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Leesville | Harrington Grove | Lake Lynn | Springdale | Creedmoor Rd | 27613

Leesv All-Loille’s Maga cal zine

JULY | AUGUST 2013 919 Magazine LV

919Magazine.com July | August 2013

Volume 2 | Number 4 www.919Magazine.com

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919 Magazine LV

July | August 2013

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Dr. Gina Lee 10411 Moncreiffe Road Suite 105A, Raleigh

briercreekortho.com

Braces for Children and Adults Invisible Incognito (inside braces) • Clear Ceramic Braces • Damon System Invisalign • Traditional Metal Braces • Retainers

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends a check-up with an orthodontist no later than age 7. Our mission is to provide you with the very best orthodontic care to achieve the smile you deserve in a warm and family-oriented environment. Dr. Lee gives each patient plenty of personal attention, as each patient's smile is a customized work of art, and each patient's orthodontic needs are different. Our office utilizes the most advanced cutting edge orthodontic equipment and techniques to ensure the optimal results and maximum comfort in the least amount of time.

Flexible Payment Plan • MostJulyInsurance Accepted • 0% Financing | August 2013 www.919Magazine.com

919 Magazine LV

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919 ‹‹ SYLLABUS

Features

The Cover

14

Off To Washington Hilburn Student Part of Prestigious National Leadership Conference

16

Home of The Pride The Vicks Give Full Support to Leesville Pride

18

Feeling the Leesville Beat 18 Years Ago, the Crawford Family Found its Real Hometown

22

Meeting Individual Needs Dr. Stevens Unique Academy Offers Students A Specialized Program

25

Dedication To Education Mayer Humbled By Sycamore Creek Teacher of The Year

26

The Legacy of Leesville’s Band New Band Director Proud To Return to Leesville Roots

45

Pump It Up The Ultimate Birthday Party Special Events And More

50

Just Keep Trying Leesville High Graduate Overcomes All Challenges

12 14

Planners 7

Personal Connections

Leesville Teacher Uses Music To Influence Students’ Lives

An Adventurous Spirit

Compassion, Camera Take Leesville High Graduate Around the World

Community

8

School Events

8

Extracurricular Activities

8

Community Sports

Departments 6

Publisher’s Notes

28

Yearbook

42

Community

46

Field Trip

52

Homework

54

Food Break

55

Along the I-540 Corridor

56

919 Region

57

Advertisers Index

60

Bulletin Board

62

919 Final Bell

On the Cover

BIG

D I S CO U N

TS

COUP AND MONS PAGES ORE, 60-61

The Angus Barn, Van Eure and Chef Walter Royal Photo by Ame Deaton 919 Magazine LV

32 34 July | August 2013

Student Awareness, Understanding Discovering Benefits of Foreign Language Immersion Program

The Big Red

The Angus Barn’s Legacy Of Great Service to Raleigh www.919Magazine.com

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919 ›› NOTES Publisher

Suzy Beth Sarver

Hometown Stories: Keep Them Coming

IT Operations

One of the most rewarding aspects of my position with 919 Magazine is when I have the opportunity to meet our readers here in the community. I love it when they share their stories and insights, or tell me how the publication has made an impact in their life.

Keith Bullington

Art Director Ben Bipes

Photography

Recently a local grandfather expressed his delight about reading a recent “Field Trip” article on the observation deck at Raleigh-Durham International Airport — and how he now has a special place to watch airplanes with his grandson. I met a woman at the gym who made an entrée from a “Food Break” recipe we featured, and was so excited that it was such a big hit with her family. Kids often come up and ask me how they can have their picture in 919 Magazine and are thrilled when I say it’s as simple as sending one in (to info@919Magazine.com). Sharing hometown stories, introducing new friends and neighbors and seeing familiar faces — that’s what we’re about and how we are keeping it local in Leesville. Speaking of local, we start off with an up close look at one of the most famous landmarks in North Raleigh: The one and only Big Red, The Angus Barn. We sit down with Owner Van Eure, who shares many details on the rich history of this legendary restaurant beginning on page 34. Other features to catch in this issue include: • A profile of Hilburn student Sean Michael Thomas and his road to Washington. Find him on page 14. • On page 16, a feature on volunteers Jay and Susan Vick, newer members of the community — and already giving their full support to the Leesville Pride. • A look at the Crawford family, who moved to the Leesville community 18 years ago and found the hometown they were seeking. Their story begins on page 18. • An intriguing story about how Diane Covington reaches young people with music — hoping in some small way to make a personal connection and influence their lives. It’s on page 12. • For car racing enthusiasts with no time to get to Charlotte, an exciting “Field Trip” report on Orange County Speedway. We take you to pit row and beyond. Once home to a Busch Series race, this live car racing venue is alive and thriving — and very close to Leesville. Buckle up and race over to page 46. And finally, be sure to catch our list of the Raleigh area’s Independence Day activities on page 11. We provide a few choices on where to go and what to do this 4th of July holiday. Whatever you are doing this summer in the 919, we want to hear about it. Please stay connected with us through Facebook and Twitter, or simply drop us an email or send in your photos to info@919magazine.com. Because if it’s important to you, it’s important to us. This is 919, where we all Live, Work, and Play.

Reflections by Cathy Foreman

Production Ame Deaton Tika Stuart

Contributors

Stephanie Friedl Alyssa Baucom

Marketing Debra Hurst

Advertising

advertise@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

Content

info@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

Annual Subscriptions

$23.95 plus $6.00 Postage & Handling Call 919-747-2899 Email info@919Magazine.com

Back Issues

A limited number of back issues of various editions are available. $3.99 postage and handling for one copy; $1.00 for additional copies (limit 2) Call 919-747-2899 Email info@919Magazine.com

8801 Fast Park Drive, Suite 311 | Raleigh, NC 27617 www.919Magazine.com Volume 2, Number 4 © Copyright 2013 919 Magazine Reproduction without permission is prohibited. 919 Magazine is published locally six times a year by dreamLake Media. Information provided by advertisers – or other companies or individuals – does not represent an endorsement or verification of accuracy, and is entirely the responsibility of advertisers. 919 Magazine assumes no responsibility or liability for the content of advertising placed in the publication (or on 919Magazine.com website).

A dreamLake Media Publication

Scott McElhaney President and CEO

Sincerely,

SB Sarver Publisher 6

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919 ‹‹ PLANNER

COMMUNITY EVENTS

COMMUNITY EVENTS 7/5, 12, 19

7/24

JULY

5th Annual Great Open Jump/Imagination Celebration Autism Speaks Benefit

7/1-3

Pirates, Mermaids and Fairies Summer Dance Camp 9:30 am-12 pm Age 2.5-6; $75 Stage Door Dance 2720 Godley Ln, Ste 101 919-720-3036 www.stagedoordance.com

7/4

Brier Creek Commons Fireworks 5 pm (festivities); fireworks start 9:15-9:45 pm Clock Plaza 8161 Brier Creek Pkwy shopbriercreekcommons.com

7/4

Independence Day

Parents Date Night Out Dinner, movie, inflatable play 6-10 pm, ages 4-12 $20 per child; $15 per sibling Reservations Required Pump It Up 10700 World Trade Blvd, Brier Creek 919-828-3344 www.pumpitupparty.com

7/9-11, 7/16-18, 7/23-25

7/24-8/21

Jump-N-Art Camp

Art Jumpstart

9:30 am-2:30 pm (3 days) Ages 4-12; $100 (one day, $35) Snacks, art supplies, play, T-shirt Reservations required Pump It Up 10700 World Trade Blvd, Brier Creek 919-828-3344 www.pumpitupparty.com

Age 18m-4; $25 Fee 9-10 am, Wednesdays Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

7/13-8/10

Music and Movement: Sing a Song of Summer

Piano Introduction

7/24-8/21

Age 5-up; $100 Various times Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

Age 18m-3; $25 Fee 10-11 am, Wednesdays Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

7/22-26

7/24-8/21

Nick Junior Summer Dance Camp 9:30 am-12 pm Age 2.5-6; $115 Stage Door Dance 2720 Godley Ln, Ste 101 919-720-3036 www.stagedoordance.com

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6-9 pm; donation for admission Pump It Up 10700 World Trade Blvd, Brier Creek 919-828-3344 www.pumpitupparty.com

July | August 2013

Sensational Summer Age 2-4; $25 Fee 11 am-12 pm, Wednesdays Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

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919 ›› PLANNER

SCHOOL EVENTS

AUGUST 8/21

Pride Launch/Freshman Camp

7/29-8/2

World of Dance Summer Dance Camp 9:30 am-12 pm Age 2.5-6; $115 Stage Door Dance 2720 Godley Ln, Ste 101 919-720-3036 www.stagedoordance.com

Jul/Aug

Pop-in-Playtime Events 10 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri $7 per child; $5 per sibling Pump It Up 10700 World Trade Blvd, Brier Creek 919-828-3344 www.pumpitupparty.com

AUGUST 8/21

Nature Tales and Scales Age 2-5; $3 Fee 9:30-10:15 am Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

8 am-12 pm Leesville Road High 8409 Leesville Rd 919-870-4250 www.leesville.org

8/26

Jul/Aug

WCPSS tradition calendar campuses

Pool, darts and more 5800 Duraleigh Rd 919-783-5448 www.sharkysnc.com

First Day of School

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES EVENTS Jul/Aug Summer Movie Express 10 am; $1 admission Regal Brier Creek Stadium 14 8611 Brier Creek Pkwy 919-361-1115 7/2 Mr. Poppers’ Penguins 7/3 Alvin: Chipwrecked 7/9 Coraline 7/10 Paranorman 7/16 Dr. Seuss’ Lorax 7/17 Big Miracle 7/23 Yogi Bear 7/24 Journey 2 7/30 Racing Stripes 7/31 Happy Feet Two 8/6 African Cats 8/7 Chimpanzee

8/10-11 Annual Summer Intensive Stage Door Dance Productions 2720 Godley Ln, Ste 101 919-720-3036 www.stagedoordance.com

9/27

Denim & Diamonds Annual Gala Pay it Forward Fertility Foundation Benefit $150 per person The Pavilions at The Angus Barn 9401 Glendwood Ave. www.payitforwardfertility.org

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NIGHTLIFE

July | August 2013

Sharky’s Place

Jul/Aug

Lynnwood Grill Live music Wed, 6 pm Trivia Sun, 8 pm 4821 Grove Barton Rd 919-785-0043 www.lynnwoodgrill.com

Jul/Aug

Wild Turkey Lounge (Angus Barn) Live Music Nightly 9401 Glenwood Ave 919-781-2444 www.angusbarn.com

COMMUNITY SPORTS REGISTRATIONS, CAMPS, LESSONS Jul

Ultra5 Soccer Camps Boys, girls; various age groups M-F, 12-4 pm; $250 D1 Sports 6330 Mt. Herman Rd 919-825-1298 www.D1Raleigh.com

Jul/Aug

Sports and Day Camps Trinity Academy 10224 Baileywick Rd 919-786-0114 www.trinityacademy.com www.919Magazine.com


919 ‹‹ PLANNER Jul/Aug

Sports Summer Camps Leesville Road High 8409 Leesville Rd www.leesvilleathletics.com

7/8-7/12

Fall Girls Fast Pitch Softball Registration Age 11-13; $48 fee Athletic Program 2401 Wade Ave 919-831-6836 www.parks.raleighnc.gov

7/8-7/19

Youth Volleyball Registration

7/22-7/26

Youth Little League Tackle Football Registration Age 9-11; $48 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

7/22-7/26

Youth Junior League Tackle Football Registration Age 11-13; $48 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

Age 8-11; $50 fee Athletic Program 2401 Wade Ave 919-831-6836 www.parks.raleighnc.gov

7/24

5th Annual Great Open Jump/Imagination Celebration Autism Speaks Benefit 6-9 pm; donation for admission Pump It Up 10700 World Trade Blvd, Brier Creek 919-828-3344 www.pumpitupparty.com

7/22-7/26

Youth Cheerleading Registration Age 7-13; $48 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov

7/27

Run with Heart 5K 8 am Town Hall Dr, Morrisville www.runwithheart.org

8/5

Adult Baseball Registration Begins Age 18+; $450 team fee Athletic Program 2401 Wade Ave 919-831-6836 www.parks.raleighnc.gov

8/26-29

Adult Fall Kickball Registration Age 18+; $300 Class Fee Athletic Program 2401 Wade Ave 919-831-6836 www.parks.raleighnc.gov

7/22-7/26

Youth Mitey Mite Tackle Football Registration Age 7-9; $48 fee Lake Lynn Community Center 7921 Ray Rd 919-870-2911 www.raleigh.gov 919 Magazine LV

WALKS, RACES, GOLF

Jul/Aug

Summer Volleyball Camps Triangle Volleyball Club Girls and boys; ages 2-12 Full/Half-day camps, clinics 919-544-9400 info@trianglevolleyball.org www.trianglevolleyball.org

July | August 2013

8/3

Kids in Training Youth Triathlon 8:30 am; ages 5-17; $30 Brier Creek Country Club 9400 Club Hill Dr, Raleigh www.kidsintraining.org

8/24

19th Annual 5K Raleigh Run for Life 8 am WakeMed Soccer Park 201 Soccer Park Dr 919-815-1369 blk4jmj@gmail.com www.raleighrunforlife.org

Send Us Your Events & Activities! Submit information about events at your school, church, club or organization.

Events@919Magazine.com www.919Magazine.com

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919 ›› PLANNER 9/28

7/13

Race, street party, music, food 4 pm Glenwood South, Raleigh Tanya@1in9.com

Age 6-12 3 pm Umstead Park 8801 Glenwood Ave 919-571-4170 www.ncparks.gov

Pink Shamrock 5K

10/5, 12

Junior Park Ranger

Light the Night Walk

OTHER

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Benefit Oct 5 – Downtown Durham Oct 12 – Downtown Raleigh www.lightthenight.org/nc

JULY

10/10

Fishing Fun

Pink Play Day Breast Cancer Fundraiser Brier Creek Country Club www.briercreek4pink.org

10/13

25th Annual Thad & Alice Eure Walk for Hope, 5K & 10K Benefit for the Research And Treatment of Mental Illness 8 am (5K, 10K); 10 am (Walk) The Angus Barn 9401 Glenwood Ave 919-781-9255 www.walkforhope.com

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Canoeing Skills I for Young Adults

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10 am Umstead Park 8801 Glenwood Ave 919-571-4170 www.ncparks.gov

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7/11

July | August 2013

WED

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919 ‹‹ PLANNER

4TH OF JULY EVENTS 7/4

7/4

11 am-3 pm NC State Capital 1 E. Edenton St 919-733-4994 www.visitraleigh.com

Independence Day Celebration Gates open 5 pm; concert, 7:30 pm Free admission Koka Booth Amphitheater Cary 8003 Regency Pkwy 919-462-2052 www.boothamphitheatre.com

July 4th at the State Capital

7/4

Historic Independence Day Open House An Old-Fashioned 4th of July Celebration

11 am-4 pm Joel Lane Museum House 728 W. Hargett St 919-833-3431 www.visitraleigh.com

NC Symphony’s Triangle’s Best

7/4

The ‘Works: July 4th on Fayetteville Street, Red Hat Amphitheater Music, contests, vendors (free) Downtown Raleigh 12-10 pm; fireworks, 9:15 pm, 10:15pm www.raleighconvention.com/works/

7/4

Brier Creek Commons Fireworks 5 pm (festivities); fireworks start 9:15-9:45 pm Clock Plaza 8161 Brier Creek Pkwy shopbriercreekcommons.com

STAGE DOOR DANCE

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919 ›› PERSONALITY PROFILE

Reaching Young People With Music

LRHS’s Diane Covington Makes Personal Connections To Influence Students’ Lives By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Connecting young people with music is Diane Covington’s life’s work. As the director for Leesville Road High School’s award winning choral department, Covington, a 25-year teaching veteran, enjoys helping students succeed through music. “I try to make a personal connection with all 186 of my students and to be a positive influence in their lives,” said Covington. A long time Raleigh resident, Covington lives in Dominion Park with her husband Dr. David L. Covington, who is the director of music for First Presbyterian Church in downtown Raleigh. “We love Raleigh, the people of Raleigh, and the musical and cultural events that Raleigh offers,” said Covington. Their grown children, Meredith Clayton and Jonathan Covington, both live in the Raleigh area as well. Covington is a proud new grandparent to Maggie Leigh Clayton, daughter of Meredith and her husband Ryan Clayton.

Whenever adults say that they are worried about this next generation, I invite them to sit in on one of my classes. DIANE COVINGTON Photos by Emory Lane Photography

Diane Covington Profile AGE: 56 RESIDENCE: Dominion Park, Raleigh PROFESSION: Leesville Road High School Choral Director FAMILY: Husband (35 yrs), Dr. David L. Covington; 2 children: Meredith Clayton, Jonathan R. Covington PETS: Allie, Sophie (dogs) INTERESTS: Music of all types, yoga, reading, family, swimming

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As a National Board Certified educator and choral director, Covington directs the LRHS ensembles, beginning chorus, intermediate chorale, and Capital Pride — the advanced honors group — until her retirement in June. Consistently, LRHS choral groups receive superior ratings at district, state, and national festivals and competitions. Recently, the intermediate chorale won first place and Best AllRound Choir at a festival in Williamsburg, VA. Capital Pride won the same honors at a Disney festival this past April and has had the honor of being invited to perform in prestigious venues such as Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., and Westminster Cathedral in London, England. Reflecting on their successes, Covington said, “We delve very deeply into the marriage of the music and the text to produce, what we hope, is very close to the composer’s original intent.” For her outstanding achievements in education, Covington was awarded the

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coveted North Carolina Music Educator’s Teacher of the Year Award in 2010. Covington appreciates the support of the faculty and administration for the choral program and cannot say enough good things about the students at LRHS. “Whenever adults

July | August 2013

say that they are worried about this next generation, I invite them to sit in on one of my classes,” said Covington. “Students from all backgrounds and circumstances in life work together to achieve something that is far greater than anything that they can do alone.”

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919 ›› STUDENT PROFILE

Young Mr. Thomas Goes to Washington

Hilburn Student Part Of Prestigious National Leadership Conference By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

As the first baby born in Raleigh in 2001 (at 12:25 a.m.), Sean Michael Thomas began his life in the spotlight – and years later, he continues to shine. “I was in the News & Observer and on the local news, so I can tell people I have been on TV,” said Thomas. This summer, the rising Hilburn Academy 7th Grader heads to Washington, DC, to attend the 2013 Junior National Young Leaders Conference. JrNYLC accepts nominations from teachers and mentors for outstanding middle school students who demonstrate maturity, academic excellence, and leadership potential. “I was very happy that Ms. Lauren Boop nominated me and excited when I was accepted for the conference,” said Thomas. Thomas lives in Harrington Grove with his parents, Angela and Sean Thomas; his sister,

Alexis; and their dog Sadie, a smart toy Pomeranian, who gives high fives on command. Mom Angela is a project manager for InScope International, and dad Sean is a sales manager for Bertlekamp Automation. “Sean Michael has been a very special child from the day he was born,” said Sean. “He has always been a very compassionate and kind individual, helping anyone and anything in need, and has always been a great student,” said Angela. As an A/B honor roll student at Hilburn, Thomas likes being a part of the inaugural 6th Grade class and is well liked by his peers and teachers. He enjoys both social studies and science classes because, he said, “I learn great facts from all over the world, and, in science, we get to do cool experiments.” Thomas hopes to parlay his interests into a future career of building defense weapons for the U.S. Military. Inspired by his parents and grandmother, Thomas believes in being true to himself and

Sean Michael Thomas Profile

Photos by Ame Deaton

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AGE: 12 SCHOOL: Hilburn Academy (7th Grade) PARENTS: Angela and Sean Thomas RESIDENCE: Harrington Grove, North Raleigh SIBLINGS: Alexis, 9 PET: Sadie (dog) INTERESTS: Fishing, karate, coin collecting, World War II history

July | August 2013

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not following the crowd. A second degree brown belt, Thomas enjoys karate at Karate International of West Raleigh. He also loves fishing with his dad, swimming, coin collecting, and World War II history. Thomas is looking forward to his trip to Washington, DC, which includes visiting the national memorials and Harpers Ferry National Historic Park – the site of John Brown’s attack on slavery, and a sleepover at the Maryland Science Center. “I hope to gain public speaking and leadership skills and skills for working in groups at the conference,” said Thomas.

(Sean Michael) has always been a very compassionate and kind individual, helping anyone and anything in need, and has always been a great student.

Pictured from left to right are Angela, Sean, Alexis, Sean Michael and grandmother Billie Hayes

ANGELA THOMAS

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919 ›› VOLUNTEER PROFILE

Jay and Susan Vick Adopt North Raleigh, Give Full Support to Leesville Pride By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Although a new family to Leesville Road High School, Jay and Susan Vick are no strangers to leading the charge for high school athletics. After their son, Clay (age 15), transferred to LRHS this past November to play Cap 8 football, the Vicks were quickly welcomed and encouraged to get involved – with Jay now serving as president of the Pride Athletic Club, and Susan as a board member of Football Families at LRHS. Previously, the Vicks had served on the booster club at their children’s school (St. David’s) handling every conceivable job during their 10year stint, from organizing and selling concessions for many sports and organizing state meets and tournaments, to collecting and washing uniforms, raising money for athletic buses, tennis courts, and irrigation systems, and more. Daughter Wesleigh (age 19) played basketball for St. David’s and is now at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, VA, and member of the Generals women’s basketball team. “When Clay transferred to Leesville, we attempted to quietly blend in

– as if we were in the booster-club-witnessprotection program,” said Jay. “We initially started attending basketball games and getting the feel for being part of the Leesville family, and then somebody ratted us out, and soon we found ourselves involved to the level we had served at our former school...happily.” Although the Vicks live in Broughton (near Five Points) – “enemy territory” – and like where they live, they opted for their son to attend LRHS under the Wake County School Board’s School of Choice Option. Aware of the LRHS coaching staff, disciplined football program, and strong sense of community support among its families, the Vicks decided to commit to the 20 min. drive every morning to North Raleigh. “We love our adopted home of North Raleigh,” said Susan. “Everyone we have met has been so kind to us.” And for the record, Susan grew up near North Hills, when North Hills was North Raleigh.

Photos by Reflections by Cathy Foreman

By day, Jay works as owner and operator of Final Grade, a commercial seeding company serving North Carolina for over 25 years. Susan is an attorney and lobbyist with Fetzer Strategic Partners, with her brother and former Raleigh Mayor, Tom Fetzer. The Vicks look forward to working with Athletic Director Jack Rogers and continuing the tradition of outstanding leadership in support of the LRHS athletic program.

Jay and Susan Vick Profile AFFILIATION: AGES: RESIDENCE: FAMILY: PETS: INTERESTS:

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LRHS, Pride Athletic Club (Jay, president); LRHS Football Families (Susan, board member) Jay, 52; Susan, 50 Inside the beltline, near Five Points Daughter, Wesleigh, 19; son, Clay, 15. Deacon (dachshund); Jackson (Labrador retriever) LRHS football and athletics; Washington & Lee University basketball; boating

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We love our adopted home of North Raleigh. Everyone we have met has been so kind to us. SUSAN VICK

Pride Athletic Club 2013-14 GOAL: Following the path of the great leadership of last years’s PAC board and deploying the long-term strategy for athletic enhancements – and working the athletic director on new concepts. PURPOSE: Raise funds to enhance the environment for student athletes at Leesville Road High School. This is accomplished through volunteers running the concessions stands, assisting with the summer camps, participating in fundraisers, publishing sports programs, and other activities centered around school spirit. MEETINGS: 7 p.m., first Monday each month at LRHS Career Center CONTACT: www.leesvilleathletics.com

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919 ›› FAMILY PROFILE

A Successful Search for a New Hometown

18 Years Later, the Crawford Family Still Feels The Beat of the Leesville Community By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

The Crawford Family hears, feels and lives the beat of Leesville. Natives of South Florida, Jim Crawford Sr. and Betty, his wife of nearly 29 years, moved to Glen Arbors at Dominion Park 18 years ago, raised their family, became active in the Fountain of Raleigh Church, and became immersed in their North Raleigh community. “When we first moved here from South Florida we searched for a community that reminded us of home, friendly family oriented folks of mixed races,” Betty said. “We liked the wooded feel along with sidewalks, pools and community playground. But most of all we wanted to live in a community with excellent schools for our children to attend.” They were hearing the Leesville beat, and the family thrived: • Jim Sr. completed his 30year tenure at IBM and retired in 2012. He’s very much into electronics. • Betty took some time off when her children were younger, then joined the Wake County Public School System (she’s currently the Data Manager at Leesville Road Middle School). She enjoys cooking, sewing, gardening and volunteering at church. • Oldest son, Jim Jr. is now 25, lives in Brier Creek, and works for Credit Suisse in Research Triangle Park. He 18

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graduated from NC State in 2010. He loves music and enjoys working in ministry with college students. Daughter Kimberly, 23, works at Trone Brand Energy in Greensboro, and graduated from UNC-Greensboro in 2011. She volunteers at church and “enjoys adventurous things.” And Timothy, 18, is a full time student at NC State, currently participating in a summer internship at Cisco Systems.

Majoring in Computer Engineering & Electrical Engineering, he hopes to become an Embedded Systems Engineer and work on the computers that help enhance

Growing up in the Leesville area was living in a true community. TIMOTHY CRAWFORD

Crawford Family Profile PARENTS: RESIDENCE: CHILDREN: INTERESTS:

Jim Crawford Sr., Betty Crawford Glen Arbors at Dominion Park Jim Jr., 25; Kimberly, 23; Timothy, 18 Traveling; visiting amusement parks (“we’re all thrill seekers”); movie nights

July | August 2013

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automotive performance. In addition to being in the honors program, he has been on the Dean’s List and sits on the executive board of NC State’s Chapter of National Society of Black Engineers. He’s a car enthusiast, a DJ, and really likes to keep busy. “I’ve always enjoyed being exposed to what new things I could get involved in,” Timothy said. “When you’re busy you don’t always realize what all you are doing, but when you take a second and realize, it feels highly rewarding.” He also feels the Leesville beat. “Growing up in the Leesville area was living in a true community,” he said. “I really enjoyed forming the lasting friendships from classmates I met back in kindergarten. You’d learn and grow with them all the way into your high school years.”

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In fact, Timothy chose to attend NC State, in part, so he could remain heavily involved in the community in which he was raised. “I still wanted to be able to volunteer with the YMCA and stay active in my church,” he said. Yes, Timothy and the Crawfords

definitely feel the Leesville beat and love their hometown community. Actually, since Jim Sr. loves to play the drums and taught both Jim Jr. and Timothy to play — they literally feel the beat. “It’s something that runs in the family,” Timothy noted.

Photo by Reflections by Cathy Foreman

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919 ›› PERSONALITY PROFILE By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Photojournalist and Leesville Road High School and UNC Chapel Hill graduate Rachel Dennis is using her compassion, camera, and adventurous spirit to make a difference in the world. As a member of the PhotogenX Track team, Dennis is on an 18-month-long journey transforming communities around the world through photography, video, and writing, telling the stories of people who can’t tell their own. “I love traveling as a photojournalist because my camera acts as another kind of passport,” said Dennis. “It’s a point of entry into places and lives that I otherwise wouldn’t have a reason or access to go.”

Compassion, Camera Take Rachel Dennis On a World Adventure

I had excellent teachers at Leesville who inspired me to work hard and taught me how to think. RACHEL DENNIS

Her travels have taken her to such exotic and faraway places as the Amazon, Indonesia, and Thailand. And as a photojournalist, Dennis is not just visiting but immersing herself into the lives of the indigenous people, sometimes learning more about herself than those whom she is studying and documenting. In Argentina, Dennis had the opportunity to spend every waking moment of the day with an actor. “He was extremely open, letting me into 20

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Photos by Barrow Images

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every area of his life, personal and professional,” said Dennis. “I learned a lot from him about using your gifts, no matter what you’re gifted in, to impact people’s lives for the better.” Some of her most memorable experiences to date include spending a week in the Amazon weeding banana trees, helping build a new orphanage facility, and making friends with a monkey; spending a night filming at an orphanage in Cusco and falling in love with the kids there; eating suri (a fried grub delicacy in the jungle) and frogs in Indonesia; and, in Thailand, riding elephants,

Rachel Dennis Profile

petting tigers, bamboo river rafting, and shooting backstage at a cabaret show – befriending the ladyboys, and singing karaoke with them. Dennis credits her experience at LRHS and UNC-Chapel Hill for preparing her for life. “I had excellent teachers at Leesville who inspired me to work hard and taught me how to think,” said Dennis. “At UNC, I met some of the most driven, hardworking and passionate people, and at the same time was surrounded by bucket-loads of opportunities to learn and try new things and meet people from all walks of life.” As for her future, Dennis

said, “I hope to become a better photographer and storyteller, to be a help and a blessing to the people I meet, and to learn how to inspire people to connect with them.”

AGE: 23 EDUCATION: LRHS (class of 2008); UNC-Chapel Hill (class of 2012) PARENTS: Richard and Carla Dennis RESIDENCE: Springdale Gardens SIBLINGS: Paul Dennis (21, NC State); Robyn Dennis (15, LRHS) PETS: Tess (dog) INTERESTS: Photojournalism, travel, music, people, reading, dance

Pay it Forward Fertility Foundation proudly announces 5th annual gala! Come join us for a night of dinner, dancing, and giving at The Pavilions at The Angus Barn. Please scan QR code for more information about Pay it Forward Fertility Foundation.

Visit us at:

www.payitforwardfertility.org

For more information about Pay It Forward Fertility Foundation or to make a donation to this worthy cause, visit our website or make a check payable to Pay It Forward Fertility Foundation and mail to: PIFFF; 8311 Brier Creek Parkway • Suite 105-111 • Raleigh, NC 27617. All contributions are tax-deductible.

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919 ›› PERSONALITY PROFILE By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Twenty-five years ago, Dr. CM Stevens founded Stevens Prep Academy to serve the needs of students who didn’t fit the one-size-fits-all approach he witnessed in other public and private schools. Nick-named “a home school by professionals,” Stevens Prep Academy offers a specialized program designed to meet each student’s needs. “I saw the deficiencies in traditional educational systems and knew how to correct them, so I began Stevens Prep Academy,” said Stevens. “Instead of telling the student to keep up with everyone else, each student is tested and placed at their level of ability in each subject with reinforcement in place for any weaker areas that are not at grade level.” Stevens – a silver level ballroom dancer, photographer, and world traveler – is a former Wake County teacher who graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke with a Master of Science and PhD in Educational Counseling. While at UNC Pembroke, Stevens was president and founder of the NC Student Legislation and member of Delta Psi Omega Fraternity and the Political Science Masochists International. In 1988, Stevens earned his teaching certificate, and, since 1993, has been licensed with NC Dept. of Non Public Education. A three time recipient of the National Who’s Who award for outstanding professional and civic achievements, Stevens is also a graduate of Wood Badge, the most advanced training 22

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Meeting Individual Needs

Dr. Stevens’ Unique Academy Offers Students A Specialized Program

Photos by Ame Deaton

I saw the deficiencies in traditional educational systems and knew how to correct them, so I began Stevens Prep Academy. DR. CM STEVENS July | August 2013

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available for Scout Leaders of the Boy Scouts of America and successfully completed a Philmont trek of 112 miles in 13 days. After many years of providing individualized education in accordance with North Carolina graduation requirements, Stevens enjoys discovering new ways to understand and educate students and takes great pride in knowing he has helped his students achieve their goals. His greatest reward comes from hearing from former graduates with thanks and gratitude for providing a quality education and the foundation they needed for success. Particularly rewarding for Stevens is seeing former students go on to earn their fouryear degrees and continue on to pursue even higher education. “I think to myself, I am so happy and pleased that I helped you on to the next stage of your life,� said Stevens. Stevens Prep Academy, established in 1988, is located at 901 Oak Creek Road in North Raleigh. For more information,

Dr. CM Stevens Profile RESIDENCE: PROFESSION: PETS: INTERESTS:

Sheffield Manor, North Raleigh Entrepreneur/ Educator (Stevens Prep Academy) 8-Ball, Little Girl (Jack Russell terriers) Ballroom dance, photography, traveling

visit www.stevensprepacademy.com, email

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By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Anne Mayer is humbled about being named Sycamore Creek Elementary School’s Teacher of the Year. “This entire process has been a great honor,” the 4th Grade teacher said. “I am grateful to work with such dedicated teachers and administrators.” A teacher for 19 years, the Westlake neighborhood resident joined SCES three years ago after more than five years at Leesville Elementary. And her enthusiasm for her job is evident. “I

I love (the Leesville) community because neighbors care very much about the success of the schools and do all they can to support them.

Mayer Humbled by Sycamore Creek Teacher of the Year Honor

enjoy getting to know the students and helping them reach academic success in a respectful, caring environment,” Mayer said. “I also enjoy collaborating with other educators about curriculum standards, creating student projects, and enriching activities to make learning relevant and fun for the students.

Mayer, a finalist for Wake County Public School System’s Teacher of the Year, noted that she was honored because the nomination came from her peers. “I

get inspired by other amazing teachers around me,” she said. “I was very surprised. I can think of at least 20 other teachers who deserve this honor as well.”

Originally from Chicago, Mayer lived in Indiana and Florida before arriving in North Carolina. She comes from a large family, and has been married to husband Eric for 20 years. “I love the (Leesville) community because neighbors care very much about the success of the schools and do all they can to support them.”

ANNE MAYER

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By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Alyssa Montgomery takes a lot of pride in her Leesville connection. She’s proud of growing up in the Leesville area, she’s proud of attending Leesville Road Middle and Leesville Road High schools – and she’s very proud to be the new LRHS Director of Bands. “It is my ambition to lead with the traditions that have founded this band program for the past 20 years,” Montgomery said. “And I will work to continue to grow and develop students into adulthood in arguably one of the best bands – not only in the state of North Carolina – but in the nation.” Montgomery – who attended Appalachian State University on a full scholarship as a Chancellor’s Scholar and graduated with majors in Music Education and Piano Performance – previously was director of bands at

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New Band Director Proud To Return to Leesville Roots Wendell Middle School, also in the Wake County Public School System. In the LRMS band program, Montgomery studied with Merida Negrete and Natalie Kerr – then was tutored by founding band director Dave Albert at LRHS (who served as interim director since January, when Christopher Serina resigned). In high school, she played oboe and English horn in Symphonic Band and was the second drum major in school history to serve two years as a Drum Major (conductor for the marching aspect of the band). Montgomery also played in chamber ensembles, the pit orchestra for the LRHS musicals, the LRHS Jazz Band, and the All District Band.

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It was a true honor to have been under (Dave Albert’s) baton as a student, and it will be such a privilege to carry on the legacy he has left at Leesville. ALYSSA MONTGOMERY

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“When I went to Appalachian State, I wanted to experience as

many musical opportunities as possible,” said Montgomery, noting

that included playing piano in a clinic under the direction of Lt. Col. Lowell Graham, commander and conductor of the U.S. Air Force Band. At ASU, she participated in the marching band, serving as drum major for two years – and also was involved with Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, Concert Band, and Symphony Orchestra on several instruments. Montgomery is already working with Albert and the Bands Club parents, and looks forward to the new year at the school. “I want to thank Dave Albert for returning this spring as the Leesville Band Director. It was a true honor to have been under his baton as a student, and it will be such a privilege to carry on the legacy he has left at Leesville,” she said. “No person can ever replace Dave Albert – an amazing teacher, mentor, and friend.” To assist the LRHS band program as a volunteer or make a donation, visit www.leesvilleband.org.

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919 ›› YEARBOOK Warm-ups at the recent 7th annual St. Francis Run for Peace and Walk for Wellness. Photos by Diogenes Ruiz

Start of the 7th annual St. Francis Run for Peace and Walk for Wellness. Proceeds of the event go to support the church’s outreach to the wider community Run for Peace and Walk for Wellness.

Trevor Thompson, Director of Justice and Peace, gives 1st Place overall winner award to David Edwards, a Franciscan School alum and current Cardinal Gibbons student, for a 5k time of 16:52

Many families participated in the St. Francis Run for Peace and Walk for Wellness; Mimi the Clown helped with face painting and balloon art for the kids.

A stream overwhelmed by record rainfall in June sends floodwaters across Brier Creek Parkway

Emergency services personnel were forced to rescue motorists in several locations during flooding in June, including near Lumley and Brier Creek Parkway

Rising water overwhelmed many streets in North Wake County in June due to Tropical Storm Andrea Floodwaters in North Raleigh in June forced road closings on Ray Road, Westgate Boulevard and Lumley Road

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919 ‹‹ YEARBOOK

Cub Scout Pack 352 at the Catholic Community of St. Francis of Assisi in Leesville has adopted the Leesville Road Park at 5105 Country Trail Road (next to the Leesville Community Library). The scouts recently participated in a Spring Conservation Clean-up, as part of their “Leave No Trace” commitment -- which involves collecting trash at the park twice a year. Little i9 Sports youth soccer players getting ready for a match in North Raleigh

Little i9 Sports youth soccer players consult with their coach at fields near Old Creedmoor Road and Norwood.

Some fans of the 919 having fun at the beach

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Photo courtesy Tamara Santana

An i9 Sports youth soccer team ready for a match in early summer at the Jewish Community Center in North Raleigh

4-year-old Wyatt Spencer on the path at Lake Lynn, where he enjoys pointing out squirrels, birds and tall trees — and feeding the ducks and geese. Photo submitted by Jenny Spencer

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919 ›› YEARBOOK

Exotic flowers near the water’s edge at Lake Crabtree County Park

Enjoying a bed of clover in the late spring near Lake Crabtree

Senior art students working on the new mural for the Leesville Road High School “Senior Wall”

Leesville Road High School’s theatre department presented Hairspray, a spring musical production based off of John Waters original film.

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919 ‹‹ YEARBOOK

Work is underway to modernize Terminal 1: This “new” space will be the home of Southwest Airlines at RDU and will provide space for future growth and additional carriers. Construction is expected to be complete in early 2014. Courtesy of Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority

Recently, the American Cancer Society encouraged community residents to join the global Relay For Life movement.

The Relay For Life of Leesville/Brier Creek/RTP event was an opportunity for participants to honor cancer survivors, remember lost loved ones, and raise awareness.

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919 ›› BUSINESS PROFILE

Photos by Ame Deaton

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919 ‹‹ BUSINESS PROFILE

Families Discovering the Benefits of Lango Kids RTP

Foreign Language Immersion Program Develops Awareness, Understanding Families throughout the Research Triangle Park area are discovering the benefits of Lango Kids RTP, a foreign language immersion program for children between the ages of 18 months and 11 years offering French, Mandarin, and Spanish. “At Lango Kids RTP, we take great pride in the entire family learning together,” said Jessica Hope Murrell, owner and operator. “Our parent communication serves as the first link for families to start the conversation at home regarding the importance of global diversity, awareness, and understanding.”

Murrell, a 2007 graduate of North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, started Lango Kids RTP after the birth of her daughter, Kennedy. “As Kennedy got older, I knew I wanted her to have the advantages that come with learning a second language,” said Murrell. “And I knew that what I desired for my daughter is something that many other families desired for their children as well.” Despite a sharp downturn in the economy and few job prospects for college graduates, Murrell unleashed the tenacity she learned 919 Magazine LV

from her parents — moving forward partnerships with schools, community with a business plan and starting the organizations, and summer camp Triangle’s premiere language offerings. Murrell derives great immersion program. satisfaction from knowing she is instrumental in bringing the love of Lango Kids RTP learning language and culture together teachers and the families for families throughout the Triangle. of the students they serve believe in the power of Lango Kids RTP classes are offered throughout second language acquisition: the Triangle. To contact or for more information, Research shows that call (919) 802-7329, email Langokidsrtp@gmail. children who learn to speak a second language experience accelerated developmental and cognitive growth, improved problem solving and critical thinking skills, and enhanced creativity. The highly skilled and passionate Lango teachers provide engaging and interactive classes where JESSICA HOPE MURRELL kids not only learn the new language and culture, but also the importance of being inquisitive, open, and understanding of others, all the Lango Kids RTP Profile while making new friends. OWNER: Jessica Hope Murrell Lango Kids RTP first YEAR OPENED: 2011 WEBSITE: www.langokidsrtp.com began offering classes in 2011, EMAIL: Langokidsrtp@gmail.com and has since taught more FACEBOOK: Lango Kids RTP than 400 students through PHONE: 919-802-7329

At Lango Kids RTP, we take great pride in the entire family learning together.

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BIG RED The Angus Barn Takes Pride In Legacy of Great Service to North Raleigh

rn, The Angus Ba gh Landmark a North Ralei

1959

Thad Eure Jr. and Charles Winston purchase 50 acres halfway between Raleigh and Durham for $6,750 34

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rn The Angus Ba 4 burned in 196

rn The Angus Ba 0 opened in 196

June 28, 1960

Doors open for The Angus Barn restaurant off U.S. Highway 70

Feb. 7, 1964

Tragedy strikes when a huge fire burns The Angus Barn to the ground

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Jan. 27, 1965

Only 11 months after the fire, a bigger and better restaurant structure opens for busines www.919Magazine.com


The doors of the now-fabled red barn swung open on June 28, 1960, on a remote 50-acre spread between downtown Raleigh and downtown Durham – a unique restaurant owned by Thad Eure Jr. and Charles Winston. Then, the The Angus Barn — or “Big Red” as it was nicknamed – was an outpost, far from the familiar Raleigh neighborhoods. Today, the award-winning restaurant is owned and operated by Van Eure, daughter of the late Thad Eure Jr., and her husband, Steve Thanhauser, and staffed by a loyal, hardworking team (many of whom built their careers at the restaurant). It is now a North Raleigh landmark, setting majestically on the hill just off Glenwood Avenue and south of I-540.

Thad Eure Jr ., the original “B arnmaster”

Alice, Thad an d Van Eure

Nov. 1978

Thad Eure Jr. buys out Winston after 18 years of a legendary partnership

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1982

After beginning as a waitress growing up and teaching in Kenya, Van Eure begins full-time at The Angus Barn

Nov. 1988

Thad Eure Jr. loses battle with cancer at age 56

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Ali, Steve, Va n and Christopher

1997

Van Eure marries Steve Thanhauser in her mother’s front yard, shortly before Alice Eure loses her battle with cancer www.919Magazine.com

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Photo by Ame Deaton

A conversation with Van Eure, owner of The Angus Barn, a landmark restaurant in North Raleigh: How did The Angus Barn begin and what is its history?

What is the background of you and your husband?

Fifty acres of land was purchased in 1959 for $6,750 in a pastoral setting between Raleigh and Durham, NC to build The Angus Barn. Many believed this was a huge mistake because of the location, but critics proved wrong since it is convenient for business people that need to travel to RTP and the RDU airport. Thad Eure, Jr. and Charles Winston opened The Angus Barn on June 28, 1960. Affectionately nicknamed “Big Red”, all guests experience incomparable hospitality, excellent value, a meal of impeccable quality and the rich, rustic Americana ambience for which it is now known across the globe.

I was raised in the restaurant, working at a young age. I left the U.S. for five years to teach school in Kenya, where I opened my own school to teach children English. I returned in the early 1980s to the restaurant to work with my father. My husband, Steve Thanhauser, owned a famous nightclub in the 1970s and 1980s called “The Bear’s Den” in Raleigh. Steve also has a marketing and public relations background.

What was the inspiration for opening The Angus Barn? Both owners were young, driven and wanted a restaurant at which customers would drive miles to eat. The both had started families and had three small children. (Probably, looking back on it, they didn’t really think it through thoroughly).

Who are some of the more noteworthy guests to at The Angus Barn over the years?

We instill in our staff that while the customers are here, they are made to feel that they are totally cared for by providing a memorable, unique experience.

Many famous politicians, athletes, actors, media figures, authors, etc., have dined at the restaurant. We have a Wall of Fame that has numerous photos of so many who have visited. 36

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VAN EURE

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The Angus Barn — More than Just a Restaurant While dining at The Angus Barn is special, owner Van Eure notes that the facility has many amenities designed to make a visit a true experience:

The Meat Locker Originally an actual meat refrigerator, The Meat Locker is now decorated with antique pub tables, thickly-cushioned chairs and church pews from a former local chapel. Overlooking U.S. Highway 70, guests can sip cocktails, watch sporting events, and smoke a prized cigar from the humidor. “It’s funky – like a “Goodfellows” kind of thing,” Eure said. “What happens in the Meat Locker, stays in the Meat Locker.”

Wild Turkey Lounge When the liquor by the drink law changed in North Carolina – allowing restaurants to service alcoholic beverages – the owners offices were sacrificed and converted into the lounge. Today, it contains more than 600 Wild Turkey liquor decantors (400 from Thad Eure Jr.’s personal collection). “This has become a very popular place to eat also, with appetizers, small plates, and even the full dining experience,” Van Eure said. “The guests come to have a great time and the live music and large screen televisions are a great touch.”

Country Store at The Angus Barn Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

What makes The Angus Barn unique and sets it apart from other fine restaurants? The rustic elegance, and the longevity of the team members.

What is the mission of The Angus Barn, in terms of what it provides to diners? We instill in our staff that while the customers are here, they are made to feel that they are totally cared for by providing a memorable, unique experience.

Can you describe the dining experience at The Angus Barn? Professional, yet fun; comfortable, yet classy.

What can you tell us about Executive Chef Walter Royal? I love him. He is a wonderful chef and a wonderful person. We will be together forever. 919 Magazine LV

This shop in the lobby area offers all The Angus Barn products for sale, so guests can take them home. “The cheese spreads that are served at the tables in the restaurant are available, as well as homemade crackers, coffee, desserts, BBQ sauce, and nuts,” Eure said. “It’s a quaint little shop run by three great ladies who take so much pride in the Country Store. “

The Pavilion This lakeside oasis was created for special event, banquets, weddings and corporate events. “This is a venue to create lifetime memories,” Eure said. “And it’s just what Thad Eure Jr, would have wanted: Entirely built from reclaimed materials.”

The Foundation of Hope Founded by Thad and Alice Eure, it awarded its first grant in 1985 for the research and treatment of mental illness. The Foundation is committed to raising community awareness and supporting effective treatment programs for the research and treatment of mental illness. The Walk for Hope – a 10K run and walk that begins at The Angus Barn and routes through the beautiful Umstead State Park — is held every year, on the second Sunday in October, to raise funds for the Foundation. “It is such an important Foundation, since much mental illnesses result in victims of suicide,” Van Eure said. July | August 2013

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Will you describe the wine experience at The Angus Barn? We try to represent every single faucet of the wine industry and educate our guests in a gentle way about wine.

What are the biggest changes for The Angus Barn in 2013, compared to the early years? Now that we have the Pavilion and we are serving large scale events, everything must be perfect and nothing overlooked.

What are the future plans at The Angus Barn? Just to keep on trying every day to be better than we were the day before.

What else do you want 919 Magazine’s readers to know about The Angus Barn? We have the best team of employees that anyone could ever hope for.

The Angus Barn Profile OWNERS: Van Eure and husband, Steve Thanhauser YEAR OPENED: 1960 EMPLOYEES: 225 SEATING CAPACITY: 650 ADDRESS: 9401 Glenwood Ave. WEBSITE: www.angusbarn.com PHONE: 919-781-2444 FACEBOOK: angusbarn HOURS: Mon-Fri, 5:30-11:00 p.m.; Sat, 5-11 p.m.; Sun, 5-10 p.m.

Van Eure Profile

Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

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AGE: 58 POSITION: Owner, The Angus Barn YEARS IN POSITION: “A lifetime!“ PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND: Waitress, The Angus Barn (during high school, college); high school English teacher in Kenya, East Africa; opened elementary school in Kenya; Senior Dining Room Manager, The Angus Barn; General Manager, The Angus Barn EDUCATION: Saint Mary’s High School; UNC-Chapel Hill CIVIC ACTIVITIES: Chairperson, Walk for Hope for Foundation of Hope; Board of Associates, Theater in the Park; Board member: American Airlines “Kids are Something Special”; Convention Center Steering Comm.; North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame; Committee member: Blue Ribbon Commission; Friends of Wake County; Founder, The Cheyenne Foundation FAMILY: Married to Steve Thanhauser; 2 children: Christopher and Ali INTERESTS: Animal rescue, sports with kids

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The Angus Barn ­— Green and Sustainable

Photo by Mehdi Mirian Photography

Chef Walter Royal and Angus Barn catering manager, Kelly Joslin

Approximate pounds of beef served by The Angus Barn per year:

Since 1989, The Angus Barn has led the restaurant industry in reducing the carbon footprint threatening the plant, according to owner Van Eure. Among its initiatives: • Recycling everything, from cardboard, aluminum, glass and plastic to wine corks and old table clothes. • Converting all biodegradable waste to compost. • Donating meat scraps to the Carnivore Conversation Institute, a non-profit carnivore rescue center in Greensboro (wolves, lions, tigers, etc.). • Converting cooking oils to biodiesel fuel for trucks. • Decreasing water use by 6,000 gallons a day. • Recycling water for landscaping and grounds, utilizing own lake on the property. • Utilizing only “green” chemicals. • Installing energy-efficient equipment and controls, reducing consumption by 8 percent. • Constructing The Pavilion with reclaimed materials (dating back to the 1600s). • Utilizing herbs from The Angus Barn’s own garden.

170,000

Average number of homemade crackers consumed per day at The Angus Barn:

7,200

Photo by Ame Deaton

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Walter Royal Brings Southern Gentleman’s Style and Kitchen Skill to The Angus Barn ‘Iron Chef America’ Winner Marks 17 Years at North Raleigh Landmark

Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

Chef Walter Royal Profile AGE: 55 POSITION: Executive Chef at Angus Barn, and the Pavilion at the Angus Barn RESIDENCE: Durham FAMILY: 1 son, 1 grandchild PET: Clyde the dog

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By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

The brilliance hard at work behind the kitchen doors of the renowned Angus Barn and Pavilion at the Angus Barn belongs to none other than “Iron Chef America” Walter Royal. For 17 years, Chef Royal has been giving the royal treatment to countless Angus Barn guests by using his imagination and skill as executive chef. Royal credits his mother and grandmother for teaching him that the very essence of southern hospitality is homemade. After studying at LaGrange College and Nathalie Dupree’s Cooking School in Atlanta, Royal made his way to the Triangle area making a name for himself at some of the best fine dining establishments in the area. And when the proprietors of Angus Barn needed the perfect person to run the kitchen of the Triangle’s largest

restaurant, they looked no further than Chef Royal – and the rest is history. “The Eure family were true visionaries, and after the legacy was taken over by the current owner, Van Eure, it is still elevating to new heights,” said Royal. “I’m so proud to be a part of it.” Today, Chef Royal, who lives in Durham, manages two main kitchens, the gourmet wine cellar kitchen, the Pavilion catering kitchen, and a kitchen team of 150, sharing his creativity and experience in his southern gentlemanly style. He enjoys living in the Triangle for the shopping, travel, medical care, restaurants, and farmer’s market, where he finds inspiration for cooking from what’s in season. Fortunately for his culinary aficionados, Chef Royal also loves to teach and offers classes through Walter Royal’s Teaching Kitchen where students can learn the finer

points of cooking from the master and his staff. “Any opportunity to teach makes me happy,” said Royal. On a national and international scale, Chef Royal has earned the title of winner of Iron Chef America, was named Restaurant Guild International’s Five Star Chef of the Year, has been featured in several magazines and news publications including Southern Living magazine, and received an honorary doctorate of Culinary Arts from Johnson & Wales University. Chef Royal looks forward to continuing the tradition of excellence and acknowledges the many individuals who have mentored, taught, and guided him towards success, including the owners and staff at Angus Barn. “Angus Barn has the best support system for a staff and managers I’ve ever heard of and witnessed,” said Royal.

Photo by Ame Deaton

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919 ›› COMMUNITY Theater Features Family Films for $1 Regal Brier Creek Stadium 14 plans special summer movies at a discount price through Aug. 7.

Health Decisions, MedPro Rx, and BioAgilytix Honored as Top Triangle Area Entrepreneurs Three Triangle area business leaders were named Business Leader Magazine’s 2013 Top Entrepreneurs in the Triangle area.

The family-friendly movies start at 10 a.m. each Tuesday and Wednesday, beginning July 2 with the showing of Mr. Poppers’ Penguins (for a complete schedule of the Summer Movie Express films, see Page 8). Admission is only $1. The theater is located at 8611 Brier Creek Parkway in North Raleigh. Call 919-361-1115 for more information.

Drop the kids off at Camp Pump It Up where the doors to imaginative play open up

North Raleigh Pump It Up Plans Summer Camps for Ages 4-12

Michael Rosenberg, MD, MPH, the CEO of Health Decisions through themed activities & events. Our Camps offer active play along with creative Inc. – a clinical research organization – was honored, along thinking to build healthy bodies & minds. with Raleigh Mayor Nancy McFarlane, CEO of MedPro Rx, a specialized pharmacy services company; and James Petrilla, camps save $25. Reservations Creek President and CEO of BioAgilytix Labs, a bioanalytics firm. Dates Pump It Up in BrierEnrollment Camp and Theme “Spring Break at Fever” are required 919-828-3344. plans a series of camps this 3 Day or 1 Day “Business Leader once again is thrilled to present these very April 2 - 4th “Hometown Heroes” Enrollment Option summer for youths ages 4-12. April 23 25th A series of Lego Jump-Nspecial awards to honor and recognize the Triangle’s leading entrepreneurs,” said Publisher Stephen Reynolds. “The Triangle has such a strong, successful and diverse entrepreneurial community. Whether serving those in need or working on breakthrough innovations in health care, these winners are changing people’s lives. We thank each of our finalists for years of hard work and passion to make a difference.” Each year since 1996, Business Leader has honored executive leaders in the Triangle through its Top Entrepreneur Awards, recognizing those who have demonstrated exceptional leadership attributes and innovative approaches to enhance their company’s industry status. This year’s event was held at Brier Creek Country Club in North Raleigh.

Camps3are Day or 1 Day May 7 -Jump-N-Art 9th July 16-18 Option Mayscheduled 21 - 23rd for July 9-11,Enrollment and July 23-25, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30

3 Day or 1 Day June 11 - 13th p.m. each day. Cost forEnrollment the threeOption June 25 - 27th

day camps is $100 ($35 for one

Day or 1 Day Julyday 9 - 11th is available), which3includes Enrollment Option July 16 - 18th

snacks, all art supplies, inflatable play time and a T-shirt. Participants are asked to bring a bag lunch.

Themes for the camps include project snacks & tshirt It Upsupplies, is located at “Trains & Automobiles”, “Family Includes all artPump 10700 World Trade Blvd. For Bag lunch required ~ Ages 4information, to 12 Pets”, and “Summer Fun”. Special promotions include one free admission to Pump It Up of Raleigh 10700 World Date Trade Blvd “Parents Night Out” with Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 a three-day camp enrollment; or enroll in two three-day pumpitupparty.com 919.828.3344

Rapid Refill Plans Special Recycling Event for Inkjet, Toner Cartridges

“Sports, Sports by & More Sports” also Snap Camps Snapology “Fun In the Sun” are planned on Mondays in July (beginning July 8). Scheduled “World Travel” for 9:30 a.m.America” to 2:30 p.m. on July “Celebrating 8, 15, 22 and 29, the cost is $40 per “Planes, Trains & Automobiles” camper – with lunch included. Both “Family Pets” beginners and advanced Lego users welcome participate. Camp is are from 9:30 amto - 2:30 pm Registration is for available www. $100 per camper 3 day at camp piusnapologycamps.eventbrite.com. $35 for 1 day camp

visittoday www.pumpitupparty.com Call to reserve your spot

Recycle with Rapid Refill Ink has a special recycling event planned for the week of July 22-26: Bring in any empty or unused inkjet or toner cartridges and receive a 15 percent discount on the purchase.

Triangle Volleyball Club Hosts ‘Sitting Volleyball” Tournament

Rapid Refill Ink began in 2002 and was founded on the idea of turning used, empty cartridges into sustainable products, while saving customers money. By recycling empty cartridges, the use of fossil fuels and the amount of plastic in local landfills is greatly reduced.

Sitting volleyball is a Paralympic sport where participants play on a smaller sized court with a net set to a lower height.

Rapid Refill is located at 7851 Alexander Promenade Place, Suite 110 in Brier Creek. For information, call 919-293-0930, email plantationpoint@rapidrefillink. net, or visit www.rapidrefill.com. The event offer is only available July 22-26, 2013 and cannot be combined with other offers. It is only valid on Rapid Refill brand products; OEM products are not included. The exchange of an empty cartridge of the same model, size, and color is required for select HP inkjet cartridges.

As part of the three-day 2013 Southeast Valor Games, Triangle Volleyball Club hosted “sitting volleyball” for participants that included wounded, ill and injured veterans and active-duty service members.

In addition, Triangle Volleyball Club’s Assistant Director Jenna Hinton was among a collaborative team invited to present at the U.S. Olympic Committee’s 2013 Paralympic Leadership Conference in Colorado Springs, CO. Triangle’s Executive Director, Sherry Fadool, noted that “Triangle’s commitment to the expansion and development of sitting volleyball has a strong emphasis on connecting to and building strong relationships with the military in our state.” For information, call 919-544-9400 or visit www.trianglevolleyball.org.

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919 ‹‹ COMMUNITY Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Opens Brier Creek Location Dickey’s Barbecue Pit is now open in Brier Creek, at 7841 Alexander Promenade. Owned by local residents Brad and Christy Evers, Dickey’s is a Texas-based franchise restaurant that began in 1941 – and prides itself in “authenticity, innovation and barbecue sauce.” The casual, family-friendly restaurant serves beef brisket, pulled pork, ham, polish sausage, turkey breast and chicken, and a wide array

of home-style sides, from jalapeno beans to macaroni and cheese. Buttery rolls are served with every meal, along with complimentary ice cream and dill pickles. All meats at the Brier Creek location are smoked in the local restaurant, the same way it was done in Texas in 1941 – with no shortcuts.

Left to right: Debra Hurst (919 Magazine), Christy and Brad Evers (owners of Dickey’s Barbecue Pit), and Scott Hurst (Coldwell Banker Commercial)

Catering is also available at the Dickey’s Barbecue Pit in Brier Creek. For more information or to place take out orders, call 919-908-1466; or visit www.dickeys.com.

Pride Athletic Club Selects New Officers Jay Vick is the new president of the Leesville Road High School Pride Athletic Club. Other officers selected recently include: Lisa Boneham, vice president; Caroline Rohs, secretary; Angela Drum, treasurer; and Cindy Greene and Wendy Cooper, membership. Pride Athletic Club works to secure funds to support LRHS athletic teams and athletes. For more information or to join the organization, visit www.leesvilleathletics.com.

Crown Trophy & Awards Planning Move To Creedmoor Road in Fall Crown Trophy & Awards of Raleigh plans to move this fall to a new location on Creedmoor Road in North Raleigh. The new location will be at Stonehenge Market, located at 7412 Creedmoor Road, next to the Harris Teeter.  Though no specific date for the move was announced, owners Bob and Pam

Falkenbach hope to open at the new address in September. Crown Trophy & Awards of Raleigh offers a variety of trophies, medals, plaques, crystal awards, sculptures, engraving, acrylics, advertising specialty items, banners, signs and more. Currently open at 2431 Spring Forest Road, Suite 165, Crown Trophy can be reached at 919-8786565 or crownraleigh@gmail.com. For more information, visit www.crowntrophy.com/store-148.

LRHS Chorale Wins Best Overall at Busch Gardens

Yogathon to Help Fight Lung Cancer at Burn Athletic North Carolina Lung Cancer Partnership hosted the Free to Breathe Raleigh — 9th Annual Great 108 Yogathon at Burn Athletic in Brier Creek on June 22. All proceeds from the event benefitted the work of the Partnership in its goal to double the lung cancer survival rate by 2022.

Leesville Road High School Intermediate Chorale students recently competed in the Busch Gardens Virginia Festival – winning the first place among high school choral groups, and “Best Overall Performance”. The LRHS choral group of 67 students competed against 30 other teams, according to Diane Covington, LRHS choral director. The national event, sponsored by Music in the Parks, involved bands, orchestras and choruses from several states. 919 Magazine LV

Open to all, from yoga enthusiasts to beginners, the event included a beginner’s yoga class, a kid’s yoga session, as well as the annual 108 Sun Salutations yoga session. Following the event, participants enjoyed a chair massage and hors d’oeuvres.  Burn Athletic instructors lead all yoga sessions. Fundraising by participants continues through Aug. 6, but July | August 2013

top fundraisers at the time were recognized at the event. Visit www. nationallungcancerpartnership. org to learn more about the organization and to volunteer.

YOGA • CIRCUIT • CYCLING

Burn Athletic is a premiere yoga, circuit and cycling studio located 7910 Skyland Ridge Parkway. For more information, call 919-957-2876 or visit www.burnathletic.com. www.919Magazine.com

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919 ›› COMMUNITY Pump It Up’s Autism Speaks Fundraiser July 24 in Brier Creek Pump It Up – partnering with the Autism Speaks organization – is participating in the 5th Annual Great Open Jump/Imagination Celebration at its Brier Creek location in July.

fundraising event is open to the public. All admission donations will go to Autism Speaks, North America’s largest autism science and advocacy organization.

Planned for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, July 24 at 10700 World Trade Blvd. in North Raleigh, the

More than 140 Pump It Up locations across the U.S. are participating in the event, designed

to increase awareness about the disorder that impacts an estimated 1.5 million individuals in the U.S. and tens of millions worldwide. Pump It Up is located at 10700 World Trade Blvd. For more information, call 919-828-3344 or visit www.pumpitupparty. com or www.autismspeaks.org.

Team Best Karate Scores Nine Medals At World Championships in Australia Seven karate-ka from North Carolina recently participated as part of the U.S. National Team in the 9th World Karate Confederation World Championships and at the 5th International Martial Arts Games in Melbourne, Australia, in May. North Carolina team members included Sensei Stephen Robinson (chief instructor, Triangle’s Best Karate); Savannah Fraleigh (age 15, Leesville Road High School freshman); Joshua Lawton (age 15, LRHS freshman); Brianne Lawton (age 19, UNC freshman, winner AAU Karate’s Sullivan Award and Scholarship 2012, a national

competition); Kaitlin Riddle (age 17, LRHS junior); Asia Yu-Robinson (age 15, LRHS freshman); Claire Fraleigh (age 12, Martin Middle School 7th Grader); and Kim Dang (age 18, LRHS senior). Ms. Lawton and Ms. Yu-Robinson were repeat U.S. National Team members and representing the U.S. for their fourth time; the other five competed overseas for the first time. Based on their gold or silver medal results in the 2011 and 2012 national championships, these athletes earned the invitation to compete in forms and sparring individual events, and be considered for the coveted 3-person sparring team event. More than 30 countries sent their teams, ages 12-20, to the world championships. Robinson served as a senior referee at the World Championships.

North Carolina team members participating in the World Championships in May in Australia included (back row, left to right) Sensei Stephen Robinson, Savannah Fraleigh, Joshua Lawton, Brianne Lawton, Kaitlin Riddle, and (front row, left to right) Asia Yu-Robinson, Claire Fraleigh, and Kim Dang. Submitted Photo

Short Takes Duane Barksdale of Leesville Road High School received a one-time $2,500 National Achievement Scholarship… Local residents helped pack meals for Stop Hunger Now in May at the Lonerider Brewery at 8816 Gulf Court #100 in the Brier Creek area…Lauren Boop, a social studies teacher at Hilburn Academy, was selected recently for a 20132014 Kenan Fellowship…Kimberly Grant is the new principal at Lynn Road Elementary School. Previously, she was assistant principal at Yates Mill Elementary School… Entrinsik Inc., a North Raleigh analytics software firm, is relocating its corporate headquarters to Creedmoor Road – at the

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Final medal count for Team USA in the May event was 34 gold, 28 silver and 39 bronze, with Team Best Karate participants scoring nine awards: • Gold in Kata, ages 14-15, Asia Yu-Robinson • Gold in Sparring, ages 14-15, Asia Yu-Robinson • Bronze in Sparring, ages 1415, Savannah Fraleigh • Silver in Kata, ages 16-17, Kaitlin Riddle Horizon 1 office building at 7721 Six Forks Road… Former longtime Leesville Road High basketball coach Daryl Robinson is the new Wake Forest High School men’s basketball coach. Robinson taught at the school the past two years and was the interim athletic director during a recent transition… Wake Education Partnership awarded more than $70,000 in Teacher Leadership Grants to WCPSS teachers in several categories, including to Trisha Dillon of Sycamore Creek Elementary School (Exceptional Children with Autism)…U.S. News and World Report magazine recently ranked Leesville High School at the 16th best high school in North Carolina…CrossFit RDU, located on Glenwood Avenue near the Townridge center, plans to expand July | August 2013

• Silver in Kata, Ages 18-20, Brianne Lawton • Bronze in Kata, Ages 18-20, Kim Dang • Bronze in Sparring, Ages 18-20, Kim Dang • Bronze in Sparring, Ages 18-20, Brianne Lawton • Bronze in 3-person Team Sparring, Ages 18-20, Brianne Lawton Amateur Athletic Karate and AAU Sports organized the delegation of 55 total athletes and coaches. Triangle’s Best Karate is located at 9113 Leesville Road in North Raleigh. For information, call 919-844-5555 or visit www.trianglesbestkarate.com. to 14,000 sq. ft. (from its current 4,000 sq. ft.) in the near future…The Leesville Road High School Bands Club and the LRHS school administration declined the opportunity to attend the 2013-2014 London New Year’s Day Parade and Festival. New LRHS Director of Bands Alyssa Montgomery said the trip became more costly than anticipated and fundraising benchmarks were missed. Instead, she said the band anticipates selecting a U.S. musical festival destination in the spring that will provide less financial burden on the program…LRHS graduate Grayson Murray qualified and competed in the U.S. Open golf championship as an amateur. He plans to attend UNC-Greensboro this fall…

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919 ‹‹ BUSINESS PROFILE

Pump It Up Provides the Ultimate Birthday Party Experience, Special Events and More At Pump It Up of Raleigh, families and friends get to celebrate, socialize, and exercise for fun – stress free. Providing the ultimate birthday party experience is owner Kelly McHugh’s number one goal. “From the moment you pull into the parking lot, our trained expert staff takes care of everything for you,” said McHugh. “Customers tell us that our party planning expertise, attention to detail, and elevated level of customer service is what they appreciate the most.” With its 12,000 sq. ft. facility and staff of over 25 energetic and enthusiastic party facilitators, the birthday family and their guests are treated to a fun-filled stress free experience. In addition to interactive inflatables, special FX lights, games, party rooms, and a rocking music system, Pump It Up offers party themes such as Pirate Quests and Glow Parties – as well as events, including Camp Pump It Up (a year-round and summer camp program), Parents’ Date Night Out, Pop-In Playtime (open, public jump events), and field trips. Other special activities are also available, such

Customers tell us that our party planning expertise, attention to detail, and elevated level of customer service is what they appreciate the most. Photo by Reflections by Cathy Foreman

as graduations, sports recognition events, fundraisers, Scouts’ outings, and more. McHugh moved to Raleigh at a young age, attended North Carolina State University and worked for several major corporations including IBM, FileNET and Nortel Networks while living in North Carolina, Georgia, and California. Now married with two children, McHugh combined her entrepreneurial aspirations with her desire to be an involved wife and parent, purchasing the Triangle area Pump It Up franchise in May of 2009. With the desire to provide a fun, safe, indoor place for children to play and celebrate, McHugh brings her experience and passions to make Pump It Up the ultimate birthday party and special events destination.

KELLY McHUGH McHugh is committed to encouraging families to understand the importance of and engage in imaginative play and invites parents to visit SupportImagination.com to learn more. With tips and ideas on how to foster imaginative play at home, parents can sign the Imagination Declaration to pledge to engage in imaginative play daily with their kids and take the Imagination Evaluation, a fun way to test their own imaginations. “It has truly been a joy watching children and families celebrate with us, as well as teaching kids that exercise can be fun and leading by example the importance of imaginative play,” said McHugh. Pump It Up is located at 10700 World Trade Blvd., Suite 112, Raleigh. To contact, call 919-828-3344, email pumpitup.raleigh@gmail.com, or visit

Pump It Up of Raleigh OWNER: Kelly McHugh YEAR STARTED: Bought in 2009 ADDRESS: 10700 World Trade Blvd., Suite 112, Raleigh, NC 27617 WEBSITE: www.pumpitupparty.com EMAIL: pumpitup.raleigh@gmail.com PHONE: 919-828-3344 FACEBOOK: Pump It Up Raleigh

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919 ›› FIELD TRIP

‘The Fastest 3/8-mile Race Track in America’

Orange County Speedway Features A Rich History, ‘Grassroots’ Racing It’s called “grassroots” car racing. It’s called “the fastest 3/8-mile race track in America.” It’s called Orange County Speedway. And it’s only a short drive from the Leesville area. “This is where short-track racing is done right,” said Terry Deal, General Manager and Race Director. “Orange County Speedway is a good family atmosphere, as well as a good learning and growing venue for drivers to start racing.” Located on the site of the original Trico Motor Speedway built in the early 1960s, the venue originally opened as a dirt track – but is currently a high-banked (16 degree straightaways and 19 degree turns), asphalt oval track. The track averages 50 feet wide, which offers plenty of room for side-by-side racing among competitors. The speedway has a rich history, being one of the first tracks in the region to feature live televised Busch (now Nationwide) races. Some of the great Winston Cup drivers (and now Sprint Cup) drivers have competed at the facility, including Jimmy Johnson, Bobby Labonte, Todd Bodine and Jeff and Ward Burton. According to Deal, Dale Jarrett won his first Busch race

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Photo by Thomas Lee Photography

at OCS and Jeff Gordon won his first career Busch pole position at OCS in 1991. The facility has new aluminum bleachers installed, offering grandstand seating that follows the curvature of the track, along the front, from turn four to turn one. “This means there is an excellent view of the track from every seat,” said Deal. “Our future plans call for redesigning the concession stands, and remodeling VIP Tower seating to theater-style seating.” Among the unique aspects of Orange County Speedway are the special events. “Our special events include car shows, kids night, ladies night and more,” Deal said. “We also have opportunities

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for fans to meet drivers and view the cars up close on some occasions.” The special “Bologna Burger” is also unique – a thick slab of fried bologna on a bun, with a choice of condiments. Races are every second and fourth Saturdays of the month, April through October. Admission to the track is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and youths age 11-17, and $1 for children 10 and under. “We offer a good night of action racing,” Deal noted. “And we appreciate our loyal fans and friends who appreciate good racing. At Orange County Speedway, we want the fans to have a sense of belonging to the sport.”

This is where short-track racing is done right. TERRY DEAL

Photo courtesy Orange County Speedway

Orange County Speedway LOCATION: 9740 NC Highway 57, Rougemont, NC 27572 OWNER: Melvin Stanley RACING DIRECTOR/GM: Terry Deal WEBSITE: www.ocstrack.com EMAIL: ocstrack@gmail.com PHONE: 336-364-1222 EVENT SCHEDULE: 2nd, 4th Saturdays, April through October; most races begin 7 p.m. with qualifying under way about 5:30 p.m. ADMISSION: Adults, $10; Seniors, youths 11-17, $8; 10 and under, $1

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Sycamore Creek Team Finishes Sixth – in the World! By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Pictured from left to right: Robert Parsons, Alli Moore, Katelyn Sherman, Caden Moore, Andy Moore, Noah Treichler, Justin Hickland, Sophia Parsons, Jack Irby, & Brian Sherman Photos by Rachel Treichler

Sycamore Creek Elementary’s Odyssey of the Mind team ranks sixth in the world. Sixth. In the world. Odyssey of the Mind is an international educational program that provides creative problem-solving opportunities for students from kindergarten through college. Team members apply their creativity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary classics. They then bring their solutions to competition on the local, state, and world level. Thousands of teams from throughout the U.S. and from about 25 other countries participate

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in the program. Eight hundred teams competed in the finals. And SCES finished sixth. In the world. Known as the “The Fairly Odd Omers,” the seven-member team handles the entire competition – with no outside assistance from coaches or parents. “Our team really worked well as a group,” said Andy Moore, team coach. “Four of the seven had been friends since birth and grew up as neighbors. They naturally played well together and knew what makes each other tick.” All seven team members were friends at school and on the same track. All had been involved with school plays and school chorus. “The team was made up of seven natural leaders, which was certainly an asset but also presented challenges,” Moore said. “As coaches we designed games and challenges that would pinpoint their strengths

919 Magazine LV

and weaknesses and force the team to deal with the challenges.” Sycamore Creek team members included Jack Irby, Caden Moore, Allison Moore, Sophia Parsons, Noah Treicher, Justin Hickland, and Katelyn Sherman. The coaches were Andy Moore, Brian Sherman, and Robert Parsons.

“This program has taught our kids so many lessons that will advance them in life. It really taught them how to think and work as a team,” Coach Andy Moore said. “It focused their creative problem solving skills and showed them that if they are willing to work and think and act, they can accomplish anything.” For more information on the competition,

Pictured from left to right: Noah Treichler, Caden Moore,Sophia Parsons, Alli Moore, Katelyn Sherman, Jack Irby, Justin Hickland

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919 ›› STUDENT PROFILE By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Like many of her peers at Leesville Road High School, graduating senior and honor roll student Katie Kuhlman couldn’t be more excited and proud to be a member of the 2013 graduating class. What sets this Brier Creek resident apart, however, is facing and working hard to overcome many physical and emotional challenges throughout her life. Kuhlman was born with cerebral palsy and has physical challenges due to her “weak” muscles on the right side of her body. Although she didn’t walk until she was three and a half years old, Kuhlman was determined to walk when her younger brother showed her how to do it. Through hard work and determination, she successfully developed her own way of walking, which enables her to easily get around. Kuhlman also has mental and emotional challenges, and because she cannot process thoughts and words like others, has adapted her own way of communicating and verbalizing her thoughts and feelings.

A Proud Member of LRHS Class of 2013

North Raleigh ’s Katie Kuhlman Overcomes All Challenges and ‘Just Keeps Trying’

Katie has the tenacity to just keep trying, just keep trying… BETH KUHLMAN

At age 22, Kuhlman continues to grow, learn, and overcome her challenges with the help and support of her parents, Mike and Beth Kuhlman, brother John – currently studying at East Carolina University – and tutor and best friend, Tahnee, her CAP-MR/ DD worker. CAP-MR/DD stands for Community Alternatives Program for Persons with Mental Retardation/ Photos by Reflections by Cathy Foreman

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Developmental Disabilities, a special Medicaid program started in 1983 to serve individuals with the mental retardation/developmental disabilities who would otherwise require care in an intermediate care facility. The program allows these individuals the opportunity to be served in the community instead of residing in an institutional or group home setting. Immediately after graduation, Katie has set her sights on going to work at Life Experiences Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides fulfilling employment for adults with

developmental disabilities. Katie enjoys caring for her two dogs, Daisy and Pepper, playing on her iPad and computer, music, dancing, and cheerleading. As a four year member of the Carolina Legacy Superstar cheerleading squad, Kuhlman is part of a group of special needs and high school/all-star cheerleaders who work together performing and competing. Mom Beth likens her daughter’s approach to achieving her goals in life to Dory’s philosophy in the animated movie, Finding Nemo: Just keep swimming; just keep swimming. “Katie has the tenacity to just keep trying, just keep trying…,” said Beth.

Katherine ‘Katie” Kuhlman Profile AGE: 22 SCHOOL: Leesville Road High School (graduating senior) PARENTS: Beth and Mike Kuhlman RESIDENCE: Brier Creek Country Club SIBLINGS: John Kuhlman, 20 (ECSU student) PETS: Daisy, Pepper (black Labrador retrievers) INTERESTS: Taking care of dogs; watching movies; playing games on iPad and computer; music; American Girl dolls

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919 ›› HOMEWORK

Stay Safe Out There This Summer Dehydration

As the summertime fun picks up, so do temperatures and injuries. With the kids out of school, families at play, and everyone taking vacations, having fun can be dangerous for your health! Here are a few tips to keep the family safe and happy this season.

When the body has lost too much fluid and electrolytes, it results dehydration – especially in children. Although water is extremely important in preventing dehydration, it does not contain electrolytes. Sports drinks, soups, fruit juices, soft fruits and vegetables can help restore sodium and potassium.

Water Safety Staying safe in and around water is usually accomplished with common sense – especially if alcohol is left out of the equation. It’s not just kids who are in danger of drowning or other water-related injury; adults, usually focused on keeping kids safe, fail to take appropriate precautions for themselves. Residents with pools or spas at home should follow the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission’s suggestions, available at www.cpsc.gov. To stay safe in and around bodies of water, here are some safety tips to follow when fishing, boating, or just soaking it in:

• Learn to swim.

For a list of swimming classes at Wake County community centers, visit www.raleighnc.gov.

• Do not swim in irrigation or drainage canals (many may have strong currents or could contain pesticides or fertilizers that can cause reactions in swimmers).

• Know children’s abilities, and don’t allow them to swim in water more than chest deep unless competent to do so.

• If a child swallows water and can talk — but is uncomfortable and in mild distress — medical professionals recommend going to an urgent care facility. Excessive

water in the lungs can pose a serious condition when a child goes to sleep. • Be aware of the dangerous “toos”: Too tired, too drunk, too much sun, too far from safety, too much strenuous activity.

• Know the swimming area — the shallows and the hazards. • Only dive when the area is clear and deep enough. If uncertain, always enter the water feet first (jump or walk in). Alcohol and drugs affect balance, judgment, coordination, swimming skills, and the body’s ability to stay warm. www.redcross.org/nc/raleigh/take-a-class.

• Add ICE (“In Case of Emergency”) to your cell phone contact list (with number and name of a family member). It’s a clever way for emergency personnel to locate family if something goes wrong.

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Most damaging hours for sun exposure are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., so avoid this timeframe or take shade breaks often. If moderate burning occurs, take a cool shower or bath, apply aloe or another cooling agent, and take over-the-counter pain reliever (do not apply butter). If burn is more severe or includes extensive blistering, visit an emergency room for treatment.

Snakebites can be deadly, so it’s important to react quickly. If emergency medical services can be reached, request help through 911; or, if in a remote area, get the victim to medical care as quickly as possible. Be aware antivenin serums are typically available in emergency rooms, not urgent care centers.

area, know and adhere to the posted regulations.

• Learn CPR. To take a class visit:

Sunburn

Snakebites

• Follow the rules. When swimming in a designated

• Stay sober.

If a victim of dehydration has low blood pressure or a very rapid pulse, they may need medical attention and intravenous fluids; and if an individual shows confusion, dizziness or weakness, call 911 immediately.

The 919 area is home to a couple of different species of venomous snakes. According to David Allsbrook, manager at WakeMed Brier Creek Healthplex, the most common snakebites they see are from copperheads and water moccasins – which they treat with the antivenin Crofab. “We find with Crofab that our patients do not get such a big reaction,” he said. “Thankfully most of the snakes around here are not as venomous; however, they still pose a very real threat especially to children and older adults.” Allsbrook stressed the importance of common sense and watching the ground when walking. “As this area continues to grow, we are moving into rural areas where there used to be farmlands – and now it is residential,” he said. “With so many critters it is only expected we will see more and more of these types of injuries.” In the case of a bite, call 911 immediately. Doctors recommend not elevating the wound (keep the bite below the level of the heart) or attempting to cut the bite area or suck out the venom.

To avoid snakebites: •

Wear long pants and boots taller than the ankle.

Avoid tall brush and deep, dark crevices.

Make plenty of noise and vibration while walking.

Do not approach snakes; avoid them.

Do not expect rattlesnakes to make any noises.

If the snake is dead, bringing it to the hospital is appropriate (but be careful, as dead snakes can reflexively bite for up to an hour).

It’s not that important to identify the snake; medical crews in areas prone to snake bites can often identify the animal just from the wound.

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Comfort and Support USO’s RDU Center Positively Impacts Military Personnel With North Carolina having the fourth largest military presence of any state, John Falkenbury made clear what the USO’s mission at RaleighDurham International Airport was all about: Providing services, comfort and support to U.S. military personnel. “USO of North Carolina provided 656,000 services to individuals connected to the U.S. military last year,” said Falkenbury, USO of NC president. “That included 3,000 interactions a month at RDU.” Those interactions included food, refreshments, access to communications

919 Magazine LV

and support at the RDU USO Center in space provided at no charge by RDU. Falkenbury’s remarks were part of the USO of North Carolina’s annual Raleigh-Durham Mission Briefing breakfast, held recently at RDU’s General Aviation Terminal. He also noted that USO of NC is a self-sustaining organization, funded by generous North Carolinians. USO’s RDU Center Director Connie Inggs opened the session, following a bagpipe presentation by Robert White, SFC Army Special Forces (retired) and the National Anthem, sung by SFC

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Danielle Csolak of the North Carolina National Guard. USO volunteer Sherrill Wilkins gave the invocation. Raleigh-Durham International Airport Director Michael Languth was keynote speaker for the event, and he praised the USO’s efforts to comfort military personnel departing and arriving at RDU. “We are very active partners with the USO,” he said. “U.S. military personnel have a large amount of downtown when traveling or deploying – and the USO tries to make them as comfortable as possible.“ To donate, volunteer or gain more information on the USO of North Carolina and its operations at RDU, visit www.uso-nc.org.

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919 ›› FOOD BREAK

Carla Dennis Finds Quinoa Dish is Fast Food at its Best Carla Dennis first saw a recipe for a quinoa bean salad in a swimming magazine (some in her family of five are swimmers), and noted it was healthy; high in protein, iron, fiber and other nutrients; low in fat; and easy to digest. “I liked the idea of taking it to a swim meet, because we could easily snack on it by the spoonful. I started to experiment and to think about the quinoa as a base like lettuce or pasta and add what I like,” said Dennis, a resident of Springdale Gardens. “I rarely make it the same way twice, but I do especially like this version — my own recipe.”

Dennis really likes the versatility of the dish. “It’s so easy to pull out of the refrigerator,” she said. “It’s fast food at its best.” Dennis is married to Richard Dennis and the mother of three. She graduated in biological science from NC State and currently tutors and works in the travel industry. As for her cooking expertise, she indicated she goes through phases. “Some seasons I really get into cooking and others seasons I’d rather be outside playing,” she said.

Carla’s Quinoa Salad

Carla and son Paul of Leesville, with Carla’s Quinoa Salad dish Photo Courtesy Carla Dennis

(pronounced Keenwa) Ingredients:

Directions:

1 cup Quinoa 1 cup Shelled, frozen edamame 1/2 cup Dried cranberries 1/3 cup Dried, fresh mango 1 Apple, chopped 2 Green onions, chopped 1/4 cup Raspberry vinaigrette salad dressing (to taste) 2 tbsp Pine nuts

1. Rinse quinoa, then cook like rice (one part quinoa; two parts water): Place in pan with water and cover, bring to boil, simmer a bit, then set aside for 20 min. Let heat finish cooking. Do not lift lid for 20 min. 2. Add frozen edamame, cranberries, green onion, pine nuts and dressing to cooked hot quinoa. 3. Refrigerate until ready to serve. 4. Serve as soon as edamame have thawed. 5. Keeps for 3-4 days.

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919 Magazine: Brier Creek Edition They took the long route to get to Brier Creek Country Club, but the busy Vammino family now enjoys the North Raleigh planned community’s lifestyle, from the healthy environment and friendly neighbors, to the easy access of so many conveniences.

919 Magazine: North Raleigh Edition

North Raleigh | Six Forks | Falls of the Neuse | 27615

North Raleigh’s new Anne Gordon Center for Active Adults — located on Spring Forest Road — strives to provide quality leisure activities and services for adults ages 50 and older — with the goal to assist, inform, entertain and enrich the lives of citizens in the community.

North Ralei All-L gh's Magaocal zine

Kidz Celebrate Creates Special Days for Children PAGE PAGE24 24

JUNE | JULY 2013

919Magazine.com

Volume 2 | Number 3

Community Events, School Happenings, Local Nightlife, Youth Sports and More, Pages 5-9

919 Magazine: Wakefield Plantation/Falls Lake Edition As vice principal for Wakefield High School, Vivian Wells enjoys working with the diverse student body and her fast-pased job. She also was one of the founders of the school’s unique Just Think First program, designed to increase students’ awareness of driving safety.

919 Magazine: Wake Forest Edition Executive Director Ed Morris explains how the Wake Forest Historical Museum tells the Wake Forest story — from a variety of programs, to permanent and visiting exhibits about various people and organizations in the town, to the history of the area’s namesake college (that moved to Winston-Salem in the 1950s).

919 Magazine: Morrisville/Research Triangle Park/RDU Edition Town of Morrisville Mayor Jackie Holcombe reveals the challenges and the opportunities presented by the community’s explosive growth in such a short period of time — and the tremendous progress she has witnessed by the town known as “The Heart of the Triangle.” 919 Magazine LV

July | August 2013

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919 ›› REGION

A Commitment to Bee Health Bayer CropScience Plans State-of-the-Art Facility at RTP Site Construction is under way on Bayer CropScience’s North American Bee Care Center, a 6,000 sq. ft. facility in Research Triangle Park. Housed in the Bee Care Center will be a full laboratory and teaching apiary; honey extraction and workshop space; interactive learning center; and meeting, training and presentation facilities for beekeepers, farmers and educators, as well as office space for graduate students. “At Bayer, we have been committed to bee health for more than 25 years,” said Jim Blome, President and CEO of Bayer CropScience LP. “The Bee Care Center is the latest example of our dedication to sustainable agriculture, and we hope to continue to provide the research necessary to ensure the health of colonies and honey bees around the world. Our scientists are working to help solve some of the most pressing honey bee health problems, as their importance to the global food supply cannot be overstated.”

Although the North American Bee Care Center will have its own honeybee colonies for teaching and demonstration purposes, the facility will be supported by other research apiaries located nearby – to coordinate and extend research projects directed toward bee health. The Bee Care Center, a hub to promote worldwide bee health initiatives, will serve to support scientific research and help educate stakeholders and the general public about the importance of honey bees to agriculture by providing pollination of crops that help meet the growing global demand for a nutritious and abundant food supply. In its recent comprehensive assessment on honey bee health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture noted that bees are suffering from a complex set of stressors, including parasites and diseases, lack of genetic diversity, and

inadequate nutrition, while stressing the need for collaboration and information sharing among all stakeholders as a critical component in promoting best management practices. The North American Bee Care Center is being created with these goals in mind. Bayer CropScience is also expanding its Clayton research apiary, known as “Beesboro,” to include an approximately 1,200-square-foot building with an

office, a wintering cold room, extraction area, bee hive maintenance area and storage areas. This facility is expected to be operational in late summer 2013. For more information, visit www.bayercropscience.us/

Big Acts Ready for World Of Bluegrass in Raleigh The International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual World of Bluegrass convention is coming to Raleigh. Scheduled for Sept. 27-28 at the Red Hat Amphitheater, performers include Grammy-winning Steep Canyon Rangers backing up Steve Martin (the comedian and banjo player) with 1980s pop star Edie Brickell (known for her work with the New Bohemians); a group including Alison Kraus, Del McCoury, Bela Fleck, Tony Rice, Jerry Doublas and Sam Bush; and the Punch Brothers, featuring Nickel Creek mandolinist Chris Thile. The overall convention is Sept. 24-28 in Raleigh, following several years of meeting in Nashville. This is the first of three years scheduled in North Carolina. The International Bluegrass Music Awards are Sept. 26.

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Index of Advertisers

Access Office Business Center. . . . . . . . 63 Blo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 60 Brier Creek Center for Implant and Oral Surgery. . . . . . 60, 64 Brier Creek Orthodontics. . . . . . . . . . 3, 61 California Closets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 60 Capital Air Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 61 Colonnade Dental. . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 61 Crown Trophy & Awards. . . . . . . . . 53, 60 dreamLake Media. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Dr. G’s WeightLoss. . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 61 Gigi’s Cupcakes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 61 Lango Kids RTP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Lois J. Hamilton PLLC. . . . . . . . . . . 27, 61 Pay it Forward Fertility . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Piekaar Lawfirm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 61 Pump it Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 45, 61 Raleigh Strength and Fitness. . . . . . 10, 60 Reflections by Cathy Foreman. . . . . . . . 49 Sharky’s Place Sports Bar & Grill. . . . 25, 60 Stage Door Dance. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 60 Stevens Prep Academy. . . . . . . . . . 26, 60 Terry Thrower Inc. and Sherri Smith. . 15, 61 Thompson & Thompson Family Dentistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 61 Trinity Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 60 Wake Gymnastics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 61

Submit Photos Submit your favorite local photo of family, friends, events, pets or anything else for possible publication in Yearbook section.

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Submit Events and Activities Submit information about events and activities at your school, church, club or organization.

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Recommend A Family, Student or Volunteer Nominate a local family, a student or a volunteer for a possible future feature article.

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Plenty of Romance in Leesville Author’s New Book Set in 1851 London, An Heiress at Heart is the story of Lizzie Poole, a woman with a past who masquerades as a missing heiress in order to discover the truth about her own identity. Along the way she falls in love with the one man whom, in her new identity, she could never marry. It puts everyone in quite a quandary. Written by Jennifer Delamere – Leesville resident since 1995 – the paperback book was selected by Grand Central Publishing as its first inspirational romance for the Forever imprint. “There is plenty of romance, but no graphic love scenes,” said Delamere, who is an editorial assistant at Measurement Inc., a local company that provides achievement tests and scoring services for public and private schools, other testing companies, and various organizations. “The inspirational elements are woven into the story in a subtle and I believe very palatable way. It is suitable for teens on up.” Available at Barnes & Noble and other bookstores and websites, the book has 432 pages and retails for $5.99. Daughter of a U.S. Navy pilot who eventually settled in Savannah, GA, Delamere feels she inherited her writing skills from her mother – who

was a journalist. She decided to write the book about five years ago when attending a screenwriting seminar and meeting several women involved with Romance Writers of America. “I joined the Heart of Carolina Romance Writers organization and discovered a wonderful organization for mentoring and supporting writers – teaching all aspects of the writer’s craft and the business of publishing,” she said. “I learned not only how to write a good book, but how to sell it as well.” An Heiress at Heart is Delamere’s first published novel, and part of a trilogy (the second book, A Lady Most Lovely, will be released in September). It has received good reviews from readers and reviewers, according to Delamere – and was nominated for the Romance Writers of America 2013 RITA award—the highest award for romance fiction. “It has been gratifying to see such a positive response,” Delamere said. “I believe it fills a particular niche for readers who perhaps feel that inspirational fiction is too tame, but mainstream romances are too spicy! My goal was to tell a great story with relatable characters, flavored with the joy and sizzle of romance and a happy ending.” For more information on Delamere, visit www.jenniferdelamere.com or look for her on Facebook or Twitter.

An Heiress at Heart AUTHOR: Jennifer Delamere PUBLISHER: Grand Central GENRE: Historical Romance PAGES: 432 (paperback) RETAIL PRICE: $5.99 WHERE SOLD: Barnes & Noble, various websites

8801 Fast Park Drive, Suite 311 Raleigh, NC 27617 www.919Magazine.com 919 Magazine LV

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Leesville Road’s New Culinary Arts Program Off to Quick Start, Expanding LRHS Students Now Can Graduate with National Certificate By G. CLEVELAND KILGORE 919 Magazine Writer

Leesville Road High School’s Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Program is off to a quick start – and plans to expand next school year. “We had an amazing first semester!” said Reno Palombit, program coordinator. “Our inaugural class of 10 students has graduates attending Johnson & Wales University and Wake Tech Community College to pursue degrees in culinary arts and hospitality management.” The LRHS program is part of ProStart ®, a national two-year high school program that unites the classroom and the food industry to develop the best and brightest talent into tomorrow’s restaurant and foodservice leaders, according to Palombit. The curriculum blends restaurant management and

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culinary arts concepts, 400 hours of foodservice internship, and state and national competitions. “ProStart® gives students a platform to discover new interests and talents to open doors to fulfilling careers,”

July | August 2013

said Palombit, who started the ProStart® program at the school. “My philosophy is to connect local businesses and colleges with the career goals of my students. I recognize the value of the internship experience in increased student motivation and engagement in school.” LRHS’s program already is gaining attention, recently being featured at the North Carolina Restaurant & Lodging Association’s “Rally in Raleigh” event. Students also worked in-class and onsite at Big Ed’s City Market to cater and serve NC state legislators and leaders – and traveled to NC Central University’s Hospitality Management program to work alongside college students at a special event. Leesville High offers other classes involving food to more students, but the ProStart® program allows for www.919Magazine.com


higher achievement for those aiming toward culinary careers. “Students graduate from the program with a National Certificate of Achievement, leaving high school with a nationally recognized credential that validates their skills and knowledge,” Palombit noted, adding that the

2013-2014 school year enrollment is 16 students. “The food service industry is expected to employ 14.4 million people by 2023. Through programs such as ProStart®, the industry can grow its own talent and build a pipeline of qualified, dedicated employees to fill its ranks.”

Our inaugural class of 10 students has graduates attending Johnson & Wales University and Wake Tech Community College to pursue degrees in culinary arts and hospitality management. RENO PALOMBIT

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Construction on New Fire Station Begins This Summer Construction of the new $2.7 million Raleigh Fire Department Station 29 begins this summer at 12117 Leesville Road. Completion is expected in about 11-12 months. The new North Raleigh station is expected to reduce response times in the areas currently serviced by Station 23 in Leesville and Station 24 in Brier Creek, according to RFD Chief John T. McGrath. “The additional station is necessary

to maintain balance and make sure that the fire stations in Raleigh collectively are able to meet National Fire Protection Association codes and standards regarding response times,” he said. “To maintain the NFPA standard, an engine is needed in the Leesville Road area.” The 10,000 sq. ft. station’s design calls for three apparatus bays, sleeping quarters with 27 beds, an exercise room, office and watch station. Three platoons – each

State Road 1840 Leesville Rd

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lead by a captain – will work out of the new station (but won’t be identified until the station is ready to be manned).

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919 ›› FINAL BELL

Raleigh Ranks Third in U.S. of

AMERICAN BOOMTOWNS

Raleigh-Cary

#5

City People are Moving to SOURCE: The Fiscal Times

SOURCE: Bloomberg

Raleigh-Durham International Airport

#7 #7

RALEIGH

Best Regional Airport in North America SOURCE: World Airport Awards

Research Triangle Ranked

8th in U.S.

As 'Hot Spot for Technology Jobs' SOURCE: Bright Labs

FASTEST GROWING CITY IN AMERICA SOURCE: U-Haul, 2012

Raleigh

#2 City

To Start a Business

A new report ranks Raleigh as the second best city in the U.S. to launch a new small business, trailing only Atlanta in the calculations. Factors considered ranged from funding availability to a local economic health. “(Raleigh) is highly educated (with almost half the population having a college degree) and the cost of living is very low,” the report said. “Research is a huge industry in Raleigh, and the presence of Duke and UNC nearby contributes talent to the job pool.” Following Raleigh in the rankings were Austin, TX; Tulsa, OK; Oklahoma City, OK; Tampa, FL; Seattle, WA; Minneapolis, MN; Houston, TX; and Omaha, NB. SOURCE: Nerdwallet

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Best City for Working Mothers:

RALEIGH #14 SOURCE: Forbes

Growth Raleigh Ranks #10 City for Business Growth SOURCE: MarketWatch/The Wall Street Journal, 2012 www.919Magazine.com


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919 Magazine Zone 2 Issue 8  

Leesville, Creedmoor Road, Harrington Court, Springdale, Lake Lynn, Glenwood Avenue, North Raleigh, 27613

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