kristina DESPERADOS FRH

221 JURADO LOPEZ SJ LORENZO

Rk

75.696 (14)

Page 1/2

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 11


BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE RIO OLYMPICS WITH JULIE Two special stories surrounding Julie and her representation at Rio have emerged

ON PRIDE AND A UNIQUE ROLE REVERSAL The first story symbolizes one of the most unique features of equestrian sport - the longevity of international equestrian athletes. Julie is quoted from the first New Zealand team press conference as saying “I have created a record but I haven’t done anything yet”. This comment of course referred to her taking over from Sir Mark Todd as senior statesman (or woman if you want to be politically correct) of the NZ Olympic team. While some may wish to shy away from this accolade, it just confirms that equestrian athletes can aim for Olympic representation at a point in their lifetime that most other athletes have long since retired. But this is not the actual story. The story is of a son’s enormous sense of pride watching his mother work hard for the Olympic dream over many years and making that dream come true. It’s role reversal of a different sort - the child being proud of the parent representing New Zealand at the Olympic Games - isn’t it usually the other way around ?

12 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

“Horses are her passion and the Olympics have always been a dream. My sister Katrina and I both rode when we were at school and went to Pony Club. I gave up when I was about eleven - the training involved and required was not nearly as appealing as the competition” laughs Nicholas. “My sister Katrina went on to be much more successful in the dressage ring. It was probably as well neither of us really pursued equestrian sport seriously as it enabled Mum to focus on her dream. And now watching a loved one achieve a life dream is beyond special” Then he went on to say he’d like to quote Bear Grylls because he believed this particular quote typified the long path to Rio for his mother. “The lesson is, the rewards in life don’t always go to the biggest, or the bravest, or the smartest. The rewards go to the dogged; and when you’re going through hell, to the person who just keeps going.” Nicholas was at the Rio Games with Julie’s brother Nigel. Unfortunately Katrina could not attend due to her own career commitments - one of which includes the NZ School of Opera.


Photo: Libby Law

ON TIELCEY PARK

MEMORIES OF RIO -

When Pat and Helen Williams created the Tielcey Park (TLC Park) Equestrian Centre nearly three decades ago at Aokautere near Palmerston North, little did they know that this centre was going provide a pivotal foundation for a local rider’s Olympic dream. Julie Brougham pays tribute to their vision. On receiving a message of good luck from Pat & Helen, Julie said “Would I have done dressage without them and Tielcey Park? Probably not”

SARAH DALZIELL - NZ TEAM MANAGER

Pat and Helen are now enjoying retirement (although still leading very busy lives) in Havelock in the Marlborough Sounds, recall Julie competing there in the hey days of Tielcey Park “Julie was a pleasure to have at our dressage tournaments. Always strongly competitive at the same time giving absolute respect and courtesy to ourselves as organisers, to the volunteer officials and to her fellow competitors. We are thrilled with her achievement, grateful and humbled by her endorsement”. Pat and Helen

“We were very proud of Julie and Steiny on their day – they were both very much in the zone from the beginning of the day until their performance. I think there are some positive learnings that can come out of this and their entire European experience” JULIE BROUGHAM

The Athletes Village “I shared a bathroom with Sir Mark Todd” Valegro “He was so kind and inquisitive with such an outgoing personality. Such a lovely, lovely horse” Carl Hester “So inspiring - he watched Steiny and commented on his wonderful extensions” The horses “ All the horses were special. Just to go out and work in amongst them was amazing” Travelling Steiny “ I just feel absolutely blessed that he travelled so well throughout the whole campaign” The Venue “The venue was well set up. It was a bit strange to see military personnel everywhere though - lots of guns” The Athletes “They were all SO TALL !”

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 13


Every October, New Zealand’s Premier Equine Event takes over Mystery Creek Events Centre, transforming the property into horse heaven. Thousands of people and hundreds of horses stream into the valley, tents are pitched, yards are filled and marquees are erected for the best three days of the year.

HORSE HEAVEN ON THE HORIZON Don’t miss the shopping, competitions, and Equidays 2016 is packed with entertaining and educational clinics and seminars, covering everything equine –starting and handling young horses, jumping, driving, problem-solving, saddle fitting, nutrition, sore horses – the list goes on. And this year, Equidays visitors can look forward to Dressage Demystified, presented by Bill Noble and supported by Pryde’s EasiFeed, a Masterclass presented by Jaime Amian, and clinics conducted by Vanessa Way. Held in the world-class indoor arena, Dressage Demystified will allow spectators to follow along with riders put through a range of tests, from Young Horse to Grand Prix. The tests will not be judged, but successful Grand Prix rider and trainer Bill Noble will give commentary throughout, providing explanations as to what is required at different levels and answering questions along the way. Visitors will also be treated to a couple of freestyles to music. “Bill Noble is an asset to New Zealand equestrian and we believe Dressage Demystified will give equestrian enthusiasts and aspiring dressage riders a crucial added depth of understanding to a sport that is presented as so effortless,” says Ammie Hardie, Equidays Event Manager.

clinicians only to be experienced at Equidays

Jaime Amian’s Masterclass is something With seven arenas and two demo pens, – the un-missable event for to be seen. A lifelong equestrian, Jaime there areEquine 120 hours ofenthusiasts education on offer brings unparalleled knowledge to his at Equidays. Clinics and demonstrations students and Equidays visitors will give visitors an opportunity to gain enjoy his engaging and compassionate invaluable insights from some of the training style. Having trained with the world’s best trainers, and watch New likes of Juan Manuel Munoz and Klaus Zealand’s highest level competitors vie Balkenhol, Jaime has successfully showed for their slice of a massive prize pool. throughout Europe. Equidays’ Nightshows are legendary, “Jaime’s international experience will with New Zealand’s favourite equine give dressage fans a valuable window celebrities filling the indoor arena with into dressage at the highest level. He’s entertainment and expertise in Friday secured top finishes at Young Horse night’s Showjumping Spectacular and and Grand Prix level and the foundation Saturday night’s Horseplay and Hijinks. Highlights: of his training programme is one that And in between learning and laughing? everyone can relate to,” says Hardie. Shopping. Over 200 exhibitors pack into Exclusive Equidays: The Wilson Sisters of 3 – Vanessa will be taking a to range of the event, ready with thePower latest equipment three sisters,where three countries, three wild breeds dressage clinics at Equidays and technology, products and samples, her enthusiastic manner will keep you expert advice and the best deals to be Featuring The Kaimanawa Stallion Challenge entertained and inspire you to be the best found. Beyond the Barriers NZ Dunstan Ex-Factor – back for you can while focusing on horse friendly Visitors can camp on site or grab the second year training techniques. accommodation close by. There’s a range Presenting Dan Steers Dan available Horsemanship “Vanessa’s trained in Carl Hester’s yard ofofDouble ticket packages and can be More than 40 hours day online of inspirational and competed one of his horses. She’s each bought or at the gate. clinics Mark 14-16 representedincluding New Zealand multiple times Warwick October onSchiller, the calendar and jump on Albert Voorn, Carlos and trains Clarke Johnstone! We’re very equidays.co.nz to find everything needed Tabernaberri and Vanessa Way lucky to have her,” says Hardie. to plan a trip. See you there!

Two entertaining nightshows – Showjumping

“We’re very excited to have three Spectacular and Horseplay & Hijinks incredibly talented Grand Prix riders and Unbeatable shopping for all horse-lovers trainers sharing their vast knowledge with our Equidays visitors.”

14 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

Mystery Creek, Hamilton equidays.co.nz


14–16 OCTOBER 2016

AN UNMISSABLE EVENT FOR EQUINE ENTHUSIASTS Highlights:

Exclusive to Equidays: The Wilson Sisters Power of 3 – three sisters, three wild breeds from three countries The Kaimanawa Stallion Challenge and the Beyond the Barriers NZ Dunstan Ex-Factor Dan Steers of Double Dan Horsemanship More than 120 hours of inspirational clinics including Albert Voorn, Warwick Schiller, Carlos Tabernaberri and Vanessa Way Two entertaining nightshows – Showjumping Spectacular and Horseplay & Hijinks Unbeatable shopping for all horse-lovers with over 200 sites

Mystery Creek, Hamilton

equidays.co.nz SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 15


Rider safety (and safety in general) is always a critical concern for ESNZ and its Board has taken a bold step in mandating the use of approved safety helmets for ALL equestrian competition in the future. This means that the long-established top hat is no longer allowed to be worn in the disciplines of Dressage and Eventing with immediate effect. Following the withdrawal of safety standard EN1384 (BSEN1384) in Europe during 20142015 ESNZ has reviewed all its helmet safety requirements.  Accordingly, and with immediate effect, the new European standard VG1 is approved and any helmet bearing only EN1384 will no longer be approved from 31 July 2017.  This will give riders time to purchase new helmets if necessary, and is aligned with the New Zealand Pony Club Associations time frame for meeting the same standards.  The other approved standards which some equestrian sports use remain unchanged.

Photo: FEI.org

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Top Hats banned in all ESNZ competitions from July 14, 2016.

“This is a major step forward for safety of riders competing in New Zealand and is accompanied by the ESNZ recommendation that helmets should be worn at all time when handling horses” said ESNZ CEO Vicki Glynn. “Horses can be unpredictable and we know that riding is a risk sport so we must do everything we can to make our equestrians safe” she says. “Sadly we can no longer allow the use of the top hat in competition but the design and elegance of the contemporary safety helmet makes them a worthy replacement and safety must come first.” As per the ESNZ General Regulations, Article 150: Protective Headgear, the following will apply:  • ESNZ recommends helmets should be worn at all times when dealing with horses. • While riding at the showground/competition venue the use of properly fastened protective headgear is mandatory. • A ll riders must wear protective headgear that conforms to one of the current approved safety standards. These standards may be subject to change but the latest list can be found on the ESNZ website at http://www.nzequestrian. org.nz/esnz/resources/health-safety.   ESNZ will ensure that changes to the standards are communicated to members and area committees.

the Technical Delegate/GJ President, an athlete’s decision to wear a camera while competing will always be voluntary and at the athlete’s own risk. APPROVED PROTECTIVE HEADGEAR SAFETY STANDARDS:

• AS/NZS 3838 (current Australia and New Zealand Standard) (1998, 2003 or 2006) • VG1 (interim European Standard) • ASTM-F11632004 with the SEI mark (current US Standard) • PAS 015:1998 or 2011 with BSI Kitemark • Snell E2001 with the official Snell label and number • EN 1384 and BSEN 1384 (current outgoing European Standard) until 31 July 2017 only – not permitted from 1 August 2017)

• R iders will not be permitted to compete unless they wear approved protective headgear. • A ny rider who fails to wear protective headgear when required will be issued with an official warning. If that rider fails to comply for a second time at any Event, a protest will be lodged with the Ground Jury. If the protest is upheld, the rider will be disqualified from further participation in the Event, unless exceptional circumstances apply. • The use of cameras by riders while riding at a showground/competition venue (however such a camera is affixed, whether to the rider, protective headgear, head covering, or carriage) is prohibited, unless otherwise specifically agreed to by the ESNZ Technical Delegate officiating at the Event (in consultation with the President of the GJ, where appropriate). Such a decision will be completely at the discretion of the Technical Delegate/GJ President, and not subject to challenge. In the event that approval is given by

Kitemark

SEI mark

Snell E2001

Note (1): The Dressage NZ Conference in June discussed the wearing of top hats and intended to seek further consultation with members about the wearing of top hats by senior riders. However, the ESNZ Board made the decision to ban the wearing of top hats at it’s 5th July Board meeting and accordingly advised Dressage NZ of that decision hence no further consultation will be held. Note (2) The FEI approved schedule for the CDI-W in October at Manfeild includes a statement that no top hat may be worn by any competitor. As per current FEI rules all Young Riders in the CDIY must wear an approved safety helmet at all times in both training and competition and must also be worn at the horse inspection (trot up) SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 17


EQUESTRIAN SPORTS NZ UPDATES Membership Fees to Increase for Competitors NON-COMPETING OFFICIALS AND VOLUNTEERS TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT VOUCHERS Membership fees for all Equestrian Sport NZ human and equine members will increase this year from 1 September 2016. ESNZ board chair Nick Pyke said the current membership structure had been in place for two seasons and the membership and equine fees had been fixed for this time whilst the new system bedded in.   “However due to a significant reduction in community sport funding and the need to invest in some key areas to provide a sound basis for the future of the sport

this increase has become necessary,” he said. “The board is taking a hard line on administration costs and will be reviewing all budgets to ensure we are running the sport as efficiently as possible. After assessing the current situation it was agreed to increase both equine and human membership by $10 each.” Mr Pyke said in recognition of feedback from officials and volunteers and to recognise the contribution made by so many to the sport there would be a reintroduction of a non-competing officials/volunteers discounted membership which would remain at the $60 level. Any officials and volunteers who would like to take this offer up will need to call the membership services

team on 04 499 8994 upon receiving a membership renewal form in the post. As of 1 September 2016 the fee for full membership (human) will be $70 and the fee for equine registration will be $75. This applies to: • New human memberships and equine registrations made after 1 September 2016. • Any existing human memberships and equine registrations due for renewal after the 1 September 2016.

PONY HEIGHT CERTIFICATES COMPULSORY For the 2016-2017 season ESNZ will be enforcing its policy regarding pony height certificates in accordance with ESNZ General and Veterinary Regulations Article 127.2 which states:

“To compete as a pony in competitions under the Constitutional Rules and Regulations the pony must measure 148cm or under. The owners must be in the possession of an annual or life measurement certificate issued by the Royal Agricultural Society for that pony.”

A copy of an in-date, valid height certificate must be sent to us with all new pony registrations AND pony registration renewals.

At present ESNZ is processing pony renewals but keeping a list to follow up with after the 1st of August once measuring has started again.

If your pony has a life height certificate please also send this in so we have a copy on record. If you have sent it in previously please contact us to confirm we have it on record.

As of the 1st of September no pony registration renewals will be processed without an accompanying height certificate (within reason).

Please do NOT send the original, a copy is fine.

18 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

Contact details for the Royal Agricultural Society regarding measuring days can be found at: http:// www.ras.org.nz/equestrian/measuring/


DRESSAGE ACADEMY WELCOMES BILL NOBLE TO THE TEAM The newly-established Dressage Academy is welcoming one of New Zealand’s equestrian icons to the team. Bill Noble, a cornerstone of dressage in this country, is now a selector for the academy. “Bill will be a huge asset to the Academy,” says Brugs Nicholls (Academy Head Instructor). “We are delighted to have him on board.” Noble needs little introduction, with an impressive list of accomplishments including five Horse of the Year titles on three different horses, is the only rider to have won three consecutive Dressage Horse of the Year crowns and just this year was inducted into the Horse of the Year Hall of Fame. Over the years the Waikato rider, coach and mentor has worked with many riders both in New Zealand and the UK, including Sir Mark Todd when he won gold at the Seoul Olympics. He has long been a believer in the quality of New Zealand horses, whilst being an advocate for people learning to ride them a little better.

The Dressage Academy was launched in June 2016 and has quickly attracted the attention of potential students, sponsors and supporters. Students lucky enough to be selected will spend at least five years immersed in training giving them the foundation to be top riders, trainers and coaches. In addition to providing the immersive experience for selected students, the Dressage Academy will also promote and offer education to amateur dressage riders and to the wider equestrian sport in general. The Dressage Academy is an independent training facility. For more information about the academy head to www.dressageacademy.co.nz

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SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 19


HOPES, DREAMS AND NUTRITIONAL NEEDS 2016. Another year of hopes (some fulfilled), dreams (some crushed), aspirations, broken New Year resolutions, new beginnings and new goal settings, but for a special few, 2016 is the ultimate crescendo of a lifetimes effort. I’m talking about the Olympic Games. Mankind’s largest forum for showcasing the extraordinary talents, abilities and hard work of the world’s greatest athletes. Perhaps it is during this time when the world is brought together as one under a united sports front, rallying behind teams and individuals instead of focusing on political bickering that fires the armchair athlete in all of us. Whatever your reason for watching, there is one constant that lies beneath it all. The desire to be better, to do better, maybe not just on the sports field but in life. Watching these elite athletes makes us all feel a little nostalgic for our high school competitive days on the rugby field, or maybe it just gives the much needed motivation to get back out and live a little healthier, focus a little less on career and maybe a little more of health and longevity.

We welcome Fitfood on board as a monthly contributor, have you ever joked that your horse eats better than yourself? well each month Fitfood will share some tips and ideas for how we can add that little bit more spark to our training and performances through good old simple nutrition.

No matter what each of us as individuals gets out of these games, we can all agree it is inspirational to say the least. It gives back the meaning of true sportsmanship and comradery but the greatest gift we get is watching the humility and good grace with which most of these athletes carry themselves. The thing is how many of us have actually taken the time out to think what really goes on behind the scenes with an elite level athlete in terms of their training, but more important than even that is, have you ever taken the time out to think what goes into their nutrition? When people think of an athlete and their chosen sport such as swimming, they think of the early start and hitting the pool before most of us are awake and doing hours of stroke technique, breathing and turns. Then they have to head off to their full time employment for a long day of work then straight back to the pool for some more technique, more breathing and maybe even a couple of personal best attempts. Then it’s time to hit the gym for some load

bearing exercise to strengthen the muscles followed by a cool down and some stretching and physio work. Then its home and time to get ready for the next day. No time for a social life, in fact no time at all. So what’s missing from this athletes’ day? Nutrition. The single most important aspect in every athletes’ life. Without the correct ratio of fuels to fire our swimmer through their day they wouldn’t even have the energy to get through the gruelling training schedule let alone become a potential world champion! Fortunately, most up and coming Olympic hopefuls are being guided by some of our most knowledgeable sports minds today and have their nutrition outlined for them as well. So what about other sports where the athlete isn’t like the track and field or weight lifter, what if the athlete is a darts player or an Olympic Equestrian hopeful? Surely nutrition isn’t as paramount for this type of athlete I hear you ask, or is it? The short answer is a resounding yes! Let’s take the darts player for example, now if he only ate nutritionally deficient

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20 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016


food, didn’t drink enough water, didn’t sleep enough or liked to overindulge in sugary sweets then he is only going to fast track his path to mediocre results. Even though his sport isn’t physical you say? Yes, the simple fact is that the sugary sweets will cause insulin spikes that have an initial lift followed by a horrific crash at which point his mind will become cloudy, his depth perception becomes a little disoriented, couple this with the lack of water and his blood is a little sluggish causing tiredness and a major loss of focus and suddenly he

doesn’t get that perfect 180, instead he gets very sleepy and wishes he’d paid a little more attention to his nutrition. Now let’s look at the Equestrian athlete, surely nutrition doesn’t play a major role in a sport where the horse is the primary focus? Again not so. Sometimes having the best horse, with the best equipment and the best knowledge isn’t enough to oust a competitor who doesn’t have the best of everything but looked after their own nutrition. You see it’s just like the darts player all over again, mental fog, drowsiness, inability to focus and concentrate, not to mention not having the physical strength to control such large majestic beasts! If you spend so much time, effort and money looking after your horses’ nutrition don’t you think it makes sense to do the same for yourself? You wouldn’t feed your horse a big mac, so do your body a favour and don’t feed one to yourself either. Now it’s not just the elite athlete or even the weekend warrior that needs to worry about nutrition, each and every single one of us on the planet needs to be concerned with what eat. Now most

If you spend so much time, effort and money looking after your horses’ nutrition don’t you think it makes sense to do the same for yourself? everyone, myself included, think nothing of buying the newest phones or best Nikes or latest gadgets but so many of us neglect to spend where it counts and that is on quality, wholesome food! The latter are all replaceable but our health isn’t. The greatest cure for illness lies in prevention, and the greatest preventer there is, is whole foods. Unfortunately, in this day and age an apple isn’t an apple and a chicken certainly isn’t a chicken. So when you finally make the right choice to be a better you and live a healthier, longer and better quality of life, don’t just reach for the most convenient or price effective option, choose organic, free range and true whole foods, your body, mind, soul and planet will love you for it. Remember this, “no matter how far or hard you run or train, you can never outrun or out train a bad diet”. Eat fit, live well

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 21


1. CROSS TRAIN YOUR HORSE

TEN TIPS FOR SOUNDNESS Article by Debbie Rolmanis Photos provided by Hayley Beresford

Professional athletes train in a variety of activities to condition every area of their body. Your horse requires the same attention to ensure the body is conditioned as a whole, rather than some structures receiving more training than others. The body should be considered as a complete unit, with every individual component being prepared to do its job. This is only achieved through variety such as pole work, hacking, riding on different surfaces, hill work, etc. This work must be functional and be sprinkled throughout your training.

2. DON’T LEAVE IT TOO LONG BETWEEN SHOEING

a) At the end of the shoeing cycle, and particularly when this reaches above 6 weeks, the increased length of toe changes the hoof/pastern angle. If this changes by as little as 1 degree, the increase of pressure of the DDFT (deep digital flexor tendon) on the Navicular bone goes up by 4%. b) When shoeing has been left ‘as long as possible’, changing a longer toe back to a more correct angle may affect the horses’ movement and co-ordination initially. To avoid problems, it is best to keep them on a cycle that prevents any pronounced changes in hoof shape.

3. STAY RELEVANT

Your training and conditioning should be tailored to the stage of development your horse is at. It should also be relevant to your horses’ (and your own) abilities and limitations.

Debbie Rolmanis, founder of db Muscle Therapy is a fully qualified Personal Trainer, Human Sports Massage Therapist and Equine Sports Therapist. Debbie holds a BSc (Equine), BHSAI, Diplomas in Human Personal Training and Sports Therapy and Equine Sports Therapy, all gained in the UK. Debbie currently works/lives in the UK, with regular trips to clients in Germany including successful Grand Prix rider Hayley Beresford. www.dbmuscletherapy.com

22 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

4. WARM UP AND COOL DOWN;

A 20 minute warm up; ten min walk, some trot and canter in a stretched frame will increase the body temperature and improve oxygen delivery to muscles. It allows tendons to become more elastic, thus enabling their ‘stretch’ facility. Studies have shown that warm soft tissues cope with higher levels of load than cold ones. Be mindful of the environment you are in; cooler climates will require a longer warm up to raise the body temperature. Conversely, if you are riding in a warmer environment, the temperature of the horses’ body will be higher before you even start work, so be mindful of how much work is needed.


5. MANAGE THE SURFACE YOU TRAIN ON

Whatever the reality is for the surface you have available to you, the key is to keep the footing consistent and level. Surfaces are a minefield of exploration, and there is plenty of research happening that will guide us on the best options, but for the sake of real life, keeping the surface consistent will be the best thing you can do. If you want to wade through a scientific paper on the recent FEI research into surfaces check out the link below: https://inside.fei.org/news/world’s-most-extensive-equinesurfaces-study-published

6. CONSISTENCY IS KEY

People with an office job for 5 days a week suffer injuries when they are let loose at the weekend and think they are Tarzan, it is just as true for horses who are ridden once or twice a week with an owner who expects them to be ‘on form’. Winter is a killer, I get it, so just play down your expectations and understand that 2 days a week is not training, or hibernate and come out when the weather allows you to have more time in the saddle.

7. CONDITION, CONDITION, CONDITION

If your horse has had any time off, it will need to be slowly conditioned back into work. 3 months off means at least 3 months of long, slow (yes boring) work to prevent re-injury and to aid recovery. You have to make like a tortoise in this situation if you want to end up on top.

8. ICE

Hosing and icing legs after work is a great preventative measure to help sort out any micro traumas in the soft tissues of the lower limb.

9. INVEST IN YOU

An unbalanced rider will affect how the horse has to load his limbs; creating an imbalance of weight-bearing and therefore increasing the likelihood of lameness/injury. Imagine yourself as the mast of the ship; the top of the mast moves the most and impacts how the ship balances itself underneath. What you do in the saddle will have a direct impact on how your horse can operate. Work off-horse will help you sit in more balance on your horse, and this may well help to reduce the chance of lameness.

10.KEEP EXERCISE FUNCTIONAL Be prudent when deciding what extra-curricular activities you think your horse should do; keep work functional. If it doesn’t ADD value to your horses’ development it is either a waste of time, or damaging. For example; swimming might be fine if you are going through rehab and you need to take the weight off the skeleton, but if you are wanting to condition your horse to be fit for eventing for example, working across the ground is more functional.

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 23


VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR JOS GRESHAM Article by Frankie Webb

“Volunteers are not paid, not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.” This is so true of the Dressage New Zealand volunteer of the year Jos Gresham. Due to a serious riding accident in the UK and soundness issues with her last horse Jos had no choice but to hang up her boots but not her passion for horses. “I was never really a competitive rider,” said Jos, who grew up on the family’s Rangitikei farm. “I joined Rangitikei Pony Club when I was 7, I hunted and I loved every minute of it.” In 1978 Jos headed off on her big OE. Nearly three decades later she returned to New Zealand, with a husband and two daughters. “I had bought a horse in England, the seller forgot to tell me it couldn’t cope with any leg pressure,” Jos recalls. When the inevitable happened, Jos broke her hip and smashed her confidence. It wasn’t until she returned to New Zealand in 2007, with a husband and two daughters, she reacquainted herself with horses when they bought a lifestyle block in Bulls and her daughter took up riding. Jos joined Central Districts Dressage group. “I believe the most important thing is to enjoy what you do, I wasn’t great at dressage but I really loved it,” she said. Sadly her horse developed soundness issues, her daughter moved onto other interests and Jos now has, what she describes as “two paddock ornaments”,

living out their days on the farm. Horseless but with a real passion for all things equestrian, Jos offered her services to CD dressage. She was appointed stabling manager for a forthcoming event. It was soon evident she was a stabling manager extraordinaire with incredible organizational skills and a great manner in dealing with the challenges a stabling manager has to face. “I thoroughly enjoy doing the stabling,” she said. “I have met so many people I would have never rubbed shoulders with.” She would love to see more volunteer riders, especially young riders, and their connections. “They often have hours between classes, they would seriously get a lot out of just giving a little of their time.” Jos was surprised and humbled to be recognised as Volunteer of the Year. “There are many wonderful volunteers in this sport, I want to say a huge thank you,” she said. “This award could have gone to any one of them.” AllinFlex Accolades recognize the huge contribution volunteers make to our sport. Area Dressage groups from throughout NZ nominated a volunteer who makes a difference in their area. All Area nominees

24 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

and the Volunteer of the Year received AllinFlex product prizes and lapel pin Dressage NZ owes much to the volunteers in our community. Thank you all, and we look forward to seeing you again in the new season. ALLINFLEX AREA VOLUNTEER WINNERS Northland Colin & Julie Finlayson Waitemata Rebecca Wilson Akld-Manukau Shirley Watts Waikato Michelle Paterson Bay of Plenty Ann Smith Nth Hawkes Bay Rae West Sth Hawkes Bay Wendy Jeffery Central Districts Jos Gresham Taihape Jenny Pearce Taranaki Clare Norton Wairarapa Ann Webster Wellington Jos Gresham Nelson Helen Trotman Marlborough Sharon Inwood Canterbury Melanie van der Pol SCNO Anita Fitt Otago Alice Lloyd-Fitt Southland Rowena Smith


WENDY RICHARDS 1962 - 2016

Dressage Rotorua, and indeed the wider New Zealand equestrian community, recently lost a truly wonderful woman. Wendy Richards was involved in equestrian endeavours, in particular showing and dressage for a large part of her life.

Wendy was very well known in Rotorua and the Bay of Plenty as a horsewoman who was always impeccably turned out, beautifully prepared, and willing to lend a helping hand to anyone who needed it. As proprietor of Champions Equestrian along with daughter Sarah, Wendy provided advice, sponsorship and friendship to many people. As one of the longest standing and most valued members of Dressage Rotorua, Wendy was the ideal club member; always happy and willing to help out with whatever needed doing, and never wanting to call attention to her efforts. Her enthusiasm for the sport, and her genuine interest in and care for others involved in it, marked her as someone people sought out for encouragement, advice and if need be – a bit of a reality check as to where they were headed! Her common sense approach of “work hard and get better at it” rang true for so many people, and is advice that cannot be faulted. Wendy’s battle with cancer was one that she openly shared with everyone around her. She included us in her struggles and her triumphs, and managed to achieve more in the past couple of years than many of us ever will. Her strength and dignity while this unspeakably unfair thing happened to her was inspiring to all of those around her, and is one of the many reasons she will be remembered with love and for her amazing courage. Wendy is survived by her husband Alan, children Rachel, Sarah, Andy and Phil, and her much loved horses.

Above: Wendy Richards competing at Dressage Rotorua

Dressage NZ extends deepest its sympathy to the family and friends of Wendy Richards SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 25


HERITAGE EQUINE JOINS THE DRESSAGE NZ STABLE OF SPONSORS Article by Jess Roberts

The Gradowski-Smith family say that sponsoring dressage is their way of giving something back to the sport they enjoy. Heritage Equine is their brand and their family comprises Richard, Rachel and their two sons Luke (15) and Sam (12). Sam is a regular competitor on the dressage circuit his eye-catching grey pony, Sherwood Travel Man

26 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016


“We participate ourselves in the sport as a family, supporting Sam mainly these days,” says Rachel. “But we are aware of the effort involved by those who keep the sport going for us in New Zealand, and we were very pleased to be given the opportunity to sponsor this season’s dressage.” As well as the Young Rider International event (Riders 16-21yrs) at the Central Dressage Festival, Heritage Equine is sponsoring the Advanced class at the 2016 World Dressage Challenge, something Rachel is looking forward to. “We are particularly glad to be able support our young riders in the CDIY. They are the future of our sport, and this event gives them this valuable experience.” A paper on warmblood breeding back when she was at University led to the purchase of Rachel’s first Trakehner mare. She has had a special interest in dressage ever since, running a yard in the UK after finishing her Equine and Business degree. Originally from England, the entrepreneurial mother-of-two grew up in Wellington after her parents emigrated to New Zealand, but moved back to the UK in her late teens where she eventually met her husband Richard and started a family. Two decades later, moving back to the other side of the world was a decision that

they’ve never second-guessed. “Richard had a very demanding corporate career as a director of large organizations and moving to New Zealand was driven by the need to improve our quality of life as a family,” says Rachel. “We feel that’s been a huge success as our boys enjoy a lifestyle here that has given them some great life experiences.” Sam has two ponies: his trusty grey Sherwood Travel Man, and new addition to the team Heritage Flirtatious (by Don Quattro). “I count myself lucky as a mother. I think many people would assume I steered Sam to doing dressage because dressage is my interest” Rachel muses. “However Sam naturally showed an affinity to dressage and at nine years of age he declared that was what he wanted to do.” That was just over two years ago. He now has plenty of championship shows and HOY under his belt and plans to compete at Level 4 this season. Being a qualified saddle fitter, Rachel concentrates on the saddlery side of Heritage Equine, although the business supplies a range of products including quality built horse trucks manufactured by partners KM Horseboxes and Monarch stabling. The couple invite clients to visit their property to check out the facilities

which are built from the products they sell, including stables, crush and solariums. Compared to England and Europe, dressage is still an evolving and developing sport in New Zealand, Rachel observes, with the quality of horses ever-increasing. She has imported a graded warmblood mare and bred two foals this season (one via embryo transfer and both by graded stallions). “Sadly as fun as the breeding is, business commitments will prevent me from getting too involved! But to bring in State Premium graded mares when we now have access to superb stallions would be a great experience – and to breed international quality horses.” For now, she’s happy with the two she’s bred. “Maybe one day one of them might become a future dressage star for Sam…”

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 27


KEY DRESSAGE EVENTS 2016/17 NORTH ISLAND RE, ICH & INT EVENTS 2016/17

Venue

18 Sept

Dressage Rotorua Spring Spectacular Series 2016

Taupo NEC

RE

Qualifiers N

22/24 Oct

Boeckmann Horse Floats NI Champs

Taupo NEC

ICH

Y

28 Oct

Pryde’s Easifeed FEI World Dressage Challenge

Manfeild Park

INT

N

28/29 Oct

Kieffer/Equiscan CDIW & Heritage Equine CDIY

Manfeild Park

INT

N

28/30 Oct

Central Districts Dressage Champs

Manfeild Park

RE

Y

11/13 Nov

Dressage Waikato Festival

Kihikihi

RE

Y

12/13 Nov

Wellington Dressage Champs

Masterton

RE

Y

19/20 Nov

Gisborne Dressage Champs

Gisborne

RE

Y

27/28 Nov

Northern Hawkes Bay Dressage Champs

Hastings

RE

Y

3/4 Dec

Southern Hawkes Bay Dressage Champs

Dannevirke

RE

Y

9/11 Dec

Waitemata Dressage Champs

Woodhill Sands

RE

Y

17/18 Dec

Taihape Dressage Champs

Taihape

RE

Y

13/15 Jan

Taranaki Dressage Champs

Hawera

RE

Y

14/15 Jan

Northland Dressage Champs

Whangarei

RE

Y

20/22 Jan

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Champs

Clevedon

RE

Y

21/22 Jan

Wairarapa Dressage Champs

Masterton

RE

Y

1/5 Feb

Bates National Championships CDIW/Y/P

Manfeild Park

NCH/INT

Y

7/12 Mar

Horse of the Year Show

Hastings

NCH/INT

Y

1/2 April

Equestrian Entries U25 Youth Champs

Taupo NEC

NCH

AMS only

SOUTH ISLAND RE, ICH EVENTS 8/9 Oct

South Canterbury / North Otago Dressage Champs

Winchester

RE

Y

12/13 Nov

Otago Dressage Champs

Mosgiel

RE

Y

19/20 Nov

Ashburton Dressage Champs

Ashburton

RE

Y

3/4 Dec

Canterbury Dressage Champs

McLeans Is NEC

RE

Y

9/11 Dec

Southland Dressage Championships

Gore

RE

Y

21/22 Jan

Malborough Dressage Champs

Blenheim

RE

Y

28/29 Jan

Nelson Dressage Champs

Rough Island

RE

Y

10/12 Feb

SI Dresssage Champs

Gore

ICH

Y

8/9 April

Festival of Future Stars Championships

Canty Ag Park

RE

Y (YDH only)

QUALIFICATION TERMS

RE (Qualifying scores for NCH but not series finals. Squad eligibility scores) REQ (Qualifying scores for NCH, HOY series finals. Squad eligibility scores) Series = Super 5 League, Zilco Musicals, Prestige Futures, AMS Pony & YR Performance League ICH = Island Championship (also REQ) NCH = National Championship CDIY = International Young Rider Event CDIP = International Pony Rider Event YDH = Elite Equine YDH Championships 4,5,6 yr old horses PAL = FEI Pacific League WC™ PALF = FEI Pacific League WC™ Final

28 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016


WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER | NORTH ISLAND   3/4

SEPTEMBER | SOUTH ISLAND

Woodhill Sands Dressage and Showhunter Festival

LE

3/4

Nelson Dressage Group Eyeopener Tournament

LE

4

Dressage Waikato Spring Show Day 1

LE

4

Canterbury Dressage Group Spring Series Day 2

LE

4

Wairarapa Dressage Spring Tournament #1

LE

11

Marlborough Dressage Group

LE

10

Taupo Dressage Group

TE

18

Ashburton Dressage Group Spring Tournament

LE

11

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

11

Tauranga Dressage Group

LE

18

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

17/18

Woodhill Sands Dressage and Showhunter Festival

LE

18

Gisborne Dressage Group Spring Tournament

LE

18

Dressage Rotorua Spring Spectacular Series 2016

RE

18

Wairarapa Dressage Spring Tournament #2

LE

25

Horowhenua Dressage Group Spring Tournament

LE

25

Eastern BOP Winter Series Day 3, Championship Show

LE

28

Equestrian Sports NZ AGA

OCTOBER | NORTH ISLAND 1

Dressage Waikato Spring Show Day 2

23/25 25

SI Young Rider Talent ID Clinic (selected riders only) Northern Equestrian Group Spring Series Day 2

OCTOBER | SOUTH ISLAND 1/2

LE

Dressage Otago Spring Tournament

LE

2

Canterbury Dressage Group Spring Series Day 3

LE

8/9

South Canterbury / North Otago Dressage Group

REQ

9

Marlborough Dressage Group

LE

16

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

LE

23/24

White Horse Equestrian Goup

LE

n/a

29/30

Nelson Dressage Group Spring Tournament

LE

29/30

Southland Dressage Group

LE

Northern Equestrian Group Spring Series Day 3

LE

1/2

NI Young Rider Talent ID Camp (selected riders only)

1/2

Woodhill Sands Dressage and Showhunter Festival

LE

8

Dressage Taranaki Spring Fling

LE

9

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

9

Dressage Northland

LE

9

Poverty Bay A & P Show

LE

9

Dressage Rotorua Spring Spectacular Series - Day 3

LE

14/16

Equidays (No Dressage Competition) Demos only

n/a

16

Central Hawkes Bay Spring Tournament

LE

16

Dressage Waitemata

LE

20

North Loburn Equestrian Centre

LE

19

Hawkes Bay A & P Show

LE

27

Northern Equestrian Group Summer Series Day 1

LE

Boeckmann Horse Floats NI Championships

ICH

28

Pryde’s Easifeed FEI World Dressage Challenge

INT

28/29

Kieffer - Equiscan CDIW & Heritage Equine CDIY

INT

28/30

Dressage Central Districts Championship Show

REQ

22/24

30

Waikato Equestrian Centre Spring Dressage Show

LE

30

Warkworth Dressage Group

LE

30

NOVEMBER | SOUTH ISLAND 6

Canterbury Dressage Group - Series with Ctby A& P

LE

9/11

Canterbury A&P Show - Series with Ctby Dressage

LE

12/13

Dressage Otago Summer Championship

REQ

19/20

Ashburton Dressage Group Summer Championships

REQ

NOVEMBER | NORTH ISLAND 5

Morrinsville Te Aroha DG Dressage Tournament

LE

6

Dressage Waitemata

LE

10

Central Hawkes Bay A & P Show

LE

11/13

Dressage Waikato Festival

REQ

12/13

Wellington Dressage Champs

REQ

18

Egmont A & P Show

LE

19/20

Gisborne Dressage Championships

REQ

20

Auckland-Manukau Dressage Group

LE

20

Dressage Northland

LE

27

Warkworth Dressage

LE

27/28

Northern Hawkes Bay Regional Championships

For more details of each event & venue, and contact details go to www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/competition/calendar

REQ

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 29


Article provided by Vetpro

With the flush of spring grass growth just weeks away this is timely information and advice for not only dressage riders, but for riders in all disciplines The primary source for feed for most horses is pasture. To understand their digestion, firstly we have to start with understanding what is happening in the grass. Grass grows by way of a process called Photosynthesis, and to do this it needs sunlight, warm temperatures, also moisture and carbon dioxide from the air (yes really that gas that many think is so bad for the world!). In the presence of chlorophyll (the green colour), the plant converts those factors into growth above and below the ground, and development of seed. In winter, the cooler temperatures slow down this process but when spring comes with its warmth, extra sunlight and rainy days the processing increases and as a result, the starch and fructans (sugar) are produced. These are the carbohydrates of pasture. New Zealand pasture is an important part of the business of the country, so a lot of development has gone on to create grasses that will create good milk and meat quickly and effectively. That makes much of the grass available to horses very effective in the photosynthesis, and therefore high in these carbohydrates. The issue with the elevated behaviour reactions of horses to grass growth, particularly in Spring, is due to the higher sugar level (fructans). What happens in the spring is not just that the grass growth becomes more active, but also due to the fact that the mornings are cooler, the sun is up and photosynthesis starts, but the starch is still a bit slow as it needs heat. The fructans are up and going and as the growth hasn’t started up (also needs 30 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

more warmth) the plant stores the sugar and so the stem has a high level. As the day warms up both starch and sugars are increasing but more in balance, and they are being used up in the growing process.  When night comes the process stops, neither sugar nor starch is produced and it has been mainly used up in a warm day to grow the stems. Horses do get affected by the higher fructans as they have difficulty digesting these sugars which often pass undigested into the hindgut where they cause hindgut acidosis. This causes discomfort, even pain. So their behaviour changes, although actual responses will vary as horses are all different. The grass gets more balanced as spring moves into Summer and also the horse becomes accustomed to the better pasture. Note that fructans can also be high in hay, depending on when it is cut, and it can stay easily stored in the hay stems. However it is water soluble and so soaking or washing the hay will reduce the levels of it.  While it is ideal to have pasture sown with species more suitable for horses, very few people can actually do this. So horses that are susceptible to reacting badly to these fructans need to be kept off the pasture when it is high, graze them at night, bring them inside or off the grass in the very early morning (a yard maybe) and give them soaked hay instead. As Spring progresses into Summer gradually you can let them out earlier - starting evening and then late afternoon, until they can adjust to being out all the time. Horses do need sunlight to create certain vitamins. 


Don’t be misled into “the horse is behaving badly because the spring grass has toxins” myth, it is particularly the fructans, and also the starches that are the main cause of the springtime dances.

NZ’s longest established horsecoach builder

However another solution is to assist horses with the digestion of these sugars and starches. Scientific tests have shown horses can be assisted to digest them by giving enzymes called alpha amylase and beta glucanase (Richards, Choct et Al ). There are products available that provide these enzymes.

Horses that are overweight, sometimes of a chunky body type, are more vulnerable to carbohydrates and may develop laminitis (founder). A more drastic locking up is required as the weight must absolutely be reduced and again feeding appropriate supplements can reduce the negative effects of founder. Horses and ponies with this issue should be presented to a veterinarian for diagnosis and treatment. Don’t be misled into “the horse is behaving badly because the spring grass has toxins” myth, it is particularly the fructans, and also the starches that are the main cause of the springtime dances. Toxin binders have become a popular product, but are mainly not required by horses on normal fresh pasture The main area of toxin binder usefulness in horses is when they are grazed on endophyte rye grass. This is a type of grass used predominately for cattle pasture and the endophyte is a fungi that is deliberately present as it prevents the stem being eaten by beetles, weevils and other bugs and so debilitate the quality of the pasture. This endophyte can release neurotoxins and it is mainly the LolitremB that is harmful to susceptible horses . It causes a condition known as staggers and tends to happen in the autumn when the grass is short and the animal grazes the low stem. However many modern pastures are being sown with endophyte Rye that does not release LolitremB . Normal pasture and any grass most of the year, do not release toxins that cause negative behaviour patterns.

Contact us for more details

Brian & Sue HoBSon Ph/Fax: +64 6 376 8950 Mob: +64 274 927 431 Email: HobHorse@xtra.co.nz www.hobsonshorse.co.nz

T110705

Grains also provide starches and sugars, often to a much higher degree. The issues within the gut are similar. The starches and sugars can pass though the fore gut without digestion and absorption and therefore create acidosis in the hindgut. Again an appropriate supplement may assist towards the carbohydrate digestion of the grains.

RULE #1...

FLOWERS

ARE ALWAYS A GOOD IDEA

The solution to problems of carbohydrate digestion is to reduce the intake especially when the pasture is high in sugars. Wash all hay. Reduce the grain intake, if a high level is needed for energy then breakdown into small feeds but spread out throughout the day. SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 31


FIONTINI PROLONGS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE

ERMELO - She received a 10 for perspective: Fiontini, the daughter of Fassbinder that was already crowned world champion in the previous edition. Also this year, the bay Danish Warmblood mare (dam’s sire Romanov) made a big impression with her incredible elasticity and balance. The by Hanne Lund and Hendrik Hansen bred eye-catcher Fiontini was presented in a fantastic manner by her rider Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez. The pair was the audience’s ultimate favourite. After her performance the applause kept on going, signalling how much the audience had enjoyed this marvellous talent for the future. Photo: HippofotoTeam

32 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016


Fiontini ridden by Spain’s Seveo Jesus Jurado Lopez, 6-Year-Old Champion at the Longines FEI/WBFSH World Breeding Dressage Championships for Young Horses at Ermelo (NED) Photo: Arnd Bronkhorst

Maria Colliander, chairman of the judges: “The walk was a highlight, so relaxed in a wonderful rhythm. What was interesting was how well the horse collected in the medium-walk and before the pirouettes; a 9.8. The horse has lovely clear ground cover in the trot, although at times Severo must be careful that it will not become a passage. But I must mention that the extension totally blew us away. The canter has such an active hind leg and it so well placed under the body. Wonderful propulsion with a great extension and he came back so well: a 9.7. On the submission there is still room for improvement, the natural bending could be better and the one-change was not so fluent as the mare anticipated a bit, which caused tension: 8.9. What a talent for the future, she receives a 10 for the perspective.” This brought the total to a magnificent 95.80%. Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez, that will board the plane to the Olympics in Rio tomorrow, was proud of his mare. “She gives you a fantastic feeling and is always focused. I am extremely happy that she could show her qualities here, so everyone could see her talent. She deserves that!” The silver was awarded to the KWPNapproved stallion Five Star, that also

placed second in the qualification. The by P.G and A.S.M. Bijvelds bred workwilling stallion performed a fantastic test with Kirsten Brouwer for which they received a 9 for the perspective, the good, pure walk and the incredible uphill canter. Magnificent marks for the son of Amazing Star (dam’s sire Jazz), that was skilfully presented by Kirsten Brouwer and was bestowed with an 8.7 for the trot and an 8.8 for the submission (89%). Five Star is owned by T. Wilaras. Last year the Dutch rider won bronze in Verden with Eyecatcher, now she obtained the silver in Ermelo with Five Star. “This is very special, in front of my home crowd. Five Star is amazing: he always does the best he can! I am thrilled with out medal and I hope to ride him here in the seven-year-old class next year.” The bronze medal went to the Oldenburg-approved stallion Sir Ollie (Sir Donnerhall x Florestan I), his elegant test was rewarded with 87.60%. Last year the stallion placed seventh at the fiveyear-olds, now he accomplished a place on the stage with his elasticity and nice contact. He scored high on the basis gaits, his good rhythmic trot earned an 8.5. “In the walk the horse was overtracking very well and displayed clear ground cover and

shoulder freedom, he was truly marching to the bridle: an 8.8. The canter had a lovely mechanic and he worked beautifully through the body; an 8.9. Thanks to the fluent transitions and lovely contact and frame he receives an 8.7 for submission.” Adding up the 8.9 for perspective, resulted in the bronze medal for Sir Ollie. “I caused the mistake in the changes,” says his rider. “But he was very focused and gave me an incredible feeling.” The judges were satisfied about the quality of the dressage horses in the final. Maria Colliander: “We have seen beautiful rides and lots of quality horses. But I also want to compliment the riders with their pleasant presentation of the horses. The final was exciting right till the end, but the top-three was clearly ahead of the others. Truly promising horses for the future.” This year, the Longines FEI/ WBFSH World Breeding Dressage Championships for Young Horses is organised on the National Equesrian Centre in Ermelo for the very first time. Next year the World Breeding Dressage Championships for Young Horses takes place from the 3rd to the 6th of August. More information: www.ermeloyh.com

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 33


Winners of the 7 year old class was Dorothee Schneider with Sezuan Photo: Arnd Bronkhorst

German Beatrice Buchwald and Victoria’s Secret Photo: Lynn van Woudenbergh

RESULTS LONGINES FEI WORLD YOUNG DRESSAGE HORSE CHAMPIONSHIPS   Five-year-old Championship:  GOLD Victoria’s Secret (Beatrice Buchwald) GER 95.00; SILVER - Quel Filou OLD (Sascha Schulz) LUX 93.20; BRONZE Guadeloupe-Beau (Kim van der Velden) NED 91.00.

Six-year-old Championship:  GOLD Fiontini (Severo Jesus Jurado Lopez) ESP 95.80; SILVER - Five Star (Kirsten Brouwer) NED 89.00; BRONZE - Sir Olli (Ann-Christin Wienkamp) GER 87.60.

34 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016

Seven-year-old Championship: GOLD - Sezuan (Dorothee Schneider) GER 89.005; SILVER - Fiorucci hT (Jeanna Hogberg) SWE 80.253; BRONZE Saphire Royal (Stefanie Wolf) GER 78.641.


TWELFTH EQUITATION SCIENCE CONFERENCE IN FRANCE

Auckland’s Julie Malcolm (ESNZ Development dressage coach, List 2 Judge and competitor) and Waikato’s Jody Hartstone ESNZ Development coach, Grand Prix competitor) attended the conference, held from 23-25 June in Saumur, which included a public presentation of the Cadre Noir and a tour around the French National Riding School. The 2016 conference theme was “Understanding horses to improve training” but had a big emphasis on horse welfare. Julie was particularly interested in rider biomechanics and the effect they have on the horse, various rein pressure studies, peak noseband pressures and comparisons of training methods. “Peak noseband pressures were an eye-opener – or should I say waterer!” she notes. “Even a loose fitted noseband with two fingers fitting underneath the noseband and the frontal nasal bone had peak pressures of 300-400mgHg in walk and canter, higher than the pressure required to tourniquet and stop blood flow. I’m very tempted to throw my nosebands away! But meanwhile more research needs to be done to marry this up with rein pressure.” Full Proceedings from the Conference can be downloaded at http://www. equitationscience.com/conferences Julie also went to the Lusitano Festival in Cascais, Portugal and she shares some of the highlights of her trip here:

“While in the UK we visited the Bolsover Castle and enjoyed a short presentation of ‘Historical Equitation’ in the 17th century Riding Hall where William Cavendish trained his horses in classical dressage and is reputed to be the father of modern dressage. The three horses in the presentation were PRE and Lusitano. Two of the horses seemed very tense and could barely move straight, but the Lusitano was very well ridden. The Riding Hall was approximately 12m x 25m so they were working in a very small space with, at times, three horses at once. After a few days sightseeing I travelled to Cascais and Lisbon in Portugal to meet up with Jody Hartstone and Nicole Geiger where we were treated to a performance of the Portuguese School of Equestrian Art and visits to several Lusitano breeders. I had a lesson with the head rider of the Portuguese School on his Grand Prix trained stallion, watched some of the breed classes at the Lusitano Festival

and watched Goncarlo Conchinchas and the wonderful world class mare, Batuta, in training. The presentation of the Portuguese School of Equestrian Art was stunning. It walked the audience through the history of the Lusitano, the Alter Real Stud Farm (breeder of the Olympic finalist, Rubi), the Lusitano mares, young horse education, presentation of classical dressage, airs above the ground, a demonstration of the horse in bull fighting – the ‘bull’ was an effigy in a wheelbarrow – court games, long reining (stunning!) and the finale was the carousel, a six-horse quadrille. The riding was exquisite; the horses immaculate. When we were directed to go and look into the riding arena preshow we were very lucky to find Carlos Tomas, the previous owner of Ali Baba who took us for a behind the scenes look at the preparation of the horses for the show. This was amazing - a dozen stallions side by side in the aisle of the stables being braided and polished.”

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Linda Warren-Davey from Canterbury received a 2016 Prime Minister’s Officials Scholarship to assist her goal to achieve promotion from NZL List 1 to FEI 3* status. The current FEI rules for promotion are demanding, extensive and expensive for judges outside of Europe. It is essential that we maintain a list of NZL based FEI judges and the delivery of NZL based FEI events. This plan is vital for the overall development of the sport.

PRIME MINISTER’S SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORTS CANTERBURY JUDGE’S BID FOR PROMOTION Linda picks up the account of her experience.... “The experience was invaluable for my growth and personal development within the sport. I am very grateful to many the people and organisations who made this possible. High Performance Sport New Zealand and ESNZ High Performance Director Sarah Dalziell for their assistance and direction, Dressage NZ for their full support, my judging colleagues here and in Australia for their encouragement and the FEI mentor judges who were so enthusiastic and willing to give their time and share their expertise. Prior to sitting the FEI exam to gain an international judges qualification, several requirements need to be met and passed. Amongst them is official shadowjudging and sitting-in tasks at Grand Prix level with International judges who have mentor status. There are approximately 60 mentors spread throughout the globe and it is a considerable feat to organise these requirements from this side of the world. Ten months prior to heading to Europe, I prepared an application to apply for a High Performance Prime Ministers Official scholarship to assist with my travel budget. This involved a personal development plan (sport related), trip related budget and itinerary. This was approved and I was off to Europe. Munich CDI 4*, Compiegne CDI 3*/ 4* and 5*, FEI CDIO 5* Nations Cup,

Wiesbaden 5* - it all sounds a bit like a secret code to some and pure gibberish to the uninitiated, but is music to a judge’s ears and particularly to mine. After months of planning, twelve days of shadow-judging and sitting-in over three weekends at three different international shows in Germany and France were confirmed. The first weekend in May saw my husband and I attend the Munich CDI 3* / 5* event, which is very similar to the NZ HOYS. It was situated in beautiful show grounds on the city outskirts in an industrial area, with several other disciplines competing as well. There were literally thousands of people there every day, and the show officials (including Brian and myself) were chauffeured to the show grounds daily. We were very well looked after VIP passes (which Brian enjoyed to full advantage). It was here I gave my first 10 for piaffe to a combination - Isabell Werth’s Emilio, and fell in love with Dorothy Schneider’s loose, supple and exciting horse Showtime who received 9’s for extensions and passage. Dorothy rode a wonderful freestyle to a compilation of Queen music and the crowd and judges both loved it She was rewarded her with 84.3%. Isabell had a stunning ride on Emilio in the GP 5* special – the horse is so balanced, collected, and the passage, piaffe and half passes are shown with so much ease in a beautiful tick tock rhythm – she was well

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rewarded with 80.98%. The icing on the cake was our staying at the same hotel as Julie Brougham and spending some time with her, and feeling so proud watching her performances - 10th in the GP on 67.34% and then showing improvement in the Grand Prix Special to achieve 68.62% and 5th place. She rode very proudly in the prize-giving and the crowd really cheered the little kiwi horse. My sitting in was with 5* judges, some of whom officiated at this year’s Rio Olympics. The extremely knowledgeable and generous Katrina Wuest (5* GER) took me under her wing and sat with me for over two hours where I judged the GPS class out loud, without the test sheet to refer to – she was adamant judges must memorise their tests! To receive instant feedback when judging movements was fantastic, and by the end of the show I was feeling more relaxed and comfortable judging horses where the starting point is a 7, who are truly through and over the back, and who show collection and engagement and submission throughout, coping with the FEI movements with ease. There were classes for emerging seven to nine year old Prix St Georges horses where the collectives include a mark for each pace, submission and the rider. I really liked this way of judging as the quality of each pace is given equal consideration, the level of engagement is captured in each pace mark, the training quality is reflected in the submission mark and the rider mark is focussed on


was quite breathtaking, Ingrid Klimke is an amazing rider who displays a wonderful feel when she rides and was competing in the both the eventing and dressage competition! Hubertus Schmidt and Isabell Werth were crowd favourites.

The view from the judges box at C for the 5*GP Kur at Munich Reim. Credit: Linda Warren-Davey

quality of riding and presentation of the movements. The scores were all around 65-72%. There were also classes for the beginning dressage rider, around seven to twelve years old, who were led around on their ponies, all looking the part wearing long boots and gloves, where the focus was only on position in walk and trot, including sitting trot. The next few days we spent sightseeing and meandering our way to Wiesbaden, a beautiful traditional old German city west of Frankfurt. The show was celebrating its 80th anniversary so again, huge numbers turned up each day to watch. This is a prestigious 4* competition with the dressage arena placed in front of a stunning pink fairytale castle. The international eventing and show-jumping competitions were also situated on the castle grounds. We met up again with some of the judges from Munich and with FEI 5* judge Susie Hoevenaars from Australia and FEI 5* Peter Holler from Germany. I spent four fabulous days sitting in and shadow judging. This time Isabell Werth was competing her 11 yr old mare Weihegold OLD and out came the 9’s for her passage, piaffe and flying changes. It was wonderful to watch so many quality horses and riders in the warm up arena, and observe their warm-up strategy. Some riders rode quietly and focussed on quality of pace, submission and suppleness, only asking for full activity in the final 10 minutes prior to their test. Others utilised transitions and a more active way of going with short bursts of full collection. Matthias Rath competed the stunning and flamboyant stallion Foundation 2 whose floating movement

It was at Weisbaden I did my official shadow-judging. I had to provided all my own sheets and writer (thanks Brian). His initiation to writing had been in the comfort of our lounge judging international horses on the Clipmyhorse website. To give him the feel for a ‘live’ scenario, he came to one of Canterbury’s local days, where we had one Grand Prix horse – so we were both feeling a little apprehensive, for different reasons. The organisers were fantastic and again we were given VIP passes and ensured we had a quiet area with a good view of the arena to give me the best opportunity. The class wasn’t an easy one to judge with many of the fifteen or so horses all producing similar work in the high 60’s and early 70’s. It was difficult to show a good spread of marks and placings. My mentor judges were FEI 5* (Ger) Peter Holler and FEI 5* (Aut) Thomas Lang, who were wonderfully supportive, and gave me valuable feedback afterwards. Needless to say that was a long day and it was great to relax in the hotel bar at the end with a big glass of wine and discuss the horses and results with the rest of judging team who were all equally supportive and encouraging. I judged another class of Grand Prix Special riders with Katrina (Weust) and so it was great to utilise all I had learned at the previous show. The following day we drove seven hours to the stunning town of Compiegne, France where Susie Hoevenaars had helped with organising four full on days of sitting in. This competition was pure dressage and included 2*, 3* and 5* competition, classes for Ponies, Junior, Young Riders, U25 and the FEI CDIO 5* Nations Cup. Four days from dawn to dusk, five arenas, 20 judges, writers, groomers, scorers and officials were kept very busy and it really was a feast of dressage. There were some big names here - Carl Hester, Patrick Kittel,

Laura Graves, Adelinde Cornelissen, and Arlene Page to name a few. The classes were also big, with eight countries competing in the Nations Cup. It was really interesting watching the warmup arena with the different coaches instructing their riders. The show organisers asked if I would be interested in doing some writing, and I wrote for the Pony Freestyle. It was exciting to watch such young riders representing their countries and riding so professionally on a mix of ponies of which all were well trained, very active, very through. I also wrote for a Young Rider Grand Prix, and a Prix St Georges class. The highlight was then to write for 5* (USA) Gary Rockwell on a forty-five horse Grand Prix class from 1pm to 8.20pm. At every show there are two writers for each judge, one scoring electronically and one scribing. It involves a lot of team work and the comradery between the judges and the writers was very apparent. The team works long hours, requiring huge amounts of concentration. Snacks, coffee and water are all set out in the boxes so everyone can help themselves throughout the day. Sitting-in isn’t quite as comfortable as it sounds. Sitting-in involves giving marks when asked, giving a mark for a few specific movements in each test, typically the hardest movements to judge i.e. collected walk, pirouettes and changes, and completing your own collectives before the judge has finished theirs. And they are super quick! So after twelve days of judging over three weeks, being involved in over 200 Grand Prix tests, and a few others besides, making countless notes, I have had plenty to digest since returning home. Last but not least, I have to thank my husband Brian for his encouragement and support, his wonderful writing skills, and so patiently listening to endless conversations about dressage – I think he thoroughly enjoyed himself, met many interesting people on the side-lines and also has a few tales of his own to tell!

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2016 DRESSAGE CONFERENCE PANEL DISCUSSION ALICIA COLLIN: Grand Prix competitor, Young Dressage Horse trainer competitor, NI Riders Rep on Dressage Committee, Breeder.

An insightful array of comments resulted during the Conference Training & Development panel discussion facilitated by outgoing Training & Development Officer Lynda Clark. The five members of the panel were each invited to give a five minute snapshot of how the sport can be developed further in New Zealand.

LINDA WARREN-DAVEY: List 1 NZL Judge working towards FEI status. Member of the NZ Judges sub-committee. Previous Advanced competitor.

SUE HOBSON: FEI 4* Judge and FEI Mentor Judge. List 1 NZL Judge & Dressage NZ Board member representing Judges. Previous Grand Prix Competitor & NZL representative. The most important thing is communication between judges, riders and trainers. Judges are knowledgeable and they work with the Training Scale as their reference. All three groups must be more open to communication. Sue referred to the High Performance Squad Training Clinic held at Manfeild two seasons ago. Riders were judged riding a specific test, then judge, rider and coach all discussed the performance. Senior riders would benefit by putting themselves forward for such clinics. This is a very cost effect training exercise.

Linda started with a quote. “If you always do what you’ve always done, you will always get what you’ve always got.” ( Henry Ford) We need to keep an open mind to training possibilities. Linda referred to her recent trip to Europe where she observed the very professional presentation of young riders in regard to turn out, riding and well learned basics. There is a need to develop the complete sport, not just competition. All three groups need to improve training. We need to ensure that pathways for Young Riders are clear enough.

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Increase in percentage is the only current measure of where the sport is at. The pathways from the squads, particularly the from the Youth Squad to Advanced and High Performance is not really clear. The pathway from Pony Club to Dressage NZ seems to have a gap. We need to promote dressage as a great and exciting sport so that this gap narrows. The process of the sport must be learned - that is - establishing the basics. Riders need eyes on the ground and more collaboration. Can the sport or area groups look to more collaborative ways of training that are not so expensive as private training in order to increase the knowledge base of riders ?

HELEN HUGHES-KEEN: Chair of Selectors, FEI 4* Judge, NZL List 1 Judge. Previous Grand Prix competitor. ESNZ Coach. We have good horses but riding and training must improve. It is important that we identify coaches with correct training and qualifications. Basics must be correct. It is very important that Young Riders especially when riding schoolmasters, learn the basic principles of training, not just the aids for the movements. The judging system is working well and the process is being developed.


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Photo: Libby Law

VANESSA WAY: Grand Prix competitor and NZL representative. Producer of multi national champions across the levels. ESNZ Elite coach. Full time rider and trainer. Vanessa acknowledged the time training in the UK with her mentor Carl Hester which “filled the gaps in my own training� through riding own horse KH Arvan, and the opportunity to ride many other correctly trained horses. She also placed a huge emphasis on establishing the basics and acknowledged the part that judges played in this. Riders need to ride more tests and need eyes on the ground. Vanessa reiterated that the Manfeild Clinic was the best training experience Dressage NZ has offered to date.

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The panel had a tough task selecting just one winner from an outstanding list of area nominees for the 2016 AllinFlex Judge of the Year Award

Tracey Johnson and Apollo who are consolidating Grand Prix. Photo: Libby Law

2016 DRESSAGE NZ JUDGE OF THE YEAR AWARDED TO TRACEY JOHNSON After much deliberation, Marlborough’s Tracey Johnson was announced as the national winner Tracey took time out to share some insights into her dressage involvement and life outside of her sport

WHAT MADE YOU INTERESTED IN DRESSAGE? When my eventer got too old for top level eventing, I turned to Dressage and got hooked. I just loved experiencing and re-creating that elusive feeling of being as one and dancing with your equine partner.  WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT JUDGING? Apart from socialising and meeting new judges,

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I truly love it when I see a combination improving and developing in the correct way. When the training is correct it is a beautiful sport and satisfying from a judge perspective when you are able to give high marks. WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST DRESSAGE TEST LIKE? I rode my first dressage test when I was about 7 or 8 years old. It was on my very first pony and I imagine it was pretty awful with no bend and very little balance. WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO BE A JUDGE? I judged from the age of 18 or so, especially for pony club and eventing. It was just something that I could do to help out and put back into the sport. When I was pregnant and while my two boys were babies, I focused more on judging and coaching rather than riding.  I passed the level 2 dressage coaching exam and upgraded to List 2 judging. That was 22 or so years ago. In the following years I concentrated mostly on my riding again as that was really where my passion was. I have always judged locally, fitting it in between my riding and once or twice a year I have judged away at bigger competitions.  I have also done a few FEI clinics with visiting judges over the years. I think the more you learn the more passionate for the sport you become.

actually teach it. They may say to use more seat, but the question is how should you use your seat exactly? RIDING GOALS Apollo is now working at Grand Prix at home and is becoming more established in all the movements. We just need to improve his balance and strength so we can finesse the piaffe, passage, and the transitions - then he will be ready to bring out in competition. JUDGING GOALS Definitely to get to List 1, and depending on time frames, maybe become a FEI Judge. CAREER Quality Manager at Wine Works Marlborough, which is a wine bottling, packaging and distribution operation. I manage the Laboratory, Cellar, Quality Control, Food Safety compliance and Customer and Quality complaints. This is a very busy job, often working late and does not leave me much time for riding on working days. FAMILY Gerald, my husband, who is very supportive, and two sons now studying at University. INTERESTS I coach four riders and I love gardening and reading. I don’t have any spare time for any other interests. But I do love a good Marlborough savvy ....

A couple of years ago I had a shoulder surgery and was not able to ride for most of the season so I accepted a few more judging invitations. Suddenly I started getting more invites and I was encouraged to work towards upgrading. Soon after, I was asked if I would consider being a Mentor Judge, which I am now doing. This has been a help for our area as previously we did not have anyone. I have to say it is keeping me busy as it takes a lot of time to go through tests after mentoring.

Dressage NZ acknowledges the commitment to our sport by all our judges and congratulates Tracey and all the area nominees for 2016. All area nominees received AllinFlex product prizes and Judge of the Year lapel pins.

Waikato

Marcia Bayley

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE GIVEN YOURSELF WHEN YOU FIRST STARTED DRESSAGE, KNOWING WHAT YOU KNOW NOW? For a few years now I have been following and reading Mary Wanless. She teaches how to use your all of your body and ride in balance. This is what I wish I had been taught much sooner in my riding career. I think there is too much focus on how and what the horse is doing when really the horse only does, (or doesn’t do), what the rider’s body is telling them. Riders need to understand how to achieve the correct muscle tone and how use their core to control and regulate the horse’s tempo and length of stride, also how their weight influences them. The very talented riders (and coaches), do this naturally but can’t explain how they do what they do, so don’t

Bay of Plenty

Leonie Coker

Nth Hawkes Bay

Felicity Dobell-Brown

Sth Hawkes Bay

Leonie Coker

Central Districts

Debbie Smith

Taihape

Julie Brougham

Taranaki

Michelle King

Wairarapa

Ian Childs

Wellington

Jacqui Thompson

Nelson

Linda Warren-Davey

Marlborough

Tracey Johnson

Canterbury

Jan Mitchell

Northland

Janet Fox

Waitemata

Vickie Lawson

Auckland-Manukau Judy Alderdice

Sth Canterbury/Nth Otago Stuart Bishell Otago

Clare Banks

Southland

Helen Christie

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DRESSAGE NZ STABLE OF STALLIONS AIRTHREY HIGHLANDER

SPORTHORSE - CLYD/ TB X

lmoughan@xtra.co.nz

www.airthreylodgesporthorses.co.nz

CRYSTAL MT XODO

FRIESIAN

sandy@crystalmountain.co.nz

www.crystalmountainstud.co.nz

DONNERUBIN

OLDENBURG/HAN

jacindayounger@xtra.co.nz

www.donnerubin.co.nz

EQUIBREED

SIRES TBC

lee@equibreed.co.nz

www.equibreed.co.nz

FLORIS

FRIESIAN

marianne@glenrosefriesians.co.nz

www.glenrosefriesians.co.nz

FUGATO SW

OLDENBURG

sheenamross@gmail.com

www.sterlingwarmbloods.co.nz

GOLDEN STRIKE

GERMAN RIDING PONY

adponystud@hotmail.com

A D Pony Stud - Facebook

GOSS GREEN MIRAGE

WARMBLOOD/BRITISH SPORTHORSE

info@gossgreensporthorses.com

www.gossgreensporthorses.com

GT JAKE

BY JAZZ (KWPN)

info@roystonequine.co.nz

www.roystonequine.wordpress.com

GYMNASTIK STAR

HANOVERIAN

pwjmatthews@xtra.co.nz

www.matthewshanoverians.co.nz

HP FRESCO

OLDENBURG

hpequine@vodafone.co.nz

www.hollywoodparkequine.com

JOLMER FAN TWILLENS

FRIESIAN

marianne@glenrosefriesians.co.nz

www.glenrosefriesians.co.nz

ROHDINGER

OLDENBURG/HAN

jacindayounger@xtra.co.nz

www.donnerubin.co.nz

WORLDLY

HANOVERIAN

renai@riverparkfarm.co.nz

www.riverparkfarm.co.nz

The Stable of Stallions is a co-operative fund raising venture between Stud Owners and Dressage giving mare owners the opportunity to secure discounted service rates and support Dressage WHAT IS THE STABLE OF STALLIONS? The Stable of Stallions is a joint venture between Dressage NZ and stallion owners. WHAT ARE THE OBJECTIVES OF THE STABLE OF STALLIONS PROJECT? The Stable of Stallions has four key objectives • For the Studs: To assist stallions owners promote their stallions in a cost effective way by utilising the marketing opportunities available via Dressage NZ • For the Breeders: To make available discounted stallion services from participating studs / stallions which makes the use of these studs more desirable and cost effective and with the knowledge they are also supporting the development of equestrian sport in New Zealand • For Equestrian Sport: The increased availability of quality purpose bred sport horses thus boosting the development of equestrian sport in all disciplines. • For Dressage NZ Events: Increased funds to further develop the major events on the Dressage Calendar, the National Championships and the Under 25 Championships HOW DOES IT WORK? All participating studs have generously donated ONE SOS service. The stud retains any booking fee and any usual applicable stud charges and Dressage NZ benefits from the service fee balance. The good news is we discount all services by $200 giving our fans a great deal. You must call the stud and use the promo code Stable of Stallions - and contact Dressage NZ if you are the lucky purchaser. Tell your friends - help us sell ALL these services 42 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | SEPTEMBER 2016


New Zealand Judges continue to get international experience alongside experienced FEI judges

FROM THE JUDGES BOX Article by Sue Hobson - Judges Officer

Helen Hughes-Keen and myself have just returned from judging at the Queensland CDI in Caboulture alongside Lilo Fore (USA 5*), Mary Seefried (AUS 5*), Maria Schwennesen and Ricky McMillan (AUS 4*), Barbara Ardu (ITA 4*) and Col. Shivdas (IND 3*). “It was a really good team to work with, very friendly and open to discussion after classes”. As well as the official FEI tests we both judged national classes and observed some really good combinations. On the final day of the event we joined Mary Seefried and sat on a panel to judge the Sharon Doe Memorial class for Young Riders. This was a very enjoyable experience. It was judged basically along the lines of Young Dressage Horse classes with the emphasis on the rider instead of the horse. We judged six combinations of Young Riders working towards Prix St Georges. Each rider had a four minute timeframe to show the judges how they would work in towards riding a Prix St Georges test. At the completion of their work-in demonstration, they approached the panel at C for a discussion. Mary Seefried gave a public commentary on the microphone explaining to the audience what the judges thoughts had been while both Helen and I spoke privately to each rider explaining our thoughts of their work-in. It was a great experience and one I would certainly look forward to being part of again in the future. The winning combination was Elloise Devlin riding Brimstone Anakiwa (by Anamour). PROTOCOL DAYS This leads me on to “Protocol Days”. Dressage Waitemata are taking up the

idea of running a protocol day whereby riders can ride a test of their choice under competition atmosphere and be judged by Dressage NZ Mentor judges together with a trainer of their choice. After each ride both Mentors and the trainer can discuss with the rider how the test went and any relevant comments pertaining thereto. I am hoping more Area Groups will offer these days as it is just so important that we are all reading from the same book. Hopefully bring trainers, judges and riders more in line with what we all want to see in competition. It is hoped it will give riders a much clearer idea of what judges are looking for and what rules we are working under when judging a test. Surely, if well organised these days could benefit our sport greatly for the future. Communication is the key I am sure. DRESSAGE VICTORIA JUDGE EXCHANGE PROGRAMME The Judges Sub-committee has invited Otago’s Barbara Chalmers to participate in the Dressage Victoria Exchange Programme. Barbara will officiate at the Melbourne Dressage Festival in early December. I have to thank Jane Ventura and the Dressage Victoria committee for making this exchange possible. Exchange programmes are vital for our judges training. We have worked for many years now with Dressage Queensland and many national judges from both sides of the Tasman have enjoyed the experience of meeting new colleagues and new challenges. It is hoped we can continue working with both Queensland and Victoria to assist our judges for the future.

YOUR BUSINESS COULD BE HERE jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz

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NEW ZEALAND’S FIRST PONY FEI INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION Dressage NZ is excited about the ever increasing standard of pony dressage in New Zealand, and the increase in numbers of pony riders competing at Level 4 and above Photo: Libby Law

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“It’s just too good an opportunity to miss” said Dressage Sport Manager Wendy Hamerton. “We have some of the world’s most experienced judges coming to officiate at the Pacific League World Cup Final (held at Manfield) in February, so Event Manager Celine Filbee and myself looked at the schedule and decided - yes - we can do this - we can run a pony international to complement the achievements of the young riders ” The CDI-P will be run under FEI rules. Pony and riders will need to be FEI registered for the 2017 year and will require validated current ESNZ ID Books. (FEI registrations are processed by ESNZ national office) They will be part of the full FEI schedule with a class each day including a freestyle. The FEI schedule for the event will not be available until late October. Sponsors are being sought for the CDI-P and more information can be obtained by contacting Dressage NZ dressage@nzequestrian.org.nz


ZOE EARNS BRONZE AWARD WITH ZHARGA Seventeen year old Timaru rider Zoe MacClure recently earned the Dressage NZ Bronze Incentive Award which recognises achievement in Level 2 or Level 3 at 63% or above with a List 2, 2A or List 1 Judge

Zoe considers her best performances to date have been third place overall at Level 2 at the 2015 Horse of Year Show, and third in the 2016 National Fiber-Fresh Level 2 Young Rider Amateur Awards.

Six Q & A with Zoe HOW DID YOU GET STARTED IN DRESSAGE Initially through Pony club teams club competitions, then eventing. In 2013, I was part of the SCNO area dressage team for NZPCA Dressage Championships. This really sparked my interest and improvement in dressage. WHAT DRIVES YOU TO IMPROVE Achieving my goals and learning new skills. I would love to ride dressage at a high level and maybe even represent NZ.

ABOUT THE DRESSAGE NZ INCENTIVE AWARDS

YOUR IMMEDIATE GOALS Compete my pony at Level 3 (or help my younger sister get started on her at level 1). To train my new hack and see what he is capable of.

BRONZE: Ride test 2D or 3D & gain 63% with at least one List 1, 2A or List 2 Judge

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE DEVELOPED IN DRESSAGE IN NEW ZEALAND More pony classes at a higher level and more interest from pony riders in dressage

GOLD: Ride test FEI Prix St Georges, 6B, Int I, Int A, Int B or Int II and gain 63% with at least one List 1, 2A or 2 Judge

YOUR OTHER INTERESTS Piano, singing, multisport ABOUT YOUR PONY Rednalhgih Hayman, aka Zharga, is a nine year old, 148cm, Connemara/NZ Riding Pony x, she is owned by my Mum Ali, and was bred by Susan McEwan. She is named after Carl Hayman, the Highlanders rugby player from 2006. Rednalhgih is HIGHLANDER backward! She is a super all round pony. She loves eventing ( 95cm) and has competed at the Springston Trophy event as well NZPCA dressage and showjumping championships

SILVER: Ride test 4D or 5D & gain 63% with at least one List 1 2A or List 2 Judge

At each level riders must describe the scale of training and the importance of each requirement on the scale Answer five questions. Four out of 5 must be answered correctly. The questions are progressively more difficult at each level. For more details go to www. nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/resources/riders PLATINUM AWARD – HONORARY AWARD: Ride test FEI Grand Prix or FEI Grand Prix Special and gain 63% with at least one List I or FEI 3*or above Judge

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OVERSEAS RIDER REVIEW NICOLA FRENCH - GER Nicola comments on competitions and pony and young rider training in Germany I am part of a small team at a busy stable, and we have as many young horses as ridden horses. At the stable, there are horses that Josef has bred, have been started undersaddle, and then prepared for competition and/or sale. Often, local breeders send their horses here for breaking in and sale. We also have riding horses here who are owned and ridden by owners who live in nearby towns - it is not so common to have your horses at your own property as in NZ. Our daily routine consists of mucking out and putting new straw in the boxes, feeding, and exercising all of the horses in the walker, paddock, lunging and riding. There are always horses coming and going at different stages of training, so there is always a lot going on. I have been fortunate to expand my knowledge in all areas of horse care, along with different methods and approaches to treating injuries, and training ´problems.´ For example, with a nervous young horse

we do a lot of ground work to build confidence, and we always check that if the horse shows behavioural problems with the veterinarian and physio to rule out any physical pain. I have recently worked closely with a physio who uses acupuncture to treat reaction points over the whole body, which is always very successful. We always approach a problem by looking at the whole horse, and what could be causing problems, and look for solutions to enable the horses satisfaction in his life and training. Working with horses will always be a hard job. It is mentally and physically tiring, with long hours and working with animals who have a mind of their own! But the opportunity to work with and ride a number of different horses gives you great skills in how to approach and work with them. Each horse needs to be treated with respect and approached as an individual.

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In Germany, the Pony and young riders are quite different from NZ. They are taught how to ride horses ´`through, and correctly from a young age, and are taught like adults in their lessons. I have seen less ´making it fun and interesting because they are young´. This doesn´t mean that they are taught ìn a hard or unfriendly manner, but they are focused and ride like young adults. I have been training an 11 year old girl (who rides a young, 180cm horse!) and her commitment to training, and her knowledge of good riding, and pointing out riders who have good or bad training methods is incredible! The ponies are all trained correctly, with good contacts, reactions to the leg and balanced canter work. The difference that I see with the ponies in NZ and Germany is not the quality, but the level of training and the skills and level of knowledge and focus that the riders possess. It is perceived


more as a sport, than a hobby, which is not always a bad thing that the NZ pony riders have a more authentic childhood of riding their ponies out and about, and really look after them in the paddock at their home. I feel that riders who look after their horses 24/7 have a lot more respect for the work that goes into caring for horses, and this is reflected in their attitude and partnership with their horse. Competitions in Germany are quite different. Children and lower level classes (including young horse classes) are nearly always ridden in a 40 x 20m arena, with two horses at a time. Some pony classes incorporate more training elements, such as riding in groups with a caller in training boots, and running reins (from the hands to the side of the girth - not the stomach). This promotes a training friendly test, with less pressure of a formal competition. Running reins are a controversial topic to some, and while any training method can be damaging when used incorrectly, running reins can be a great way to learn a steady, through contact, especially for children who are learning to balance their hands and body. I would much prefer to see a child learning how to ride a horse `through and round` by using their legs to drive forward into a steady and balanced connection, rather than by fixing the horses head round using their hands - a backwards way of riding. Heading back to the competition points that I like here: riding with two horses in a test saves a lot of time and a score is also given immediately on competition, which is decided by two judges together. Once you have finished your test, the judge tells you both the scores and gives some comments on the test. Later, you can also get a paper with extra notes and the score on it when the class is completed. Once you compete at M level (Level 5), you have percentages instead. I really like this, because it is efficient, and there is nothing worse than waiting around up to 5 hours for your paper because the class was so large. If we in NZ took on some of these ways we could improve efficiency at shows and save volunteers time from scoring and writers to more, and having two horses at once means classes are completed much quicker as well! From

“I would much prefer to see a child learning how to ride a horse `through and round` by using their legs to drive forward into a steady and balanced connection, rather than by fixing the horses head round using their hands - a backwards way of riding.�

a judges point of view, I have found that the feedback and the scores I get reflect the horses way of going throughout the whole test, answering questions such as: how is the contact, is he over the back, is he relaxed and does he perform with ease. I find this to be generally more useful and reflective of the general training scale. Looking back on my time as a young rider, I am really happy to see pictures of my gorgeous pony Buckton Tumbledown, who has since gone on to teach many other wonderful girls dressage. She was a special pony, and we often competed and won against adults at Medium level! We have some great photos of her in line ups with huge horses dwarfing her at large shows, and she was very popular for being a successful pony in horse classes when there were few other pony riders doing dressage with us at that level. It is great to see now there

were enough ponies competing at Level 4 HOY 2016 to warrant their own classes. There is little that I would change, because what I did then got me to where I am today, but to change anything as a young rider would be to train more with different trainers, different horses and to make short training times overseas. When you ride the same horse every day, it is hard to change bad habits, and from riding many different horses, you find different ways to approach issues and your riding becomes more intuitive and interchangeable as your work on each horses strengths and weaknesses. I also would have tried to dial down the level of perfectionism I tried to achieve! Article by: Nicola French Photos by: Libby Law

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ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL PITT & MOORE NELSON WINTER DRESSAGE SERIES Julie Fraser

SERIES WINNERS

LEAD REIN - Champion Celia Davis & Basil INTRO HORSE - Champion Anna Terrell & Solly Reserve McKayla Fitzpatrick & Call me Classy INTRO PONY - Champion Mikaela Macdonald & Jubilee True Colours, Reserve - Grace Dalziel & Timberlee Macaroon LEVEL 1 GRADED - Champion Isabella Ladley & Solitaire Jade Reserve - Vanessa Baxter & Coalstar LEVEL 1 NON-GRADED HORSE - Champion Wendy Maclean & Quadro Pacific Flight Reserve - Liga Rakauska & Diamond Rose LEVEL 1 NON-GRADED PONY - Champion Talia Manson & Brooklyn Airs n Graces Reserve - Natalie Lorns & Sakahs Irish Rose LEVEL 2 GRADED - Champion Ginny McKenzie & U-Puna Valiant Charger Reserve - Kirsten Crabtree & TGP Kavaghn LEVEL 2 NON-GRADED HORSE - Champion Shannon Glover & Finamour Reserve - Joanne Ragg & Serendipity Toroa LEVEL 3 GRADED - Champion Kerry Goldthorpe & Hunter Valley Reserve - Meila Picard & Buckton Denniston LEVEL 3 NON-GRADED HORSE - Champion Tessa Flintoft & He’s Absolutely Fabulous LEVEL 4 GRADED - Champion Diane Wallace & Profile LEVEL 5 GRADED - Champion Julie Fraser & Arnage Rhumba YOUNG RIDER GRADED CHAMPION - Ginny Mckenzie

Georgia Weaver

YOUNG RIDER GRADED RESERVE - Rilee McMeekin  YOUNG RIDER NON-GRADED CHAMPION - Talia Manson YOUNG RIDER NON-GRADED RESERVE - Meg Rukuwai

Penny Reiter

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Jan Morice


Futures Squad member Chelsea Callaghan Photo: Libby Law

Judy Alderdice, newly elected Dressage Board Member for Training & Development has been quick off the mark to “Enter at A”

DRESSAGENZ SQUAD DEVELOPMENT UNDERWAY

With a mandate from the Dressage NZ Performance Committee, Judy has put together a package of individual development opportunities for members of the 2016 -17 squads.

particularly in regard to training requirements.

Squad members were invited to give feedback to the Performance Committee by identifying the areas they considered they needed most assistance with. Riders were in agreement in identifying four key areas for personal development: Rider Fitness, Horse Nutrition, Sports Psychology and Training. These have become the targeted areas within the package offered. It is interesting to note that many of the same subjects were identified during the rider development panel discussion at Conference,

For the first three fields, a number of providers have been identified and they have all come “on board” with special packages tailored specifically for our squad members. All the selected providers have had previous experience working with the ESNZ disciplines and are familiar with the requirements of our sport. In recognition of the wide geographical spread of the members there are both face to face and web based programs available, ensuring that those unable to travel to the clinicians will still be catered for. Riders will receive regular newsletter

updates outlining the program resources, but they are expected to initiate the training for themselves. The aim of this strategy is to increase rider commitment both to the scheme and to their own development. Rider training/coaching clinics are still being developed but the most interesting feedback from the conference panel discussion was the desire for Dressage NZ to organize squad training days where top level judges and trainers combine their skills to mentor athletes in practical test riding sessions. This format is already being rolled out at Area levels as Protocol Days and we are working on ways to deliver this as another education stream to the squad members.

Horowhenua Dressage Group presents

FOXTON RACECOURSE 25TH SEPTEMBER 2016 Graded and non graded classes tests A & B

SPRING TOURNAMENT ENTER AT www.equestrianentries.co.nz | ENTRIES CLOSE Friday 9th September Schedule available on our website www.horowhenuadressage.com

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75TH ANNIVERSARY OF WOMEN IN THE NZ POLICE PROUDLY SHOWCASED BY MOUNTED POLICEWOMEN Article by: Detective Rosanne Rix

From Left: Constable Ashley Johnston, Sergeant Rachel Willemsen and Detective Rosanne Rix with their stunning mounts in front of the Beehive!

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The parade was the culmination of a very special celebration. The 75th anniversary of Women in NZ Police had been celebrated all over New Zealand with the parade as the grand finale on August 4th in Wellington. The parade featured past and present policewomen, police dogs, a pipe band, old police vehicles and last but not least, several horses and riders representing mounted police in NZ.Â


The parade began in Civic Square and rode along Willis Street and Lambton Quay finishing at Parliament grounds. Not many riders can say they’ve executed some flying changes on the artificial grass in Civic Square or ridden on the grass outside Parliament! The horses had to cope with many distractions including screaming school children waving balloons, large crowds, crossing busy roads, steps and a person dressed up as a police dog.  All three policewomen who rode in the parade are members of Equestrian Sports NZ and compete in various disciplines. The three horses were ridden by their proud owners, and fittingly, just happened to be three mares!  Sergeant Rachel Willemsen is a senior prosecutor in Wanganui and a veteran of 23 years in Police. Her mount for the parade was her semi-retired grey mare, Memphis Belle, who at 23 years old was the senior of the three equines. A 16hh Clydesdale/TB cross, Belle has been a full-wire hunter and a successful saddle hunter in her younger days. Rachel is a very successful show and dressage rider on her current mount, DeLorean.  Constable Ashley Johnston is currently based in Taranaki. Her leggy chestnut is Miss Vee NZPH, a part time eventer, part time showjumper. Detective Rosanne Rix is approaching 32 years in Police and is currently based in Upper Hutt where she works in the Hutt Valley Family Violence Unit. Her mount for the parade was her 10 year old Prix St Georges horse Lindisfarne Laureate. Rosanne was an eventer and showjumper in a former life before converting to dressage. She has previously represented NZ Police at the International Law Enforcement Games in Sydney.   The three riders were ably supported by pooper scoopers bringing up the rear who did a superb job! They also doubled as grooms which was very useful helping

get the horses ready on the Wellington waterfront where they were faced with lots of distractions. There are a number of other equestriennes also currently in the Police including: Sergeant Caroline Marner joined Police in 1987 and has spent all of her service in Wellington. She is currently a supervisor in Family Violence. Having wanted to be a jockey as a child, she now enjoys leisure riding and having regular lessons. She also is active in the racing world owning several racehorses and enjoying success on the track.  Constable Rebecca Sherie (née Dearing) joined Police as a non-sworn member in 2006 and then became sworn in 2010.  She is currently stationed in Taranaki working in the frontline. She has ridden all her life and once an eventer is now a showjumping convert.  Inspector Tracy Phillips has been in Police since 1990 and has had a wide variety of positions including that of dog handler. She is also a bronze medallist in the high jump at the Commonwealth Games in Auckland in 1990.   Tracy is also responsible for organising the Pan Auckland Police Horses. Currently there are twelve horses and riders available for parades and public functions. As a rule, six is the maximum number who go out at once. The horses and riders cover such events as Christmas parades, Pride

parades, ANZAC day and pay parades. Pay parades are a Police event which originated from many years ago when Police were required to turn up in “number one’s” (formal uniform) to march and receive their pay - in cash of course, hence the name! These days formal attire is still required and they are held twice yearly to recognise achievements within Police, such as awards, Commissioner’s recommendations, and service awards such as 14, 21, 28 years service. Other events are considered by request. The horses playing their part in the Pan Auckland Police range from a pony to an 18hh Percheron cross. The riders all provide their own horses and are put through extensive testing and practise runs to ensure the safety of all involved. The unit is largely self-funded and promotes Police as a career, utilising recruiting booklets and giveaways which are carried in the saddle bags on the horses. They are an incredible magnet for all walks of life when they are out in public, with a constant stream of people wanting to pat the horse and talk to the Police officer. Even people whom may not normally want to converse willingly with Police are drawn to the horses! The horses are great conversation starters and there have been hundreds of children who have had the opportunity to sit on a horse and thousands of photos taken as a result of the parades. The Pan Auckland horses are famous in Auckland and you can see more bout them on on their Facebook page.

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NEW SEASON HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE International & National Competition & Series

BÖCKMANN HORSE FLOATS NORTH ISLAND CHAMPIONSHIPS

22-24 October | Fiber Fresh National Equestrian Centre Taupo Dressage Bay of Plenty will host the Böckmann Floats 2016 North Island Dressage Championships and Para Dressage Championships on 22-24 October. Featuring all national series from Level 1 to Grand Prix plus Amateur and Open Divisions up to Level 3 and Young Dressage Horse Classes for 4, 5 and 6 year olds. Australian judges will be officiating. Go to www.dressagebayofplenty.co.nz

CENTRAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL 28-30 October | Manfeild Park - Fielding Incorporating the... PRYDE’S EASIFEED FEI WORLD DRESSAGE CHALLENGE and KIEFFER/EQUISCAN FEI CDI-W (WORLD CUP QUALIFIER™) and HERITAGE EQUINE CDI-Y Pryde’s Easifeed FEI World Dressage Challenge nominations close on Equestrian Entries on the 1st of September 2016. CDIW/Y Entries close on the 30th of September 2016 on Equestrian Entries. All horses and riders must have current 2016 FEI registration. CDIW horses require current FEI passports. CDIY horses require either an FEI passport or a current validated ESNZ ID Book (no exceptions) CDIY/W Schedule at http://www.nzequestrian.org.nz/dressage/ competition/calendar/2016/october/cdiwy/

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BATES NZ DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS & FEI PACIFIC LEAGUE WORLD CUP FINAL™ 2-5 February 2017 | Manfeild Park – Feilding

Entries Close Friday 16 Dec 2016 on Equestrian Entries: Qualification Period 1 from 1 Jan 2016 • CDIW and Young Rider & Pony International Events (CDIY/P) • Bates All Grade Championships, Super 5 League Finals. • Elite Equine NZ Young Dressage Horse Championship • Amateur Rider Championships and Masters Championships • Para Dressage National Championships • Dressage Musical Spectacular Sat 4th March. Door sales from 5.30pm NATIONAL AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS AT THE BATES NZ DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS Amateur Championship at levels 1 to 4 will be run alongside the Bates Open Championship at the Bates National Dressage Championships as separate classes. Amateur Awards will be awarded in higher grades based on Championship points earned in the Open classes. Eligibility is based around rider categories. Qualification for the Championships will be at Regional Events with the same qualification for both championships. The term “Amateur” is connected to rider category status and bears no reference to the term amateur vs professional in terms of earning income in the sport.

SUPER 5 DRESSAGE LEAGUE The 2016-17 Super 5 League comprises a points series in each island at all graded Levels 1-9 (top 5 points only to count) plus an island final at both the South Island Festival of Dressage and the Bates National Championships. National Super 5 rankings will be determined from % in each level at both these events. Tests used for Super at Regional and National Events: Levels 1 to 5 - C Tests, Level 6 - FEI PSG v 2015, Level 7 - FEI Intermediate I v 2015, Level 8 FEI Intermediate A v 2015, Level 9 Regional Events - FEI Intermediate II or Grand Prix 2015. South Island Festival of Dressage & Bates National Championships SRS Final - FEI Intermediate II 2016.

SEPTEMBER 2016 | DRESSAGENZ BULLETIN | 53


NATIONAL SERIES ZILCO MUSICAL FREESTYLE SERIES

AMS SADDLERY PONY & YOUNG RIDER PERFORMANCE LEAGUE

The Zilco Musical Freestyle Series remains the same for the 2016/17 season. The competition comprises two Island Series contested at Regional Events (Top 5 scores to count). The North Island Series completes at the Horse of the Year and the South Island Series completes at the South Island Festival of Dressage. The series includes Levels 2 to 9 (Advanced levels 6/7 combined)

AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League aims to increase participation at a Pony & Young Rider level and to establish a culture where these riders compete against their peers of a similar age and experience. Every Regional Event, the Pryde’s Easifeed South Island Festival of Dressage and North Island Championships will run Pony and Young Rider classes at Levels 1 and 2. The league will culminate at the U25 NZ Pony & Championships in April 2017. Competitors must be 20 years or under at 1 August 2016 to participate. Scores will be taken from Super 5 tests at Level 3 and above. League winner to receive a fabulous dressage saddle prize generously sponsored by AMS Saddlery (Auckland)

ELITE EQUINE YOUNG DRESSAGE HORSE CHAMPIONSHIPS The purpose of the competitions are to select the best young horse which is progressing on the correct way of training, with the potential to capably perform at International Dressage level. The Elite Equine National Young Horse Dressage Championship & Age Group Championships will be held at the Bates National Championships, 2 –5 Feb 2017 at Manfeild Park. The Elite Equine South Island Young Horse Dressage Age Group Championships will be held at the Festival of Futures Stars Championships, Canterbury Agricultural Park, 8/9 April 2017

PRESTIGE Equestrian www.prestigeequestrian.co.nz

Ltd.

PRESTIGE EQUESTRIAN DRESSAGE FUTURES PRIZE The Prestige Equestrian Futures Prize will be awarded to the best performed combination competing in the Super 5 League at Regional & Island events from October 2016 – February 2017 and meeting the following eligibility conditions. 4-10 year old horses competing at Levels 1 - 7 with CN - C7 riders at 1 August 2016 (Riders not to have ever earned grading points at Level 8 or above as at 1 August 2016)

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EQUESTRIAN ENTRIES NZ U25 DRESSAGE CHAMPIONSHIPS (PONY RIDERS & RIDERS 16-25 YRS) 1-2 April 2017 | Fiber Fresh

National Equestrian Centre Taupo Featuring the Hyland Pony Championship & Waldebago Young Rider Championship, York Corporation Inter-Island Team Challenge plus the final of the AMS Saddlery Pony & Young Rider Performance League. Classes for riders up to 25yrs and including pony and young rider non-graded section up to 21yrs. No prior qualification required. www.facebook.com/NZ Pony & Young Rider Dressage Championships.


NATIONAL SERIES FLYING HORSE MASTERS TOP TEN LEAGUE

and Level 3 & 4 and above by riders with no points at level 5 and above as at 1/8/16.

This competition is designed to promote dressage competition and participation for Masters Riders. The Flying Horse series provides an opportunity for riders to compete against peers at five different levels at all levels of events and competition regardless whether riders compete locally, regionally or nationally. The competition will be open to riders 50 years & over as at 1 April 2016 and is run in five main divisions plus special awards from 1st April 2016 until 31st March 2017. View full conditions and enter on www. equestrianentries.co.nz

The top 10 scores in graded competitions will count. There will be rosettes for the top placed horse and top placed pony in each area, plus national champions and reserves in all six divisions.

ALLINFLEX AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE The AllinFlex Amateur Top Ten League extends from 1 April 2016 until 31st March 2017. The competition is open to Category CN - C5 riders aged 21yrs and over as at 1 April 2016 (C5 riders have never earned grading points at any level above Level 5) Riders must be annual competitive members of the ESNZ. All participating horses must be registered and pay start levies for graded competitions View full conditions and enter on www.equestrianentries.co.nz

View full conditions and enter on www. equestrianentries.co.nz PRYDES EASIFEED SOUTH ISLAND YOUNG RIDER HI-POINTS SERIES Each of the seven South Island Regional Events will offer a Hi- Points Qualifier class with the finals being decided at the  South Island Festival of Dressage in 10/12 Feb in Gore. Riders must be max 20yrs as at 1 Aug 2016. There is no minimum age limit for pony riders. Riders on horses must be at 12yrs in the calendar year 2016

See the next issue for news of the South Island Championships (10/12 Feb 2017), and the Festival of Future Stars Championships (8/9 April 2017)

HORSE SPORTS YOUNG RIDER AMATEUR TOP TEN LEAGUE Pony & Young Riders who have never earned points at level 5 or above, and are competing on horses or ponies up to Level 4 at 1/8/16 can compete in the Horse Sports League. All participating riders, ponies & horses must be fully ESNZ registered. Scores from 1/8/16 until 10/4/17 will count towards the Horse Sports League. Level 1 horses & ponies must be competed by riders with no Level 3 or above points, Level 2 by riders with no Level 4 or above points

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DRESSAGE DIRECTORY

INTERNATIONAL QUALITY YOUNG HORSE: “LEO WISPERN” 5yo by NZ Warmblood by Whisper from one of New Zealand’s most well performed dressage and international eventing mare lines, bred and produced for elite level dressage or eventing. Fun and safe to ride, personality plus, very suitable for an ambitious young rider or amateur. Purchased to produce to Grand Prix level and then breed from, my circumstances have changed dramatically and this is the only reason this horse has become available for sale. She is approximately 16-16.1hh (I am 5’8 tall for size aspect in photo). Her dam line has produced multiple champion and international elite level horses. Very reluctant genuine sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Alicia Collin Equestrian | Mobile: +64 210 252 4111

YOUR BUSINESS/PRODUCT/HORSE COULD BE HERE jeremy@snaffledesign.co.nz

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Ja Wellingto

DRESSAGE DIRECTORY

ADVANCED DRESSAGE 9YO MARE READY FOR PSG: ASTEK GHISELLA

Jazz. Is a

Last seaso confidence placings la take out to selling bec For further

Email Paq gbdwyer@

9yo 167cm Hanoverian mare, Sire Kinnordy Gym Bello (Gymnastick Star/Graf landau) Dam Belcam Angelica (Aachen) Read more at http://horsezone.com.au/category/240/ Warmblood/listings/56865/Advanced-Dressage-9yomare-ready-for-PSG.html#dzvVgEh8mtgYfHG7.99

NZ: Jacqu

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Janelle Sangster-Ward | Mobile: +64 214 02225

WELTSTAR (JAZZ) FOR SALE Jazz is a Warmblood cross, 17 years, 16.2hh Registered Level 5 Dressage Horse. Last season was downgraded for my first year of competition. He has built my confidence and ability and has taken me from novice to Level 4. With several placings last season. Great under saddle and fit to compete. He is awesome to take out to competitions. Saddle and tack is also available to purchase. Only selling because of changed circumstances, $10,000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Email: gbdwyer@ozemail.com.au Mobile: +61 438 468 102 Location: Wellington, Mangaroa Valley NZ: Jacqui Thompson +64 274437030

Jazz (Weltstar) For Sale $10,000 Wellington: Mangaroa Valley

Jazz. Is a Warmblood X . 17 years. He is a Registered Le

Last season was downgraded for my first year of competitio confidence and ability and has taken me from novice to Lev placings last season. Great under saddle and fit to compete take out to competitions. Saddle and tack is also available selling because of changed circumstances For further information.. Email Paquita on: +61438 468 102 gbdwyer@ozemail.com.au NZ: Jacqui Thompson +64 274437030

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NORTH LOBURN EQUESTRIAN CENTRE DRESSAGE FOR EVERYONE WITH OVER $1500 IN SPONSORSHIP PRIZES

Spring Dressage Series

Sept 18th, Oct 16th & Nov 20th // Rangiora Showgrounds A relaxed and friendly atmosphere – we aim to encourage new combinations into the sport; young horses, junior riders and the more mature rider stepping into the arena for the first time or returning to competition riding. Prydes EasiFeed Training Series Bag of feed to the winner of training classes each date & dress rug to the series champion

Graded Series sponsored by Richard Woerlee of Bayleys Three dress rugs to the series winners: Levels 1, 2 and 3, 4, 5

Rangiora Equestrian Supplies Ungraded Level One Series $50 voucher to series champion

With additional sponsorship prizes

Nicolette Gelderman Ungraded Level Two Series Equine physio/chiropractic treatment for the series champion

The Thomas Fissenden “Off The Track Series Championship” Open to off the track Standardbreds or

Thoroughbreds. $200 cash to series champion, $75 cash reserve champion, $25 cash third place

Canterbury Rails: Champion Junior rider Two 4.2m jump rails to the junior with most points over the ungraded series

combined

Silver Linings Complete Equine Care: Most Improved Combination PEMF treatment and coaching session for the most improved combination over the series

plus the chance to go in the draw for a free session on the riding simulator thanks to Sarah Elcomb of The Riding

Workshop

Reserve Sashes throughout both series sponsored by Barry McDonald and Coralie Winter

Thomas Fissenden Farrier

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Download schedule at WWW.NLEC.CO.NZ // info@nlec.co.nz - 03 313 1247


DRESSAGE DIRECTORY DRESSAGE AREA GROUP WEBSITES & OTHER USEFUL LINKS Equestrian Sports NZ/Dressage www.nzequestrian.org.nz /dressage www.facebook.com/Dressage NZ www.facebook.com/Equestrian Sports NZ www.facebook.com/NZ Pony & Young Rider Dressage Championships www.facebook.com/Stable of the Stallions Dressage Bay of Islands www.bayofislandsdressagegroup.co.nz Dressage Northland www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagenorthland

Dressage Central Districts www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagecentraldistricts

Dressage Waitemata www.dressagewaitemata.co.nz

Dressage Taranaki www.dressagetaranaki.co.nz

Dressage Warkworth www.warkworthdressage.webs.com

Dressage Wellington www.dressagewellington.org.nz

Dressage Auckland - Manukau www.amdg.org.nz

Dressage Horowhenua   www.horowhenuadressage.com

Dressage Waikato www.dressagewaikato.co.nz

Dressage Wairarapa www.dressagewairarapa.com

Dressage Morrinsville -Te Aroha www.mtdg.co.nz

Dressage Nelson    www.nelsondressage.webs.com

Dressage Gisborne www.gisbornedressage.org.nz

Dressage Marlborough www.sportsground.co.nz/marlboroughdressage

Dressage Bay of Plenty www.dressagebayofplenty.co.nz

Dressage Canterbury www.freewebs.com/canterburydressage

Dressage Eastern Bay of Plenty www.sportsground.co.nz/ebd

Dressage Otago www.dressageotago.webs.com

Dressage Rotorua         www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagerotorua

Dressage Southland www.dressage-southland.com

Dressage Tauranga        www.dressagetauranga.co.nz 

National Equestrian Centres www.nzequestrian.org.nz

Dressage Taupo www.sportsground.co.nz/taupodressagegroup

Tielcey Park Equestrian Centre www.tielceypark.co.nz (Manawatu)

Dressage Northern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/dressagenhb

North Loburn Equestrian Centre www.nlec.co.nz (Canterbury)

Dressage Central Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/chbdressage

Northern Equestrian Group www.freewebs.com/northerneq (Canterbury)

Dressage Southern Hawkes Bay www.sportsground.co.nz/shbdressage

Northgate Lodge www.northgatelodgeequestrian.com (Northland)

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DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 02 | September 2016

DressageNZ Bulletin  

Issue 02 | September 2016