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919 ‹‹ SYLLABUS

The Cover 12

Planners 5 7 7 8

Family & Friends North Raleigh’s Gonzalez Family Knows its Priorities

16

Pack With A Purpose

Departments

A Trip Can Go Farther Than The Miles Traveled

32

4 28 40 48 54 57 57 58 59 62

Unforgettable Experiences Kidz Celebrate Creates Special Days for Children

34

Not Older, Just Better! Anne Gordon Center Enriching Lives of Raleigh’s Seniors

Features 10

A Perfect Balance Sanderson Freshman Shines Academically, Musically, Athletically

14

Lending A Helping Hand A Fulfilling Life of Service North Raleighk’s Jim Captain Chairs Raleigh Chamber Board

47

Promoting Total Body Wellness

Publisher’s Notes Yearbook Community Field Trip Food Break Advertisers Index Along the I-540 Corridor 919 Region Bulletin Board 919 Final Bell

On the Cover

After Successful Career Mark Hall Pursues Passions

18

Community Events School Events Extracurricular Activities Community Sports

Carmen Rayfield of the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults Photo by Eliza Kay Photography

32

14

Skin Sense Combines State-of-the-Art Day Spa Techniques, Holistic Philosophy

48

‘Freedom’ Exhibit Open North Carolina Museum of History Offers Personality and Plenty to See

50

North Raleigh Mock Crash Event Helps Teens Aviod Bad Decisions While Driving

Check Out 4th of July Festivities in the Triangle! Page 9

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919 ›› NOTES Publisher

Summer Time in the 919

Suzy Beth Sarver

Welcome to the June/July issue of 919 Magazine-North Raleigh. It’s “Dads and Grads” season and we begin the celebrations with our friends and loved ones. Fourth of July festivities and fireworks are here now and you can smell the barbecue and taste the sweet corn. The backyard parties and outdoor events are all around, and it reminds you once again what a great place it is to live, work and play in the 919. Speaking of playing in 919, we start off with a wonderful treasure right here in our community: The Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults, where the mantra is “Not older, just better!”. Don’t miss 919 Magazine’s conversation with Carmen Rayfield, Adult Program Recreation Manager at the center. The package also includes a look at the center’s namesake, Anne Gordon, who began working with seniors throughout the city of Raleigh back in 1963. It all begins on Page 34. Other features to catch in this issue: • Meet North Raleigh’s Gonzalez Family, who definitely has its priorities in order – giving top priority to friends and family. In fact, three family members even work at the same place! See it on Page 12. • We explore where local residents can view a unique collection of artwork that celebrates the beautiful and historical treasures of North Carolina…right in North Raleigh. Check it out on Page 24. • Planning an overseas trip in the future? Then be sure to read about a wonderful North Raleigh-based non-profit organization called “Pack with a Purpose” led by Rebecca Rothney – and her efforts to give travelers another way to add value to their vacations by making a difference a world away. Our Volunteer Profile begins on Page 16. • 919 Magazine introduces Sanderson freshman Connor McCaffrey, a well-rounded student who balances sports, church and academics. We share her story on Page 10. • When the summer heat gets sizzling, here is a great place to cool off: The North Carolina Museum of History. Our feature also includes details on the new Freedom Exhibit. It’s on Page 48. And finally, be sure to catch our list of the Raleigh area’s Independence Day activities on Page 9. We give you a few choices on where to go and what to do this 4th of July holiday. Whatever you are doing this summer in the 919 we want to hear about it. Please stay connected with us through Facebook and Twitter, or simply drop us a line at info@919magazine.com. Because if it’s important to you, it’s important to us. This is 919, where we all Live, Work, and Play. Sincerely,

IT Operations Keith Bullington

Art Director Ben Bipes

Graphics Sarah Carr Sandi Wood

Production Ame Deaton Tika Stuart

Contributors

Stephanie Friedl Alyssa Baucom

Marketing Debra Hurst

Advertising

advertise@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

Content

info@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

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$23.95 plus $6.00 Postage & Handling Call 919-747-2899 Email info@919Magazine.com

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A limited number of back issues of various editions are available. $3.99 postage and handling for one copy; $1.00 for additional copies (limit 2) Call 919-747-2899 Email info@919Magazine.com

8801 Fast Park Drive, Suite 311 | Raleigh, NC 27617 www.919Magazine.com Volume 2, Number 3 © Copyright 2013 919 Magazine Reproduction without permission is prohibited. 919 Magazine is published locally six times a year by dreamLake Media. Information provided by advertisers – or other companies or individuals – does not represent an endorsement or verification of accuracy, and is entirely the responsibility of advertisers. 919 Magazine assumes no responsibility or liability for the content of advertising placed in the publication (or on 919Magazine.com website).

A dreamLake Media Publication

Scott McElhaney President and CEO

SB Sarver Publisher

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919 ‹‹ PLANNER

COMMUNITY EVENTS

COMMUNITY EVENTS 6/6

JUNE 6/1-22, 6/29-7/27 Scrapbooking

Ages 16-100; $80 9-10:30 pm, Saturdays Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov

6/3-24

Mah Jongg Intermediate 2-4 pm, Thursdays Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov

6/5-26

Ballerina Buttercups Ages 3-5; $40 10-11 am, Wednesdays Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov

Send Us Your Events & Activities! Submit information about events at your school, church, club or organization.

Events@919Magazine.com 919 Magazine NR

Beginning Composition Photography Ages 15-up; $30 6:30-9:30 pm Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-420-2329 www.raleighnc.gov

6/6

6/14

Fun with Fireflies Ages 5-12; $3 8-9 pm Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 www.raleighnc.gov

6/16

Father’s Day

Hearing Screenings 10 am-12 pm Anne Gordan Center for Active Adults 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-3285 www.raleighnc.gov

6/6-8/1

Raleigh Children’s Orchestra Ages 6-13; $65 4:45-5:50 pm, 5:50-7 pm Thursdays Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-420-2329 www.raleighnc.gov

6/17

Blanket Making 10 am-12 pm; $7 Anne Gordan Center for Active Adults 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-3285 www.raleighnc.gov

6/21

First Day of Summer

6/7, 6/8

Father’s Day Surprise Ages 3-5; $6 10:15 am-11:15 am Fri 12:30-1:30 pm Sat Optimist Community Center 5900 Whittier Dr 919-870-2880 www.raleighnc.gov

6/14

Flag Day

June | July 2013

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919 ›› PLANNER 6/22-8/10

Music and Movement Ages 2-6; $54 11:15 am-12 pm Saturdays Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-420-2329 www.raleighnc.gov

6/23

Dip and Discover Ages 5-12; $2 2-3 pm Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 www.raleighnc.gov

6/30

Finley Freedom Festival 6:30-9 pm A.E. Finley YMCA 919-848-9622 9216 Baileywick Rd www.ymcatriangle.org

Jun-Aug

Camp JCC Art Camps Jewish Community Center 919-676-6170 campjcc@shalomraleigh.com www.shalomraleigh.org

7/14

Dragonfly Days Ages 5-12; $2 2-3 pm Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 www.raleighnc.gov

7/15

Blanket Making 10 am-12 pm; $7 Anne Gordan Center for Active Adults 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-3285 www.raleighnc.gov

7/17

6/24-29

Preparing for Medicare

Preschool Princess Ballet

10 am-12 pm Anne Gordan Center for Active Adults 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-3285 www.raleighnc.gov

Ages 2-3; $54 10:30-11:15 am Mondays Ages 4-5; $54 11:30 am-12:15 pm Mondays Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-420-2329 www.raleighnc.gov

7/20

Fishing 101

JULY 7/3-24

Ballerina Buttercups

Ages 5-12; $1 10-11 am Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 www.raleighnc.gov

Ages 3-5yrs; $40 10-11 am Wednesdays Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov

7/4

Independence Day

6/25

Greystone Blanketeers Ages 55-up 1-4 pm Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov

6/26-7/31

Cartooning Classes Ages 10-15; $70 4-6 pm Wednesdays Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-420-2329 www.raleighnc.gov

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7/12, 13

Summer Daze Ages 3-5; $6 12:30-1:30 pm Optimist Community Center 5900 Whittier Dr 919-870-2880 www.raleighnc.gov

7/13

For Goodness Snakes Ages 5-12; $3 2-3 pm Durant Nature Park 8305 Camp Durant Rd 919-870-2871 www.raleighnc.gov June | July 2013

7/23

Greystone Blanketeers Ages 55-up; 1-4 pm Greystone Community Center 7713 Lead Mine Dr, Ste 55 919-996-4848 www.raleighnc.gov www.919Magazine.com


919 ‹‹ PLANNER 6/10

Graduation Ceremonies Millbrook High School 8 pm Raleigh Convention Center 500 S Salisbury St 919-831-6011 www.raleighconvention.com

6/11

Graduation Ceremonies

SCHOOL EVENTS

JUNE 6/1

YMCA Summer Youth Rally 7 am Sanderson High 5500 Dixon Dr 919-881-4800 www.sandersonhs.wcpss.net

Sanderson High School 12 pm Raleigh Convention Center 500 S Salisbury St (919) 831-6011 www.raleighconvention.com

Jun/Jul

Free Weekly Tours Prepare Learning Disabled Students for Summer, Fall 6-7 pm, Thursdays Stevens Prep Academy Registration: 919-846-0118 www.stevensprepacademy.com

6/15

Coffee House: Music of the 60s Bruce Emergy, Roland Hill perform 2 pm, North Regional Library 7009 Harps Mill Rd 919-870-4000 www.wakegov.com

6/28, 7/26

Christian Singles Conversation, Dining Panera Bread; 7-9 pm 4421 Six Forks Rd 919-790-1191 nightonthetown@yahoo.com

6/28, 7/26

Christian Singles 50+ Games, Conversation Panera Bread; 7-9 pm 4421 Six Forks Rd 919-790-1191 nightonthetown@yahoo.com

7/19-21

40th Annual Coin, Currency, & Stamp Show 10 am-6 pm (Sun, 10 am-3 pm) Exposition Center NC State Fairgrounds Raleigh Coin Club 919-247-1982 www.raleighcoinclub.org

6/3

3rd Grade Performance 6:30-7:30 pm Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-0900 www.ravenscroft.org

NIGHTLIFE Jun/Jul

6/6

Village Grill

5th Grade Picnic

Live Acoustic Music Fridays, 9 pm-12 am 8450 Honeycutt Rd 919-890-5440 www.villagegrillraleigh.com

12 pm North Ridge Elementary 7120 Harps Mill Rd 919-870-4100 www.northridgees.wcpss.net

6/7

8th Grade Picnic 11:30 am-1:30 pm East Millbrook Middle 3801 Spring Forest Rd 919-850-8755 www.eastmillbrookms.wcpss.net

6/7

Graduation Ceremonies Ravenscroft School 6:30 pm Ravenscroft’s Campus Green 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-0900 www.ravenscroft.org

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EXTRACURRICULAR EVENTS 6/6, 13, 20

Paint & Sip, Wine and Painting Event $30; includes music, hors d’oeuvres Kidz Celebrate 6801 Falls of Neuse Rd Reservations: 919-645-9799 www.kidzcelebrate.com June | July 2013

Jun/Jul

The Pickled Onion Acoustic Open Mic, Tue Live Trivia, Wed Karaoke, DJ; Fri 7901 Falls of the Neuse Rd #101 919-848-4161 www.thepickledonionrestaurant.com www.919Magazine.com

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919 ›› PLANNER Jun/Jul

Carolina Ale House Live Trivia, Tue 4512 Falls of the Neuse Rd 919-848-4782 www.carolinaalehouse.com

Jun/Jul

Fork and Barrel Live Music, Thu; 1st, 3rd Wed 6675-105 Falls of the Neuse Road 919-322-0190 www.forkandbarrelnc.com

7/15-19

Ravenscroft Basketball Program Rising 3rd-12th Graders; $225 Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-9000 www.ravenscroft.org/summer

Girls Soccer Camp Grades 7-12; 5-8 pm Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Road Thori Bryan Soccer Academy 919-796-9269 www.thoribryansocceracademy.com

Rising 3rd-10th Graders; $170 Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-9000 www.ravenscroft.org/summer

7/22-26

Bike Rides 8 am; Saturdays (40M), Sundays (60M) TLC for Bikes Lafayette Village 8480 Honeycutt Road, Suite 126 919-324-4966 www.tlc4bikes.com

Cheerleading Registration Ages 7-13; $48 Millbrook Exchange Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 www.raleighnc.gov

7/22-26

Tackle Football Registration Ages 7-9, 9-11, 11-13; $48 Millbrook Exchange Center 1905 Spring Forest Rd 919-996-4156 www.raleighnc.gov

REGISTRATIONS, CAMPS, LESSONS

Rising 7th-12th Graders; $185 Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-9000 www.ravenscroft.org/summer

Sports and Day Camps Trinity Academy 10224 Baileywick Rd 919-786-0114 www.trinityacademy.com

WALKS, RACES, GOLF 6/2

Catchin’ Fireflies 5K ‘Illuminated’ Leukemia Society Benefit 7:30 pm; $20 adults, $15 students Future Farmers of America Wakefield High School 2200 Wakefield Pines Dr 919-562-3600 www.fsseries.com

6/3

Operation: Fore the Troops USO RDU Center Benefit Golf Tournament 8 am-5 pm Hasentree Country Club 7305 Village Club Dr, Wake Forest 919-840-2943 cinggs@uso-nc.org

Jimmy V Celebrity Golf Classic North Ridge Country Club 6612 Falls of Neuse Rd www.golfclassic.org

Shooters Basketball Program Rising 1st-9th Graders; $170 Ravenscroft School 7409 Falls of Neuse Rd 919-847-9000 www.ravenscroft.org/summer

10/13

25th Annual Thad & Alice Eure Walk for Hope, 5K & 10K Benefit for the Research And Treatment of Mental Illness 8 am (5K, 10K); 10 am (Walk) The Angus Barn 9401 Glenwood Ave 919-781-9255 www.walkforhope.com

Jun

NC State Golf Schools Various dates; boys & girls, ages 6-18 919-846-1536 www.wildwoodgreen.com www.lonniepoolegolfcourse.com 919 Magazine NR

Football Flight Program (QB, WR)

8/23-25

6/24-28

8

Ages 7-9; 9-11, 11-13; $48 Optimist Community Center 5900 Whittier Dr 919-870-2880 www.raleighnc.gov

Jun/Jul

Ravenscroft Football Program

Jun/Jul

Tackle Football Registration

7/23-25

7/22-26

7/22-26

COMMUNITY SPORTS ACTIVITIES

7/22-26

June | July 2013

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919 ‹‹ PLANNER

4th of JULY EVENTS 6/30

Finley Freedom Festival 6:30-9 pm A.E. Finley YMCA 919-848-9622 9216 Baileywick Rd www.ymcatriangle.org

7/3

Independence Eve Celebration 6:30 pm Sertoma Art Center 1400 W. Millbrook Rd 919-469-4069 www.visitraleigh.com

7/4

July 4th at the State Capital

7/4

NC Symphony’s Triangle’s Best

11 am-3 pm NC State Capital 1 E. Edenton St 919-733-4994 www.visitraleigh.com

Independence Day Celebration Gates open 5 pm; concert, 7:30 pm Free admission Koka Booth Amphitheater Cary 8003 Regency Pkwy 919-462-2052 www.boothamphitheatre.com

7/4

Historic Independence Day Open House An Old-Fashioned 4th of July Celebration 11 am-4 pm Joel Lane Museum House 728 W. Hargett St 919-833-3431 www.visitraleigh.com

7/4

The Works: July 4th on Fayetteville Street Music, contests, vendors (free) Downtown Raleigh 12-10 pm; fireworks, 9:30 pm www.raleighconvention.com/works/

Sales & Service Custom Built Bikes Bicycle Repair

(919)

324-4966

LaFayette Village

8480 Honeycutt Rd Suite #126 Raleigh, NC 27615 919 Magazine NR

June | July 2013

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919 ›› STUDENT PROFILE By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Connor McCaffrey, a 15-year-old freshman at Sanderson High School, exemplifies what it means to be a wellrounded student – putting school first, while still finding time to pursue her many interests. Connor successfully balances chorus, sports, church, and volunteer work with her studies, keeping her on the A/B Honor Roll every quarter this school year. Connor’s favorite subjects are World History and Madrigal Chorus (she finds chorus a stress-free environment where she can have fun and sing, and expects to progress to Voices and Sandpipers, the highest choral levels at Sanderson). And Connor truly enjoys the family feel of SHS. “The teachers are all amazing, and they always have their doors open if you ever need help,” she said. In addition to her musical endeavors, Connor is also an athlete. She has played soccer since she was five, and she currently plays on the JV soccer team at Sanderson and in the Capital Area Soccer League. Connor also plans to run cross country in the fall. Recently, Connor received her second Hamilton Sportsmanship Award, having been nominated for the award by her CASL coach for being a leader in sportsmanship. “It is really an honor,” said mom Mary.

A Perfect Balance

Sanderson Freshman Shines Academically, Musically, Athletically

Connor always has a smile on her face and she is always so willing to help everyone. MARY McCAFFREY Connor’s mother

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Connor McCaffrey Profile AGE: SCHOOL: PARENTS: RESIDENCE: SIBLINGS: PETS: INTERESTS:

15 Sanderson High School (9th Grade) Mary and Doug McCaffrey North Ridge Subdivision Brian Hood (39); Sean McCaffrey (33) Bruier (Pekapoo); Mama Dog and Boots (Chihuahuas); Gypsy, Sweet Pea and Cosmo (cats); Elvis (king betta fish) Soccer, singing, bike riding, volunteer work

Connor one day plans to go to UNC-Wilmington or NC State to become an elementary school teacher. She enjoys working with kids, and volunteers with preschoolers at her church – where she also participates in the high school youth group and volunteers in the community. “Connor always has a smile on her face and she is always so willing to help everyone,” said Mary. “So many people have come up to me over the years and told me what a wonderful sweet girl she is and what a blessing she is.”

Photos by Ame Deaton

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NEW PATIENTS WELCOME MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED 919 Magazine NR

June | July 2013

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919 ›› FAMILY PROFILE

North Raleigh’s Gonzalez Family Knows Importance Of Family and Friends By ALYSSA BAUCOM 919 Magazine Writer

Visitors to the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults are very likely to bump into a member of Gonzalez family; but they’re not there just because of the opportunities to socialize, meet new friends, and take advantage of numerous activities. It’s because three of them work at the North Raleigh center. Originally from Caracas, Venezuela, Antonio and Iris Gonzalez have made their home in North Raleigh’s Riverside neighborhood for 10 years. They enjoy that while Riverside is close to major roads and shopping areas, it also offers peace and quiet amidst ample green surroundings, including one of Raleigh’s Greenways.

Married for 37 years, Antonio and Iris met in high school and are the parents of three grown children. Antonio holds degrees from the University of Florida and NC State, and Iris studied design in Caracas. They enjoy playing tennis and other outdoor activities, especially going to the beach. They also enjoy traveling. “In the past we have been fortunate enough to be able to take many trips together as a family, and the memories are priceless, as they say,” said Antonio. Antonio, Iris, and their daughter Kalena (Carmen Elena) all work at the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults, performing a variety of tasks. “To put it simply, we do everything, from welcoming and

registering patrons for the various classes, trips, or activities we offer to having the rooms set up for various activities at the center, “ said Antonio. They enjoy working at the center because they get an opportunity to interact with people they otherwise might never meet, and they can help people in their work. “The center has made us get to know, learn from, and connect with patrons that appreciate us like family.” Antonio serves as an Adult Program Recreation Leader, and Iris as both Recreation Aide and Staff Support for the English as a Second Language program. Iris also teaches Spanish privately and does translations and interpretations. She enjoys sharing

(Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults) has made us get to know, learn from, and connect with patrons that appreciate us like family. ANTONIO GONZALEZ North Raleigh resident 12

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Photos by Eliza Kay Photography

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life experiences with others, especially pictures and stories about her new grandson. Above all, Antonio and Iris Gonzalez enjoy spending time with family and friends. They consider friends as part of their family and have remained close with some friends for decades. “I guess that it breeds in our ‘Latin blood’ that we love to be around family and we like to treat friends as part of our family,” said Antonio.

Antonio and Iris Gonzalez Family Profile RESIDENCE: PARENTS: PARENTS’ HOMETOWN: CHILDREN: INTERESTS:

919 Magazine NR

Riverside Neighborhood, North Raleigh Antonio and Iris Gonzalez Caracas, Venezuela Antonio Jose, 33; Carmen Elena, 30; Cristina Elena, 24 Traveling, outdoor activities, tennis, the beach

June | July 2013

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919 ›› PERSONALITY PROFILE

After Successful Career, Mark Hall Pursues Passions

By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

After a rewarding and successful career as an architect, Stonebridge resident Mark Hall enjoys the time he now has to pursue his passions, including art, music, travel, and tending his koi pond. “What gives me the greatest joy and fulfillment is being active,” said Hall. Since 1998, Hall and wife Mona have called Stonebridge home, where they raised their two children, Erika and Brian, and still enjoy the area for the reasons they settled there in the first place – pools, tennis courts, a soccer field, and two clubhouses offering community meetings and social gatherings. “It’s a great neighborhood made up of families with children of all ages to retirees,” said Hall. Hall, a 1977 graduate of Virginia Tech, went on to live and work as an 14

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Photos by Ame Deaton

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architect on both coasts, spending much of his career specializing in health care projects for the Veteran’s Administration. “Working with other professionals to provide the best medical space needed to deliver medical services to our country’s veterans was an honor,” he said.

(Stonebridge) is a great neighborhood made up of families with children of all ages to retirees. MARK HALL North Raleigh resident

919 Magazine NR

In addition, for almost 30 years, Hall has pursued his passion for stained glass, expanding his creations from lead and copper foil to fused glass. Recently Hall was commissioned to create fused glass crosses in brushed aluminum frames approximately five feet in height, currently on display in the Church of the Holy Cross in Raleigh and Peak Methodist Church in Apex. And from a young age, music has been a big part of Hall’s life, from guitar lessons as a boy, recording an album and touring with a youth group, to today playing guitar with the Praise Team at the Church of the

Holy Cross in North Raleigh, for which Mona sings soprano, and both serve as members of the lay leadership board. Hall and Mona are also active in the local North Carolina Koi and Watergarden Society and enjoy tending their pond in their own backyard. Most recently, having traveled to Africa on a “Pack for a Purpose” mission to bring school supplies to children in Namibia, Hall and his wife continue to work with Scott and Rebecca Rothney, the group’s organizers, to extend the reach of “Pack for a Purpose” in hopes of making a difference in the lives of many others around the world.

Mark Hall AGE: RESIDENCE: PROFESSION: FAMILY: PETS: INTERESTS:

“Really old”…60 Stonebridge, North Raleigh Retired Spouse, Mona; children: Erika and Brian Stormy (dog); Ricochet or “Riki” (cat) Stained glass, guitar, koi

June | July 2013

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919 ›› VOLUNTEER PROFILE

A Trip Can Go Farther Than the Miles Traveled Rebecca Rothney’s Efforts Send Necessary Supplies Worldwide Pack for a Purpose gives travelers a way to add value to their vacations — making sure the trip they take goes much farther than the miles they travel. REBECCA ROTHNEY Pack for a Purpose founder

Photos by Ame Deaton

By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

It all began during her first trip to Africa. Rebecca Rothney learned that she and husband, Scott, were limited to 40 pounds of luggage on safari – even though the airline allowance was 100 pounds checked and another 40 pounds for carry-on. On a subsequent visit, she secured information about needs at a school near her lodge in Botswana and was able to deliver 140 pounds of school supplies and soccer balls.

Pack for a Purpose Profile ESTABLISHED: PURPOSE:

CONTACT:

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“It was enormously rewarding to be able to help the people in the (African) community that had given us such a life-changing experience,” said a North Raleigh resident. “Since then, we and a few of our fellow-travelers have made several trips to other countries in Africa and have been able to deliver an estimated 1,000 pounds in donations of clothing, school and medical supplies.” Thus was born Pack for a Purpose, a non-profit organization with the mission to positively impact communities around the world by assisting travelers who want to bring meaningful contributions

2009 Non-profit organization with the mission to positively impact communities around the world by assisting travelers who want to bring meaningful contributions of requested supplies to the destinations they visit Phone: 919-844 9998 Email: packforapurpose@gmail.com Website: www.packforapurpose.org Social: www.facebook.com, www.twitter.com www.pinterest.com

June | July 2013

of requested supplies to the destinations they visit. “By asking travelers to pack five pounds of supplies, we felt we would be able to involve everyone who wanted to add value to his or her trip by participating,” Rothney said. “By delivering the supplies directly to the traveler’s accommodation, it would be possible for every traveler to contribute and require no logistical support. That amount would take only a small space, require little effort and still make a big impact.” Pack for a Purpose’s website (www. packforapurpose.org) provides lists of requested items and more than 300 global collection points, making it simple for travelers to make a difference on every trip. Since its inception in 2009, the global travel community has donated more than 20,000 pounds of supplies to needy schools, clinics and orphanages worldwide. Last year, the organization won the Global Vision www.919Magazine.com


Award from Travel + Leisure magazine. “Pack for a Purpose gives travelers a way to add value to their vacations—making sure the trip they take goes much farther than the miles they travel,” Rothney said. In addition to being founder and chairperson of the board at Pack for a Purpose, Rothney is involved in many other community activities. As a member of Raleigh’s International Affairs Council, she has hosted more than 400 visitors from around the world in the last 24 years. She has been a docent at the North Carolina Museum of Art for 24 years,

and also volunteers at the Assistance League of the Triangle and Temple Beth Or Sisterhood and several other groups. But it’s Pack for a Purpose that is her passion now. “The most wonderful part of my job is being able to provide a resource to connect people with caring hearts to people in desperate need around the world,” said Rothney, a former teacher, who has travelled to all seven continents. “Equally wonderful is the opportunity to work with an amazing group of volunteers who have donated their time, expertise and resources to make Pack for a Purpose possible.”

Rebecca Rothney Profile AGE: RESIDENCE: AFFILIATION: HOMETOWN: EDUCATION: FAMILY: INTERESTS:

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63 Northwest Raleigh Pack for a Purpose Savannah, GA Washington University, St. Louis, MO Husband, Scott Travel, reading, photography, entertaining, modern dance, ballet, live theater, movies, symphony, cards, board games.

June | July 2013

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919 ›› VOLUNTEER PROFILE

A Fulfilling Life of Family, Community and Service

North Raleigh’s Jim Captain Chairs Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

North Raleigh resident Jim Captain leads a fulfilling life of family, community, and service. As a volunteer for the Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, Captain, Raleigh Site Executive at Credit

Suisse, lends his expertise in business and finance as board chairman of the business organization. “Our board meets regularly to discuss issues facing the community, opportunities that the community might benefit from, and to establish our position on any significant issue,” said Captain. “As board chair,

I’m happy to be involved in a rather broad range of activities and events, most often as master of ceremonies.” Captain relocated to the Raleigh area from Tampa, FL, eight years ago with his wife Michele – who splits her time between Tampa and Raleigh due to elder care responsibilities. The Captains immediately took a liking to the area for its proximity to restaurants, shopping, and golf, and love their neighborhood for its secluded private setting. With two grown sons, two daughters-inlaw, and four grandsons, these days for Captain it’s all about enjoying the grandsons. “I will admit that after a full day with them, I’m ready to pass out, but I wouldn’t trade a minute of it for anything,” said Captain.

While I’ve been in the same industry for 35 years, I feel like I’ve had 20 different careers. JIM CAPTAIN Board Chairman, Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce

Jim Captain Profile AGE: RESIDENCE: FAMILY: PROFESSION: VOLUNTEER AFFILIATION: INTERESTS:

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57 Brier Creek Country Club Wife, Michele; 2 sons; 4 grandsons Raleigh Site Executive, Credit Suisse Chairman, Greater Raleigh Chamber Of Commerce Board of Directors Golf; home improvement projects (he has a lot of tools); reading (primarily fiction); eating out; cooking; grandsons

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Born and raised in Brooklyn, NY, Captain is a first generation American, whose parents are from the island of Crete. He has enjoyed a long career managing operations and client relationship groups in the investment banking industry. “While I’ve been in the same industry for 35 years, I feel like I’ve had 20 different careers,” said www.919Magazine.com


Captain. “The businesses are so diverse, and the industry has evolved so dramatically over the years that I’ve never stopped learning.” Celebrating its 125th year of service as the voice of business in Raleigh, the Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce promotes economic prosperity and quality of life for the citizens of Raleigh. Captain is proud to be a part of this vital organization dedicated to attracting jobs and business to the area, supporting education initiatives, promoting transit options, understanding legislation that may impact our local economy, and promoting opportunities that add to the quality of life, such as bringing the Ironman 70.3 to Raleigh.

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Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce Profile To promote economic development and a great quality of life for the citizens of Raleigh and the surrounding areas 800 S Salisbury St. Jim Captain, Chairman (Board of Directors) Harvey Schmitt, President and CEO Janet Carr, Gen. Mgr./Sr. Vice president 919-664-7000 www.raleighchamber.org

PURPOSE: ADDRESS: EXECUTIVES: PHONE: WEBSITE:

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West Millbrook Middle School hosted a Pi-athon where students participated in a 3.14 mile run while performing different tasks. Once they completed the run/activities, they turned in fully punched cards for a moon pie.

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Millbrook High School recently transformed it’s gym into an International Festival where students participated in an array of activities that exposed and educated them on different cultures around the world.

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Montessori School Packages 100,000 Meals to Feed Hungry Montessori School of Raleigh’s student, faculty, parents and grandparents packaged 100,000 meals recently for Stop Hunger Now, More than 400 students and family members were involved in the three-day May event at the North Raleigh campus “Before the school year began, the staff asked me to discuss various ways to weave Stop Hunger Now’s mission into our curriculum at every level,” said head of School Nancy Errichetti. “Our dream is that Montessori School of Raleigh starts something that other schools can join in to have long term positive impact on the world.” Community service plays a big role in the Montessori curriculum and this year, MSR integrated this initiative to educate students about the world hunger program and instill a lifelong passion for community service on a global level. “We teamed with Stop Hunger Now because the meals we pack are delivered directly to educational institutions in the world’s neediest countries,” Errichetti said. “This is a huge incentive for parents to send their children to school, obtain an education, and hopefully begin to break the cycle of poverty.” Montessori School of Raleigh is located at 7005 Lead Mine Rd. For information, call 919-848-1545 or visit www.msr.org.

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Rescue Addicted Men. Empower Hurting Families. Impact Diverse Communities.

(919) 322-2171

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• • • • •

Assessment Consultation Family Support Services/Aftercare Family Intervention Non Residential Program Residential Program

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Unique Raleighwood Cinema Grill Movie, Dining Experience Also Features Unique Artwork Not only is Raleighwood Cinema Grill in North Raleigh a unique movie and dining experience, it also is one of the nation’s most beautifully decorated theaters. Prior to construction in 1992, world famous fabric artist Mickey Bjork of Atlanta was commissioned to provide art murals for both theaters – following the theme of “Celebrate the beautiful and historical treasures of North Carolina.” “Four historical sites – unique to our beautiful state – were chosen to decorate the theaters,” said Raleighwood owner James Keane. “They span from the coast to the mountains.”

Helping People Connect with God

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According to Keane, the murals at the theater include: • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse: Constructed in 1870, the lighthouse stands guard over the treacherous shoals off the North Carolina coast. The large number of ships that ran aground because of the shifting sandbars — including the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor — gave this area the nickname, “Graveyard of the Atlantic.” The distinctive and highly visible black and white diagonal paint scheme provides daytime recognition, and the bright flashing Morse Code pulse E light provides a beacon of hope and comfort to mariners. • Wright Brothers National Memorial: Located in Kill Devil Hills, the monument commemorates the first successful, sustained, powered

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flights in a heavier-than-air machine. From this humble first baby step, mankind leapt into modern aviation and eventually space flight. Soaring over the monument at Raleighwood is the Wright Brothers first plane “The Flyer”.

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• BB-55 Battleship North Carolina: The first, newly constructed American battleship to enter service during World War II. She took part in every major naval offensive in the Pacific to become the most highly decorated American battleship

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of the war, surviving enemy shelling, bombing, kamikaze and torpedo’s attacks. Decommissioned, the ship was purchased from the U.S. Navy by the efforts of North Carolina school children, who saved their spare change and lunch money for the “Save Our Ship” campaign. Moored in Wilmington, BB-55 is a memorial to the North Carolinians of all services who were killed in World War II. • The Biltmore House: Set on 8,000 acres in the beautiful mountains outside

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Asheville, the main house on the estate is a Chateauesquestyled mansion built by George Washington Vanderbilt II between 1889 and 1895 and is the largest privately owned house in The United States. The structure is 178,926 sq. ft. and features 250 rooms. The gardens — designed by Frederick Law Olmsted (who designed New York City’s Central Park) — are breathtaking, and the estate, gardens and winery are opened year around for touring. Featuring the newest digital High Definition Texas Instrument light projectors and Dolby Digital/JBL sound systems available, Raleighwood Cinema Grill is family owned and operated in the Falls Village Shopping Center, 6609 Falls of the Neuse Road in Raleigh. For information, call 919-847-0326 or visit www.raleighwoodmovies.com.

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919 ›› YEARBOOK

West Millbrook Middle School students gained an appreciation for the travel and transportation industry at the Careers Behind the Cars event. The Truck Fair highlighted careers that use trucks, cars, or other vehicles as part of the day-to-day workplace activities.

Hanging in the Sutton Square shopping center at lunchtime along Falls of Neuse Road in North Raleigh

Sanderson High School performers presented their Theatre Ensemble Spring Musical, “Thoroughly Modern Millie” in April.

Successfully ending the school year with a magnificent performance, the Millbrook High School dance team performed their Spring Dance Concert in May.

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919 ‹‹ YEARBOOK The Sawyer’s Smile 5K raised over $4,800 for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, in memory of Sawyer Sharp, a Lynn Road ES student, who passed away last year. Kelley Sharp, Sawyer’s mother, was in attendance for the 5K event. She passed out ribbons to each participant to thank them personally. From left: Rachel Chapman, Lane Swecker, and Miranda Cominole checked in the participants.

The top two finishers were Erica LaBonte and Crystal Gordon. Notable 3rd place overall, and first kid to finish, was Noah Franklin (5th grader at Lynn Rd.).

From left: Ruby Phipps, Briana Wells, Katelyn Conn and Lily Wilkerson geared up to run the 5k.

The Rotary Club of North Raleigh held its 4th Annual Charity Golf Tournament at Wildwood Green Golf Club Need Captions in support of Jack Andrews Memorial and to help raise funds for Rotary scholarships and literacy projects.

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The Pretty in Pink foundation hosted its 7th annual “Raleigh Pink Ribbon Ride,” a motorcycle ride benefitting the foundation, with 318 participants.

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919 ›› YEARBOOK

Toddlers and preschoolers brought their baskets in April, ready to fill up with Easter eggs at the Wee Walkers Egg Hunt held at Durant Nature Park.

A crowd attended the recent Blessing of the Ground event at the new Carillon Assisted Living of North Raleigh, located at 5219 Old Wake Forest Road

Band Of Oz keyboardist David Franks and Blue Diamond Limousines CEO Carrie Peele — also known as Mr. and Mrs. David Franks— at a recent Triangle Ladies Power Lunch in North Raleigh.

Lead Mine ES kicked off its 2013 Spring Carnival & Health Fair, where students enjoyed a great day filled with games & prizes, food, a silent auction & raffles, a photo booth, bounce houses, and performances galore. Nemonde Cafe & Market at 9650 Strickland Road celebrated its Spring Festival in May, which included music, dancing, food samples, wine tasting, face painting, and many other festivities.

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919 ‹‹ COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Out and About in the 919! 919 Magazine team members recently visited with valued 919 Magazine advertisers, friends and business leaders throughout the North Raleigh area along Falls of Neuse Road. The day was filled with fun activities and impromptu meet-and-greet sessions. Just take a look at who’s reading 919 Magazine!

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919 ›› BUSINESS PROFILE

Unforgettable Experiences Kidz Celebrate Creates Unique Themed Parties For Children’s Special Days – and Much More

Looking for a unique way to celebrate your child’s imagination and creativity? At Kidz Celebrate, you’ve come to the right place. The brainchild of Angela Padgett, mother of 9-year-old twins and a North Carolina native, Kidz Celebrate brings parties to life offering unique themed all-inclusive parties, art and

Kidz Celebrate ADDRESS: OWNER: YEAR OPENED: WEBSITE: EMAIL: PHONE: SOCIAL MEDIA:

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music classes, summer camps, day camps, bisque art, drop-ins, and more. As the owner of the Triangle’s leading spa, Skin Sense, a day spa, Padgett enjoyed offering spa parties and teen/ tween spa treatments at Teens Too, a spa experience designed especially for teens and tweens. Teens Too became her inspiration behind the popular Spa Parties at Kidz Celebrate where

6801 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh Angela Padgett 2012 www.kidzcelebrate.com info@kidzcelebrate.com 919-645-9799 Facebook: facebook.com/kidzcelebrate Twitter: twitter.com/kidzcelebrate Pininterest: pinterest.com/kidzcelebrate

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partygoers slip into cozy robes, create spa crafts, and enjoy pampering in the company of friends all in a tranquil spa lounge-themed room. Kidz Celebrate now features five other themed party rooms that fire up kids’ imaginations – from a rock ‘n’ roll room complete with green screen and karaoke, to a vintage tea room, a kitchen for cooking camps and classes, a ceramics studio with potters’ wheels and kiln, an enchanted princess/fairy room, and an art studio where kids can paint on walls and mirrors, and more. “At Kidz Celebrate, we are passionate about creating an unforgettable experience on your child’s special day,” said Padgett. From the decorations to the food, crafts, and games and www.919Magazine.com


919 ‹‹ BUSINESS PROFILE activities, Kidz Celebrators take care of everything allowing parents to enjoy the experience with their child without hassles or clean-up.

Parents can rest assured their children are busy learning and playing at Kidz Celebrate. ANGELA PADGETT Kidz Celebrate

Beyond parties for all ages and passions, Kidz Celebrate offers unique for-the-day camps, a fun alternative to week-long camps featuring imaginative themes such as Ooey Gooey Science Camp, Superhero and Princess Camps, Spa Camp, Music Camps, Mosaic and Ceramics Camps – all with non-stop enriching activities led by outstanding artists, musicians, and educators. “It’s a fun way to try the wide variety camps that Kidz Celebrate has to offer without a week-long commitment,” said Padgett. Kidz Celebrate also features a fully equipped ceramics studio for art classes, and where visitors can browse a wide

selection of unpainted ceramic bisque (starting at only $5, materials included) — then choose colors, brushes and “paint a masterpiece.” Plus, Kidz Celebrate offers a drop-in program that keeps children always learning through structured crafts and play, engaging activity centers, story times, and more. “No matter if you need only five minutes or up to four hours, parents can rest assured their children are busy learning and playing at Kidz Celebrate,” said Padgett. Kidz Celebrate is located at 6801 Falls of Neuse Road, Raleigh. To contact or for more information, call 919-645-9799, email info@kidzcelebrate.com, or visit www.kidzcelebrate.com.

Ashley Stoick and Angela Padgett

Photos by Ame Deaton

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NOT OLDER, JUST BETTER! Anne Gordon Center Involves, Enriches North Raleigh Seniors Carmen Rayfield strives to provide quality leisure activities and services to all adults ages 50 and older who enter the doors of the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults in North Raleigh. Her goal is that these activities assist, inform, entertain, and enrich the lives of citizens in the community. She loves her job, and she spent some time sharing her thoughts and goals for the center for 919 Magazine readers.

A Conversation with Carmen Rayfield of the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults in North Raleigh: What is the history of the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults? This is a long story, so I will give you the short version: The City of Raleigh did not have a “senior center”. We had the Adult Program, which began in the 1960s and was directed by Anne Gordon from 1963 to 1996. The Adult Program offered an array of programs to individuals 50 years and over throughout the City of Raleigh. Wake County did have the Whitaker Mill Senior Center, located on Whitaker Mill Road, and operated by Resources for Seniors. A resident request was brought to the City Council asking for the City of Raleigh to have a “senior center”. A feasibility study was conducted and from that study the 2007 Parks and Recreation bond was brought forward and passed. City Council directed that two centers be built at the same time, one at the Wake County site on Whitaker Mill Road (Five Points Center) and the second at Millbrook Exchange Park in North Raleigh, which opened in October 2012.

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How is the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults funded?

What is the relationship with Resources for Seniors, Inc.?

Both the Five Points Center for Active Adults and Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults, as well as the Adult Program, are funded and operated by the City of Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department.

Resources for Seniors is a partnering agency with the two Raleigh active adult centers. They have an Information and referral specialist housed at the Five Points Center and is available by appointment to meet one-on-one with individuals at the Anne Gordon Center. The RSF develops and provides all of the health education classes and screenings for both sites.

What is the purpose of this center? The purpose of the center – as well as the Adult Program area – is to provide quality leisure activities and services to all adults ages 50 and older. These activities are designed to assist, inform, entertain, and enrich the lives of citizens of the City of Raleigh. It is our goal to improve the lives of adults age 50 and over throughout the Raleigh area through diverse and exciting programs, as well as through collaborative partnerships with other public and private organizations that serve the senior adult community.

What are the various programs provided to local residents? The center offers a variety of quality programs, as well an array of levels to fit the needs of the older adult population. Fitness programs include Seniorcise, Tai Chi, QiGong, line dancing and more. Social programs consist of Men’s Monday Morning, Thursday Theater, Book Club, bingo, cards, Mah Jongg, and Golden Years Senior Club. Educational classes touch onhHow to use your Ipad/Iphone, computer classes, and an array of healthy living classes offered by Resources for Seniors, including health screenings, and safe driving. All of the Adult Program day and overnight trips leave from the Anne Gordon Center as well. 919 Magazine NR

What is the most unique program offered by the center? That would be, by far, Drumming for Fitness. This class is made up of traditional no-to-low impact aerobic movements, combined with the powerful beat and rhythm of drums. The drums are a back of a chair and the drumsticks are “pool noodles” cut down. The class incorporates both the left side of the brain and the right side. You don’t have to have any rhythm to take this class. Both the men and the women in the class say it is the most fun form of exercise they have ever done.

Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults Profile ADDRESS: DIRECTOR: PHONE: WEBSITE: EMAIL: YEAR OPENED: SIZE: HOURS:

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1901 Spring Forest Rd Carmen Rayfield, Adult Program Recreation Manager 919-996-4720 www.raleighnc.gov AnneGordonCenter@raleighnc.gov 2012 4,500 sq. ft. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., M-F

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Center’s Contemporary Design Kept 50-Plus Clientele in Mind Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults – a contemporary 4,600 sq. ft. facility, was designed by HH Architecture specifically with the age 50-plus demographic in mind. The building includes an easy-to-follow floor plan, as well as day-lit interior spaces that decrease glare. According to the architect, the design intention for the interior was to establish functional, yet welcoming and cozy environment for the clientele. In collaboration with Lifespan Design Studio, HH Architecture tailored a facility to the community by holding public meetings to gather input during the design process. The site was chosen to take full advantage of southern exposure for maximum daylight in the multi-purpose room. In addition, the design plan protected old-growth trees, which offer green, shaded outdoor space. According to the architect, the center contains indoor and outdoor recreational areas for clientele to enjoy – such as an outdoor patio area, a community kitchenette, office and support areas, classroom space – and, the multi-purpose meeting room. SOURCE: www.hh-arch.com

Photos by Eliza Kay Photography


It is our goal to improve the lives of adults age 50 and over…through diverse and exciting programs, as well as through collaborative partnerships with other public and private organizations that serve the senior adult community. CARMEN RAYFIELD Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults

What is the most popular program offered to local residents? That is a toss-up between line dancing and card playing. Both groups are dedicated to their activity and would not miss it for the world. Both programs are open for anyone of any ability level to come in and join the ongoing groups. Line dancers have fun dancing to everything from country music, rock and roll, and oldies. Card players play everything from hand and foot, bridge, poker, and canasta.

What is most important about what the center offers the community? The Active Adult Center provides a great opportunity for socialization for all individuals. Studies have shown that socialization for the older population is a great benefit for both mental and physical wellbeing. We provide a wide range of programs and activities to reach out to a variety of interest. There is something for everyone!

TENURE: CAREER BACKGROUND:

EDUCATION: RESIDENCE: HOMETOWN: FAMILY: PETS: INTERESTS:

Anne Gordon began her service for seniors officially in 1963 as an Activity Supervisor for Senior Adult Programs with the City of Raleigh – and has continued beyond her retirement in 1996, spanning more than 49 years. Gordon garnered several accolades and awards along the way including, but not limited to: • 1971: Raleigh Parks & Recreation Department and the City of Raleigh Employee of the Year. • 1973: Fellow Award from North Carolina Recreation and Parks Association for excellence in parks and recreation. • 1974: Inducted into the Wake County Academy of Women

Carmen Rayfield Profile POSITION:

Who is Anne Gordon?

• 1975: Women’s Club of Raleigh Mabel Claire Maddrey Award

Adult Program Recreation Manager, Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults 11.5 years with City of Raleigh, Parks and Recreation Department Joined Raleigh Parks and Recreation in 2002 working with Specialized Recreation Services, then moving to the Adult Program in 2007; previously worked as a child case manager, social worker for juvenile delinquents B.S., General Recreation, Central Missouri State University Johnston County Waynesville MO; however; lived in several Locations as a “military brat” Robert (husband); two children: Kali (16), and Owen (8) Cheyenne (retriever mix); Rainer (terrier/lab mix) Being outside with family, yard work, camping, hiking, bike riding, hanging out at the beach

Gordon today serves on the Board of Directors for the Raleigh Friendship Force and has personally hosted ambassadors from Jordan, Germany, England, Japan, Costa Rica and Belgium. Gordon was asked about the most rewarding aspect of working with the senior adult population: “The greatest challenge and the greatest reward has been to come up with, to present, and to deliver the greatest variety of activities that would enrich the lives of all senior adults in our programs. It is also very important for me and all of our staff to treat every individual with respect.” SOURCE: City of Raleigh, Parks and Recreation Department

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The Graying of Raleigh’s Population Between 2000 and 2010, the Raleigh-Cary area was the fastest growing metropolitan area in the U.S. for people age 65 and older. According to the Brookings Institute’s analysis of U.S. Census data, Raleigh-Cary’s elder population grew at a spectacular 60 percent rate during the period of 2000 to 2010 – topping Austin, TX and Las Vegas, NV. In a 2007 “Senior Center Feasibility Study”, the Raleigh city staff indicated that the population of people age 55 and older was 51,142 – or 16.1 percent of the total population. A year later, the percentage had risen to 16.3 percent, and the projection for 2020 was 24 percent. SOURCES: U.S. Census, Brookings Institute, City of Raleigh

‘(Our center’s) activities are designed to assist, inform, entertain, and enrich the lives of citizens of the City of Raleigh. CARMEN RAYFIELD Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults

A sampling of some of the programs at the Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults: Bingo This is not typical bingo; instead a variety of games are played each day – from straight bingo to four corners to clear all. Cost is $1 for three cards (or 50 cents for one card). Bingo is played 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday.

Cards and Mahjong Open card play includes games such as bridge, canasta, poker, mahjong and more – for all levels of skill. Currently, play is 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays.

Men’s Monday Mornings Looking for a place to hang out, play games, make new friends or just socialize? Drop in and enjoy some coffee, 9 a.m. to 12 noon on Mondays.

Read and Go Like to read? Enjoy travel? This series combines the best of both activities, as participants read a select group of fiction and non-fiction books based on North Carolina locations – and then travel to the sites to explore. Call 919-996-4720 for information or to join the mailing list.

Read and Watch

What will surprise most local residents about what is offered at the center? The Adult Program and Active Adult Center are geared towards adults 50 years and better, but are not limited to those ages. Our programs are ability-based not agebased, which is one of the reasons we are Active Adults Centers not “senior centers”. If any adult in Raleigh and the surrounding area feels like our classes meet their needs, then they are welcome to come and participate.

What can you tell us about the staff at the center? The Adult Program staff is a family – not only a family with each other, but a family to the patrons. We get to know our patrons, find out their likes and dislikes, learn about their families and ask about their life.

Does the center need volunteers to support programs or projects? We have many volunteer opportunities – not only with the center, but throughout the City of Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department. We are always interested in individuals volunteering to teach specialty classes here at the center that focus on arts, music, computers, gardening, bird watching, history, and more!

Read a book, have a discussion, then watch the movie based on the book. Pre-registration is required due to the popularity. Next meeting is 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. June 24. SOURCE: Leisure Ledger, Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department Photos by Eliza Kay Photography

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What do you enjoy most about your job at the center? Being with the patrons, especially when they are trying something new. Older adults become rejuvenated after retirement. They are interested in learning new things or trying out an exciting activity like indoor skydiving. We offer these new and fun experiences through our various programs and our Senior Outdoor Adventure Recreation (S.O.A.R.) program.

How did you get involved in this type of work? When I began working with the City of Raleigh Parks & Recreation Department in 2002, it was with the Specialized Recreation Program. I was a Recreation Specialist (SRS) working with adults of all ages with special needs. I can truly say that is the first job in my career that I loved. Where else could you go to work and have a standing ovation from the patrons just for coming to work! Within the five years that I worked with the SRS program I worked with Steve White, Raleigh Parks and Recreation Adult Program Director, on policies and procedures for trips and travels for the patrons. When the Adult Program Recreation Manager position became available, I knew that it was a great transition and opportunity. I have always been a fighter for the “underdog” and I saw that there were many issues nationwide where I can help fight for the older adult population and their needs.

If you could add one program or activity to the center, what would it be? This is a long list I don’t think I could narrow it down to just one. The patrons are bringing new program interest to us every week. Steve White, Adult Program Director, Jennifer Tabery, Five Points Assistant Director, and I keep a list of program ideas that are brought to our attention or requested. We work hard seeking out partnerships and volunteers to make those programs a reality, not only in the Active Adults Centers but also throughout the Parks and Recreation Department.

If you had one wish for the center, what would it be? To have the budget to be open six days a week from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. This would allow all individuals 50 years and older the opportunity to utilize our facility to its fullest extent.


919 ›› COMMUNITY Wakefield ‘Illuminated’ 5K Benefits Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

and lacrosse coach at Heritage High School in Wake Forest) was diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma in 2011 (Jamie is now cancer-free and celebrating life with his wife and 2-year-old son, Will). This year, the event honors WHS English teacher Heather McDonald, who was diagnosed with lymphoma in 2012.

A unique evening family-friendly run-walk to support the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society takes place in June at Wakefield High School.

Sponsored by the WHS Future Farmers of America, the race begins at 7:30 p.m. – with packet pickup beginning at 5 p.m. on June 2.

The Illuminated Catchin’ Fireflies 5K begins at 7:30 p.m., June 2, at 2200 Wakefield Pines Dr. in North Raleigh. Cost of the race is $20 ($15 for WCPSS and college students), and all participants will receive a T-short, glow-stick, a lymphoma awareness bracelet, and refreshments.

Visit www.fsseries.com to register or volunteer for the event.

Prizes will be provided for top males and females in several age categories – as well as for the most-illumiated participant. The event began last year when WHS students Aaron Wollett and Anna Brown created a 5K event to assist Jodi Riedel, his Agricultural Education teacher – whose husband, Jamie (a teacher

Wake Forest July 4th Committee Seeking Sponsors, Donors for Annual Celebration contributions are accepted from individuals, and will be used exclusively for fireworks, the children’s parade, and art/games at the park.

Hoping to make the 2013 Fourth of July Celebration the best in the event’s 40-year history, the Wake Forest July 4th Committee seeks additional supporters and sponsors. “The Fourth of July Committee will continue to make memories in 2013 by providing one of the best fireworks displays in the state of North Carolina at the 40th annual Fourth of July Celebration,” Rhonda Alderman, committee president, wrote in a letter to local residents and businesses. “But we can’t do it without your support.” Alderman outlined sponsorships available to local businesses, ranging from $200 up to $15,000 for an exclusive sponsorship. All levels of sponsorship involve recognition in the program and promotions – and varying numbers of event tickets. In addition, “name your amount”

The Wake Forest 2013 Fourth of July Celebration includes: • Fireworks Spectacular: 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Wednesday, July 3 at Wake Forest-Roleseville High School, 420 W. Stadium Dr. ($5). • Children’s Parade: 10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 4 at North Main Street and West Juniper Avenue. • Art-In-The-Park, Games-In-The-Park: 11 a.m., Thursday, July 4 at Holding Park, 133 W. Owen Ave. Tax deductible donations may be sent to Wake Forest 4th of July, P.O. Box 466, Wake Forest NC 27588. For more information or to become a sponsor, call 919-812-9121, email wfjuly4th@aol.com, or visit www.wakeforestnc.gov/july4.aspx.

Millbrook Hosts Culture Conference at North Raleigh Campus

Crown Trophy & Awards of Raleigh plans to move this fall to a new location on Creedmoor Road in North Raleigh. The new location will be at Stonehenge Market, located at 7412 Creedmoor Road, next to the Harris Teeter. Though no specific date for the move was announced, owners Bob and Pam Falkenbach hope to open at the new address in September. Crown Trophy & Awards of Raleigh offers a variety of trophies, medals, plaques, crystal awards, sculptures, engraving, acrylics, advertising specialty items, banners, signs and more. Currently open at 2431 Spring Forest Road, Suite 165, Crown Trophy can be reached at 919-878-6565 or crownraleigh@gmail.com.

Millbrook High School hosted a free conference recently to help international parents learn more about working with the Wake County Public School System to support their children. The Culture Conference addressed social, cultural and academic issues – including guidance for students working through transitions into a new culture, how to prepare to move from middle school to high school, and how to prepare academically and financially for college. Sessions were offered in eight different languages.

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Crown Trophy & Awards Planning Move To Creedmoor Road in Fall

For more information, visit www.crowntrophy.com/store-148. June | July 2013

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919 ‹‹ COMMUNITY Summer Mini-Camps at Blue Jay Point Have Nature Themes Blue Jay Point County Park plans several summer mini-camps this summer, for several age groups. Among the sessions: •

Eco-Kids Birds of Blue Jay: 9 a.m.-11 a.m., or 1 p.m.-3 p.m.; June 10, 12, 14; ages 4-5; $25. Learn what makes a bird a bird, how to identify different bird songs, and how different birds “earn a living”.

Bird Bonanza: 9 a.m.-12 p.m., or 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; June 17, 19, 21; ages 6-8; $36. Learn to identify birds by sight and sound and find out how to make your backyard a wildlife sanctuary. Plus, get to know other junior bird enthusiasts while hiking, playing games, doing crafts and having thematic snacks.

My Side of the Point: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; June 24, 26, 28; ages 9-12; $72. Learn to identify plants, track animals, know bird songs, and feel at home in the forest. Group also will read the book, “My Side of the Mountain.”

Eco-Kids Bug-A-Boo: 9 a.m.-11 a.m., or 1 p.m.-3 p.m.; July 8, 10, 12; ages 4-5; $25. Get up close and personal with cool critters.

Critter Capers: 9 a.m.-12 p.m.; July 15, 17, 19; ages 6-8; $36. Explore the fields, forests and streams at Blue Jay Point. Hiking, crafts, games and thematic snacks.

Eco-Kids Summer Sun-sations: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.; Aug. 12, 14, 16; ages 4-5; $25. Learn how the sun affects everyday lives in various cultures.

Blue Jay Point is located at 3200 Pleasant Union Church Road on Falls Lake. For information, call 919-870-4330 or visit www.wakegov.com.

North Raleigh Exchange Club Benefit Lobster Sale June 1

North Raleigh Exchange Club’s annual Lobster Day is June 1, featuring live Maine lobsters for $15. Proceeds from the sales are used to support the prevention of child abuse and the club’s other community projects . Each lobster is guaranteed to be at least 1.25 pounds. Pickup is between 9:30 a.m. and 12 noon at the Quail Corners parking lot, at the intersection of Millbrook and Falls of the Neuse in North Raleigh (look for the tent). To pre-order (by May 29), email frhester@bellsouth.net (preferred), or call 919-782-2820 (leave name, phone and number of lobsters). 919 Magazine NR

The Organic Bedroom Celebrates One Year Anniversary, Moves to Glenwood The Organic Bedroom – a locally owned and operated mattress and bedding accessories store, specializing in organic, natural and chemical-free mattresses and bedding – plans to celebrate the grand opening of its new location in Oak Park Shopping Center on Glenwood Avenue on Memorial Day weekend, May 25-27. The move from Sutton Square in North Raleigh to 5230 Hollyridge Drive south of Brier Creek coincides with the unique store’s first anniversary. Owned by Joey and Vicki Ashley, The Organic Bedroom was opened in response to the need they saw for a healthy alternative to cheaply made, petro and toxic chemicalladen (formaldehyde, boric acid, and PBDEs) matresses widely available in the marketplace. The Organic Bedroom is certified by the Green America’s Green Business Network as an environmentally and socially responsible business. For more information, email info@theorganicbedroom.com, visit www.theorganicbedroom.com, or call 919-521-5566.

Youths Can Compete In Track & Field Games North Raleigh youths can participate in the 2013 Raleigh Local Games in June, part of the national Hershey’s Track & Field Games – the with the opportunity to advance to the regional, state and North American Finals meets. Boys and girls ages 9-14 compete in various age groups in several events, including spring and distance running (50m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m and 1600m), softball throw, and standing long jump.

8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. A registration form with parent signature is required to participate and may be turned in the day of the event. The Hershey Youth Program is designed to encourage physical fitness among youth and emphasizes participation and sportsmanship. Youths may participate in up to three different events. For more information, contact Tori Voska at 919-329-5994 or tori.voska@raleighnc.gov or visit www.nchershey.net.

The local meet is 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, June 18 at Buffaloe Road Athletic Park, 5900 Buffaloe Road in North Raleigh. Registration is June | July 2013

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919 ›› COMMUNITY Trinity Academy Group Raising Funds for Mission Trip to Kenya A group of nine Trinity Academy of Raleigh high school students, a teacher, two parents and a local pastor are traveling to Kenya in July for a service-focused mission, known as Tigers2Kenya. Working with the Gessner family – a Trinity family serving a two-year medical mission in Kijabe – the team will do service in the patients’ ward at Kijabe Hospital, work on service projects at Rift Valley Academy, and provide spiritual outreach in the African bush and the Kibera slums in Nairobi. Each student must raise $3,500 for trip expenses, and the team is partnering for multiple fundraisers: • Over recent spring break, students organized a soccer camp for 32 youths, raising $1,300.

Business sponsors also are sought. Visit www.kickinforkenya. blogspot.com for more information and to register.

• An online silent auction in April raised additional funds.

Participants in the Tigers2Kenya adventure are Jon Horner, faculty representative; students Ben Rein, Thad Beaver, David Morgan, Matt Currin, Joseph DelGrosso, JP Puthenveetil, Jordan Thomas, Montana Johnson, and Amanda Clark; parents Jane Currin and Jennifer Morgan; and Pastor George Tissiere of Providence Baptist Church.

• A 3v3 soccer tournament is scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, June 15 on the Trinity Academy of Raleigh soccer fields -- open to all who want to participate (5th Grade and older, including adults). Entry fee is $15 per player and teams can consist of 3-5 players.

The Tigers2Kenya experience can be followed at www.Tigers2Kenya.blogspot.com.

Berry Oliver New Executive Director at A.E. Finley YMCA

Paint & Sip Event Includes Wine, Food and Possible ‘Masterpiece’

Berry Oliver is the new branch executive director at A.E. Finley YMCA in North Raleigh. A 17-year veteran with the YMCA, he previously served as sports director and associate executive director of adult programs at the Finley branch. He also was branch director at the Garner/Johnston County YMCA. A native of Smithfield who now lives in Clayton, he has an undergraduate degree from East Carolina State University and a graduate degree from NC State. He is married and father of two children.

An adult’s Paint & Sip event – featuring a night of wine and painting – is scheduled for three dates in June at Kidz Celebrate in North Raleigh. In addition to the wine, participants can also enjoy music and hors d’oeuvres while creating a masterpiece at the events on June 6, 13 and 20. Each event has a new theme and a talented art instructor. Fee for each session is $30, which includes art materials and smocks; participants should bring their own favorite beverage. Call 919-645-9799 to register. For more information, visit www. kidzcelebrate.com. Kids Celebrate is located at 6801 Falls of Neuse Road.

Raleigh Coin Club’s Annual Show July 19-21

A.E. Finley YMCA is located at 9216 Baileywick Road. For more information, call 919-848-9622 or visit www.ymcatriangle.org/ae-finley-ymca.

Classic, Antique Cars Coming To Downtown Wake Forest

Raleigh Coin Club’s 40th Annual Coin, Currency, and Stamp Show is scheduled July 19-21 at the Exposition Center on the North Carolina State Fairgrounds. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, the show will feature more than 150 dealers exhibiting U.S. and world coins and currency, gold and silver, U.S. and world stamps, tokens and medals, and books and supplies. Free appraisals are available at the event, as well as educational exhibits and seminars, young collector activities, free coins and stamps for kids and hourly door prizes. Admission and parking are free. For information, call 919-247-1982 or visit www.raleighcoinclub.org.

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Downtown Wake Forest fills with classic cars and classic car lovers on June 15. Presented by the Wake Forest Downtown Revitalization Corporation, the Antique and Classic Car Show is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on South White Street – and benefits local charities. Admission is free to the event, which showcases vehicles of all makes and models, including muscle cars, sports cars, pony cars, street rods and more. The Results will provide live music throughout the day. Registration for participants is 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., and costs $20 per car. For information, contact Lisa Newhouse at 919-4359415 or lisa@wakeforestdowntown.com.

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919 ‹‹ COMMUNITY

MHS Honors Millbrook High Recognized As a ‘School of Excellence’

Millbrook High Receives Exemplary School Award

Millbrook High School was recognized as a “School of Excellence” by the Magnet Schools of America for 2012-2013. It was among 25 Wake County Public School System campuses honored by the organization. “We appreciate the hard work of our schools, their teachers and their families in earning this national recognition for our school system and our community,” WCPSS board chairman Keith Sutton said. “The number of our schools earning national recognition speaks to the quality of our magnet program. We are proud of the wonderful opportunities in our magnet schools for our students.” The Magnet Schools of Excellence is the top award given to a select group of magnet schools. These schools are eligible to receive monetary awards, including $1,000 for New & Emerging Magnet School Award and $5,000 for the Dr. Ronald P. Simpson Distinguished Merit Award -- considered the top award for magnet schools in the nation. Millbrook High was selected from more than 2,000 magnet schools from across the U.S. based on innovative instructional strategies, student achievement, desegregation and diversity goals, and parent and community involvement in the school.

Seventh annual winner of the Exemplary School Award is North Raleigh’s Millbrook High School. The award is a cooperative venture among the North Carolina High School Athletic Association and the North Carolina Athletic Directors Association. MHS receives a trophy, a banner for display at the campus, and a $1,000 cash award. The award honors the top overall school in the state in terms of the “total program,” including but not limited to athletic success, scope of athletic opportunities offered, facilities, community interest and involvement, academics and the like. The school offers 32 sports programs and has expanded to include such activities as 9th Grade men’s basketball and junior varsity wrestling.

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919 ›› COMMUNITY Luke Miles of Durant Road Middle Named WCPSS Teacher of the Year Durant Road Middle School teacher Luke Miles is the Wake County Teacher of the Year. “Luke Miles is a third generation teacher,” Interim Supt. Stephen Gainey said. “His father and grandparents taught. From them he learned the importance of teaching academics, as well as the importance of caring for our students, listening to them and treating them with kindness and consideration.” Miles has been teaching three years – all at Durant Road Middle – and has been a leader in using instructional technology and the school’s digital communications, according to a WCPSS release. Specifically, he has used the “flip the classroom” technique, recording short videos for his students. “I became convinced that flipping the classroom would open up more time

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for my students to engage in activities that explore content at deeper levels, incorporate higher level thinking skills and allow for more opportunities for discussion and collaboration,” Miles said. “This allows me to spend class time meeting the needs of individual students.” Principal Drew Sawyer said Miles is extremely passionate about the learning process. “What makes him different is his innovation and calculated risk taking, which reap tremendous results and rewards from his students,” Sawyer said. “Whether it’s the use of music to enhance a topic or pioneering the flipped model of instruction in the content area of social studies, Mr. Miles is constantly pushing and challenging the boundaries of teaching and learning.” Miles was chosen from 12 district finalists, and received his award at a special banquet in May.

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919 ‹‹ COMMUNITY Short Takes Caroline Konrad and Grace Patton, 6th Graders at St. Timothy School in North Raleigh, were recognized recently for their participation in the Young Authors writing competition…Elizabeth Replogle and Daniella Solovay of Ravenscroft School in North Raleigh recently served as pages for the North Carolina State Senate. Daniella is the daughter of Russell and Julie Solovay of Raleigh, and Elizabeth is the daughter of John and Kristin Replogle…Millbrook High’s Coach Chris East was named the Associated Press girls high school coach of the year in North Carolina for 2012-2013, after leading the team to a 33-0 record and a second consecutive state championship…Wesley Frazier, a senior at Ravenscroft School who set a U.S. high school mark in the 5K at indoor nationals in New York City earlier this year, was featured in a March issue of Sports Illustrated magazine. According to the “Faces in the Crowd” mention, Frazier trailed by more than 12 seconds with less than 1,000 meters left in the race, but still edged defending champion and previous record holder Erin Finn by 0.01 in 16:18.01. She also won the two-mile race in 10:12.23, the fastest time ever by a North Carolina girl. She plans to run for Duke University next year…H&M plans to open in Triangle Town Center…Highway 55 Burgers & Shakes is now open at 6613 Falls of Neuse Road in North Raleigh…Sushi One opened in Lafayette Village at 8470-100 Honeycutt Road recently. Call 919-6153209 for information…Sanderson High School

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recently hosted a panel with Chief District Court Judge Robert Rader and Wake County District Attorney Colon Willoughby answering students’ questions about underage drinking, driving, parties and other topics… Among the campus winners in the 3rd Annual PAGE of Wake County Spelling Bee: Lily Ahlin, Durant Road Elementary; Lindsey Bateman, Durant Road Middle; Milan Dhokia, Brassfield Elementary; Alexander Grodh, East Millbrook Middle; Amie Jemmeh, Lead Mine Elementary; Benjamin Lockhart, Ravenscroft School; Sara Vandersip, Baileywick Elementary… Raleigh-based Trust Atlantic Bank acquired Harrington Bank’s Falls River Branch, including deposits and employees. The branch is located at 1151 Falls River Ave. in the Falls River Town Center…Caroline Vanyo won first place in the American History Essay Contest, sponsored by the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is a 7th Grader at St. Timothy’s School in North Raleigh…Brian Brooks of Millbrook High School received a National Achievement Scholarship, a $2,000 annual award renewable as he meets undergraduate requirements…Julia Laird, a senior at Ravenscroft School in North Raleigh, was named 2013 Outstanding Female High School Vocalist at the recent Mid-Atlantic District of the National Association of Teachers of Singing meeting in Charleston, SC. The daughter of Clinton and Mary Lee Laird of Raleigh, she also took first place in the Junior/Senior High School Classical Singer category…The Green Chair Project of Raleigh recently received a $500 Keep NC Beautiful Community Improvement Grant

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(with support from the NC Coca-Cola Bottlers Council) to expand its “Reusing, Renewing Lives” program that diverts usable goods from the landfill and make them available to households in need… Former Millbrook High School assistant basketball coach Mickey Bissette retired recently from his position as Wake Forest-Rolesville High School boys basketball coach…Nelson Nunalee, a teacher at Ravenscroft School, received the 2013 Vernier Engineering Contest…Daniel Willey of Sanderson High School and Miaya Alston of Millbrook High School received the Alex Wilson Award from the Rotary Club of North Raleigh…Michael Olson, a senior at Sanderson High School, received the $1,000 Cooper-Miller Organ Scholarship from the Central North Carolina Chapter of the American Guild of Organists…Emma Taurence of St. Raphael Catholic School in North Raleigh won the recent 4-Way Test Essay Contest sponsored by the Rotary Club of North Raleigh. Tripp Fraley and Matthew Kress, also of St. Raphael, finished second and third respectively… Emily Jolley, a social studies teacher at Millbrook High School, was selected recently for a 2013-2014 Kenan Fellowship……Bill Dooley Triangle/East Chapter of the National Football Foundation presented $1,000 scholarships recently to Darius Alfred of Millbrook High School and Carson Cattano of Sanderson High School… LaVida Massage recently opened its first Raleigh location at the Shoppes at Wakefield, 13600 New Falls of Neuse Road, Suite 108. For information, call 919-7615185 visit www.raleigh.nc.lavidamassage.com.

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Sanderson High Inducting 11 into School Hall of Fame Sanderson High School plans to induct 11 new members of the SHS Athletics Hall of Fame this fall. This is the third class of the SHS Athletics Hall of Fame, and inductees will be introduced at halftime of the home football game Sept. 6. A luncheon will follow on Sept. 8 at North Ridge Country Club. All activities are open to the public. Tickets for the football game are $7, and tickets for the luncheon are $30. Members of the Sanderson High 2013 Athletics Hall of Fame include: • Treshell Mayo (SHS 1992): An outstanding basketball player and track athlete. The NCHSAA state champion in the 400 meter dash as a junior and senior, she was Sanderson’s “Most Outstanding Female Athlete” as a junior and senior. She received a track scholarship to Clemson University, where she was All-ACC for four years. • Bob Catapano: Math teacher, soccer coach and athletic director at SHS for 33 years. His men’s soccer teams won 11 state championships and 17 conference championships.

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• 1981 Men’s Soccer Team: Finished the season with 19 wins and one loss, while winning a conference regular season championship and Sanderson’s fourth NCHSAA Men’s Soccer State Championship. • Tyreck Knox (SHS 1995): Led the Spartans to three straight basketball conference championships in the 1980s. • Betsy Cook Lanzen (SHS 1989): Participated in two SHS gymnastics teams that earned state titles. • Founders of the Sanderson Athletic Club: A group of fathers who saw that their sons’ teams needed support, resulting in an athletic booster club in 1971-v72. • Gregg Zwilling (SHS 1983): A state wrestling champion and outstanding football player in the early 1980s. • Chuck Lehning: A teacher and coach at SHS for 23 years. • Todd Renner (SHS 1985): An outstanding soccer player who helped lead the team to three conference championships and two state titles. He became a two-time All American at Wake Forest University. • Terry Teague (SHS 1979): In three years as a basketballl player at SHS he became the alltime scoring leader with 1,290 points. • Jay Stainback (SHS 1983): A state wrestling champion and outstanding football player.

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919 ‹‹ BUSINESS PROFILE Skin Sense, a day spa, combines state-of-the art facial skin and body care techniques with a holistic philosophy to promote total body wellness helping to bring balance to life. “Our goal is to ensure you leave our spa feeling relaxed and rejuvenated, whether you have spent an hour or a day with us,” said owner Angela Padgett. Padgett, the company’s founder and president, is a licensed esthetician with 27 years of experience, specializing in acne. She trained in Los Angeles with the most highly regarded experts in the skin and body care industry and received post-graduate training in medical esthetics, clinical aromatherapy, and Ayurveda. A native North Carolinian, Padgett is the mother of 9-year-old twins and has lived in Raleigh for 22 years.

We are passionate about giving you an outstanding, rejuvenating experience that brings balance to your life. ANGELA PADGETT Skin Sense, a day spa Padgett started her solo practice in 1991 offering facials and waxing and has grown her business into a true day spa with a plethora of relaxing and therapeutic services including therapeutic massages, deeply relaxing body

Skin Sense, a day spa OWNER: YEAR OPENED: ADDRESS: WEBSITE: EMAIL: PHONE: SOCIAL MEDIA:

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Promoting Total Body Wellness

Skin Sense Combines State-of-the-Art Day Spa Techniques with a Holistic Philosophy treatments, nail care, makeup, peels, sunless tanning, microdermabrasion, and more. At each of Padgett’s three elegant and award winning day spas (serving North Raleigh, Cary, and Brier Creek), Skin Sense clients enjoy saunas, mud rooms, steam rooms, and relaxation lounges, as well as their signature spa water and Nannie’s Tea — all complimentary with spa treatments. And for that perfect gift, clients can visit the Skin Sense online gift shop to select from elegant gift cards in a variety of designs that never expire. Recognizing the relationship between holistic wellness and caring for the earth, Skin Sense takes great pride in its commitment to the environment offering treatments and products made with natural, vegan, and eco-friendly ingredients and using eco-friendly cleaning products. Likewise, Skin Sense is passionate about its commitment to the communities it serves. Through The Skin Sense Foundation, the company supports causes that benefit women, children, and animals partnering

Angela Padgett 1991 North Raleigh: 6801 Falls of Neuse Road Brier Creek: 8441 Brier Creek Parkway Cary: 2058 Renaissance Park Place www.skinsense.com info@skinsense.com 919-870-0700 facebook.com/skinsenseadayspa Twitter.com/SkinSenseSpa Pinterest.com/SkinSense

with organizations such as the Susan G. Komen Foundation, American Cancer Society, SPCA, Wake County Schools, Literacy Council of Wake County, and

Make a Wish Foundation of Eastern North Carolina, to name a few. “We recognize that your spa visits are an important part of your healthy lifestyle of caring for your body in harmony with other wellness rituals such as a healthy diet and going to the gym,” said Padgett. “We are passionate about giving you an outstanding, rejuvenating experience that brings balance to your life.” Skin Sense, a day spa, has three locations: North Raleigh – 6801 Falls of Neuse Road; Brier Creek – 8441 Brier Creek Parkway; and Cary – 2058 Renaissance Park Place. To contact or for more information, call 919-870-0700, email info@skinsense.com, or visit www.skinsense.com.

Photos by Ame Deaton

Special Advertising Section

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919 ›› FIELD TRIP

‘Freedom’ Exhibit Now Open

North Carolina Museum of History Offers Personality and Plenty to See

North Carolina Museum of History has personality, and plenty to see and do – especially this summer. Located at 5 East Edenton St. in downtown Raleigh, it is operated by the Division of State History Museums and provides a wide range of permanent and traveling exhibits designed to inform and involve the state’s residents – both young and old.

Among the current exhibits at the museum: • “The Story of North Carolina”, a permanent exhibit using artifacts, multimedia presentations, and other components to chronicle life in North Carolina from the earliest inhabitants through the 20th century. • “North Carolina and the Civil War: The Raging Storm, 1863”, which continues through Oct. 27. • “Art in Clay: Masterworks of North Carolina Earthenware”, which continues through Sept. 1 and features nearly 200 objects made by Piedmont potters in the 18th and 19th centuries. Two new exhibits arrived recently, related to major historical events: • “Freedom Coming, Freedom for All” panel exhibit features the official Preliminary Emancipation

North Carolina Museum of History ADDRESS: PHONE: HOURS: WEBSITE:

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5 East Edenton St., Raleigh 919-807-7900 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 12 noon-5 p.m., Sun www.ncmuseumofhistory.org

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Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln. On a onemonth loan from the National Archives, the exhibit closes June 16 – and then reopens July 1 with a copy of the 13th Amendment. • “Watergate: Political Scandal & the Presidency” exhibit examines the political scandal that engrossed Americans in the early 1970s as a Congressional Committee led by North Carolina Senator Sam Ervin investigated President Richard Nixon’s White House – ultimately leading to Nixon’s resignation. Related to the “Freedom” exhibit, a special event – “The Legacy of Freedom Symposium” – is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, May 31 and Saturday, June 1. This free two-day event will examine President Abraham Lincoln’s reasons for issuing the Emancipation Proclamation and the overall impact of the change on legal and academic communities, and feature speakers, panel discussions, freedom songs, historical reenactments and more. For details and to register, visit www.ncfmp.org. The museum’s own history starts in the 1880s, when News & Observer newspaper publisher Samuel A’Court Ashe launched an editorial campaign encouraging an effort to preserve North Carolina’s history. The newspaper’s city editor, Frederick Augustus Olds, later began traveling the state and collecting historical artifacts – and his collection was merged in 1902 with one at the State Museum (now the www.919Magazine.com


North Carolina Museum of Natural Resources) as the Hall of History. In 1914, the North Carolina Historical Commission took control of the combined collections and moved the Hall of History to a new location in the State Administration Building. It moved again in 1939, this time to a new facility know as the Education Building at Edenton and Salisbury streets. The name changed to the North Carolina Museum of History in 1965, and the exhibits moved to the new Archives and History/State Library Building on East Jones Street in 1968. The museum moved into its current facility in 1992.

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Photos Courtesy of North Carolina Museum of History

Summer Camps North Carolina Museum of History offers a variety of themed one-week camps this summer, open to a limited number of youths in grades K-2, 3-5 and 6-8. For information, call 919-807-7979, email emily.grant@ncdcr.gov, or visit www.ncmuseumofhistory.org.

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North Raleigh Mock Crash Event Helps Teens Avoid Bad Decisions While Driving For North Raleigh residents who saw or heard the commotion at Millbrook Exchange Park, it probably seemed real – but it wasn’t. Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department and the Raleigh Youth Council, in partnership with the Raleigh Police Department, conducted a DRIFT (Drive Responsible Initiative for Teens) Mock Crash event recently. Featuring a “mock crash” with emergency responders, the event was designed to demonstrate what could happen if teens make bad decisions behind the wheel of a vehicle. Teens also learned about safe driving practices and the dangers associated with distracted driving through interactive activities and presentations. Participants signed pledges to adhere to safe driving techniques (such as not speeding, always buckling seat belts, avoiding distracted driving, not drinking and driving, and using care during night driving) and enjoyed free food. Allstate Foundation also was a sponsor of the free event. Millbrook Exchange Park is located at 1815 Spring Forest Road in North Raleigh. For more information on the City of Raleigh’s Teen Program, call 919-807-5409 or email teens@raleighnc.gov.

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Photos by Eliza Kay Photography

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North Wake Psychologist Maximizes Brain, Body Health Dr. William Farrell’s New Book Helps Handle Stress

By ALYSSA BAUCOM 919 Magazine Writer

After a thirty-year career as a psychologist, North Wake County resident Dr. William Farrell decided to share his expertise in the self-help book.

Stress is troublesome and even unhealthy. But it’s neither unavoidable nor unmanageable. Dr. WILLIAM FARRELL, Ph.D Author and Psychologist

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The result is Strong Brains, Strong Bodies: You Can Live a Longer, Healthier, and Happier Life, a 214- page book geared primarily toward adult readers who wish to manage their stress levels for a better quality of life. “I was inspired to write this book after working for many years as a psychologist,” said Farrell. “I felt that what I had learned over the years working as a psychologist and information that I gleaned from the research could be helpful to the general public.” Strong Brains covers a wide range of topics, including various types of stress and stressors and their effects on the body and brain,

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techniques that can help reduce stress, and relaxation methods that can help lead to a life of happiness and tranquility. Farrell emphasizes the importance exercise, rational thinking, and adequate nutrition and sleep can have on our brains and bodies. “I practice what I preach. I have been a lifelong athlete and proponent of exercise,” said Farrell, a marathon runner and award-winning powerlifter. “Stress is troublesome and even unhealthy,” Farrell says in his book. “But it’s neither unavoidable nor unmanageable. To a remarkable extent, we can make choices that reduce the stressors in our lives, build up our resilience and lead to a life that is longer, more active, and more enjoyable. It’s all in your hands.” Farrell’s first book, Strong Brains can be ordered from Amazon, Kindle, and the author’s website at www.strongbrainsstrongbodies.com.

William H. Farrell, Ph.D Profile RESIDENCE: PROFESSION: FAMILY: PET: INTERESTS: WEBSITE:

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Heritage Community, North Wake County Senior Psychologist, State of North Carolina Wife, Heather; one daughter; one son Winston (furry, four-legged powerlifter) Exercise, powerlifting www.strongbrainsstrongbodies.com

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919 ›› FOOD BREAK

North Raleigh Resident Shares A Friend’s Tasty, Easy Recipe North Ridge resident Mary McCaffrey likes her “Rosemary’s Quiche” because its tasty and really easy to make. “This is a recipe a friend from my Bible Study gave me. She made it several times this year when we had snack time,” McCaffrey said. “I love it.”

Noting that she usually prepares the dish for special occasions, like when the girls get together, McCaffrey said it’s a simple and quick recipe to prepare. “I don’t do complicated time consuming cooking,” said McCaffrey, who has lived in Raleigh for 29 years – she’s been

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married to husband Doug for 19 of those years. Both work at Doug’s company, Remodel Raleigh Inc. and between them, they have three children. “I will do something special, but usually we keep things pretty quick and simple,” McCaffrey said. “We grill out a lot. Our schedule is pretty busy so there just isn’t a lot of time to prepare big meals.”

Rosemary’s Quiche Ingredients:

1½ cup ½ cup 1/2 stick 3 1 cup ¼ cup 1 cup

Milk Bisquick Butter (or margarine) Eggs Diced ham, turkey, chicken, shrimp or baco n Chopped onion Grated sharp cheddar ch eese

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees 2. Combine milk, Bisqu ick, margarine, eggs and on ion. 3. Mix in blender. 4. Place meat and ched dar in 10” regular pie pan or 9” deep pie pan. 5. Pour blender mixtu re over meat and cheese. 6. Bake 45 min. or until inserted knife comes cle an.

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NORTH RALEIGH

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Index of Advertisers

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Submit Events and Activities Submit information about events and activities at your school, church, club or organization. Email: events@919Magazine.com

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919 Magazine: Brier Creek Edition • Collaboration, technology help Brier Creek Elementary students enjoy learning • Brier Creek’s Dukes family loves their country club neighborhood -- and hosting friends • Ameya Rao is enthusiastic, curious, and the winner of the local spelling bee • Brier Creek youths enjoy the sights and learn about history in Washington, D.C.

MAY | JUNE 2013

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Volume 2 | Number 3

919 Magazine: Leesville/Creedmoor Road Edition • Anthony Muttillo marks his first year as principal at Leesville Road High, which celebrates 20 years since its opening in 1993 • Lessville’s Mark Stiles shares his love of music with eager students • Noah Butler demonstrates the best attributes of middle school students • Hilburn Academy 6th Graders help save sea turtles, one towel at a time

919 Magazine: Wakefield Plantation/Falls Lake • Falls Lake and the Falls Lake Dam: A thorough look at a wonderful part of the Triangle • Wakefield’s Curtis Family finds hosting an exchange student very rewarding • Susan Martin leads the Wakefied Rotary Club and its efforts to assist local youths • A look at Wakefield High School’s Just Think First ongoing initiative, and founder Vivian Wells

919 Magazine: Wake Forest Edition • Police Chief Jeffrey Leonard provides residents tips on preventing crime in Wake Forest • The Deran and Lesley Coe Family enjoys life in Wake Forest • Heritage High’s Ryan Varner is dedicated and caring, on and off the lacrosse field • Volunteer Dorothy Maynard enthusiastically shares smiles, passion for Northern Wake seniors

919 Magazine: Morrisville/Research Triangle Park/RDU • Morrisville Mayor Jackie Holcombe talks about her community and its priorities for the future • Resident TJ Cawley gives a little time to his community -- and gets back a lot • A look at Morrisville Elementary School’s Susan Davis, Spotlight Student award winner • India-born couple now feels right at home in Morrisville June | July 2013

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919 ›› REGION

Record 2012 for NC Farmers, And Big Projections This Year North Carolina farmers experienced a record year in 2012, and projections are up in several categories this year, according to government agencies. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, North Carolina winter wheat plantings in 2013 are expected at 960,000 acres – up a whopping 16 percent over last year. In addition, corn plantings this year are expected at 890,000 acres – up 3 percent over last year. Flue-cured tobacco farmers and hay producers also project increased acreage this year. In 2012, North Carolina farmers produced record yields per acre of cotton, peanuts, soybeans and sweet potatoes, according to figures released by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. SOURCE: NC Department of Agriculture

Raleigh Adds 20 Miles of New Trails to its Greenway System Raleigh added 20 miles of new trails to the Capital Area Greenway System, with the opening of the lower section of the Neuse River Trail. The new section generally runs along the Neuse River and extends all the way to the Wake County/Johnston County line. In addition, three bridges now cross the waterway, providing trail connections into Wake Forest and Knightdale. The trail is a 10-foot wide asphalt pathway, with numerous boardwalks, that winds its way through such diverse settings as wetlands, mature forests, creeks, agriculture fields, and several parks. Parking is available in several locations. For more information, visit www.raleighnc.gov. SOURCE: Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department’s Leisure Ledger

Number of Paddlings Drops At North Carolina Schools Fewer North Carolina school districts are using paddling to enforce discipline, according to a new North Carolina State Board of Education report. About a dozen school districts in the state still allow corporal punishment. Local school boards make the decision on whether to permit paddling. The report indicated a 55 percent drop in paddling in the 2011-2012 school year, with 404 incidents counted. Two out of three paddlings last year were in Robeson County. SOURCE: NC State Board of Education

NC Film Industry Off to a Fast Start After Record Year in 2012 Last year was a record-breaking year for the film industry in North Carolina – and 2013 is off to a fast start as well. Productions had a direct in-state spend in excess of $376 million and created more than 4,100 crew positions for the state’s highly skilled workforce, according to the North Carolina Film Office. All told, productions created nearly 20,000 job opportunities — including talent and background extra positions — for North Carolinians (eclipsing 2011’s $220 million in spending and 3,300 crew positions). Nearly 50 productions registered with the state film office and filmed in North Carolina in 2012. Those productions amassed over 4,100 production days with filming taking place in more than 30 of the state’s 100 counties. Highlights of the 2012 year include the production of the blockbuster feature Iron Man 3 and Season 2 of the award winning television drama Homeland. SOURCE: NC Film Office

Highway Deaths Increase, But Numbers Still Below Averages North Carolina saw roadway deaths increase last year, but state Department of Transportation figures show the number is still down significantly from a few years ago. NCDOT reports 1,224 people were killed in automobile accidents in 2012 – including 23 bicyclists and 170 pedestrians. That compares with an average of 1,560 between 2001 and 2006. SOURCE: NC Department of Transportation

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919 ‹‹ BULLETIN BOARD

Millbrook Exchange Children’s Playground Re-Opening After Renovations The children’s playground next to the Millbrook Exchange Community Center is expected to re-open in June following an extensive renovation. The playground closed Jan. 28 to facilitate the improvements, including: • A Play Area for ages 2-5 to accommodate approximately 20 children, including composite play equipment with platforms, roofs, slides, climbers and acoustic instruments; a swing set; and two spring riders. • A Play Area for ages 5-12 to accommodate approximately 90 children, including a multi-level play structure with slides, climbers, overhead climbers, play panels and exercise bars; and a swing set. • Other play elements, such as a rubber safety surface in the play areas; two sand diggers, including one with wheelchair access; and painted games — such as hopscotch and four-square — on sidewalks. The site also now includes picnic tables (including one that is wheelchair accessible), benches, trash receptacles, shade trees and centrally located natural area, and a fenced parking area. Millbrook Exchange Community Center is located at 1905 Spring Forest Road in North Raleigh.

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919 ›› FINAL BELL Raleigh Ranks

#3 in U.S.

For Growth of Women-Owned Businesses A recent American Express report ranks North Carolina third in the nation in terms of the growth in the number of women-owned businesses. North Carolina trailed only Georgia and Texas on the list, and was the only state to see growth of more than 100 percent. The firm’s Open Study report indicated 267,000 women-owned businesses currently in North Carolina, which represents a 90 percent increase since 1997 (compared to a 59 percent increase nationally). States with the lowest growth rate for womenowned businesses included Alaska, West Virginia, Iowa, Ohio and Kansas.

By the Numbers Here’s a look at Raleigh, by the numbers:

Parks

217 Acres of Parkland

9,424 Community Centers

26 Miles of Streets

1,050 Streetlights

SOURCE: American Express Open Study

33,067

Seventy-eight percent of all residents in the RaleighCary area feel safe walking along at night where they live – the second highest percentage among the 50 largest U.S. Metropolitan areas. In new information released by Gallop, Raleigh-Cary tied with DenverAurora, CO, in second place. Both trailed Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN in the rankings. Memphis, TN, was identified as the metro area where residents felt the least safe, followed by New Orleans, LA, Riverside-San Bernardino, CA, HoustonBaytown, TX and Jacksonville, FL.

Miles of Water Mains

Raleigh/Cary Residents

2nd

Most Likely To Feel Safe

2,204 Square Miles

145 Sworn Police Officers

777 Fire Stations

27 SOURCE: 2012 Raleigh Citizens’ Annual Financial Report

Where to Start a Business? Raleigh Ranks

#2

National Federation of Independent Business ranks Raleigh as the second best place in the U.S. to start a business. Raleigh gains accolades in the rankings due to a burgeoning population, safety, affordable housing, and a fast-growing job market. Number one on the list was California’s Silicon Valley. Following Raleigh on the list was Madison, WI; Austin, TX; and Boulder, CO. SOURCE: National Federation of Independent Business

#1

BEST QUALITY OF LIFE Business Facilities magazine ranked Raleigh as having the Best Quality of Life in the U.S. in 2012. SOURCE: Business Facilities magazine

Working Mothers In Raleigh In a Good Spot Raleigh ranks as the number 14 best city for working mothers to live and thrive, according to Forbes magazine. SOURCE: Forbes magazine

SOURCE: Gallop

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919 Magazine Zone 3 Issue 6  

North Raleigh, Six Forks Road, Falls of Neuse Road, Pleasant, New Hope, Millbrook, and Zip Code 27615