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DFWFACTS.COM

2017


McKINNEY, TEXAS

Situated for business.

The gateway to your business future. Strategically located 30 minutes north of Dallas, McKinney is perfectly situated for business with a highly-educated workforce, available space opportunities and competitive incentives. Home to McKinney National Airport, a first-class corporate aviation airport with onsite U.S. Customs, McKinney is also within minutes of DFW International and Love Field airports connecting you to nearly every major global market. Discover why companies like Raytheon, Encore Wire, Service First Mortgage, UPS, Torchmark Corporation and Emerson Process Management choose McKinney as the place to grow their business.

M c K I N N E Y E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T C O R P O R AT I O N McKINNEYEDC.COM • INFO@McKINNEYEDC.COM • 972-547-7651


Welcome to the family. Allen is home to many businesses, and we’re proud of every single one. From our diverse, well-educated population to our business-friendly economic development corporation, we give the companies that call us home the tools they need to succeed. To find out if this is the family for you, visit AllenEDC.com.

The Place to Raise Your Business


PRIME SPACE FOR LEADERS IDEAL FOR CORPORATE RELOCATIONS


A GROWING, EDUCATED POPULATION 2016 2010 2000

RETAIL TRADE AREA (RTA) POPULATION ALMOST TRIPLED IN THE LAST 15 YEARS

155,425 2016 ESTIMATED RTA POPULATION

• • • •

COLLEGE GRADUATES DOMINATE RTA POPULATION, AT OVER 50%

12.66%

RETAIL TRADE AREA PROJECTED GROWTH 2016-2021

AWARD-WINNING COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENTS

Nebraska Furniture Mart 400-acre Grandscape Development The Cascades – mixed use along SH 121 Austin Ranch – mixed use minutes from SH 121

$129,628

2016 ESTIMATED AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME

BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE • • • • •

Main Street/FM 423 widening project Plano Parkway widening project Memorial Drive to Spring Creek Parkway connection Nebraska Furniture Mart/121 SRT overpass Headquarters Drive/Grandscape Drive overpass

UPSCALE LIVING & RECREATION

IN THE HEART OF D/FW

• •

• • • •

• • •

The Tribute - A premier lakeside golf community TopGolf - Award-winning entertainment complex Old American Golf Club - named to Golf Magazine’s Top 5 Best Public Golf Courses in Texas 23 shoreline miles on Lake Lewisville 3,000 acres of park land - one of highest acres of parks per capita in Texas

15 minutes to D/FW International and Dallas Love Field airports 25 minutes North of Downtown Dallas 40 minutes to Alliance Industrial Airport 8 minutes to Interstate 35E 5 minutes to Dallas North Tollway

Keri Samford, Economic Development Director 972.624.3127 • edc@thecolonytx.org • www.TheColonyEDC.org


A D A L L A S REGION A L CH A MBER P UBL IC AT ION

P U B L I C AT I O N S

EXCLUSIVELY PUBLISHED FOR THE DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER BY D MAGAZINE PARTNERS

D MAGAZINE PARTNERS BUSINESS GROUP PUBLISHER Josh Schimmels

PUBLISHER Quincy Curé Preston 214.523.5215 quincy.preston@dmagazine.com

MANAGING EDITOR

DENTON COUNTY COURTHOUSE

IRVING CONVENTION CENTER

DFW AIRPORT

PEGASUS

MARGARET HUNT HILL BRIDGE

Lance Murray

CREATIVE DIRECTOR REUNION TOWER

Michael Samples

PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

OMNI HOTEL, FORT WORTH

DIRECTOR OF SALES Kyle Moss 214.523.5247 kyle.moss@dmagazine.com

INTERNS UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS AT&T STADIUM, ARLINGTON

Julia Batlle Sarah Bradbury Julia Falcon Tiffany Pereyra

ADDISON CIRCLE

DART

WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL CENTER, FORT WORTH

DALLAS ZOO TRINITY AUDUBON CENTER

UNT DALLAS INLAND PORT

TOWN SQUARES

Dallas-Fort Worth Economic Development Guide is published for The Dallas Regional Chamber by D Magazine Partners, 750 N. St. Paul St., Ste. 2100, Dallas, TX 75201; www.dallaschamberpublications. com, 214.523.0300. ©2017 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or reprinted without written permission. Neither the Dallas Regional Chamber nor D Magazine Partners is a sponsor of, or committed to, the views expressed in these articles. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited contributions. For reprints and bulk copies, call 214.523.5215.

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


BIG THINGS HAPPEN IN DALLAS WHEN YOU PARTNER WITH US

The Dallas Office of Economic Development is here to partner with you on your project, big or small. When you’re ready to discuss your business or development needs, contact us: (214) 670-1685 DallasEcoDev.org

BUSINESS. SKILLS. IDEAS. NETWORKS. LIVING. CULTURE. Photography: Large Dallas skyline, Dallas Love Field Airport - Urban Fabric Photography; Winspear Opera House - DCVB


147 UTILITIES Water, Sewer, Gas and Telecommunications ...................... 148 Electricity .......................................................... 150

153 TAXES AND INCENTIVES Taxes and Union Activity ............................... 154 State and Local Incentives ........................... 156

DALLAS 14 THE REGIONAL CHAMBER Regional Map .......................................................14

Economic Forecast ............................................78

Economic Development Services ..................16

Global Trade .........................................................80

DFW Marketing Team ........................................18

Accolades .............................................................82

Building Tomorrow Together ...........................20

Economic Metro-to-Metro Comparisons ....84

Top Investors .......................................................22

Moody’s Diversity Index ....................................86

Economic Development Allies ........................24

Cost of Doing Business .....................................88

27 ACCESS The Dallas–Fort Worth Region .......................28 Location ...............................................................30

Corporate Business Climate Comparison ..........................................90

93 THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY

Transportation ....................................................32

Major Companies and Headquarters ..............................................94

Public Transit.......................................................34

Fortune 1000 ......................................................98

Mobility 2040.......................................................36

Small Business................................................. 100

Commuting Patterns ........................................38

The Innovation Ecosystem ........................... 102

Drive Times ..........................................................40

International Companies .............................. 106

DFW International Airport and Dallas Love Field.........................................42

Major Expansions and Relocations ............ 108

Nonstop Flight Times from Dallas-Fort Worth ..............................................44

47 PEOPLE Regional Population ..........................................48 Population Density and Growth .....................52 Demographics .....................................................54 Dallas Fort-Worth Market Tapestry ..............56 Migration Patterns ............................................58 Demographic Metro-toMetro Comparisons ...........................................60

63 WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Labor Supply ........................................................64 Industry Sectors ................................................66 Wages and Salaries ...........................................68 Occupation Clusters ..........................................70 Training, Colleges and Universities ...............72

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77 THE ECONOMY

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

113 INDUSTRY CLUSTERS Advanced Services ......................................... 114 Manufacturing ................................................. 116 Financial ............................................................ 118 Logistics ............................................................ 120 High Tech ........................................................... 122 Health Care ....................................................... 124 Life Sciences .................................................... 126 Aviation and Aerospace ................................. 128 Telecommunications ...................................... 130 Data Centers .................................................... 132 Hospitality ......................................................... 134

161 HOUSING Housing Costs .................................................. 162 Housing Choices .............................................. 164

169 SCHOOLS School Districts ............................................... 170 Private Schools................................................ 172

174 QUALITY OF LIFE Cost of Living.................................................... 176 Arts, Culture and Entertainment ................ 178 Live-Work-Play ................................................ 180 Parks and Recreation..................................... 182

185 AROUND THE REGION Traffi c Counts ................................................... 186 Major Transportation Construction Projects ................................... 188 Signifi cant Projects ........................................ 190 Future Projects................................................ 192 Urban Core ........................................................ 194 Dallas .................................................................. 196 Eastern Dallas County Area .......................... 198 Northwest Dallas County .............................. 200 Northeast Dallas County ............................... 202 Southern Dallas County Area ....................... 204 Park Cities and Vicinity .................................. 206 Arlington/Grand Prairie Area ....................... 208 Fort Worth and Vicinity ................................. 210 Northeast Tarrant County ............................. 212 Denton Area ...................................................... 214 Western Collin County ................................... 216

137 COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Eastern Collin County..................................... 218

Offi ce Clusters.................................................. 138

Advertiser Index .............................................. 220

Industrial Clusters .......................................... 140 Retail Clusters ................................................. 144

2017


DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER | WELCOME

WELCOME

A LETTER FROM THE DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER

If you’re considering making a move to the Dallas Region, or moving your business here, there’s probably something pulling you in this direction. It could be because our economy is booming. In the past five years alone, more than 500,000 jobs have been created by corporate expansions or relocations. And since 2010 we’ve seen more than 75 companies move here. Or, it could be because we’re quite literally in the middle of things -- the Dallas Region is among the U.S.’s prime central locations -- serving as a major hub for rail, DALE PETROSKEY President and Chief freight, air, and highway traffic. It also could be because we offer a Executive Officer welcoming environment for all and a great quality of life in one of Dallas Regional Chamber the most-affordable markets in the country. The fact is that the Dallas Region has become a magnet for companies and people seeking good jobs, good lives, and prosperous futures. As Dallas Fed President and CEO Robert Kaplan said at the Dallas Regional Chamber’s annual meeting in January, “You may take it for granted if you live here. But Texas, and Dallas, in particular, is about as welcoming a city as I’ve seen in the country,” he said. “The culture of this community is, ‘How can I help you?’ ‘How can I assist you?’ ‘How can I help your family?’ And so I’ve felt welcomed the day I got here. I think it’s one of the reasons we have become a magnet for people and for firms.” And what a magnet. Since 1994, our region has grown to be the fourth-largest metro area in the nation, with more than 7.1 million people living in the cities and suburbs in and between Dallas and Fort Worth. The Dallas Region has evolved into a thriving, growing, diverse metropolitan area. This has not happened by accident, or by coincidence. Aside from our prime geographic location, business and community leaders have united in a common mission, working steadily and strategically to make our city and our state a great place to live, work, and to do business. We’ve strived to keep Texas an income-tax-free state, to allow individuals and companies to pursue their business goals in a business-friendly and low-regulation environment, and to create and grow a world-class workforce. Relocations and expansions to our region in 2016 – Jamba Juice, Charles Schwab, Jacobs Engineering and OKIData, to name a few – tell us we’re continuing to move in the right direction. We’re in constant contact with our 1,100 member companies – who employ more than 500,000 workers – to gauge their needs, and to inform them of crucial developments in the Texas and U.S. business climate. Our strategic plan, “Building Tomorrow Together,” keeps us focused on three core priorities: continued economic development, our work to recruit more companies and jobs here, to help existing businesses grow, and to raise the region’s international profile; talent development, our work to strengthen the local education system from early childhood all the way through higher education graduation; and talent attraction, an expanded effort to enhance the quality of life and to share our story beyond the region to attract the best and brightest workers from around the world. Now in our 109th year, the Dallas Regional Chamber is proud to serve as the voice of business and as the champion for economic growth and development in this region. We are the single point of contact for companies, site-selection firms, and corporate real estate professionals who are considering moving here. We’d love for you to join us in our steadfast mission to make the Dallas Region the most desirable places to live, work and to do business in the United States.

2017 CHAIR OF THE BOARD Hilda C. Galvan Partner-in-Charge Jones Day PRESIDENT & CEO Dale Petroskey CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Pat Priest ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Mike Rosa ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, VICE PRESIDENT Sarah Carabias-Rush

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

M

Y

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Duane Dankesreiter

CM

MY

CY

TALENT ATTRACTION, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Jessica Heer

CMY

K

MEMBERSHIP AND REVENUE GROWTH, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT G.W. Hail MEMBER SERVICES, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Jennifer A. Schmiel COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING, & EVENTS, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT DARREN GRUBB EDUCATION & WORKFORCE, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Angela L. Farley PUBLIC POLICY, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT Virginia Schaefer STRATEGIC INITIATIVES, VICE PRESIDENT Kelle Marsalis

8

C

2017


LIVE

Midlothian

“I discovered the true draw of Midlothian. It’s all about the community.”


WHY MIDLOTHIAN? AVAILABLE WORKFORCE f Three million people within a 45-minute radius f Opportunities for higher education and career advancement at Midlothian Higher Education Center

EASY ACCESS TO ROAD, RAIL & AIR

35W

635

161

30

DFW INTERNATIONAL

820

LOVE FIELD

FORT WORTH

DALLAS

30 360

820

20

20 287 67 35W

35E

MIDLOTHIAN

35W

45

f Located along major state highways and 30 minutes south of Dallas and Fort Worth f Just 30 miles from DFW International Airport and Love Field Airport; also serviced by Midlothian’s Midway Airport f Centrally located along major rails, served by Union Pacific and BNSF

MIDWAY

RESOURCES TO GROW f Midlothian Railport offers 1,700 acres of rail-served, construction-ready greenfield sites f The new Midlothian Business Park supports companies ranging from light to heavy industrial development, including warehousing, distribution, advanced manufacturing, and food & beverage processing f A pro-business Midlothian government supports your company every step of the way

Midlothian Economic Development Make great things with us.

310 N. 9th Street, Suite A, Midlothian, TX 76065 | selectors.midlothian-tx.org | 972.723.3800


REGIONAL MAP The Dallas region is a thriving location for companies looking for a friendly business environment with reasonable taxes and straightforward regulation. Our strength is in the general attitude of continued improvement of our state and region in order to ensure we are positioned as a place of choice now and in the future.

CLAY

COOKE

MONTAGUE

JACK

WISE

DENTON

Alvord

Chico

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

Bridgeport Ponder

Runaway Bay Paradise

DISH

New Fairview

Justin

Boyd Aurora

Reno

Graford Sanctuary

R

Newark

Briar CDP

Springtown

North

Rhome

FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT

Pecan Acres CDP Pelican Bay Eagle Mountain CDP Azle Eagle Mountain Lake

Haslet

Wata

Saginaw Blue Mound

Lakeside

Mineral Wells

Cool

PALO PINTO

Millsap

NAS FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE River BASE

Oaks White SettlementWestover Hills

Willow Park

Hudson Oaks

FORT WORTH

Annetta North Weatherford

Haltom City R

FORT WORTH MEACHAM INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Lake Worth

Aledo

Annetta

Benbrook

Annetta South

Forest H

Edgecliff Village

Everman

PARKER TARRANT HOOD JOHNSON

Gordon

Crowley

FORT WORTH SPINKS

Burleson

Cresson

Lipan

ERATH

Briaroaks

Oak Trail Shores CDP

Cross Timbe

Granbury

Godley

Joshua

De Cordova Bend Keene Tolar Pecan Plantation CDP

Cleburne

Glen Rose

Stephenville

Dublin

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

R

AIRPORT

SOMERVELL

Rio Vista

BOSQUE 2017


Denison

LAMAR

GRAYSON

N

Pilot Point

FANNIN

COLLIN

Sanger

Anna

HUNT

Weston

Celina

Blue Ridge

Aubrey

DELTA

Wolfe City

Celeste

Melissa

Krugerville Krum

Commerce Denton

Prosper

Cross Roads

New Hope

DENTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

McKinney Oak Point Corinth

Frisco

Allen

Campbell

Hebron

Lewisville

Caddo Mills

Josephine

Parker

Plano

St. Paul

Murphy

Nevada Lavon

Wylie

Lone Oak Royse City

Westlake

Grapevine Lake Southlake

Addison

Garland

Farmers Branch

DALLAS University LOVE Park FIELD Highland Park

Irving

Euless

Bedford

Hurst

Lake ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL Ray AIRPORT Hubbard Rockwall

Rowlett

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Colleyville

ROCKWALL

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton

Coppell

Grapevine

Keller

White Rock Lake

Union Valley

Fate

Quinlan Hawk Cove

Pantego Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens Arlington

Mountain Creek Lake

Heath

Forney

Mansfield

Talty

Hutchins

LancasterLANCASTERWilmer

DeSoto

REGIONAL AIRPORT

Glenn Heights

DALLAS

Kaufman

Oak Grove

ELLIS

Red Oak Oak Leaf

Combine

VAN ZANDT

Oak Ridge

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

Ferris

Ovilla

Scurry

Pecan Hill

Midlothian

er

Terrell

Seagoville

Cedar Hill

Rendon CDP

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Balch Springs

Duncanville

Joe Pool Lake

RAINS

KAUFMAN

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Kennedale

Mesquite

DALLAS

Cockrell Hill

West Tawakoni

McLendonChisholm

Sunnyvale

Hill

HOPKINS

Lucas

The Colony

Roanoke Trophy Club

Richland Hills

Farmersville

Fairview

Flower Mound

auga North Richland Hills

Neylandville Princeton

Lowry Crossing

Greenville

Hickory Creek Lewisville Copper Lake Canyon Highland Village Bartonville Double Oak

McKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT

Little Elm Shady Shores

Argyle

hlake

DALLAS REGIONAL AROUND THE REGION | REGIONAL CHAMBER | XXXXXXX MAP

Sherman Gainesville

Rosser

Cottonwood Grays Prairie

Kemp

Palmer

Venus Waxahachie

Alvarado

Mabank

Garrett

HENDERSON

Ennis Maypearl Alma Bardwell

Grandview

Rice Athens

Italy Emhouse Kerens Milford Blooming Grove

HILL

Frost

Barry

NAVARRO

Goodlow

Corsicana Retreat

2017

Powell

Oak Valley

Mildred Mustang Angus

Eureka Navarro

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES The Dallas Regional Chamber is committed to promoting prosperity through sound public policy, focused economic development, education, and member engagement. The Chamber’s economic development program works directly with companies, location consultants, and local and state allies to market the region and attract new and expanding corporations.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Dallas Regional Chamber serves as a single point of contact for companies, site selection consultants and corporate real estate executives examining the region.

SERVICES > > > > > >

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Supplying regional data and information Identifying sites and buildings Compiling state and local incentives Coordinating with area cities and counties Hosting corporate and consultant visits to the region Assisting employees and families moving to the region

MIKE ROSA

SARAH CARABIAS-RUSH

ERICA FLORES

Senior Vice President 214-746-6735 mrosa@dallaschamber.org

Vice President 214-746-6750 srush@dallaschamber.org

Director 214-712-1921 eflores@dallaschamber.org

MARGARET SELID

KEVIN SHATLEY

PENNY LYNCH

Director 214-712-1968 mselid@dallaschamber.org

Director 214-746-6641 kshatley@dallaschamber.org

Manager 214-746-6739 plynch@dallaschamber.org

2017


The Dallas Regional Chamber maintains a robust and dynamic research and innovation program that is a recognized voice for the Dallas region’s business community.

DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  CHAMBER | XXXXXXX ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

PHOTO:.MICHAEL SAMPLES

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION PRIORITIES > Ensure that Chamber leaders, the larger business community and other key decision makers have ready access to information resources that support economic development activities, public policy, talent pipeline and attraction, and other Chamber initiatives.

> Create research products that tell the “DFW Story,” including the breadth, quality, and successes of the DFW community, locally, nationally, and internationally.

> Support the launch and growth of innovation activities by connecting entrepreneurs, innovators, researchers, and the business community.

DUANE DANKESREITER

ERIC GRIFFIN

JOSIAH BALL

Senior Vice President 214-746-6772 ddankesreiter@dallaschamber.org

Managing Director 214-746-6688 egriffin@dallaschamber.org

Research Analyst 214-746-6617 jball@dallaschamber.org

DAVE MOORE

Staff Writer 214-746-6689 dmoore@dallaschamber.org

PHOTO:.MICHAEL SAMPLES

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

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DFW MARKETING TEAM The DFW Marketing Team is an alliance of economic development organizations in the Dallas–Fort Worth area. Our team works with location consultants and corporate real estate executives who are examining the Dallas–Fort Worth region for business locations and expansion.

THE DFW MARKETING TEAM IS COMMITTED TO: > Facilitating new business development in the Dallas–Fort Worth region > Assisting with due diligence, research, qualified site identification and contacts > Coordinating a regional approach to economic development > Providing network opportunities among economic development allies

WE CAN CONNECT YOU TO A VARIETY OF URBAN, SUBURBAN AND RURAL OPPORTUNITIES, INCLUDING: > Industrial/manufacturing > Distribution facilities > Corporate headquarters > Retail > Call centers > Mixed-use developments > Residential land > Transit-oriented developments > Tourism sites > Airport properties For more information about the DFW Marketing Team, please call Margaret Selid at 214-712-1968 or visit www.DFWmarketingteam.com

North Lake

161

183

183

30

67

PHOTO:.MICHAEL SAMPLES

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

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3

TEXAS MADE HERE

Lavon Lake

75

289 190

190

GARLAND

635 635

75

30

Love Field

DALLAS 30

Lake Ray Hubbard

80 635

175

35E 45

20

20


BUILDING TOMORROW TOGETHER The Dallas Regional Chamber’s fi ve-year strategic plan is designed to build on recent successes while addressing new challenges — and taking advantage of new opportunities. The DRC is deeply invested in strengthening the region and its vibrant business community. Our fi ve-year strategic plan, Building Tomorrow Together, is based on three core priorities: Increasing economic growth; creating the best possible quality of life to attract the best and brightest workers from around the world; and strengthening the local talent pipeline for all students from pre-K through higher education. We work with our more than 1,100 member companies and regional partners to advocate for pro-growth public policies to achieve these priorities and to strategically manage our region’s continued growth. Through our work in economic development and public policy, Dallas has become a shining example to the country for business opportunities, corporate relocations, and job growth. With our momentum strong and a plan to build on our recent success in the years ahead, there is no better time to join the DRC.

JOIN THE DRC DallasChamber.org/Join

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT In partnership with our regional allies, the DRC will continue its work to attract companies to move here and create new jobs. With an increased focus on international opportunities, we will work to raise our region’s international profile, and we will continue to help drive a burgeoning culture of innovation and entrepreneurship.

TALENT ATTRACTION The Dallas Regional Chamber created a new Talent Attraction department to lead a national marketing and outreach campaign to showcase Dallas as a great place to start or continue a career, to raise a family, and to experience a high quality of life in one of the most vibrant and affordable markets in the nation.

TALENT ATTRACTION

TALENT PIPELINE The interests of local students and the business community are directly aligned: Improving educational outcomes for local students creates better career options for them. The DRC works to improve education at all levels – early childhood, K-12, and higher education – so every student has a better opportunity to find a good job that leads to a good life.

PUBLIC POLICY Public Policy is the foundation of all we do at the DRC. We work with our member companies and regional partners to strengthen our business community by advocating for pro-growth public policies, improving the educational system at every level, and creating a high quality of life to attract and retain the best and brightest workers from around the world. Our goal is to make Dallas the best place in America to live, work, and do business.

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DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  CHAMBER | XXXXXXX MEMBERSHIP

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


TOP INVESTORS The Dallas Regional Chamber recognizes the following companies and organizations for their membership investment at one of our top levels. Companies in bold print are represented on the DRC Board of Directors. Companies highlighted with an asterisk are investors the DRC Tomorrow Fund, an accelerated investment opportunity which provides us with the necessary resources to drive economic development, improve education, and attract talent. For more information about the benefits of membership at these levels call (214) 746-6600.

STRATEGY AT&T* BKD* Texas Instruments* Toyota North America*

CATALYST ACTIVE Network* Baylor Scott & White Health* Capital One Bank* Chase* Chickasaw Nation Comerica Bank* DFW International Airport* EY* Hilti North America* Hunt Consolidated Inc.* ONCOR* Tenet Healthcare* Tom Thumb Food & Pharmacy Wells Fargo

ADVOCATE 7-Eleven* Amegy Bank of Texas* American Airlines* Axxess* Baker Botts LLP BB&T* BBVA Compass* CBRE Group Inc.* Children’s Health* Citi* Copart* Corrigan Investments Inc.* Dallas Morning News Dal-Tile Corp.* Deloitte LLP* Dr Pepper Snapple Group Energy Future Holdings* Exxon Mobil Corp. FedEx Office* Fidelity Investments* Fluor Corp.* Forest City Texas Inc. Frito-Lay North America* Golden Living* Haynes and Boone LLP* HEB and Central Market Highland Capital Management LP* HKS* IBM Corp. Invesco Jones Day* KPMG LLP* Kroger Food Stores* Littler Mendelson PC* Locke Lord LLP* Lockheed Martin Manpower Group* Medical City Dallas Hospital/ Medical City Children’s

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D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Hospital Methodist Health System* Microsoft Corp.* NEC Corp. of America* New York Life Regional HQ Omni Dallas Hotel Omnitracs* PwC* Reliant Energy* Rent-A-Center* Sheraton - Dallas Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits* Spirit Realty Capital TDIndustries* Teledoc Texas Central Partners Texas Health Resources* Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children Thomson Reuters, Tax & Accounting TM Advertising* Tom Thumb Food & Pharmacy Torchmark Corp.* TXU Energy UT Southwestern Medical Center* LegacyTexas Bank Winstead PC*

BOARD OF ADVISORS Acadian Ambulance Accenture* ActivTek Global LLC Adastra Addison Law Airbus Helicopters Inc. AlixPartners Altair Global Ameriflex Andrews Distributing Andrews Kurth LLP Army & Air Force Exchange Arthur J Gallagher & Co. Austin Industries* Baker & McKenzie LLP Bank of America * Bank of Texas* Barnes & Thornburg BDO USA LLP* Bell Nunnally & Martin LLP Brasfield & Gorrie The Beck Group* Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas* Big 12 Conference Bracewell & Giuliani LLP Boomtime Boston Consulting Group* Bottle Rocket Brierley+Partners Brink’s Inc. Brinker International, Inc.

Business Wise C.C. Young Cassidy Turley Century 21 Judge Fite Co.* Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma* CHRISTUS Health City Electric Supply Civitas Capital Group* CliftonLarsonAllen LLP ClubCorp Inc.* Coca-Cola Refreshments* Colliers International* Commemorative Air Force Commerce Bank Consolidated Communications Conway MacKenzie Cook Children’s Healthcare Corgan Associates Inc.* CP&Y Inc. CSI GlobalVcard Cushman & Wakefield* Dallas County Community College District* Dallas Cowboys Football Club Dallas Marriott City Center Dallas Wings Dallas Stars Hockey Club* Dallas Women’s Foundation DataMob Dean Foods Co. DHD Films* Dunavant Distribution Group Emmitt Smith Enterprises* Ebby Halliday, Realtors* Edelman PR Worldwide EF Johnson Technologies Elemetal Recycling EN Consulting Inc. Etihad Airways The Fairmont Dallas FastSigns Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Flowserve Corp.* Fossil Foster Blair Consulting LLC Fox Sports Southwest Freeman* Frost Bank* Furniture Marketing Group* Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP* Gensler* Generational Equity Grant Thornton LLP* Greatbatch Inc. Greenberg Traurig LLP Gruber Elrod Johansen Hail Shank LLP Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. Gupta & Associates HDBD HDR Inc. Heritage Health Solutions Hill & Wilkinson* 2017


2017

Southwest Office Systems* Squire Patton Boggs Staffelbach Inc.* Stantec* State Farm Insurance* Strasburger & Price LLP* Strategic Staffing Solutions Susan G. Komen Taste of Dallas TDJ Enterprises* Texans Can Academies Texas A&M University Texas Star Alliance Texas Woman’s University* TGI Fridays Thompson & Knight LLP* Time Warner Cable* TopGolf* Town of Addison Trane Commercial Systems TravisWolff LLP Trinity Groves* TrustPoint Management Turner Construction Co.* Universal Mind UMB Bank N.A.* University of Texas at Arlington* University of Texas at Dallas* UnitedHealthcare Universal Mind URS Corporation Verizon Wireless* Village Green Holding LLC Vinson & Elkins LLP Walgreen’s Co. Weber Shandwick Southwest WFAA-TV Whitebox Real Estate Whiting–Turner Contracting Co. Whitley Penn LLP* Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP WFF*

LEAD 1820 Productions AAA Texas Inc. Account Control Technology Inc. Ackerman McQueen Acme Brick Co.* Adolfson & Peterson Construction Adolphus Hotel Advocare International LP Alcuin School Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas Alliance Data Allsteel Wilson Ameriflex APAC - Texas Inc. Ash Grove Cement Co. Aviall, A Boeing Company Bain & Company Inc.* Balfour Beatty Construction*

Beasley, Hightower & Harris, P.C. Berger Engineering Co. Beshear Group BMO Transportation Finance BOKA Powell LLC* Business Jet Center* Carlo’s Bakery Carrington, Coleman, Sloman & Blumenthal LLP Cawley Partners Champion Partners* Chandler Signs LLP CityDoc Urgent Care Commercial Metals Co. Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Dallas Inc. Crowe Horwath LLP* Dallas Foundation Dallas Mavericks Dave and Busters DeGolyer and MacNaughton Domain at Midtown Park Essilor of America Inc. Estrada, Hinojosa & Co. Inc.* Fogo De Chao Four Seasons Resort & Club at Las Colinas Gables Residential Trust George W. Bush Foundation* Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP H Mart Companies Inc. Halff Associates Inc.* Hart Group Inc. Hazel’s Hot Shot Inc. Hill + Knowlton Strategies Holmes Murphy and Associates* Huawei Technologies* Hunt Construction Group* Hunton & Williams LLP Huselton, Morgan & Maultsby PC* Imaginuity Interactive Inc. In-N-Out Burger J-BJ Marketing LLC Joule, A Luxury Collection Hotel Kiewit Infrastructure South Co. Kimberly-Clark Corp. Kofax Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson LLP Martin Marrietta Mary Kay Inc.* McAlister’s Deli – Dallas Metrocare Services MW Logistics LLC MWH Americas Inc. Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr PC National Math & Science Initiative Nationwide Networking Results Inc. New York Life Regional Headquarters Ocean Prime Restaurant One Uptown Apartments Peter O’Donnell Jr.

Polsinelli PC Post Properties Inc. Prudential Asset Resources The Ritz-Carlton, Dallas REES Rehab Synergies Republic Title of Texas Rising Fall Rone Engineering Services Ltd.* Ruth’s Chris Steak House Russell Reynolds Associates Inc. ScienceSoft Securadyne Systems Serta Mattress Co. Sewell Automotive Companies* SevenTablets Inc. Signet Jewelers Limited Smile Workshop Stream Realty Southwest International Trucks Sparks Agency Stahls’ State Fair of Texas Stream Realty Partners* Structure Tone Southwest* Sun Holdings LLC Texas A&M University Texas Capital Bank* Texas Oncology Texas Rangers Baseball Club* The Taylor The Westin Dallas Downtown Willis Towers Watson* Tradition Senior Living Trinity Basin Preparatory Uber Technologies Union Pacific Railroad United Site Services University of Phoenix University of South Carolina Career Center USAA Virgin America Airlines VNA Vonage Business VOX Global W Dallas – Victory Hotel WageWorks Walter P Moore* Walton Development and Management* Weaver* Woodbine Development Corp. YP Marketing Solutions

DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  CHAMBER | XXXXXXX TOP INVESTORS

Hilton Anatole* Hilton Garden Inn Downtown Dallas Hilton Worldwide HNTB Corp. Holland & Knight LLP* HollyFrontier Corp.* Hoar Program Mgmt.* HOLT CAT* HPI Real Estate & Ross Tower* HUB International* InStaff * Interceramic* Int’l Leadership of Texas Invitation Homes Jackson Walker L.L.P.* Jacobs* JE Dunn Construction JLL* Johnson Controls Inc. Ketchum PR Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Life School Live Nation Lockwood, Andrews, & Newnam Mission Foods MHBT Inc.* Moss Adams LLP NACD North Texas Chapter Neiman Marcus Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Nextt Northwood University NTT Data Inc. Oliver Wyman ORIX USA Corp. Oscar Health Insurance Parker University Parkland Foundation PDS Technical Services* Perkins+Will* Perkins Coie LLP People Performance Resources PlainsCapital Bank* Point B Premier Truck Group PSA Constructors Inc. PureFlow Inc. Reflect Systems Regions Bank RML Automotive Rosewood Crescent Hotel Rosewood Property Co. Santander Consumer USA SAP - America Saulsbury Industries Schneider Electric SCORE Dallas Showcall Sidley Austin LLP Slalom Consulting Southern Methodist University* Southwest Airlines*

* Building Tomorrow Together Fund Investors D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

23


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ALLIES The Dallas Regional Chamber proudly supports economic development in the 13-county Dallas-Fort Worth region by maintaining relationships with more than 120 key local community allies.

ADDISON, TOWN OF Drew Dietrich Economic Development Manager (972) 450-7039 Orlando Campos Director Economic Development (972) 450-7034 ALEDO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Ken Pfeifer City Administrator (817) 441-7016 Dan Bowman Executive Director/ CEO (972) 727-0228 David Ellis Assistant Director (972) 727-0250 Eileen Gonzales Marketing Director (972) 727-0228 Tracey Cline Business Retention & Expansion Coordinator (972) 727-0250 ALVARADO, CITY OF Emile Moline Economic Development Director (817) 790-3351 ANNA, CITY OF Jessica Perkins Chief Administrative Officer (972) 924-3325 ARLINGTON, CITY OF Bruce Payne Economic Development Manager (817) 459-6114 Matthew Harp Economic Development Specialist (817) 459-6115 Marcus Young Economic Development Specialist (817) 459-6117 Alex Agnor Economic Development Analyst (817) 459-6155 ATHENS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Lisa Denton Executive Director (903) 675-4617 AZLE, CITY OF Karen Dickson Economic Development Director

24

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Caitlin Glenn Economic Development Director (817) 444-7076 Susie Hiles Assistant to the City Manager (817) 444-2541 BALCH SPRINGS, CITY OF Chris Dyser EDC Planner/City Planner (972) 557-6082 Charles Fenner Assistant City Manager/Economic Development (972) 286-4477 x230 Effie Donaldson EDC Specialist (972) 913-3004 BEDFORD, CITY OF Bill Syblon Director of Development (817) 952-2175 Audrey Thorne Economic Development Analyst (817) 952-2129 BENBROOK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Cathy Morris BEDC & Marketing Director (817) 249-6090 BRIDGEPORT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Kevin Holzbog Executive Director (940) 683-3490 BURLESON, CITY OF Justin Bond Manager of Economic Development (817) 426-9684 Alex Philips Economic Development Coordinator (817) 426-9613 Kent George Development Project Manager (817) 426-9689 CARROLLTON, CITY OF

CEDAR HILL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Development (214) 670-1696

Allison Thompson Executive Director (972) 291-5132 x5

David Schleg Chief Planner, Office of Economic Development (214) 671-9824

Andy Buffington Marketing Manager (972) 291-5132 x4 CELINA ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Corbett Howard Executive Director (972) 382-8949 CLEBURNE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION INC. Jerry Cash Executive Vice President (817) 645-8644 COLLEYVILLE, CITY OF Mark Wood Executive Director, Economic Development and Communications (817) 503-1060 COMMERCE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Bonnie Hunter Executive Director (903) 886-1121 COPPELL, CITY OF Mindi Hurley Economic Development Coordinator (972) 304-3677 CORINTH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Jason Alexander Executive Director (940) 498-7510 CORSICANA, CITY OF

Kevin Spath Manager, Office of Economic Development (214) 670-1691 DALLAS COUNTY Rick Loessberg Director of Planning & Development (214) 653-7601 DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER Mike Rosa Senior Vice President, Economic Development (214) 746-6735 Sarah Carabias-Rush Vice President, Economic Development (214) 746-6750 Margaret Selid Director, Economic Development (214) 712-1968 Erica Flores Director, Economic Development (214) 712-1921 Kevin Shatley Director, Economic Development (214) 746-6641 Penny Lynch Manager, Economic Development (214) 746-6739

Connie Standridge City Manager (903) 654-4803

Duane Dankesreiter Senior Vice President, Research & Innovation (214) 746-6772

Scott Jones Economic Development Director (903) 654-4806

Eric Griffin Managing Director, Research & Innovation (214) 746-6688

CRANDALL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Josiah Ball Research Analyst (214) 746-6617

James Stroman Board President (972) 427-8300

Tom Latchem Director of Economic Development (972) 466-3299

Mike Barnes President/CEO (830) 833-5300

Andrea Roy Manager of Economic Development (972) 466-5741

Karl Zavitkovsky Director, Office of Economic Development (214) 670-5140

DALLAS, CITY OF

J. Hammond Perot Assistant Director, Office of Economic

Dave Moore Writer/Journalist (214) 746-6689 DECATUR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Thom Lambert Executive Director (866) 627-9109 DENISON DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE Tony Kaai President (903) 464-0883

2017


Loretta Rhoden Vice President of Operations (903) 464-0883 DENTON, CITY OF Caroline Booth (940) 349-8200 DENTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP Adam Gawarecki Vice President, Economic Development (940) 382-7151 DESOTO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Murphy Cheatham II Chief Executive Officer (972) 230-9611 Antoine Long Economic Development Specialist (972) 230-9608 DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT John Brookby Assistant Vice President, Commercial Development (972) 973-4645 DUNCANVILLE, CITY OF Jessica James Director of Economic Development (972) 780-4997 Kevin Hugman City Manager (972) 780-5003 ENNIS, CITY OF Marty Nelson Economic Development Coordinator (972) 921-4794 Mike Collins Director, Planning & Economic Development (817) 685-1684 EVERMAN, CITY OF Michael Box City Manager (817) 293-0525 Michael Nicoletti Director, Economic Development (817) 293-0525 FAIRVIEW, TOWN OF Ray Dunlap Economic Development Manager 2017

(972) 886-4222 Shannon Craft Event/Marketing Specialist (972) 886-4227 FARMERS BRANCH, CITY OF Allison Cook Economic Development Manager (972) 919-2507 John Land Managing Director, External Operations (972) 919-2512 FARMERSVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Erica Estrada Manager, Domestic & International Recruitment (817) 338-3392 Melonye Whitson Vice President, Economic Development (817) 338-3393 FRISCO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Jim Gandy President (972) 292-5160 Dave Quinn Vice President (972) 292-5158

Daphne Hamlin FEDC Administrator (972) 782-6151

Harry Whalen Director of Business Development (972) 292-5156

Ben White City Manager/Public Works Director (972) 782-6151

John Bonnot Director of Economic Development (972) 292-5143

FATE, CITY OF

Darcy Schroer Director of Marketing (972) 292-5155

Justin Weiss Assitant to City Manager, Economic and Community Development (972) 771-4601 FERRIS, CITY OF Carl Sherman City Manager (972) 544-2110 FLOWER MOUND, TOWN OF Alora Wachholz Economic Development Manager (972) 874-6044 Jimmy Stathatos Town Manager (972) 874-6089 FOREST HILL, CITY OF Sheyi Ipaye City Manager (817) 568-3009 FORNEY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Warren Ketteman Executive Director (972) 564-7376 Stewart McGregor Economic Coordinator (972) 564-5808 FORT WORTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Brandom Gengelbach Executive Vice President, Economic Development (817) 336-2491

Stefanie Wagoner Director of Business & Expansion (972) 292-5157 GAINESVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Arleene Loyd Executive Director (940) 665-5241 Kelsey Hawkins Economic Development Specialist (940) 665-5241 GARLAND, CITY OF David Gwin Director, Economic Development (972) 205-2462 Ayako Schuster Business Development Manager (972) 205-3818 Armando Gallardo Department Coordinator II (972) 205-3800 GARLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Diane Whitlock Economic Development Assistant (469) 326-7447 GLEN ROSE, CITY OF Ray Moody Code Enforcement (254) 897-2272

GLENN HEIGHTS, CITY OF

HIGHLAND VILLAGE, CITY OF

Folakemi Osoba Executive Assistant to City Manager (972) 223-1690 x215

Autumn Aman Community Development (972) 899-5093

GRANBURY, CITY OF

HIGHLAND VILLAGE, CITY OF

Chris Coffman City Manager (817) 573-1114 Scott Sopchak Planning Director (817) 573-1114 Holly Brackeen Coordinator (817) 279-9991 GRAND PRAIRIE, CITY OF Marty Wieder Director of Business and Retail Recruitment (972) 237-8160 Terry Jones Business Development Manager (Industrial Projects) (972) 237-8020 GRAPEVINE, CITY OF Robert Farley Economic Development Manager (817) 410-3108 Dan Truex City Manager’s Office (817) 410-3153 GREENVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Greg Sims President/CEO (903) 455-1197 John Dickson Director of Business Development/ Retention (903) 455-1197 HALTOM CITY, CITY OF Rex Phelps Assistant City Manager (817) 222-7733 HEB ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Mary Frazior Director (817) 540-1053 HICKORY CREEK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Sydney Leyva Administrative Assistant (940) 497-2528

Michael Leavitt City Manager (972) 899-5131 HURST, CITY OF Steve Bowden Executive Director, Economic Development (817) 788-7025 HUTCHINS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Guy Brown (972) 225-4449 IRVING, CITY OF Scott Connell Economic Development Director (972) 721-2398 IRVING-LAS COLINAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Don Williams Vice President of Economic Development and Operations (214) 507-5091 JOHNSON COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION Diana Miller Executive Director (817) 556-6985 JUSTIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Shani Inhfeldt Executive Director (940) 648-3800 KAUFMAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Lee Ayres Executive Director (972) 932-5332 KEENE, CITY OF William Guinn City Administrator (817) 641-3336 Michael Talley Director, Economic Development (682) 970-0395 KELLER, CITY OF Trina Zais Director of Public Services and Economic Development (817) 743-4009

Kayla Thomas Economic Development Coordinator (817) 743-4021 Mark Hafner Economic Development (817) 743-4020 KEMP ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Dorothy Locklin EDC Secretary (903) 275-1581 KENNEDALE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Bob Hart Executive Director (817) 985-2102 LAKE DALLAS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Nick Ristagno Interim City Manager (940) 497-2226 LAKE WORTH, CITY OF Jami Woodall Economic Development Coordinator (817) 237-1211

DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  CHAMBER | XXXXXXX ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ALLIES

William Myers Vice President (903) 464-0883

LANCASTER, CITY OF Shane Shepard Director of Economic Development (972) 218-1314 LAVON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Kay Wright President (469) 867-9258 Pamela Mundo Executive Director (214) 773-0966 LEWISVILLE, CITY OF Nika Reinecke Director, Economic Development (972) 219-3750 Pritiben Patel Economic Development Coordinator (972) 219-3482 LITTLE ELM ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Jennette Killingsworth Executive Director of EDC (214) 975-0455 MANSFIELD ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Richard Nevins Assistant Director Economic Development (817) 728-3652 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

25


DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ALLIES

MCKINNEY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

NORTH RICHLAND HILLS, CITY OF

Darrell Auterson President & CEO (972) 547-7687

Craig Hulse Director, Economic Development (817) 427-6091

Abby Liu Executive Vice President (972) 547-7688 Chad Walker Director of Business Development (972) 547-7659 John Valencia Director of BREP & Emerging Technology (972) 562-5430 Madison Clark Economic Development Coordinator (972) 547-1083 MELISSA, CITY OF Jason Little City Manager (972) 838-2338 MESQUITE, CITY OF Tom Palmer Manager of Economic Development (972) 216-6340 Kim Buttram Assistant Manager of Economic Development (972) 216-6446 Wayne Larson Director of Communications & Marketing (972) 329-8319 MIDLOTHIAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Larry Barnett President/CEO (972) 723-3800 Jennifer Stockett Marketing Manager (972) 723-3800 MINERAL WELLS, CITY OF Steve Butcher AGC Director (940) 325-9734 MURPHY, CITY OF Kristen Roberts Director of Economic and Community Development (972) 468-4006 NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS Donna Coggeshall Manager of Research and Technical Services (817) 695-9168

26

NORTHEAST TARRANT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Jack Bradshaw President & CEO (817) 281-9376 NORTHLAKE, TOWN OF Nathan Reddin Development Director (940) 242-5703 OAK POINT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Luke Olson City Manager & Executive Director of Economic Development (972) 294-2312 ONCOR ELECTRIC DELIVERY Mike Cain Director of Economic Development (214) 486-6323 Sharon Cook Economic Development Consultant (214) 486-7030 OVILLA, CITY OF Cyndy Powell Economic Development CEO (972) 617-2489 Brad Piland Director of Public Works (972) 617-7262

PRINCETON, CITY OF Derek Borg City Manager (972) 736-2416 Amber Anderson Building Permits & Inspections RED OAK, CITY OF Lee McCleary Economic Development Director (972) 617-6831 RICHARDSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Bill Sproull President & CEO (972) 792-2801 John Jacobs Vice President (972) 792-2802 Jenny Mizutowicz Director of Marketing (972) 792-2817 Mike Skelton Director, Mayor’s Office of International Business (972) 792-2814 RICHLAND HILLS, CITY OF Jason Moore Assistant to the City Manager (817) 616-3745 RIVER OAKS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. JoAnn Gordon President (817) 626-5421 Marvin Gregory City Administrator (817) 626-3791

PANTEGO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Pamela Mundo Consultant (214) 773-0966

Matthew Fielder Town Manager (817) 274-1381

ROANOKE, CITY OF

Bill Brown President (682) 551-1228 PILOT POINT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Amanda Davenport Director of Economic Development (940) 218-3411

Scott Campbell City Manager (817) 491-2411 ROCKWALL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Sheri Franza President & CEO (972) 772-0025 Suzie Bell Director of Marketing (972) 772-0025

PLANO, CITY OF

ROWLETT, CITY OF

Sally Bane Executive Director (972) 208-8300

Jim Grabenhorst Director of Economic Development (972) 463-3953

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Joey Grisham Assistant Director of Economic Development (972) 412-6193 Nathan Weber Economic Development Specialist (972) 412-6121 ROYSE CITY, CITY OF Larry Lott Executive Director (972) 636-2183 SACHSE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Leslyn Blake Chief Executive Officer (469) 429-4764 SAGINAW, CITY OF

STATE OF TEXAS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM Janie Havel North Texas Region Representative 214-733-4274 SUNNYVALE, TOWN OF Cheri Dolan (972) 203-4154 TERRELL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Danny Booth President (972) 524-5704 Dawn Steil Assistant Vice President (972) 563-5703

Mark White Director, Public and Community Development (817) 230-0500 x2449

TEXAS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

SANGER, CITY OF

THE COLONY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Michael Brice City Manager (940) 458-7930 Alina Ciocan Director of Economic Development (940) 458-9096 SEAGOVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Kirk Clennan Executive Director (972) 287-9944

Carlton Schwab President & CEO (512) 480-8432

Keri Samford Director of Economic Development (972) 624-3126 Cindi Lane Economic Development Specialist (972) 624-3127 TROPHY CLUB, TOWN OF

SHERMAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP.

Patrick Arata Acting Town Manager (682) 831-4655

Frank Gadek, Executive Vice President (903) 868-2566

Steven Glickman Assistant Town Manager (682) 831-4607

John Plotnik President

VAN ALSTYNE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Ashton Ghaemi Research & Marketing Assistant (903) 868-2566 SOUTHLAKE, CITY OF Denise Artho Economic Development & Tourism (817) 748-8039

Jodi Carr Director (903) 482-9587

WAXAHACHIE, CITY OF Doug Barnes Director of Economic Development (469) 309-4121 Kassandra Carroll Economic Development Coordinator (469) 309-4122 WEATHERFORD, CITY OF Dennis Clayton, Executive Director (817) 598-4302 WESTLAKE, TOWN OF Tom Brymer Town Manager (817) 490-5720 Amanda DeGan Assistant Town Manager (817) 490-5715 Ginger Awtry Director of Communications & Community Affairs (817) 490-5719 WHITESBORO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Lynda Anderson Economic Development Director (903) 564-4000 WILMER, CITY OF David Miracle Economic Development Director (972) 965-6348 WYLIE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP. Sam Satterwhite Executive Director (972) 442-7901 Jason Greiner Assistant Director (972) 442-7901

Kanita Larkins Administrative Coordinator (903) 482-9587 WATAUGA, CITY OF Jackie Reyff Planning Director (817) 514-5818 Victoria Vaughan Economic Development Coordinator (817) 514-5813

2017


ACCESS THE DALLAS–FORT WORTH REGION MOBILITY 2040

|

|

LOCATION

COMMUTING PATTERNS

|

|

TRANSPORTATION

|

PUBLIC TRANSIT

DRIVE TIMES

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AND DALLAS LOVE FIELD NON-STOP FLIGHT TIMES FROM DALLAS-FORT WORTH

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

27


THE DALLAS– FORT WORTH REGION The Dallas Regional Chamber welcomes you and your company to the DFW region. This region is an innovation hub with a wealth of resources that make it an ideal business climate. The DFW region’s attractive quality of life, strong regional and state economy, low cost of living, skilled labor force, pro-business mindset and absence of corporate and personal income taxes all contribute to the thriving DFW location. Forward-looking companies seeking a friendly and profitable place to do business have discovered in DFW the attributes they have been seeking. Due to its central location and worldclass transportation infrastructure, DFW is a major international gateway. The region excels in passenger air travel and air cargo operations with the nation’s third-busiest airport, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport; Dallas Love Field Airport, home to the largest domestic airline in the country; and the world’s first fully industrial airport, Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Our roads and rail lines are remarkable for the volume and delivery speed they provide for transporting freight products across the country. Our region ranks among the top three U.S. metropolitan areas for business expansions, relocations and employment growth. DFW’s young, highly educated workforce of over 3.5 million people is growing quickly, providing companies with the abundance of talent they need to make their business a success. Texas’ business climate, combined with the attributes and functionality that Dallas currently holds as a major corporate headquarters destination, sends a simple, yet compelling, message. There is no better region from which to operate a national or global firm today, next year, or even decades into the future. We know you will find yourself right at home in the DFW region. We look forward to supporting your business expansion projects.

28

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

CENTRAL LOCATION, LEVERAGED BY TRANSPORTATION ASSETS AND FAVORABLE BUSINESS CLIMATE Amarillo 40

Lubbock Abilene El Paso

Odessa

FORT WORTH DALLAS

20

20

35 10

30

45

Austin Houston

San Antonio

10

Galveston 37

Corpus Christi

Laredo

2017


Portland

Boston Detroit

New York Philadelphia

Chicago San Francisco

Indianapolis

Denver Las Vegas

Los Angeles

Washington

Charlotte Albuquerque

Atlanta

DALLASFORT WORTH

Phoenix

Austin

Houston

San Antonio

Miami

Moscow

London

Los Angeles

DALLASFORT WORTH

Paris

New York

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  THE DALLAS-FORT CHAMBER | XXXXXXX WORTH REGION

Seattle

Frankfurt Beijing Cairo

Tokyo Dubai

Mexico City

Shanghai Mumbai Singapore

Rio de Janeiro Buenos Aires

2017

Cape Town

Sydney

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

29


SUPERIOR COMBINATION OF LOCATION AND ACCESS FEATURING DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, MAJOR HIGHWAYS, AND RAIL

LOCATION You’ve heard the phrase “Everything is bigger in Texas?” That includes the Dallas– Fort Worth region, whose combined footprint is larger than some U.S. states. Dallas–Fort Worth is the nation’s fourth-largest metro area, conveniently CLAY positioned in the middle of the United States and offering competitiveJACK advantages to businesses that locate here. The region’s central location allows it to function as a logistics and distribution hub, giving businesses an edge by putting key markets within easy reach of both truck and rail shipping. For business travelers, the region’s mid-continent location means saving time on travel—any major U.S. city is less than four hours away.

COOKE

MONTAGUE

WISE

GR

DENTON

Pilot Point

COLLIN

Sanger

Anna

Alvord Weston

Celina Aubrey Chico

Melissa

Krugerville Krum Denton

Decatur Lake Bridgeport

Prosper

Cross Roads

New Hope

Bridgeport

McKinney Oak Point

Ponder

Runaway Bay Paradise

Corinth DISH

New Fairview

Justin

Springtown Reno

Graford Sanctuary

Northlake

Rhome

Westlake Haslet

Grapevine Lake Southlake

Hebron

Lewisville

Parker

Plano

Watauga North Richland

Saginaw

Addison

Haltom City

Lake Worth

Rowlett

Dallas Love Field Airport

Irving

Euless

Garland

Farmers Branch

Dallas/Fort Worth Internaltional Airport

Bedford

Hills

Wylie

Sachse

Richardson

Carrollton

Coppell

Grapevine

Colleyville

St. Paul

Murphy

Keller

Blue Mound

Hurst

University Park Highland Park

White Rock Lake

Sunnyval

Richland Hills

Cool

Dallas

River Oaks

PALO PINTO

Lucas

The Colony

Roanoke Trophy Club

Pecan Acres CDP Pelican Bay Eagle Mountain CDP Azle Eagle Mountain Lake

Lakeside

Fairview Allen

Flower Mound

Newark

Briar CDP

Frisco

Hickory Creek Lewisville Copper Lake Canyon Highland Village Bartonville Double Oak

Aurora

Lowry Crossing

Little Elm Shady Shores

Argyle

Boyd

Mineral Wells

Sherman

Gainesville

White Settlement

Willow Park

Hudson Oaks

Millsap

Mesquite

Westover Hills Annetta North Weatherford

Pantego

Fort Worth

Aledo

Annetta Annetta South

Grand Prairie

Dalworthington Gardens

Benbrook

Cockrell Hill

Seagovi

DeSoto

Cedar Hill

PARKER TARRANT HOOD JOHNSON

Gordon

Rendon CDP

Hutchins

Duncanville

Joe Pool Lake

Kennedale Everman

Crowley

Mansfield

ERATH

DALLAS Ferris

ELLIS

Red Oak Oak Leaf

Pecan Hill

Midlothian

Cross Timber

Granbury

Wilmer

Glenn Heights

Briaroaks

Oak Trail Shores CDP

Lancaster

Ovilla

Burleson

Cresson

Lipan

Balch Springs

Arlington

Forest Hill

Edgecliff Village

Mountain Creek Lake

Joshua

Godley

Palmer

Venus

De Cordova Bend Keene

Waxahachie

Alvarado

Tolar

Garrett

Pecan Plantation CDP

Cleburne Ennis Maypearl

Alm Bardwell

Grandview Glen Rose

Stephenville

SOMERVELL

Rio Vista

Italy

DFW CLIMATE

Emhouse

Milford

Dublin

30

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

AVERAGE DAILY TEMP BOSQUE

HIGH

LOW

JANUARY

56

APRIL

HILL

Blooming Grove Frost

WEATHER CATEGORY

ANNUAL AVERAGE

36

AVERAGE ANNUAL PERCENT OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE

61%

76

55

AVERAGE NO. OF RAINY DAYS

80 days

JULY

96

75

AVERAGE PRECIPITATION

36.1 inches

OCTOBER

78

57

AVERAGE SNOWFALL

1.7 inches

ANNUAL AVERAGE

76

55

AVERAGE WIND SPEED

10.5 mph

(°F)

(°F)

SOURCES: National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office, NOAA

2017

Barry


RING

1

MILES

KILOMETERS

% OF US POP. SERVED

10

600

966

16%

24

960

1,545

37%

48

1,800

2,887

93%

LAMAR

2

RAYSON

FANNIN

3

Wolfe City

DELTA

HUNT Blue Ridge

Celeste

Commerce

3

Neylandville Princeton

g

Farmersville

Campbell

Greenville

HOPKINS

Caddo Mills

Josephine Nevada

S E AT T L E

Lavon

Lone Oak Royse City

ROCKWALL Lake Rockwall Ray Hubbard

2

Union Valley

Fate

Quinlan Hawk Cove

West Tawakoni

RAINS

McLendonChisholm

Heath

CHICAGO

KAUFMAN

le

Forney

LO S A N G E L E S

Talty

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall Combine

N E W YO R K C I T Y

1

Terrell

ille

S

HOURS

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  LOCATION CHAMBER | XXXXXXX

TRUCK TRANSIT TIMES AND POPULATION SERVED

DFW

Oak Ridge

VAN ZANDT

Kaufman

Oak Grove

S

Scurry

Rosser

Cottonwood Grays Prairie

Kemp

Mabank

ma Rice

HENDERSON

FLIGHT TIME FROM DFW

RAIL TRANSIT TIME

Kerens

NAVARRO Corsicana Retreat Oak Valley

Powell

Goodlow

Eureka LOSNavarro ANGELES, CA (LAX)

2 hrs. 56 min.

LOS ANGELES (Long Beach): 4+ days

TORONTO, ON, CANADA (YTO)

2 hrs. 50 min.

CHICAGO: 3+ days

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO (MEX)

2 hrs. 32 min.

ATLANTA: 3 days

PARIS, FRANCE (PAR)

9 hrs. 30 min.

TOKYO, JAPAN (TYO)

14 hrs. 25 min.

HOUSTON: 1 day

NEW YORK, NY (NYC)

3 hrs. 15 min.

Mildred

Mustang Angus

2017

FREESTONE

SOURCES: OAG North American Executive Flight Guide

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

31


Dallas-Fort Worth’s vast transportation infrastructure provides connectivity for residents and businesses. The freeway system provides east-west and northsouth corridors with easy access to job centers and residential communities. Mass transit options, including the Dallas Area Rapid Transit system, offer alternatives to automobiles for getting around the region. The region’s robust interstate infrastructure provides easy links along the NAFTA corridor, linking Mexico to Canada and to East and West Coast destinations, making it an important intermodal center for the distribution of air, rail and truck freight. The nation’s two largest railroads, Fort Worth–based Burlington Northern Santa Fe and Union Pacific have major operation nodes in the region, offering business-efficient access to other key ports and distribution centers across the United States and into Mexico.

PHOTO: DFW AIRPORT

TRANSPORTATION

AIRPORTS 8

5

15 3

4 9 16

1 2 7 17

10

14

6

12

18 13 11

AIRPORTS 1 DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

11 FORT WORTH SPINKS

2 LOVE FIELD

12 ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL

3 FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT

13 LANCASTER REGIONAL AIRPORT

4 ADDISON AIRPORT

14 MESQUITE METRO

5 MCKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT

15 NORTHWEST REGIONAL

6 DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT 7 FORT WORTH MEACHAM INTERNATIONAL

HELICOPTERS AND VERTICAL TAKE-OFF AND LANDING AIRCRAFT ONLY:

8 DENTON ENTERPRISE

16 GARLAND/DFW HELOPLEX

9 RALPH M HALL/ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL 10 NAS FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE BASE

17 DALLAS CBD VERTIPORT 18 HELIPORT DESOTO

COMMERCIAL AIRPORTS AIRPORT

32

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

RUNWAYS Number

Lengths (feet)

TOTAL OPERATIONS 2016 2015

Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW)

7

8,500; 9,000; 9,301; 13,400 (2); 13,401 (2)

672,748

681,261

Dallas Love Field (DAL)

3

8,800; 7,752; 6,147

224,193

216,099

Alliance Airport (AFW)

2

8,220; 9,600

106,563

117,499

SOURCE: TxDOT; Air Traffic Activity Data System (ATADS), FAA

2017


HIGHWAYS AND ARTERIALS

McKINNEY FRISCO LEWISVILLE LEWISVILLE

ALLEN

PLANO WYLIE

FLOWER MOUND

CARROLTON

GRAPEVINE

BEDFORD EULESS

FORT WORTH

ARLINGTON

RICHARDSON RICHARDSON GARLAND ROWLETT

IRVING

DALLAS

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  TRANSPORTATION CHAMBER | XXXXXXX

DENTON

MESQUITE

GRAND PRAIRIE

LANCASTER LANCASTER MANSFIELD

CEDAR HILL

DESOTO

CARGO

PRE-DESIGNATED FOREIGN TRADE ZONE “MAGNET SITES”

McKinney National Airport

Any company may locate on this land and simply activate with Customs.

BNSF Intermodal Yard

Kansas City Southern Wylie Rail Yard

Addison Airport Fort Worth Alliance

Fort Worth Meacham International

D/FW International Airport

Kansas City Southern Garland Rail Yard

Dallas Love Field

Union Pacific Rail Yard Union Pacific Rail Yard -GM

COMPANY/SITESPECIFIC FOREIGN TRADE ZONES For companies wanting FTZ status but which cannot locate in an existing magnet site.

RAIL YARD / INTERMODAL FACILITY DISTRIBUTION CENTERS CUSTOM PORT OF ENTRY

Union Pacific Miller Intermodal Facility

RAIL LINE

Centennial Yard Union Pacific Dallas Intermodal Terminal

Lancaster Regional Airport

Railport

Union Pacific Rail Yard

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

33


DART RAIL SYSTEM

PUBLIC TRANSIT

TO DENTON

(Operated by DCTA)

PLANO

BLUE LINE

FARMERS BRANCH

ORANGE LINE

FARMERS BRANCH

XX

FARE ZONE BOUNDARY

ROYAL LANE

PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH TURNPIKE

E FW

RS GE OD

TO

D

SS

RO

JA CIN

W OO

LD

AN GE OR

UNION STATION CONVENTION CENTER CEDARS COCKRELL HILL

8TH & CORINTH DALLAS ZOO TYLER/VERNON MORRELL HAMPTON ILLINOIS WESTMORELAND KIEST

Deep Ellum Station

GO

OD

L N RA RYA East DE B FE Transfer

LA TIM

ER

Center

Akard Station

St. Paul PACIFIC ELM Station ERCE COMM SON JACK WOOD G YOUN

FOREST/JUPITER LBJ/SKILLMAN LAKE HIGHLANDS WHITE ROCK

MOCKINGBIRD

DALLAS

MESQUITE

CITYPLACE/UPTOWN DEEP ELLUM BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER FAIR PARK MLK, JR. HATCHER LAWNVIEW LAKE JUNE BUCKNER

LEDBETTER CAMP WISDOM (2016) UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS (2016)

D.

D

AK

Y VA ER

AR

GLENN HEIGHTS

D

ET

R

IN

LAMA

GRIFF

MARK

L AU .P ST

OO RW

LA

MARIL

LV

HA

ZB

VE HA

RC

SA

CE

TON HOUS

FIELD

Rosa Parks Plaza

PARK LANE LOVERS LANE

VA MEDICAL CENTER

MAIN

West End Station

Union Station

Pearl/Arts District Station

SA

DA L

FIE

West Transfer Center

L

RW OO

N

CEDAR SPRINGS

NEY AV MCKIN

AR

L AU .P ST VAY ER

RY

VICTO

HOUSTON

LR

PE

HA

Y

ES

IN

NTAL

CONTINE

M-Line Trolley to Cityplace/ Uptown Station

WALNUT HILL

DOWNTOWN ROWLETT

T

L

E

ROWLETT

DOWNTOWN GARLAND

FOREST LANE

R IC D IST RTS R L /A PEA AUL ST. P R D D A KA S T E N WE

YH RR

HA

Victory Station

AR

IV

GARLAND

LBJ/CENTRAL

IRVING WALNUT HILL/DENTON PARKING AVAILABLE DFW CONVENTION AIRPORT CENTER LAS COLINAS TERMINAL A BACHMAN URBAN PARK LOVE CENTER NORTH LAKE CITIES COLLEGE BURBANK DFWXX UNIVERSITY IRVING INWOOD/ OF DALLAS LOVE FIELD WEST SOUTHWESTERN BELL IRVING RICHLAND HILLS MEDICAL DISTRICT/ FORT PARKLAND WORTH DOWNTOWN IRVING/ HERITAGE CROSSING MARKET CENTER MEDICAL/ CENTREPORT/ MARKET CENTER DFW AIRPORT FORT WORTH ITC VICTORY T & P STATION

PE

ARAPAHO CENTER SPRING VALLEY

BELT LINE

DOWNTOWN DALLAS

GE

Convention Center Station to Bishop Arts

DART TRANSIT SYSTEM PLAN 93

A-Train to Denton (operated by DCTA) NW PLANO PARK & RIDE Dallas North Tollway

PLANO PARKER ROAD

P r e s ide

JACK HATCHELL TRANSIT CTR.

nt

Ge

o r g e Bush

DOWNTOWN PLANO

SHILOH ROAD

Red Line interface to be determined

Turnpike

CITYLINE/BUSH

NORTH CARROLLTON/FRANKFORD

GALATYN PARK TRINITY MILLS

ADDISON

RICHARDSON

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON ADDISON TRANSIT CTR. CARROLLTON

SPRING VALLEY

FARMERS BRANCH

GARLAND

FARMERS BRANCH

LBJ/CENTRAL

DFW AIRPORT DFW

FOREST LANE

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

WALNUT HILL/DENTON IRVING CONVENTION CENTER LAS COLINAS URBAN CENTER BACHMAN

UNIVERSITY OF DALLAS

BURBANK

To Fort Worth

CENTREPORT/ DFW AIRPORT

WEST IRVING

LOVE FIELD

WALNUT HILL

UNIVERSITY PARK HIGHLAND PARK

DOWNTOWN IRVING/ HERITAGE CROSSING

S. GARLAND TRANSIT CTR.

WHITE ROCK

UNION STATION CONVENTION CENTER

r

DEEP ELLUM BAYLOR UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER FAIR PARK MLK, JR. LAWNVIEW

CEDARS

COCKRELL HILL

CURRENTLY OPERATING DART RAIL RED LINE DART RAIL BLUE LINE DART RAIL GREEN LINE DART RAIL ORANGE LINE DART RAIL ORANGE LINE (Selected weekday trips rush hour only)

TRINITY RAILWAY EXPRESS (TRE) DCTA A-TRAIN M-LINE TROLLEY DALLAS STREETCAR UNDER DESIGN/CONSTRUCTION

HATCHER

8TH & CORINTH DALLAS ZOO MORRELL TYLER/VERNON HAMPTON ILLINOIS WESTMORELAND

La ke Ra y Hubba r d

LAKE RAY HUBBARD TRANSIT CTR.

W hi te MOCKINGBIRD Ro ck Lake

T RIC IST SD RT L /A AR L PE . PAUD ST AR END AK EST W

nity Rive

LOVERS LANE

DOWNTOWN ROWLETT

ROWLETT

LAKE HIGHLANDS

PARK LANE

VICTORY Tr i

FOREST/JUPITER

INWOOD/LOVE FIELD SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL DISTRICT/ DALLAS PARKLAND MARKET MEDICAL/ MARKET CENTER CENTER CITYPLACE/UPTOWN

IRVING

DOWNTOWN GARLAND

LBJ/SKILLMAN

ROYAL LANE

BELT LINE

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

ARAPAHO CENTER

LAKE JUNE

COTTON BELT

BUCKNER

KIEST VA MEDICAL CENTER LEDBETTER

RED BIRD TRANSIT CTR.

FORT WORTH

CAMP WISDOM UNT DALLAS

GLENN HEIGHTS

GLENN HEIGHTS PARK & RIDE

SOURCE: Dallas Area Rapid Transit

34

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017

TURNPIKE

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON

P RE S I D E N T

BU S H

DCTA A-TRAIN

ADDISON

BUSH TURNPIKE

GALATYN PARK

GE

TRINITY MILLS

RICHARDSON

OR

TRINITY RAILWAY EXPRESS

DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

CARROLLTON

LIN EW eek

NORTH CARROLLTON/FRANKFORD

da yP eak

PRESIDENT GEORGE BUSH TURNPIKE

GREEN LINE

OL

PARKER ROAD DOWNTOWN PLANO

On ly

RED LINE

The Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) system, which includes light rail and bus service, featuring the nation’s longest light rail network, enables easy access to key job centers in Dallas and its suburbs. DART links to Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, providing convenient light rail access. DART also interfaces with the Trinity Railway Express (TRE), an intercity commuter train, to transport passengers between downtown Dallas and Fort Worth, with stops at several “mid-cities” suburbs in between. Fort Worth residents are served by the T, which also connects to the TRE. The A-Train operated by the Denton County Transit Authority (DCTA) connects DART riders in Carrollton to an additional fi ve stations ending in Denton.


AR

ST

Y

YA VE

FL OR

T

CA RL IS L

E

ST

ES

A

W RO O O DG DA ER L L S FW

T IV

PL

KIN

TY

NE

1

CI

D-LINK

POINTS OF INTEREST

ST

LS OL

CEDAR SPRINGS RD

N UR KB AC BL

E AV

E AV

PE

W LA

ON M M LE

N

K OA

ST

CO

ST NG

LA

AR

IL

YO U

5

M

NS

T

Cedars

AT T A

LE V BEL

PO WH

6

M

AP

LE

10

AV E

11

DU

CT

Dallas Streetcar & Stop

ST

ST

CEDAR SPRINGS RD

AR

NEY A VE

D OO W

ST

2 MIN-WALK

7

8

McKIN

ST

ER M M

N

CO

4

AIL

TR

IEW

CE

M TO

L AM

LEGEND

Y RI

US

IT R

T LS AR

DO BLVD

GB

13

ST

Z AN

E IV

OL

MAP NOT TO SCALE LVD

L

L DA

AK

Park

D RO

FW

OO W

15

14

16 17

RS

GE

PE

VE

Trinity Railway Express Commuter Rail and Station

COLORA

Y

12

HO

IN

T

TO N

TR

VIA

723 Bishop Arts Shuttle D-Link Transfer Point To Downtown Dallas

2

W

NG YO U

M ST

ST N AI

T

US

Convention Center

5 MIN-WALK

DART Light Rail and Station

3

ST

M EL

ST N AI

LE AVE

PEARL ST

DE FE

CESAR CHAVEZ BLVD

RA

L

ST M OO BR

AV E SS

ST

RO

AV E

C FI

EL

PA CI

ST

M

AR

ST

TS

HO

9

Convention Center Kay Bailey Hutchison

T

Union Station

AV E

E

D

D

M KE

R

AR

IV E

M

YR

B

TY KA

EL

LA

RD T CO S

IN IT

C

FI

West End

ON

ST

OO RW ST

RE

TR

G G

M

LL HA

HA

L AU .P ST

ST

M

E AV

ST

AR

VD BL

D

L AM

LE MAIN & ST. PAUL

ON M M

EL

Akard

LE

ST .

MC

E AC

FI

St. Paul

SS

E AV

O NT

RO

18

AN

ST

CI JA

S

JEFFERSON BLVD

MARSALIS AVE

ELSBETH

BECKLEY AVE

ZANG BLVD

CEDAR HILL AVE

TYLER ST

BISHOP AVE

BL VD N SO ER FF JE

ZANG BLVD

ST

4

19

West Village Cityplace Tower McKinney Plaza The MAC Greenwood Cemetery Uptown Visitors Center Quadrangle Hotel St Germain Maple Manor Hotel Shops at The Crescent Hotel ZaZa The Ritz-Carlton Hotel American Airlines Center Klyde Warren Park AT&T Performing Arts Center Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas Museum of Art Crow Collection of Asian Art Fairmont Hotel Dallas World Aquarium West End

Y VA ER

21

JEFFERSON BLVD

3

GRIFFIN ST

DALLAS STREETCAR 20

1 6

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT POLK ST

ST

DAVIS ST 2

D

AR

6TH ST

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

ACCESS |  PUBLIC TRANSIT

M-LINE TROLLEY - UPTOWN AND DOWNTOWN DALLAS

DALLAS STREETCAR AND D-LINK

C AVE PACIFI T ELM S ST MAIN

ERCE

COMM

LEGEND ST

M-Line Trolley

5

SOURCE: Dallas Area Rapid Transit

SOURCE: MATA

s, “Good time e.” right on tim Guillermo S. –submitted by rtable at DART.org/da

GEM #81 TRINITY RAILWAY EXPRESS | #DARTable

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

35


MOBILITY 2040 Mobility 2040 ensures that North Texas commuters are going places. Mobility 2040 is just one in a series of ongoing transportation plans implemented by the Regional Transportation Council (RTC) of the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). Their comprehensive blueprint for the region’s multimodal mobility needs is designed to enhance how we travel both now and into 2040, when the population of North Texas is projected to swell from 7.1 million to 10.5 million. The benefits of investing in transportation are evident in every facet of the Mobility 2040 plan. And it’s not just about cars and roads. Rail, bike and pedestrian components are vital to increasing the region’s mobility and ensuring long-term sustainability. Improving efficiencies in both roadway and land use will reduce the burden on the region’s infrastructure and address quality of life concerns.

FUNDED RECOMMENDATIONS Mobility 2040 represents a $98.7 billion blueprint for the continued maintenance and development of the regional transportation system over the next 20 plus years. Mobility 2040 complies with all federal requirements related to the financial aspects of the metropolitan transportation plan. As the Dallas-Fort Worth region continues to grow, additional solutions will be imperative to comprehensively address the ever-increasing transportation needs. PASSENGER RAIL IMPROVEMENTS TextWise

TextWise Wise

LEGEND Passenger rail mode

Denton

Wise

Collin

Denton

Hunt

Collin

Hunt

Recommended Rail Existing Rail Recommended High-Intensity Bus

Rockwall

Major Roadways

Rockwall

Tarrant

Parker

Dallas CBD

Hood

Tarrant

Parker Hood

Johnson

Fort Worth CBD

Dallas

Dallas

Kaufman

Ellis

Johnson

Kaufman

Ellis

Corridor-specific alignment, design and operational characteristcs for the intercity passenger, regional passenger and freight rail systems will be determined through capacity evaluation and ongoing project development. Refined rail forecasts are necessary to determine technology and alignment in future rail corridors. TextWise Wise

Denton

Collin

Hunt

BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN OFF-STREET FACILITIES TextWise

LEGEND Regional veloweb

Wise

Denton

Collin

Hunt

Existing 442 miles Funded 146 miles

Rockwall

Planned 1,288 miles Major roads

TextWise

Rail lines Parks Fort Worth CBD

Parker Hood

Parker

Wise

Rockwall

Denton

Collin Dallas

Tarrant

Tarrant

Hunt

Dallas

Kaufman

Hood

Johnson Johnson

Ellis

Kaufman

Ellis Rockwall

Dallas CBD

Facility recommendations indicate transportation needs. CorridorTarrant Parker Dallas specific alignment, design and operational characteristics for the Regional Veloweb system will be determined through ongoing project Hood development.

Kaufman

36

Johnson D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: North Central Texas Council of Governments

Ellis 2017


DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  MOBILITY CHAMBER | XXXXXXX 2040

FREEWAY, TOLLWAY AND HOV/MANAGED LANE IMPROVEMENTS TextWise

LEGEND Recommendations

Wise

Denton

Collin

TextWise

Hunt

Wise

Denton

Collin

Hun

New or Additional Freeway Capacity Additional Freeway Capacity and New Tolled Managed Lanes New or Additional Tolled Managed Capacity New or Additional Toll Road Capacity

TextWise Wise

Rockwall

Denton Rockwall

Tarrant

Parker

Dallas

Hood

Capacity Maintenance

Parker

Freeways/Tollways

Johnson

Kaufman

Tarrant

Dallas

Ellis Hood

Other Major Roadways

Kauf

Fort Worth CBD

Facility recommendations indicate transportation needs. Corridor-specific alignment, design and operational characteristics for the freeway/tollway system will be determined through ongoing project development.

Dallas CBD

Johnson Parker

Johnson

Wise

Denton

Collin

Text Text TextWise

LEGEND Park & Ride locations Existing Planned Candidates F G F G F G G F F G

F G

F G

G F F G

F G

F G

Fort WorthGFCBD

n

F G G F F G G F F G F G

F G

F G

F G

Dallas CBD F G

F G G F

F G F G G F F G F G F G

F G

F G

Denton

F G G F

Collin

Hunt F G F G G F G G F F F FG G FG G F F G F G F FG G F G F FG G F G F G F F FG G F G F FG F F F G F G FG G FG G FG G F G FG G F G FG G F G F G F G F G F F G F F G Rockwall F G F G G F G F F G G FG F G G F G FG F F F G F G G F G F FG G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G FG F G F G G F FG G F G F F G G F G G F G F G F G FG G FF F F F G F G Text Text F F FG FG G F G FG G F G F G FG G F F G FG TextWiseGF GF FG G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G G F F G F G F FG G F G F G F F F F G F G FG G FG G F G Wise GF GFGFDenton FG G F G F G F G F G Collin F Tarrant F G F G F G G F G Parker F Dallas F G Rockwall F G F G G F G F G Hunt FG F G G F G F G FG F F G F G F G F G G F G F F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G Hood F G F G F G F G F G FG G F G F G G F G F F G FG G FF F G F G F F G F G FG G F G F G F F G G F F G Kaufman F G G F G F G F G G F G F F FG G F G F G Tarrant F G F G Parker F G Dallas F G F G F F G G Johnson GF Ellis F G F G G F G F G F F FG G FG G F F G F G Hood F G F G F F G FG G F G F G F F FG G F G F G FG F F F G F G FG G FG G F G FG G F G F G FG G Kaufman F G F G F F G F G F G F F G Rockwall F G F G G F G F G F G F G G F G F G F F G F G F G F G F G F F G F G F G F G G F G F G G F F G Johnson FG F G F G G Ellis F F G F G F G F G G F G FG G FF F G F G F F G F G FG G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G F G G F G F F FG G F G Tarrant F G Parker Dallas F G

F G

F G

F G F G

F G

2017

F G

F G

F G

Hood

F G

Hunt

F G

Wise

F G

n

Tarrant

Hood

Text Text TextWise

PARK-AND-RIDE LOCATIONS

Ellis

Johnson

Ellis

Kaufman

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

37


COMMUTING PATTERNS Getting around the Dallas–Fort Worth region is easy, thanks to a well-developed network of interstate freeways, state highways and tollways connecting job centers to fast-growing new communities. That’s good news for employers, allowing them to draw from a larger base of skilled workers. And it’s good for workers, allowing them to choose from a variety of affordable communities in which to live. In Dallas and Tarrant counties, the vast majority of workers live and work in the same county. Though these two counties also serve as the region’s biggest magnets for workers, the surrounding counties maintain strong job bases of their own to support the community.

GETTING TO WORK MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION (WORKERS 16 AND OVER) MEANS

ESTIMATE

Car, truck, or van

90.6%

Drove alone

81.1%

Carpooled

9.5%

In 2-person carpool

7.1%

In 3-person carpool

1.5%

In 4-or-more-person carpool

0.9%

Workers per car, truck, or van

1.06

Public transportation (excluding taxicab)

1.5%

Walked

1.3%

Bicycle

0.2%

Taxicab, motorcycle, or other means

1.3%

Worked at home

5.1%

TOTAL WORKERS ESTIMATE: 3,456,842

85%

(934,059 PEOPLE )

OF ALL WORKERS LIVING IN DALLAS COUNTY WORK IN DALLAS COUNTY AND 6% COMMUTE TO TARRANT COUNTY.

AVERAGE COMMUTE TIME

10 9 8

38

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

11

12

1

2 3

7

6

5

4

27.5 MINUTES

SOURCE: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2015 1-year estimates

2017


7%

DENTON 47%

COLLIN 58%

12%

6%

HUNT 66%

5% 9%

16%

32%

4%

6%

26%

36% 7% 7%

PARKER 48%

6%

TARRANT 79%

44%

DALL AS 85%

17%

45% ROCK WALL 39%

19% HOOD 60%

42% 6%

7%

8%

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  COMMUTING CHAMBER | XXXXXXX PATTERNS

WISE 56%

37% 49% ELLIS 52%

JOHNSON 46%

K AUFMAN 42%

SOMERVELL 61%

%

Live and work in the same county

%

Travel out of county for work

COUNTY-TO-COUNTY WORKER FLOW RESIDENCE COUNTY | COUNTY OF EMPLOYMENT FROM È | TO Æ

COLLIN

DALLAS

DENTON

COLLIN DALLAS DENTON ELLIS HOOD HUNT JOHNSON KAUFMAN PARKER ROCKWALL SOMERVELL TARRANT WISE

232,297 64,182 40,360 549 120 2,070 39 1,002 123 2,490 13 7,017 121

145,984 934,059 108,298 25,311 770 5,092 4,065 21,591 1,804 16,664 33 143,625 1,331

11,951 21,119 162,310 362 284 285 420 210 273 193 16 16,925 1,638

ELLIS

HOOD

HUNT

JOHNSON

KAUFMAN

PARKER

ROCKWALL

113 4,582 42 122 17 35,316 22 68 12,018 14 1,502 518 434 76 763 41 106 517 1,949 982

1,372 1,136 45 41 61 21,644

211 3,126 157 277

16 204 329 51 825 41 523

1,806 6,997 66 10

145 45

60 528 163 648 908 43 29,864 3 246 10 451 7,068 74

545 1,586

1,164 18,415 12 754

SOMERVELL

1,111 2,171 363 1,096

23,947

103 14,478

292

3,875 973

127 29

1,980 185

TARRANT

WISE

7,680 11 65,905 146 29,294 779 5,289 48 3,733 23 292 3 27,216 107 775 3 21,806 783 409 27 233 675,215 2,467 6,413 13,746

RESIDENCE COUNTY | COUNTY OF EMPLOYMENT FROM È | TO Æ

COLLIN

DALLAS

DENTON

ELLIS

HOOD

HUNT

JOHNSON

KAUFMAN

PARKER

ROCKWALL

SOMERVELL

TARRANT

WISE

COLLIN DALLAS DENTON ELLIS HOOD HUNT JOHNSON KAUFMAN PARKER ROCKWALL SOMERVELL TARRANT WISE

58% 6% 12% 1% 1% 6% 0% 2% 0% 7% 0% 1% 0%

36% 85% 32% 37% 4% 16% 6% 49% 4% 45% 1% 17% 5%

3% 2% 47% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 1% 1% 0% 2% 7%

0% 0% 0% 52% 0% 0% 2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 60% 0% 1% 0% 2% 0% 16% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 66% 0% 1% 0% 4% 0% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 1% 5% 0% 46% 0% 0% 0% 14% 1% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 4% 0% 42% 0% 2% 0% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 4% 0% 1% 0% 48% 0% 0% 0% 4%

0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 7% 0% 2% 0% 39% 0% 0% 0%

0% 0% 0% 0% 6% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 61% 0% 0%

2% 6% 9% 8% 19% 1% 42% 2% 44% 1% 7% 79% 26%

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 2% 0% 0% 0% 56%

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 2009-2013 Five-year estimates. Special Tabulation: Census Transportation Planning

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

39


HWY 190 AND HWY 75

DRIVE TIMES It’s common to work in one part of the Dallas-Fort Worth area and live in another. It’s only a matter of getting from point A to point B. More than 90 percent of people who commute to work here do so by car, truck, or van, which is easy, thanks to our well-developed network of interstate freeways, state highways and tollways connecting job centers to fast-growing new communities. The following maps— based on morning rush hour—give you an idea of how long you can expect it to take.

DOWNTOWN DALLAS

LEGEND

15 MINUTES

40

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

30 MINUTES

45 MINUTES

60 MINUTES

75 MINUTES

90 MINUTES

105 MINUTES

120 MINUTES 2017


DENTON

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SOUTHERN DALLAS

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  DRIVE TIMES CHAMBER | XXXXXXX

HWY 121 & DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

DOWNTOWN FORT WORTH

SOURCE: North Central Texas Council of Governments 2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

41


DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AND DALLAS LOVE FIELD Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is an economic engine for the region, generating $37 billion in economic impact annually. Built in 1974, midway between Dallas and Fort Worth, it is the highestcapacity commercial airport in the world and one of two international gateway airports in Texas. As a major hub of Fort Worth–based American Airlines, DFW International Airport offers business travelers a highfrequency schedule and access to any major city in the continental United States in less than four hours. Cargo operations, which amounted to 829,803 metric tons in 2016, serve 34 major markets around the world, including several key markets in Asia. DFW Airport is currently upgrading its four original terminals with a $2.7 billion dollar ‘Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program’ (TRIP) and is expected to be completed in 2020. Located just seven miles from downtown Dallas, Dallas Love Field is a convenient general-use airport that serves as the headquarters for low-cost carrier Southwest Airlines. The airport, which served more than 15.5 million passengers in 2016, recently underwent a $519 million renovation, including a centralized terminal with 20 gates, a new lobby and an expanded baggage claim area.

PHOTO: DFW INTERNATIONALAIRPORT

DFW BY THE NUMBERS (2016) DAILY PASSENGERS

TOTAL PASSENGERS

179,920

65,670,697

INTERNATIONAL PASSENGERS

TOTAL CARGO (METRIC TONNES)

8,432,213

829,803

The final segment of DART’s light rail Orange Line to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport opened in October 2014. The DFW Station connects travelers to the Las Colinas Urban Center, Dallas Medical District, Downtown Dallas and the entire DART light rail network.

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: OUR GLOBAL CENTER > 3rd busiest airport in the world (operations); > 10th busiest airport in the world (passengers); > Access to every major city in the continental U.S. within four hours; > Host to 25 passenger airlines and 18 cargo carriers; > Service to 149 domestic and 57 international destinations out of 165 gates; > Footrprint covering 26.9 square miles – larger than Manhattan; > Highest capacity commercial airport in the world with seven runways; > Midway through $2.7B Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP); > Economic output to the Dallas Region totalling $37B.

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL’S CARGO NETWORK CONNECTS THE REGION TO 34 MAJOR HUBS AROUNDTHE WORLD

ANCHORAGE CHONGQING

SHANGHAI HONG KONG

VANCOUVER SEATTLE SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES

SEOUL TOKYO

EDMONTON CHICAGO

HAMILTON TORONTO

ATLANTA DALLAS-FORT WORTH MIAMI MEXICO CITY HOUSTON HONOLULU GUADALAJARA

TAIPEI

GLASGOW MANCHESTER AMSTERDAM BRUSSELS

MOSCOW FRANKFURT LUXEMBOURG MILAN SHARJAH MUMBAI

SINGAPORE

SYDNEY

42

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCES: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and City of Dallas

2017


ANCHORAGE

SEATTLE 69 flights per week

DENVER 134 flights per week

SAN FRANCISCO 99 flights per week

BOSTON 81 flights per week MINNEAPOLIS 88 flights CHICAGO NEW YORK per week 176 flights per week PHILADELPHIA 162 flights per week 79 flights per week DETROIT 77 flights per week WASHINGTON D.C. 125 flights per week CHARLOTTE 91 flights per week

LAS VEGAS 85 flights per week LOS ANGELES 187 flights per week

ATLANTA 160 flights per week

PHOENIX 94 flights per week AUSTIN SAN ANTONIO 102 flights per week 100 flights per week NEW ORLEANS HOUSTON 163 flights per week

HONOLULU MAUI

ORLANDO 84 flights per week MIAMI 69 flights per week SAN JUAN

SOURCE: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport

PHOTO: DALLAS CVB

DALLAS LOVE FIELD BY THE NUMBERS DAILY PASSENGERS

TOTAL OPERATIONS

42,638

224,193

TOTAL PASSENGERS

TRAVEL TIME FROM DOWNTOWN DALLAS

15,562,738

11 minutes

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  DALLASCHAMBER | XXXXXXX FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AND DALLAS LOVE FIELD

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT DOMESTIC DESTINATIONS

LOVE FIELD NONSTOP DESTINATIONS SEATTLE/TACOMA PORTLAND BOSTON (LOGAN) MILWAUKEE CHICAGO (MDW)

SACRAMENTO SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND (SFO) SAN JOSE LAS VEGAS BURBANK LOS ANGELES (LAX) ORANGE COUNTY PHOENIX SAN DIEGO

DENVER

OMAHA KANSAS CITY

ALBUQUERQUE

ST LOUIS RALEIGH/DURHAM

TULSA OKLAHOMA CITY DALLAS LOVE FIELD

NASHVILLE MEMPHIS LITTLE ROCK

CHARLOTTE

ATLANTA

CHARLESTON

BIRMINGHAM

NEW ORLEANS

SOURCE: Love Field, DRC research

NEW YORK (LaGUARDIA)

DETROIT

PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH BALTIMORE / WASHINGTON (BWI) COLUMBUS WASHINGTON DC (REAGAN NATIONAL) INDIANAPOLIS

SALT LAKE CITY

ORLANDO TAMPA FT. LAUDERDALE

SOURCE: City of Dallas

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

43


3:4

3:4 8—

S 3:4 AN 2 4:0 6 FR 9 — — O 0 — — O ANC SE RAN PO AKL ISC 8 : 3 6 : 1 8 AT T G E R T L A A N D O , C 1 — — LE CO N , A 8 : 0 H O A N C / TA C O U N T D , O C A 9 — N O H O M Y, C R K A LU LU R A G A , W A 5 : 2 H U LU / O A H E , A A 10:0 8 — I/M U K 8— 5:5 BO G AUI, , HI SAO 0 — OT H 1 0 : 2 PA U LO 9 : 2 4 6 : 5 8 — QUI Á , CO I 1— T — BUE GUARU SANT LIMAO, EC NOS LHO IAG , PE AIRE S, S O, C P 0 : 3 8 S , B A , A, B R L 0:42 — WACO R —T ,T 0:4 0 : 4 7 — 8 — LO N G Y L E R , T XX W IC H IT V I E W, T 0 :4 7 — A FA L L S , T XX 0 :4 8 — K IL L E E N , T X L A 0: 49 — C O LL EG E S W T O N , O K TATI 0: 47 — AB IL O N , TX 0:5 1 — TE XA RK EN E, TX AN A, 0:5 3 — SHR EVE PORT, AR LA 0:52 — OKLA HOMA CITY, OK 0:54 — AUSTIN, TX 0:58 — FORT SMITH, AR 0:57 — SAN ANG ELO, TX 0:5 7 — TU LS A, OK , TX ON TI NE NTAL , TX RC TE IN NTO 1: 07 — HO US N AN TO N IO 1: 02 — SA X A N D R IA , L A LE 1 :0 4 — A A R K A N S A S , A RA E, L EST W H T R MONRO TX NO 1 :0 5 — N - H O B BY, T X 1 :0 4 — TO K, HOUS UBBO C AR 1:04 — 1:05 — L E RO CK, , L A L T ES T — LI HARL , TX 1:03 L AKE C DESSA , TX O LO A — D/ 1:09 IDL AN AMARIL TTE, L X M T E Y — — A TI, 1:09 1:09 — L AF HRIS E, L A S C OUG M 4 S 1 : , U 1 R ORP ON SON , TX — C B AT J A C K R E D O R , T X 4 1:1 :16 — 6 — L A THU S, TN A 1 1:1 :20 — T AR PHI S, L TX 1 OR EM AN , S M LE EN , M X T/P O N : 2 4 — W O R C A L L OX I E , T S M U E 1 M BIL ILL , M A N BE — 8 — RT / N S V I A N — 9 D O 2 1 7 1: 1: LFP O W ERI 1:0 GU BR — M — 0 — 30 25 1:3 1: 1:

4:1

3:1

1:4

0—

1 HU :34 1:3 NT — 3 — SV BI 1:4 1:41 ILLE RMI MOB 1 — — /D NGH IL 1:5 0 — 1:4 M NA ECA AM E, A FO 3 — ON SHV TU , L 1 : 5 RT W P E N T G O M I L L E R , A A L L 2 — AL T SA ER , T 1 : 5 C H A O N B C O L A Y, A L N 7 — T TA E A , F C LO N O O H , L 2: 1 02 — UIS GA FL 1 : 5 9 : 5 7 — AT L V I L L E , T N 2:09 K — T N O A N TA , K Y —C XV AL ,G 2 INCI N N A : 0 3 — L L A H A S SI L L E , T A TI, O EXIN EE, N 2:12 H G F / T C L 2 O — GR O E E N V : 2 0 — VA V I N G T O N , K Y ILLE/ IL/EA N, K 2 : 1 4 — S PA RTA N G L E , C OY BUR JA 2 :1 6 —C K S O N V IL L G , S C C O LU M E , F L 2 :1 9 — B IA , S C S AVA 2 :1 7 — N N A H , G A 2: 2

It’s common knowledge that the DallasFort Worth region is globally connected. Dallas Fort Worth International is one of only 14 airports in the world offering service to more than 200 destinations. Over a dozen new international routes have been added in the last three years with new destinations on the way. In the 10 years since Terminal D opened, DFW has added 10 new international carriers and 20 new international destinations. European destinations, such as Paris, London, Frankfurt, and Madrid; as well as South American cities like Bogata, Lima, Buenos Aires, and Quito are all within reach. In 2014, service was launched to Shanghai and Hong Kong by American Airlines, as well as to Doha by Qatar Airways, and to Abu Dhabi by Etihad Airways. Emirates Airline and Qantas Airways expanded their service from DFW to Dubai and Sydney, respectively, by adding the Airbus A380, the largest passenger aircraft in the world. 2015 ushered in the beginning of American Airlines service to Beijing, and 2016 saw new routes to Montreal, Rome and Amsterdam, as well as expanded service to Abu Dhabi. The number of nonstop flights originating from DFW International Airport and Dallas Love Field provides travelers with options as well as convenience. New international routes, more carriers, and increases in the air service destinations confirm DFW’s place as a global super hub.

2: 02 — , CO N E P S 2 :0 3 — A R O S E , C O MONT CO 2 :1 4 — J U N C T IO N , A Z , N GRAND UCSO O 2 :1 4 — 2 : 1 7 — T R I N G S , C T P AN, M A O AT S M A, C EAMB BOZE — S T 2 : 2 7 — A N TA A N I X , A Z 2:21 OEN , ID —S 2:33 6 — PH BOISE , UT 2:3 :39 — CIT Y WY 2 E , L AK OLE NV A LT N H A S , A — S ACKSO S VEG GS, C CA J A IN , 2:47 4 — — L PR RIO CA 2 : 5 2 : 5 4 A L M S O N TA L E S , , C A P — GE NK CA 1 — 3:03 S AN RBA GO, , CA O 3:0 U L B DIE NO NM 0 — 0 — SAN RES FE, , CA A F A TO C 3:2 3:2 6 — — ANT EN E, 3:0 3:27 — S AM JOS 4 ACR AN 1:4 — S — S 1 :38 3

NONSTOP FLIGHT TIMES FROM DALLAS-FORT WORTH

44

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCES: Dallas Fort Worth Airport, Love Field Airport

2017


SHA NGH AI, CN — 15:1 5 SE OU L, KR — 14 :52 TO KY O- NA RI TA , JP — 13 :3 7 BE IJ IN G, CN — 14 :1 5 VA N C O U V E R , H C A LG A O BC, C A — 4 :1 6 N G KO N G , H K — M O N R Y, A B , C A 1 7 :0 2 T O R O T R E A L- P E T, — 3 :4 8 N PUNT TO, ON, C Q C, C A — 3 :25 A—2 SAN A CAN :55 PRO JUAN A , DO — MON VIDEN , PR — 4 4:35 GR TEGO CIALE :33 N A S A N D C B AY, J S , T C — 3:45 S A S A U AY M A M — MA N JOS , BS — N ISL 3:35 A N E N 3: LI AG , C D, C I— SA BER UA , R — 01 3:1 GU N SA IA , C NI — 3:56 7 R A R O T E LV A — 3 : 5 B E ATA M A D O 3 : 4 0 RO LIZ N , L A R , S 7 AM ME E C HN CIT V — S T , I T I T Y — Y, G ER — , B 3:0 T — 3:22 DA 1 Z — 9 3:0 M, 3:2 2 8 NL 5 :50 — 10 :55

DALLAS REGIONAL ACCESS |  NONSTOP CHAMBER | XXXXXXX FLIGHT TIMES FROM DALLASFORT WORTH

1:28 — ROSW ELL, NM 1:47 — ALBUQUERQUE, NM 1:45 — CLOVIS , NM , CO 1:50 — COLORA DO SPR INGS CO 2:0 5 — DE NV ER ,, CO IS ON 2: 07 — GU NN GO , CO — D UR AN

23 — CH AR

TA LO TT E- D O M PA , F L U GL 2: 28 — OR LA AS , N C ND 2:2 5 — FO RT MY O, FL ER S, FL 2:28 — GRE ENS BOR O, NC 2:32 — RALEIG H/DURH AM, NC 2:34 — WEST PALM BEACH, FL 2:40 — MIAMI, FL E, FL 2:40 — FORT LAU DER DALD, VA 2:4 2 — RIC HM ON K, VA OL 2: 47 — NO RF CH , SC YRTL E B EA 2: 36 — M 7 — R E N O , N V 3 :2

34 1: :47 7 — 1 1:2 O — 2 , M IN O — 1:2 29 IS E, M : L O U I L T Y, S — 1 . L SV CI , K S — 2:19 14 ST AN AS AN , K : E V A N S H AT T C I T Y S D — — 1 K A N E N T Y, , M O 4 M RD CI LD 1:1 GA PID FIE — 1:10 RA RING , MO — 30 :33 S P P L I N TA , K S — 3 : Y — 3 :19 JO ICHI , MA FK, N 18 —3 3: W ON -J , NY T K A — I BOS YOR D, CT U A R D N E WRT F O R K- L A G 3 : 2 8 06 HA W YOR NJ — — 3: A — 2:52 NE RK, ,V A , PA I S A NEW ADELPH N-DULLE 50 45 P H I LS H I N G T O M D — 2 : L , D C — 2 : A 1 6 :5 2 WA IMORE, AT IO N Y, A U — B A LT IN G T O N - N — 2 :3 2 SYDNE W A S H B U R G H , PA P IT T S

8 44 9 8:5 9: 9:2 B — — 8 — G E 2 , D 9: FR N, 51 RT — E , , E : 3 2 2 : FU , ES AULL RO W — 2 X — K AN ID G TH MX O, M FR ADR S-DE -HEA RA , NEJ 2 1 M R I O N A J A ATA 2 : 3 2:5 — 0 PA O N D A L I H U X — : 3 2 X D 4 Z M : 2 L UA A/ , M — , 2 G TA P E L X C A B O X — I X Z U M N , M D E L TA , M 3 2 CO NCU SE L AR — 2: C A N J O VA L , M X 3 8 S A E RT O C I T Y — 2 : PU XICO , MX 2:34 9 ME RELIA MX — — 2:2 — 2:22 MO EBL A , N, MX O, MX P U Z AT L Á A J U AT 2 : 2 4 MA N/GUAN , MX — L E O R E TA R O — 2 : 1 7 2:17 QUE IDA , MX , MX — M E R C A L IE N T E S M X — 2 :0 8 S I, A A G U U IS P O T O S :1 1 SAN L ECAS, MX — 2 Z A C AT N , M X — 1 :5 9 O E 54 TO R R A, M X — 1: CH IH UA HU Y, MX — 1: 36 MO NT ER RE DO HA , QA — 14: 30 ABU DHA BI, UAE — 15:0 7 DUBAI, UAE — 14:43 CHICAGO-O'HARE, IL — 2:17 FARGO, ND — 2:31 CLEV ELAN D, OH — 2:32 DE TR OIT, MI — 2:3 6 GR AN D RA PI CO LU M BU DS , MI — 2: 20 S, OH — M ILW A 2: 17 M IN N E U K E E , W I — 2 :1 B IS M A A P O L IS /S T. P 4 F O RT R C K , N D — A U L , M N — 2 :2 2 D AY T W AY N E , IN 2 :4 2 MAD ON, OH — — 2:11 I SIO SON, W 2:10 I N D U X FA L L I — 2 : 0 CED IANAPO S, SD — 9 2:01 MO AR R LIS, B LO L I N E , A P I D S , I N — 2 : I O I L A CH MI — — 1 00 :53 PE AMP NGTO 1:54 SIO ORIA AIGN, N, IL CO UX , IL — IL — — 1: D LU M C I T 1: 53 1 O E S M B I Y, I A : 4 9 5 2 SP MAH OIN A , MO — 1 G RI A , ES — :2 EL RAN NGF NE — , IA 1:2 9 — 8 PA D I I E L 1 S D : SO L A , 4 1: , T ND IL — 0 48 X— , N 1 1:4 E — :46 3 1:4 1

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

45


A one-of-a kind community; a natural oasis providing an exceptional level of service. Westlake is home to master planned residential neighborhoods and captivating corporate campuses such as Fidelity Investments, Deloitte University and Solana Office Park– all developed with high development standards and a commitment to open space preservation.

Entrada

Glenwyck Farms Park

■ Located 15 miles west of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport; and, 8 miles east of Fort Worth Alliance Airport in the Alliance Global Logistics Hub. ■ Bordered by State Highway 114 with over 95,000 vehicles per day, and US 377; intersected by FM 1938 and SH 170; and, within 10 miles to Highways 121 and Interstate 35-W. ■ Strategically poised to be the economic epicenter of the Metroplex – Vision North Texas Plan

WESTLAKE ACADEMY – Highly acclaimed Texas Charter school, serving grades K-12 with the rigorous International Baccalaureate programs; WA has been consistently ranked as a top tiered school not only locally and across the State but also nationally, by US News & World Report, Newsweek, and the Washington Post

Westlake Academy

Fidelity Investments

LATEST COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENTS: ■ Charles Schwab, 70 acre, $100 million regional campus ■ Hillwood/Howard Hughes Circle T Ranch, 130 acre mixed use development ■ Entrada, 85 acre European-style mixed use development LATEST RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS: ■ Quail Hollow, 188 acres with 92 stately estate home sites ■ Granada, 84 luxury home sites under construction ■ Average home price in Westlake: $1.8 million

TOWN OF WESTLAKE | 1301 Solana Blvd., Suite 4202, Westlake, TX 76262 | 817-430-0941 | Visit us at: http://bit.ly/2kuwGkr

46

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


PEOPLE REGIONAL POPULATION POPULATION DENSITY AND GROWTH DEMOGRAPHICS DALLAS FORT-WORTH MARKET TAPESTRY MIGRATION PATTERNS DEMOGRAPHIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS

PHOTO: UNT

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

47


REGIONAL POPULATION During the last decade, the Dallas–Fort Worth region was among the nation’s fastest-growing areas, attracting significant job and population growth. The population growth has fueled real estate development, as retailers and service providers expand to meet increasing demand. This growth has pushed Dallas and Fort Worth to redevelop and reenergize their downtowns, creating mixed-use buildings with residential, office and retail space in a high-end urban environment. While Dallas and Fort Worth serve as the biggest population centers, four other suburbs—Irving, Garland, Plano and Arlington—exceed 200,000, offering residents an abundance of choice as they search for the community that best fits their needs.

TOP 25 CITIES BY POPULATION Denton 131,044 Frisco 154,407

Flower Mound 71,253

P 28

Lewisville 104,039

Carrollton 133,168

Grapevine 51,404 North Richland Hills 69,204 Bedford 49,337

Euless 54,219

Irving 236,607

Da 1,30

Fort Worth 833,319

Arlington 388,125

Grand Prairie 187,809

DeSoto 52,486 Mansfield 64,274

48

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: US Census Bureau, 2015 Annual Population Estimates

Cedar Hill 48,507

2017


DFW MSA Population is larger than the combined populations of North Dakota, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Vermont, Maine and Alaska.

+ +

North Dakota 756,927 North Dakota 756,927

McKinney 162,898

+ +

Allen 98,143

Idaho 1,654,930 Idaho 1,654,930

Plano 83,558

+ Vermont+

Rowlett 60,236

Wise 62,953 Wise 62,953 Parker 126,042 Parker 126,042 Hood 55,423 Hood 55,423

Mesquite 144,788

Alaska 738,432 Alaska 738,432

POPULATION: 6,724,715 POPULATION: 6,724,715 POPULATION: 6,724,715 POPULATION: 7,102,796 POPULATION: 7,102,796

Richardson 110,815

allas 00,092

+ +

626,042 Vermont 626,042

Wylie 46,708

Garland 236,897

Maine 1,329,328 Maine 1,329,328

Montana 1,032,949 Montana 1,032,949

+ +

Wyoming 586,107 Wyoming 586,107

PEOPLE | REGIONAL POPULATION

DFW BY THE NUMBERS

Denton 780,612 Denton 780,612 Tarrant 1,982,498 Tarrant 1,982,498 Johnson 159,990 Johnson 159,990

Collin 914,127 Collin 914,127 Dallas 2,553,385 Dallas 2,553,385 Ellis 163,632 Ellis 163,632

Somervell 8,739 Somervell 8,739

Hunt 89,844 Hunt 89,844

Kaufman 114,690 Kaufman 114,690

Rockwall 90,861 Rockwall 90,861

POPULATION: 7,102,796

TEN LARGEST METROPOLITAN AREAS METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA (MSA)

2017

2015 POPULATION

New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA

20,182,305

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

2010-2015 PERCENT CHANGE 3.0%

13,340,068

3.9%

Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI

9,551,031

0.8%

Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX

7,102,796

10.1%

Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX

6,656,947

11.9%

Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD

6,097,684

7.6%

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

6,069,875

1.6%

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL

6,012,331

7.6%

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA

5,710,795

7.7%

Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH

4,774,321

4.6%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

49


PEOPLE | REGIONAL POPULATION 50

1980–2015 CITY AND COUNTY POPULATION FINAL CENSUS 4/1/80

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/90

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/00

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/10

COLLIN COUNTY ALLEN ANNA CELINA FAIRVIEW FARMERSVILLE FRISCO LAVON LOWRY CROSSING LUCAS MCKINNEY MELISSA MURPHY PARKER PLANO PRINCETON PROSPER WYLIE

144,762 8,314 855 1,520 893 2,360 3,499 185 443 1,371 16,256 604 1,150 1,098 72,331 3,408 675 3,152

264,036 18,309 904 1,737 1,554 2,640 6,141 303 865 2,205 21,283 557 1,547 1,235 128,713 2,321 1,018 8,716

491,675 43,554 1,225 1,861 2,644 3,118 33,714 387 1,229 2,890 54,369 1,350 3,099 1,379 222,030 3,477 2,097 15,132

782,341 84,246 8,249 6,028 7,248 3,301 116,989 2,219 1,711 5,166 131,117 4,695 17,708 3,811 259,841 6,807 9,423 41,427

914,127 98,143 11,463 7,697 8,438 3,447 154,407 2,889 1,780 6,883 162,898 7,436 20,610 4,352 283,558 8,939 15,967 46,708

290,666 40,692 7,024 4,167 4,604 183 83,275 1,832 482 2,276 76,748 3,345 14,609 2,432 37,811 3,330 7,326 26,295

59.12% 93.43% 573.39% 223.91% 174.13% 5.87% 247.00% 473.39% 39.22% 78.75% 141.16% 247.78% 471.41% 176.36% 17.03% 95.77% 349.36% 173.77%

DALLAS COUNTY ADDISON BALCH SPRINGS CEDAR HILL COCKRELL HILL COPPELL DALLAS DESOTO DUNCANVILLE FARMERS BRANCH GARLAND GLENN HEIGHTS GRAND PRAIRIE HIGHLAND PARK HUTCHINS IRVING LANCASTER MESQUITE RICHARDSON ROWLETT SACHSE SEAGOVILLE SUNNYVALE UNIVERSITY PARK WILMER

1,556,390 5,553 13,746 6,849 3,262 3,826 904,078 15,538 27,781 24,863 138,857 1,033 71,462 8,909 2,837 109,943 14,807 67,053 72,496 7,522 1,640 7,304 1,404 22,254 2,367

1,852,810 8,783 17,406 19,976 3,746 16,881 1,006,877 30,544 35,748 24,250 180,650 4,564 99,616 8,739 2,719 155,037 22,117 101,484 74,840 23,260 5,346 8,969 2,228 22,259 2,479

2,218,899 14,166 19,375 32,093 4,443 35,958 1,188,580 37,646 36,081 27,508 215,768 7,224 127,427 8,842 2,805 191,615 25,894 124,523 91,802 44,503 9,751 10,823 2,693 23,324 3,393

2,368,139 13,056 23,728 45,028 4,193 38,659 1,197,816 49,047 38,524 28,616 226,876 11,278 175,396 8,564 5,338 216,290 36,361 139,824 99,223 56,199 20,329 14,835 5,130 23,068 3,682

2,553,385 15,518 25,210 48,507 4,316 41,159 1,300,092 52,486 39,826 32,689 236,897 12,042 187,809 9,189 5,727 236,607 38,801 144,788 110,815 60,236 24,554 15,894 6,044 24,759 3,928

149,240 -1,110 4,353 12,935 -250 2,701 9,236 11,401 2,443 1,108 11,108 4,054 47,969 -278 2,533 24,675 10,467 15,301 7,421 11,696 10,578 4,012 2,437 -256 289

6.73% -7.84% 22.47% 40.30% -5.63% 7.51% 0.78% 30.28% 6.77% 4.03% 5.15% 56.12% 37.64% -3.14% 90.30% 12.88% 40.42% 12.29% 8.08% 26.28% 108.48% 37.07% 90.49% -1.10% 8.52%

DENTON COUNTY ARGYLE AUBREY BARTONVILLE CARROLLTON COPPER CANYON CORINTH DENTON DOUBLE OAK FLOWER MOUND HICKORY CREEK HIGHLAND VILLAGE JUSTIN KRUM LAKE DALLAS LEWISVILLE LITTLE ELM NORTHLAKE OAK POINT PILOT POINT PONDER PROVIDENCE ROANOKE SANGER SHADY SHORES THE COLONY TROPHY CLUB

143,126 1,111 948 441 40,595 465 1,264 48,063 836 4,402 1,422 3,246 920 917 3,177 24,273 926 143 387 2,211 297 NI 910 2,574 813 11,586 NI

273,525 1,575 1,138 849 82,169 978 3,944 66,270 1,664 15,527 1,893 7,027 1,234 1,542 3,656 46,521 1,255 250 645 2,538 432 NI 1,616 3,508 1,045 22,113 3,922

432,976 2,365 1,500 1,093 109,576 1,216 11,325 80,537 2,179 50,702 2,078 12,173 1,891 1,979 6,166 77,737 3,646 921 1,747 3,538 507 NI 2,810 4,534 1,461 26,531 6,350

662,614 3,282 2,595 1,469 119,097 1,334 19,935 113,383 2,867 64,669 3,247 15,056 3,246 4,157 7,105 95,290 25,898 1,724 2,786 3,856 1,395 4,786 5,962 6,916 2,612 36,328 8,024

780,612 3,905 3,352 1,680 133,168 1,431 20,998 131,044 3,078 71,253 4,139 16,149 3,437 4,990 7,892 104,039 38,341 2,237 3,349 4,093 1,530 5,700 7,400 7,747 2,866 41,779 11,759

229,638 917 1,095 376 9,521 118 8,610 32,846 688 13,967 1,169 2,883 1,355 2,178 939 17,553 22,252 803 1,039 318 888 N/A 3,152 2,382 1,151 9,797 1,674

53.04% 38.77% 73.00% 34.40% 8.69% 9.70% 76.03% 40.78% 31.57% 27.55% 56.26% 23.68% 71.66% 110.06% 15.23% 22.58% 610.31% 87.19% 59.47% 8.99% 175.15% N/A 112.17% 52.54% 78.78% 36.93% 26.36%

ELLIS COUNTY ENNIS FERRIS ITALY MIDLOTHIAN OAK LEAF OVILLA PALMER RED OAK WAXAHACHIE

59,743 12,110 2,228 1,306 3,219 NI 1,067 1,187 1,882 14,624

85,167 13,883 2,212 1,699 5,141 984 2,027 1,659 3,124 18,168

111,360 16,045 2,175 1,993 7,480 1,209 3,405 1,774 4,301 21,426

149,610 18,513 2,436 1,863 18,037 1,298 3,492 2,000 10,769 29,621

163,632 19,007 2,534 1,897 22,318 1,373 3,855 2,055 12,022 33,384

38,250 2,468 261 -130 10,557 89 87 226 6,468 8,195

34.35% 15.38% 12.00% -6.52% 141.14% 7.36% 2.56% 12.74% 150.38% 38.25%

HOOD COUNTY GRANBURY

17,714 3,332

28,981 4,045

41,100 5,718

51,182 7,978

55,423 9,386

10,082 2,260

24.53% 39.52%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

ESTIMATED POPULATION 7/1/15

DECENNIAL GROWTH 2000-2010

DECENNIAL GROWTH RATE 2000-2010

2017


FINAL CENSUS 4/1/90

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/00

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/10

HUNT COUNTY CADDO MILLS COMMERCE GREENVILLE QUINLAN WEST TAWAKONI WOLFE CITY

55,248 1,060 8,136 22,161 1,002 840 1,594

64,343 1,068 6,825 23,071 1,360 932 1,505

76,596 1,149 7,742 24,117 1,370 1,462 1,581

86,129 1,338 8,078 25,557 1,394 1,576 1,412

89,844 1,470 8,892 26,515 1,439 1,641 1,416

9,533 189 336 1,440 24 114 -169

12.45% 16.45% 4.34% 5.97% 1.75% 7.80% -10.69%

JOHNSON COUNTY ALVARADO BURLESON CLEBURNE GRANDVIEW JOSHUA KEENE VENUS

67,649 2,701 11,734 19,218 1,205 1,470 3,013 518

97,165 2,918 16,113 22,205 1,245 3,828 3,944 977

126,811 3,288 20,976 26,005 1,358 4,528 5,003 1,892

150,934 3,785 36,690 29,337 1,561 5,910 6,106 2,960

159,990 4,015 43,625 30,020 1,615 6,066 6,181 3,297

24,123 497 15,714 3,332 203 1,382 1,103 1,068

19.02% 15.12% 74.91% 12.81% 14.95% 30.52% 22.05% 56.45%

KAUFMAN COUNTY COMBINE CRANDALL FORNEY KAUFMAN KEMP MABANK TALTY TERRELL

39,015 688 831 2,483 4,658 1,035 1,443 NI 13,225

52,220 1,329 1,652 4,070 5,238 1,184 1,739 NI 12,490

71,313 1,788 2,774 5,588 6,490 1,133 2,151 1,028 13,606

103,350 1,942 2,858 14,661 6,703 1,154 3,035 1,535 15,816

114,690 2,107 3,238 18,418 7,156 1,256 3,309 1,927 16,981

32,037 154 84 9,073 213 21 884 507 2,210

44.92% 8.61% 3.03% 162.37% 3.28% 1.85% 41.10% 49.32% 16.24%

PARKER COUNTY ALEDO ANNETTA HUDSON OAKS RENO SPRINGTOWN WEATHERFORD WILLOW PARK

44,609 1,027 454 309 1,174 1,658 12,049 1,113

64,785 1,169 672 711 2,322 1,740 14,804 2,328

88,495 1,726 1,108 1,637 2,441 2,062 19,000 2,849

116,927 2,716 1,288 1,662 2,494 2,658 25,250 3,982

126,042 3,412 1,442 2,160 3,281 2,811 28,742 4,922

28,432 990 180 25 53 596 6,250 1,133

32.13% 57.36% 16.25% 1.53% 2.17% 28.90% 32.89% 39.77%

ROCKWALL COUNTY FATE HEATH MCLENDON-CHISHOLM ROCKWALL ROYSE CITY

14,528 263 1,459 NI 5,939 1,566

25,604 475 2,108 646 10,486 2,206

43,080 463 4,149 914 17,976 2,957

78,337 6,357 6,921 1,373 37,490 9,349

90,861 9,847 8,211 2,210 42,566 11,465

35,257 5,894 2,772 459 19,514 6,392

81.84% 1273.00% 66.81% 50.22% 108.56% 216.17%

4,154 NI

5,360 1,949

6,809 2,122

8,490 2,444

8,739 2,570

1,681 322

24.69% 15.17%

860,880 160,113 5,822 20,821 13,579 2,169 6,700 5,852 1,100 2,695 24,002 5,387 11,684 385,164 11,801 29,014 262 31,420 4,156 2,594 4,394 957 8,102 30,592 2,431 NI 7,977 6,890 5,736 3,921 2,808 10,284 3,651 13,508

1,170,103 261,721 8,868 43,762 19,564 2,133 12,724 6,974 1,758 2,715 38,149 5,672 11,482 447,619 29,202 32,856 795 33,574 13,683 4,096 4,591 816 15,607 45,895 2,371 1,271 7,978 6,580 8,551 3,928 7,065 20,009 2,350 15,472

1,446,219 332,969 9,600 47,152 20,208 2,388 19,636 7,467 2,186 2,550 46,005 5,836 12,949 534,694 42,059 39,018 1,134 36,273 27,345 5,850 4,618 1,040 28,031 55,635 2,318 1,505 8,132 6,985 12,374 4,181 21,519 21,908 2,124 14,831

1,809,034 365,438 10,947 46,979 21,234 2,394 22,807 12,838 2,259 2,776 51,277 6,108 12,355 741,206 46,334 42,409 1,517 37,337 39,627 6,763 4,584 1,307 56,368 63,343 2,394 1,547 7,801 7,427 19,806 4,686 26,575 23,497 2,472 16,116

1,982,498 388,125 11,693 49,337 22,629 2,490 25,487 14,853 2,373 2,970 54,219 6,352 12,881 833,319 51,404 44,206 1,786 39,016 45,758 7,715 4,822 1,385 64,274 69,204 2,531 1,635 8,098 7,724 22,079 4,858 29,941 24,525 2,651 17,077

362,815 32,469 1,347 -173 1,026 6 3,171 5,371 73 226 5,272 272 -594 206,512 4,275 3,391 383 1,064 12,282 913 -34 267 28,337 7,708 76 42 -331 442 7,432 505 5,056 1,589 348 1,285

25.09% 9.75% 14.03% -0.37% 5.08% 0.25% 16.15% 71.93% 3.34% 8.86% 11.46% 4.66% -4.59% 38.62% 10.16% 8.69% 33.77% 2.93% 44.91% 15.61% -0.74% 25.67% 101.09% 13.85% 3.28% 2.79% -4.07% 6.33% 60.06% 12.08% 23.50% 7.25% 16.38% 8.66%

26,575 874 889 3,737 890 4,104 466 478 504

34,679 865 1,041 3,581 800 4,252 651 605 700

48,793 1,007 1,099 4,827 947 5,201 887 551 1,104

59,127 1,334 1,207 5,976 1,002 6,042 1,005 1,522 1,286

62,953 1,403 1,335 6,381 1,069 6,521 1,061 1,630 1,408

10,334 327 108 1,149 55 841 118 971 182

21.18% 32.47% 9.83% 23.80% 5.81% 16.17% 13.30% 176.23% 16.49%

SOMERVELL COUNTY GLEN ROSE TARRANT COUNTY ARLINGTON AZLE BEDFORD BENBROOK BLUE MOUND COLLEYVILLE CROWLEY DALWORTHINGTON GARDENS EDGECLIFF VILLAGE EULESS EVERMAN FOREST HILL FORT WORTH GRAPEVINE HALTOM CITY HASLET HURST KELLER KENNEDALE LAKE WORTH LAKESIDE MANSFIELD NORTH RICHLAND HILLS PANTEGO PELICAN BAY RICHLAND HILLS RIVER OAKS SAGINAW SANSOM PARK SOUTHLAKE WATAUGA WESTWORTH VILLAGE WHITE SETTLEMENT WISE COUNTY ALVORD BOYD BRIDGEPORT CHICO DECATUR NEWARK RHOME RUNAWAY BAY

ESTIMATED POPULATION 7/1/15

DECENNIAL GROWTH 2000-2010

DECENNIAL GROWTH RATE 2000-2010

NI = NOT INCORPORATED

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau, 2015 Population Estimates

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

PEOPLE | REGIONAL POPULATION

FINAL CENSUS 4/1/80

51


POPULATION DENSITY AND GROWTH While the majority of the population growth from 2000 to 2010 occurred in suburban communities, the urban core and the first-ring suburbs continue to show vibrancy and opportunity due to well-established neighborhoods and dense population concentrations. The Dallas–Fort Worth region is expected to grow to a population of 10.5 million people and employ more than 6.6 million by the year 2040. Growth is likely to occur in most parts of the region. Data presented on this map are compiled by traffic survey zone (TSZ), an aggregate of census blocks. Forecast estimates are produced by the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) and are the result of a combination of efforts. The first of these is an objective, deterministic model that uses factors such as inventory of vacant land and accessibility to allocate given levels of households and employment. The second is a subjective local review process whereby local entities are given an opportunity to review the model outputs and suggest adjustments. For this, local reviewers use their own expertise, experience and knowledge along with substantiating information such as adopted comprehensive plans and known development activity. It is important to note that both the objective and the subjective processes represent possible outcomes of future development activity. NCTCOG staff assess input submitted by local reviewers along with other data tracked by NCTCOG to complete the forecast estimates. These data were developed for regional planning activities and have not been evaluated for other uses. The North Central Texas Council of Governments makes no warranty, express or implied, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Responsibility for the use of these data lies solely with the user.

DFW TOTAL POPULATION DENSITY

SOURCE: JLL

TOTAL POPULATION PER SQ 1/4 MILE

180467

468826

8271,221

1,2221,651

1,6522,298

2,2993,446

3,4479,155

DFW TOTAL EMPLOYMENT DENSITY

SOURCE: JLL

TOTAL EMPLOYEE COUNT PER SQ 1/4 MILE

91453

52

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

4541,177

1,1782,444

2,4454,435

4,4368,417

8,41814,933

14,93423,079 2017


PROJECTED 2005-2040 POPULATION GROWTH

35

0-226 380 75

227-623 121 35E

624-1,156

35W 190

1,157-1,857 30

635

DNT

1,858-2,797

75 183 820

2,798-3,956

12

360

30

PEOPLE | POPULATION DENSITY AND GROWTH

2005-2040 POPULATION GROWTH PROJECTIONS

175

3,957-5,522

45

20

5,523-8,206

35W

35E

8,207-12,399 Projected 2005-2040 Population Growth Legend: 0-226

227-623

624-1156

1157-1857

1858-2797

2798-3956

3957-5522

5523-8206

8207-12399

12400-17263

12,400-17,263

SOURCE: North Texas Central Texas Council of Governments

2005-2040 EMPLOYMENT GROWTH PROJECTIONS PROJECTED 2005-2040 EMPLOYMENT GROWTH

35

0-391 380 75

392-816 121 35E

817-1,343 35W 190

1,344-2,009 30

635

DNT

2,010-2,899

75 183 820 360

12

2,900-4,151

30

175

4,152-5,869

45 20

5,870-8,551

35W

35E

8,552-13,150 Projected 2005-2040 Employment Growth Legend: 0-391

392-816

817-1343

1344-2009

2010-2899

2900-4151

4152-5869

5870-8551

8552-13150

13151-20634

13,151-20,634

SOURCE: North Central Texas Council of Governments 2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

53


DEMOGRAPHICS Demographics in the Dallas–Fort Worth region are changing as the population diversifies. Just over 17 percent of the population is foreign-born, with Hispanics accounting for the largest minority group both in the region and in the state. With a growing immigrant population, the region’s workforce is relatively young and well educated. Over 60 percent of workers 25 years of age and older have at least some college education, with nearly a third holding a bachelor’s degree or another advanced degree.

IN THE DFW AREA

MORE THAN

650,182

RESIDENTS WERE ADDED FROM 2010 TO 2015 WILL LIVE IN THE DFW AREA BY 2040

THE RAPID INFLUX OF RESIDENTS HAS LED DALLAS-FORT WORTH TO BECOME THE FASTEST-GROWING U.S. METRO IN THE PAST DECADE

TOTAL POPULATION

7,102,796 54

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: 2015 Population Estimates and ACS 5-year estimates (2011-15), U.S. Census Bureau

2017


29.1% 21.4% 28.0% 17.5% 4.0% 34.7

FOREIGN-BORN POPULATION

17.0%

WORLD REGION OF BIRTH OF FOREIGN BORN

FOREIGN BORN

EUROPE ASIA AFRICA OCEANIA LATIN AMERICA NORTHERN AMERICA

4.4% 25.7% 6.2% 0.3% 62.1% 1.2%

RACE/ ETHNICITY

WHITE HISPANIC BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN ASIAN OTHER

48.8% 28.0% 14.8% 5.9% 0.1%

MANAGEMENT, BUSINESS, SCIENCE, AND ARTS OCCUPATIONS

38.0%

LABOR FORCE

[OCCUPATIONS OF PERSONS 16 AND OLDER]

PHOTOS: ISTOCKPHOTO

15.9%

SALES AND OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

25.3%

NATURAL RESOURCES, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE OCCUPATIONS

9.3%

PRODUCTION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MATERIAL MOVING OCCUPATIONS

11.6%

EDUCATION

LESS THAN 9TH GRADE NINTH TO 12TH GRADE, NO DIPLOMA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE/GED SOME COLLEGE/NO DEGREE ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE BACHELOR’S DEGREE GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

7.6% 8.1% 22.7% 22.5% 6.6% 21.6% 10.9%

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE 0 - $34,999 $35,000 - $74,999 $75,000 - $149,999 $150,000 + MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

[PERSONS 25 AND OLDER]

2017

SERVICE OCCUPATIONS

PEOPLE | DEMOGRAPHICS

AGE

0-19 YEARS 20-34 35-54 YEARS 55-74 YEARS 75+ YEARS MEDIAN AGE

2.80 28.8% 31.4% 27.1% 12.6% $59,946

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

55


DALLAS–FORT WORTH MARKET TAPESTRY For more than 30 years, companies, agencies, and organizations have used segmentation to divide and group their consumer markets to more precisely target their best customers and prospects. This targeting method is superior to “scattershot” methods that might attract these preferred groups. Segmentation explains customer diversity, simplifies marketing campaigns, describes lifestyle and lifestage, and incorporates a wide range of data. Segmentation systems operate on the theory that people with similar tastes, lifestyles and behaviors seek others with the same tastes—“like seeks like.” These behaviors can be measured, predicted, and targeted.

56

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

MARKET TAPESTRY The market tapestry is a fascinating snapshot of lifestyle choices. Based on demography and geography, the main purpose of this type of data is targeted marketing efforts, but the high-level picture of types of neighborhoods and the people who live in them based on the activities and expenses of those people is a compelling story all on its own. Some segments develop as a result of age, some show up as a result of money, and still others result from ethnic influence.

SOURCE: ESRI Market Tapestry 2016

2017


AFFLUENT ESTATES

Established wealth— educated, well-traveled married couples

UPSCALE AVENUES

Prosperous, married couples in higher density neighborhoods

UPTOWN INDIVIDUAL

Younger, urban singles on the move

FAMILY LANDSCAPES

Successful younger families in newer housing

GEN X URBAN

Gen X in middle age; families with fewer kids and a mortgage

COZY COUNTRY LIVING Empty nesters in bucolic settings

ETHNIC ENCLAVES

Established diversity— young, Hispanic homeowners with families

MIDDLE GROUND Lifestyles of thirtysomethings

SENIOR STYLES

Senior lifestyles reveal the effects of saving for retirement

RUSTIC OUTPOSTS

Country life with older families, older homes

MIDTOWN SINGLES

Millennials on the move; single, diverse and urban

HOMETOWN

Growing up and staying close to home; single householders

NEXT WAVE

Urban denizens; young, diverse, hardworking families

SCHOLARS & PATRIOTS College campuses and military neighborhoods

2017

POPULATION

PERCENTAGE OF DFW POPULATION

$97,900 $160,800

916,449

17.6%

$84,900 $104,800

148,788

2.9%

$60,400 $106,200

189,745

3.6%

$59,300 $89,500

656,419

12.6%

$51,500 $70,500

333,138

6.4%

$41,000 $74,200

219,825

4.2%

$29,400 $70,800

1,200,711

23.1%

$27,100 $66,500

296,049

5.7%

$17,500 $68,400

80,877

1.6%

$31,100 $45,800

222,278

4.3%

$18,500 $42,200

434,643

8.4%

$23,500 $40,200

180,142

3.5%

$23,100 $44,200

267,219

5.1%

$16,300 $49,000

53,369

1.0%

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

PEOPLE | MARKET TAPESTRY

ESRI’s Tapestry Segmentation, shown on the map below, combines the “who” of lifestyle demography with the “where” of local neighborhood geography to create a model of various lifestyle classifications or segments of actual neighborhoods with addresses—distinct behavioral market segments. To create this map, U.S. residential areas are divided into 65 distinctive segments based on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics to provide an accurate, detailed description of U.S. neighborhoods. These segments are then grouped into the 12 Tapestry Segmentation LifeMode Summary Groups, which are characterized by lifestyle and lifestage, and share an experience such as being born in the same time period or a trait such as affluence.

57


Seattle

MIGRATION PATTERNS Domestic migration patterns can illustrate the flow of workers within the country. The reasons people relocate are numerous and can range from quality of life to employment prospects to overall business climate. The origins of people migrating to the Dallas–Fort Worth area are evident through analysis of IRS data. Just as important are the places to which people are moving when they leave DFW. As illustrated here, people relocate to the DFW area from all parts of the country.

San Francisco

Boulder

Denver

San Jose Riverside Los Angeles

San Diego

Phoenix

MIGRATION PATTERNS BETWEEN DFW AND OTHER METRO AREAS: 2011 TO 2015 METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA (MSA)

58

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

INTO DFW

OUT OF DFW

NET

Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI

23,688

11,039

12,649

New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA

24,270

12,435

11,835

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

27,126

17,669

9,457

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA

16,911

11,092

5,819

Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ

13,527

9,462

4,065

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

12,386

8,427

3,959

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA

9,337

5,440

3,897

Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI

6,994

3,622

3,372

San Diego-Carlsbad, CA

10,414

7,565

2,849

Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL

13,355

10,701

2,654

Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD

5,133

2,913

2,220 2,020

Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI

5,134

3,114

Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH

5,205

3,240

1,965

Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL

5,757

4,137

1,620

2017


Boston

Chicago

Detroit

New York Pittsburgh

1 to 999

Philadelphia Washington Durham

Raleigh Charlotte

PEOPLE | MIGRATION PATTERNS

Net loss

Minneapolis

1000 to 2,999

3,000 to 4,999

Atlanta 5,000 and above

Orlando Tampa Austin

Net Gain

Houston San Antonio

Net Loss

Miami

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA (MSA) Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA

INTO DFW

OUT OF DFW

NET

7,501

6,251

1,250

7,346

6,350

996

21,760

21,113

647

2,338

1,848

490

Pittsburgh, PA

1,574

1,204

370

Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC

3,150

2,863

287

594

383

211

4,733

4,772

(39)

689

870

(181)

8,492

9,026

(534)

San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX Raleigh, NC

Durham-Chapel Hill, NC San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Boulder, CO Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO

9,229

10,334

(1,105)

Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX

52,701

57,894

(5,193)

Austin-Round Rock, TX

33,003

40,086

(7,083)

2017

SOURCE: US Internal Revenue Service, compiled by Aaron Renn

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

59


DEMOGRAPHIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS With regard to key demographics, Dallas– Fort Worth competes favorably with other world-class metropolitan areas across the United States, with a well-educated workforce. Its central location provides easy access to important markets on both coasts, without the higher prices and congestion of more traditional corporate markets such as Chicago, but with more depth than other fast-growing markets such as Denver or Phoenix. The region’s low cost of living means residents can enjoy a higher standard of living on a lower median household income than in many other large markets located on the East or West Coasts.

METROPOLITAN POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS DALLAS-FORT WORTH

ATLANTA

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

7,102,796 34.3 2,370,055 2.8

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

5,710,795 35.7 1,936,823 2.77

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

% High School Graduate or Higher 84.3% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 32.5%

% High School Graduate or Higher 88.2% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 35.8%

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

Median Household Income

$59,946

Median Household Income

HOUSTON

LOS ANGELES

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

6,656,947 33.7 2,112,447 2.90

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

$57,000

13,340,068 35.9 4,244,676 3.03

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

% High School Graduate or Higher 81.8% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 30.7%

% High School Graduate or Higher 78.9% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 32.0%

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

Median Household Income

$59,649

Median Household Income

$60,705

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA

CHICAGO

DENVER

SAN FRANCISCO

CHARLOTTE LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO

ATLANTA

PHOENIX DALLAS-FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

60

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


CHICAGO

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

2,426,363 36.9 857,926 2.64

DENVER

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

9,551,031 36.5 3,438,560 2.72

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

2,814,330 36.1 1,025,246 2.56

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

% High School Graduate or Higher 87.4% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 35.5%

% High School Graduate or Higher 87.2% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 35.5%

% High School Graduate or Higher 90.2% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 40.6%

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

Median Household Income

$53,076

Median Household Income

$61,828

Median Household Income

$65,614

NEW YORK

PHILADELPHIA

PHOENIX

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

20,182,305 37.9 7,105,003 2.75

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

6,069,875 38.3 2,229,039 2.63

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

4,574,531 35.8 1,550,372 2.76

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

% High School Graduate or Higher 85.4% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 37.5%

% High School Graduate or Higher 89.4% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 34.8%

% High School Graduate or Higher 86.6% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 29.3%

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

Median Household Income

$67,296

SAN DIEGO

$62,513

$53,723

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

3,299,521 35.1 1,083,811 2.86

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

4,656,132 38.7 1,642,466 2.68

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

EDUCATION CHARACTERISTICS

% High School Graduate or Higher 86.0% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 35.7%

% High School Graduate or Higher 88.0% % Bachelor’s Degree or Higher 45.6%

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS

Median Household Income

Median Household Income

SAN FRANCISCO

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

Total Population Median Age Total Households Average Household size

Median Household Income

PEOPLE | DEMOGRAPHIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS

CHARLOTTE

$64,309

Median Household Income

$81,552

COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE - JULY 1, 2014 TO JULY 1, 2015 METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS Atlanta Charlotte Chicago Dallas-Fort Worth Denver Houston Los Angeles New York Philadelphia Phoenix San Diego San Francisco

TOTAL POPULATION CHANGE

NET MIGRATION

VITAL EVENTS Natural increase

Births

Deaths

Total

International

Domestic

95,431

37,237

73,242

36,005

58,197

21,391

36,806

47,186 -6,263 144,704 58,474 159,083 85,671 87,186 16,155 87,988 33,821 60,152

12,186 48,115 57,392 18,495 59,844 84,154 102,436 16,998 28,576 22,981 21,833

30,069 118,637 99,906 35,808 98,397 167,846 249,610 71,412 60,296 44,561 52,913

17,883 70,522 42,514 17,313 38,553 83,692 147,174 54,414 31,720 21,580 31,080

33,756 -48,201 86,701 39,892 99,260 576 -68 -1,021 58,222 9,096 40,851

6,328 31,959 28,962 7,861 37,501 71,745 163,951 23,464 12,923 18,468 32,298

27,428 -80,160 57,739 32,031 61,759 -71,169 -164,019 -24,485 45,299 -9,372 8,553

SOURCE: ACS 5-year estimates (2011-2015), U.S. Census Bureau

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

61


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WORKFORCE, EDUCATION & TRAINING

2017

LABOR SUPPLY INDUSTRY SECTORS WAGES AND SALARIES OCCUPATION CLUSTERS TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

63


LABOR SUPPLY Employers in Dallas–Fort Worth draw from a well-educated and skilled workforce throughout the 13-county region. A robust network of interstate highways, state highways, and tollways makes it easy for workers to navigate the area, keeping commute times low for major employment centers surrounding the Dallas and Fort Worth city centers. The region’s relatively low cost of living means employers can tap into a strong workforce no matter where they base their operations. For employees, the wide distribution of jobs means that they are able to choose from a variety of communities in which to live and enjoy the lifestyle that best fits their needs—whether their preference is a well-established neighborhood, a new, fast-growing community, or a small town or rural setting—while maintaining a reasonable commute time. Seventy three percent of the region’s 7.1 million residents are working age. From this base, employers can look forward to selecting from a total civilian labor force of 3.8 million people, a workforce size bested only by the much larger Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York metro areas.

RADAR CHARTS EXPLAINED

The U.S. Census Bureau pairs home/ work census blocks in order to describe geographic patterns related to the workforce. Mapping commuter flows, for example, can help employers determine where potential workers live, as well as how far they might be willing to travel for work. Radar images dynamically communicate several important aspects about worker commute patterns. Using Dallas Downtown-Uptown as an employment center example, the radar indicates primary and secondary cardinal directions from which a worker travels to a job, and the distance traveled as determined by the color of each pie piece. The size of each pie piece indicates the volume of workers who commute from that direction and distance as indicated by the dashed concentric circles marked in hundreds or thousands of people. For instance, the greatest number of downtown workers live north of Dallas, with the majority residing between 10 and 24 miles away (approximately 15,600).

64

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

MAJOR EMPLOYMENT CENTERS WITH DISTANCE AND DIRECTION OF WORKER COMMUTE ALLIANCE

1

FORT WORTH DOWNTOWN

2

N

NW

W

4200

N

NW

NE

E

1400

7000

TOTAL JOBS: 21,848

W

S

DISTANCE TO JOB

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

3

% OF WORKERS 29% 39% 18% 14%

DISTANCE TO JOB

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

       

DALLAS NORTH TOLLWAY

4

N

NW

W

15000 25000

E

5000

TOTAL JOBS: 130,557

W

12000 20000

SE

% OF WORKERS 32% 42% 10% 16%

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

       

6

N

9600 16000

E

3200

TOTAL JOBS: 74,029

W

12000 20000

SE

% OF WORKERS 42% 33% 13% 12%

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

       

8

N

9600 16000

E

3200

       

TOTAL JOBS: 83,106

W

8400 14000

SE

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

27.3% 46.0% 11.9% 14.8%

N

NE

E

2800

TOTAL JOBS: 80,172

SE

SW

S

DISTANCE TO JOB

% OF WORKERS

GREAT SOUTHWEST

NW

NE

SW

TOTAL JOBS: 99,579

SE

DISTANCE TO JOB

LBJ CORRIDOR

W

E

4000

S

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

NW

NE

SW

DISTANCE TO JOB

7

22% 50% 9% 19%

N

S

       

% OF WORKERS

DFW AIRPORT NORTH

NW

NE

SW

TOTAL JOBS: 111,034

SE

DISTANCE TO JOB

LEGACY

W

E

4000

S

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

NW

NE

SW

DISTANCE TO JOB

5

39% 36% 13% 12%

N

S

       

% OF WORKERS

LAS COLINAS

NW

NE

SW

TOTAL JOBS: 37,901

SE

SW

S

       

E

1400

7000

SE

SW

4200

NE

S

% OF WORKERS 33% 39% 11% 17%

DISTANCE TO JOB        

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

% OF WORKERS 33% 42% 11% 13%

SOURCE: US Census Bureau, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (data based on 2014 employment estimates)

2017


WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | LABOR SUPPLY

WHERE PEOPLE LIVE POPULATION DENSITY

5

1

6

10 3 7 4

9 2

8

11

TOTAL POPULATION PER SQ 1/4 MILE

9

DALLAS DOWNTOWN-UPTOWN

180467

10

N

NW

W

18000 30000

TOTAL JOBS: 144,567

W

       

2017

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

4200

28.4% 45.1% 12.4% 14.1%

N

TOTAL JOBS: 82,991

W

       

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

2100

NE

E

700

3500

SE

DISTANCE TO JOB

3,4479,155

SOUTHERN DALLAS INLAND PORT

11

TOTAL JOBS: 16,152

SE

SW

S

% OF WORKERS

2,2993,446

NW

E

1400

SW

S

DISTANCE TO JOB

1,6522,298

NE

14000

SE

SW

1,2221,651

TELECOM CORRIDOR

NW

E

8271,221

N

NE

6000

468826

S

% OF WORKERS 40% 36% 12% 12%

DISTANCE TO JOB        

Less than 10 miles 10 to 24 miles 25 to 50 miles Greater than 50 miles

% OF WORKERS 35% 32% 16% 17%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

65


OT L EH% IES U 21.8 R S

AN O T HC I E

1 VI . 0 T R 9 CL UC 6 SE S R E . % T UD 0 C 2 H .97 4 NS MAN T VI O L I 2 6 R N C . . U FA G 50 97 1.09 1 E . EA 2 S 1 CTU E . H 0 0 H 1.09 1.12 1.21 LT 1.5 % R I ND UGC 1.8 A HE AT 9 I O .02 5. 1N ) .0 74 2 2 1.1 % . 4 HEAL 0 6.9 . INFO 9 7 5 11.2.2 RMA 0.82 9 . 0 FINA TION 1 VI . 1 5 9 R 5 . N AT U 0 2 E 0 . S AN 1 FIN EN, AT T UR A L R E R 1 E . H H 2 T EA R A RN A L R ES SO U R 8 O C O U R CE SE SA N 4.1 LT SPO 2 1 A ND DMMI H . RTA 1 I N SE N I NI GN G TIO N %

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% DFW'S DIVERSE ECONOMY 2.4 0 1.21 0.82%1.5 1.50 1 1.0%21 0.97 S U RI .1 09 1.21 .82 .82 2.4 0.82 1%.02.5201.4.1% .021 HCETRILVESIIETRI EVSI 0 0 0.95 1.1 TA % LO.1 LE A I C N 0.74 0 . 6 I N4A 4.1 1.28 F 1.12 1.28 4 0 0 8 2 2 . 1 1 . 0 5 . .95 . 6 74 9 . 6 . .0 97 1 0 4 0 1.8 MA

The Dallas–Fort Worth regional economy is among the most diverse in the nation, which means that companies can draw from a deep base of skilled workers. Logistics and trade, technology, and % advanced services represent the lifeblood of the Dallas–Fort Worth regional economy,%offering competitive advantages for this area on both the national and the international levels. Businesses in DFW can move goods quickly and costeffectively using a robust intermodal network that connects to regional centers by truck and rail and to world centers by air. The region’s technology sector, led by international powerhouses such as Texas Instruments Inc., has helped develop a strong base of%engineers and information science professionals to lead product innovation for the world. The DFW area has % a strong base of headquarters and other professional services, making the region a magnet for business leadership.

%

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I 1.8 URCES NFO A N R D M MIAN I N G T ION

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0.64

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operations, no matter how remote. Without these three competencies, today's global % economy simply would not exist.

4.1

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B D UU S I N E % S I NT IEL S S S N UF SI ST I SE E R V AC SE R V I C E TU I S C RIN E S 2% I N F GOUR GLOBAL FOOTPRINTS LEISU is no surprise that DFW enjoys international standing in three sectors that are the O RItlifeblood 2.5 M A of the global economy. Each of these sectors serves DFW well at the regional, T IandO continental levels of economic engagement. Transportation, national O Tcommunication H EandRgoods 6.9 N technologies provide the means to move information, people and information SER around the globe. Logistics and trade direct and manage the movement of materials and V I C E S products, while advanced services provide the management and control functions for all

CO

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Advanced services traditionally have meant headquarters, but also include financial, professional and technical services ranging from management consulting firms LOCATION QUOTIENT to business insurers, accountants, and legal services. Complex technologies and transnational operations have pushed most of the growth in advanced services activities into highly specialized firms and enterprises. This region has an exceptionally large number of these operations and is likely to continue to attract additional companies.

CTI % V I T I E S8.8

UB

TI

% Y IT AL IT ES CES SP CTIVITI RVI H O A N C I A L A T H S E8.8% D FIN H E A LL E IS AN U R EA N D HO

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beginning in 1958 with the invention of the microchip at Texas Instruments. Today, the local technology sector is broad and deep, and DFW technology companies enable many of the core activities and processes of the global economy.

9.5 % 6 % .7

11 %

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

LE

) ER N I OS S S T E C AI NTECHNOLOGY SECTOR U S U D Dallas led the nation into the new era of information and communication technologies EB

D 9% N G A U I N 6. L O A D ES I O NC L U R S L S IN E A F R O N( U R T P IO AT R ST I N I M AD C LI 66

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Historically, this region has leveraged its central geography with various transportation assets. Significant trade and distribution activity now comes to and through the DFW metro area by land, air, and rail with local intermodal facilities linking the three modes of transport. Looking ahead, as high value materials and products move from shipping vessels to airplanes, the region's place in international trade routes will become increasingly vital.

ESTABLISH

2017


% EMPLOYMENT % ESTABLISHMENTS

LOCATION QUOTIENT

NG

%

% 12.0 ES

% NT

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EM

%

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SOURCE: QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees & Self-Employed - JobsEQ 2016Q3; OES, 2015

2017

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WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | INDUSTRY SECTORS

8.8

9.5

18.7%

% 7.7

21.8

%

An industry concentration measure, LQ (location quotient) = Industry’s share of local employment/ Industry’s share of national employment (e.g., an LQ of 1.15 means the location is 15% more reliant on that industry’s employment than is the nation as a whole).

% 19.7

% 21.6

%

%

%

8.8

26.2%

%

%

LEGEND

13.7

IT Y

9.6

IES

2 1.09

%

% N D U 1 . T I L % IT 5 6.2

AL DH T I N E EAS OSP H C ND A SI RE U S I

1.1

9.6

IT

P OS

Y

6.9 %

TI O NA

N (IN C

IT AL

9%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

67


WAGES AND SALARIES Median wages and salaries in the Dallas– Fort Worth region generally track below other major metro markets, thanks to Texas’ pro-business labor environment and low taxes. An abundance of affordable housing compared to major metropolitan areas means employees can still enjoy a high standard of living at lower costs than in other major markets.

WHAT PEOPLE IN DFW EARN FOOD PREPARATION & SERVING RELATED

MANAGEMENT

LEGAL

212,032 | TOTAL WORKERS $129,100 | DF W MEDIAN $114,100 | U.S. MEDIAN

27,095 | TOTAL WORKERS $109,900 | DF W MEDIAN $103,300 | U.S. MEDIAN

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL OPERATIONS

EDUCATION, TRAINING & LIBRARY

197,517 | TOTAL WORKERS $77,700 | DF W MEDIAN $73,900 | U.S. MEDIAN

204,177 | TOTAL WORKERS $47,500 | DF W MEDIAN $53,100 | U.S. MEDIAN

122,007 | TOTAL WORKERS $23,700 | DF W MEDIAN $26,900 | U.S. MEDIAN

COMPUTER & MATHEMATICAL

ARTS, DESIGN, ENTERTAINMENT, SPORTS & MEDIA

PERSONAL CARE & SERVICE

119,926 | TOTAL WORKERS $87,800 | DF W MEDIAN $86,200 | U.S. MEDIAN

56,220 | TOTAL WORKERS $54,300 | DF W MEDIAN $56,400 | U.S. MEDIAN

115,623 | TOTAL WORKERS $24,100 | DF W MEDIAN $25,400 | U.S. MEDIAN

ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING

HEALTH CARE PRACTITIONER & TECHNICAL

63,816 | TOTAL WORKERS $87,800 | DF W MEDIAN $83,000 | U.S. MEDIAN

176,261 | TOTAL WORKERS $81,100 | DF W MEDIAN $77,700 | U.S. MEDIAN

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE TAX RATE

LIFE, PHYSICAL & SOCIAL SCIENCE

HEALTH CARE SUPPORT

New employers who do not acquire an existing business start at a tax rate of 2.7 percent, or the NAICS industry average rate, whichever is higher. The employer will keep the entry level tax rate until the employer’s account is chargeable with claims for unemployment benefits for four complete quarters. After these conditions have been met, the effective tax rate is calculated as the sum of fi ve components multiplied by taxable wages. For 2016, the average tax rate is 1.64 percent.

20,791 | TOTAL WORKERS $69,000 | DF W MEDIAN $71,400 | U.S. MEDIAN

307,484 | TOTAL WORKERS $22,400 | DF W MEDIAN $22,800 | U.S. MEDIAN

TYPICAL WORKERS’ COMPENSATION COSTS OCCUPATION

INSURANCE RATES

Electronic Apparatus Manufacturing

$1.30

Fabricated Products

$3.72

Machinery Manufacturing

$3.95

Metal Goods Manufacturing

$5.00

Sales and Service

$2.72

Hospital Professional Employees

$1.08

Office Workers

$0.23

BUILDING & GROUNDS CLEANING & MAINTENANCE

SALES & RELATED 403,462 | TOTAL WORKERS $43,500 | DF W MEDIAN $39,500 | U.S. MEDIAN

Basis of Rates per $100 Payroll

68

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

90,882 | TOTAL WORKERS $29,800 | DF W MEDIAN $29,300 | U.S. MEDIAN

OFFICE & ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT 584,570 | TOTAL WORKERS $37,400 | DF W MEDIAN $36,300 | U.S. MEDIAN

COMMUNITY & SOCIAL SERVICE

PROTECTIVE SERVICES

FARMING, FISHING & FORESTRY

39,978 | TOTAL WORKERS $49,400 | DF W MEDIAN $45,700 | U.S. MEDIAN

56,704 | TOTAL WORKERS $39,100 | DF W MEDIAN $42,900 | U.S. MEDIAN

5,146 | TOTAL WORKERS $23,900 | DF W MEDIAN $25,500 | U.S. MEDIAN

2017


OCCUPATION

2016 JOBS

2017 JOBS

2018 JOBS

2019 JOBS

DFW MEDIAN

54,383

55,284

56,200

57,131

$138,800

9,728

9,962

10,201

10,446

$149,700

Financial Managers

14,616

14,856

15,099

15,347

$145,000

Accountants and Auditors

35,107

35,831

36,570

37,325

$79,600

8,389

8,556

8,727

8,901

$92,400

Loan Officers

12,662

12,893

13,129

13,369

$77,600

Computer Systems Analysts

16,964

17,464

17,979

18,508

$94,500

9,962

9,938

9,915

9,891

$87,700

Software Developers, Applications

22,262

22,860

23,475

24,105

$102,400

Software Developers, Systems Software

13,208

13,495

13,787

14,086

$103,000

3,335

3,403

3,473

3,544

$86,000

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

10,805

10,998

11,195

11,396

$85,900

Computer Support Specialists

17,027

17,404

17,789

18,182

$51,300

6,174

6,272

6,373

6,474

$100,200

Registered Nurses

55,789

57,230

58,709

60,226

$72,900

First-Line Supervisors of Non-Retail Sales Workers

12,378

12,561

12,746

12,934

$82,900

First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Support Workers

38,204

38,862

39,532

40,212

$61,800

Bill and Account Collectors

12,715

12,871

13,029

13,188

$40,500

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks

45,176

45,271

45,366

45,461

$40,900

Customer Service Representatives

76,912

78,288

79,689

81,115

$35,900

9,394

9,566

9,742

9,921

$46,100

Receptionists and Information Clerks

25,507

25,981

26,464

26,956

$27,200

Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative Assistants

17,678

17,765

17,853

17,941

$56,900

Office Clerks, General

75,250

76,207

77,175

78,157

$34,300

First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers

12,904

12,994

13,084

13,175

$61,700

6,380

6,405

6,429

6,454

$28,100

Team Assemblers

26,977

27,242

27,510

27,781

$29,400

Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers

11,848

11,957

12,067

12,178

$40,900

1,231

1,232

1,233

1,234

$36,500

General and Operations Managers Computer and Information Systems Managers CONSTRUCTION & EXTRACTION 172,799 | TOTAL WORKERS $39,200 | DF W MEDIAN $47,500 | U.S. MEDIAN

Financial Analysts

INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE & REPAIR 150,435 | TOTAL WORKERS $45,700 | DF W MEDIAN $46,000 | U.S. MEDIAN

Computer Programmers

Database Administrators

PRODUCTION 201,546 | TOTAL WORKERS $34,300 | DF W MEDIAN $36,300 | U.S. MEDIAN

TRANSPORTATION & MATERIAL MOVING 275,645 | TOTAL WORKERS $36,500 | DF W MEDIAN $34,900 | U.S. MEDIAN

Mechanical Engineers

Loan Interviewers and Clerks

Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers

Semiconductor Processors

WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | WAGES AND SALARIES

KEY OCCUPATIONS IN DFW TARGET INDUSTRIES

SOURCE: QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees & Self-Employed - JobsEQ 2016Q3; OES, 2015

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

69


OCCUPATION CLUSTERS The practice of identifying occupation clusters within a local economy is a relatively new approach to regional development. Similar to how industry clusters categorize businesses by what they produce, occupation clusters focus on grouping people with similar skill sets, abilities, and training levels. Analyzing where these clusters are located helps identify potential investment areas and assists businesses seeking specific labor talent.

The maps shown here represent a sample of occupation clusters within the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area. Each cluster is derived from a sample of occupations that fall within that category. For instance, the Finance cluster would include occupations related to Financial Services such as financial advisers, budget analysts, and loan officers. The Manufacturing and Distribution occupation clusters contain light manufacturing, material movers and assemblers, welders and other general distribution-related jobs. Those with hightech skill sets such as software developers, mechanical and electrical engineers, and computer system designers comprise the Engineering, IT and Software Developer clusters.

EXECUTIVES AND MANAGERIAL OCCUPATIONS 75

35E

121

190

287

35W

114 DNT

635 161

30

183 820 30 20 20 20

287

35W

67

45 35E

FINANCIAL OCCUPATIONS 75

35E

121

190

287

35W

114 DNT

635 161

30

183 820 30 20 20 20

287

35W

67

45 35E

CALL CENTER OCCUPATIONS 75

35E

121

190

287

35W

114 DNT

635 161

30

183 820 30 20 20 20

287

35W

67

45 35E

1 DOT EQUALS 25 WORKERS WITHIN EACH OCCUPATION GROUP.

70

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS

75

35E

75

35E

121

121

190

287

35W

190

114

287

35W

114

DNT

DNT

635

635

161

161

30

183

30

183

820

820 30

30

20

20 20

20

20

20

287

287

35W

67

45

35W

35E

ASSEMBLY AND MANUFACTURING OCCUPATIONS

67

45 35E

IT - COMPUTER OCCUPATIONS

75

35E

75

35E

121

121

190

287

35W

190

114

287

35W

114

DNT

DNT

635

WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | OCCUPATION CLUSTERS

DISTRIBUTION-LOGISTICS OCCUPATIONS

635

161

161

30

183

30

183

820

820 30

30

20

20 20

20

20

20

287

287

35W

67

45

35W

35E

SKILLED PRODUCTION OCCUPATIONS

67

45 35E

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER OCCUPATIONS 75

35E

75

35E

121

121

190

287

35W

190

114

287

35W

114

DNT

DNT

635

635

161

161

30

183

30

183

820

820 30

30

20

20 20

20

20

20

287

35W

287

67

45 35E

35W

67

45 35E

OCCUPATION GROUPS ARE MAPPED BY PLACE OF WORK AND INDIVIDUAL DOTS ARE RANDOMLY LOCATED WITHIN A PARTICULAR ZIP CODE.

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

71


TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The Dallas–Fort Worth region offers a variety of public and private school educational opportunities, with robust programming in life sciences, engineering, and the arts. The University of North Texas at Denton, the University of Texas at Dallas, and the University of Texas at Arlington are among Texas’ seven “emerging research” universities and are currently expanding program capabilities and funding in an effort to become worldclass “tier one” research institutions, which are nationally recognized for the highest levels of innovation and academic excellence. UT Southwestern Medical Center is among the nation’s best in biology and biochemistry research, boasting countless clinical breakthroughs and innovations.

HIGHER EDUCATION

A WIDE ARRAY OF UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES ATTRACT STUDENTS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. 4

WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (WISE COUNTY)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS

2

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE (FLOWER MOUND)

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHPORT)

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHEAST)

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (NORTHWEST) WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (MINERAL WELLS) TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (TRINITY RIVER) UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON (FORT WORTH) WEATHERFORD COLLEGE

TARLETON STATE 7 SOUTHWEST METROPLEX CENTER TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER

11

14

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON RESEARCH INSTITUTE

TEXAS A&M LAW

TERRELL SCHOOL OF TARLETON STATE

SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

10

TEXAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (SOUTH)

ARLINGTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

SOUTHWESTERN ADVENTIST UNIVERSITY

HILL COLLEGE (JOHNSON COUNTY)

Private University Public University HILL COLLEGE

(GLEN ROSE) Community College

SOURCE:

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

UNIVERS AT ARLIN

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE (SOUTHEAST)

WEATHERFORD COLLEGE (GRANBURY)

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

1

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX ARLINGTON CAMPUS

HILL COLLEGE (BURLESON)

72

TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY

2017


UNIVERSITY

COLLIN COLLEGE (CENTRAL PARK)

COLLIN COLLEGE (HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER)

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE COLLIN COLLEGE (PRESTON RIDGE)

COLLIN COLLEGE (SPRING CREEK)

L E )

N

COLLIN COLLEGE (ALLEN)

AMBERTON UNIVERSITY (FRISCO)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS - FRISCO

COLLIN COLLEGE (COURTYARD) DCCCD (NORTH LAKE NORTH)

ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY DALLAS

3

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

TEXAS A&M AG EXTENSION LETOURNEAU UNIVERSITY

DCCCD (BROOKHAVEN) DCCCD (NORTH LAKE WEST)

DCCCD (MOUNTAIN VIEW)

8

DALLAS BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

PAUL QUINN COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS AT DALLAS

NORTHWOOD UNIVERSITY

39,706

2 University of North Texas (UNT) - Denton

37,979

3 The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD)

26,793

4 Texas Woman’s University (TWU)

15,511

5 Texas A&M University (TAMU) - Commerce

12,385

6 Southern Methodist University (SMU)

11,739

7 Texas Christian University (TCU)

10,363

8 Dallas Baptist University (DBU)

5,156

9 University of North Texas (UNT) - Dallas

3,030

10 Texas Wesleyan University

2,557

11 University of North Texas Health Science Center - Fort Worth

2,366

12 University of Dallas (UD)

2,357

13 UT Southwestern

2,277

14 Texas A&M University School of Law - Fort Worth

484

15 University of North Texas College of Law - Dallas

387

DCCCD (RICHLAND GARLAND)

PARKER UNIVERSITY SOUTHERN ART INSTITUTE METHODIST OF DALLAS UNIVERSITY TEXAS TECH SMU UD 6 12 EVEREST HEALTH SCIENCE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CENTER OF DALLAS DCCCD WEST COAST (EASTFIELD) UT SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 13 TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY DCCCD INSTITUTE (NORTH LAKE 15 OF HEALTH SOUTH) SCIENCES DCCCD (NORTH LAKE)

SITY OF TEXAS NGTON

1 The University of Texas at Arlington (UTA)

COLLIN COLLEGE (ROCKWALL)

AMBERTON UNIVERSITY (GARLAND)

DALLAS THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY CRISWELL COLLEGE TEXAS A&M HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY AT CITYSQUARE BAYLOR COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY DCCCD (EL CENTRO) UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS LAW (DALLAS) DCCCD (BILL J. PRIEST)

DCCCD (EASTFIELD PLEASANT GROVE)

9

DCCCD (CEDAR VALLEY)

COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICTS INSTITUTION

2016 ENROLLMENT

Dallas County Community College District

NAVARRO COLLEGE (MIDLOTHIAN)

5 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY COMMERCE

DCCCD (RICHLAND)

UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX DALLAS CAMPUS

DALLAS CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

2016 ENROLLMENT

NAVARRO COLLEGE (WAXAHACHIE) SOUTHWESTERN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

MAJOR UNIVERSITIES

71,393

Tarrant County College District

55,468

Collin County Community College District

29,153

North Central Texas Community College District

9,433

Navarro College

9,127

Trinity Valley Community College

6,950

Weatherford College DFW Total Community College Students

5,607 187,131

The Texas Workforce Commission provides funding for continuing education courses within the community college system. A total of 10,678 students enrolled in CE courses in the districts and colleges listed above in Fall 2016.

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E NAVARRO COLLEGE

73


WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 74

DFW HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

2014-15 TOTAL ENROLLMENT AND DEGREES AWARDED FOR SELECT INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTION

2014 ENROLLMENT

Amberton University Argosy University-Dallas Brookhaven College Cedar Valley College Collin County Community College District Concorde Career College-Dallas Dallas Baptist University Dallas Theological Seminary DeVry University-Texas Eastfield College El Centro College ITT Technical Institute-Arlington ITT Technical Institute-Richardson Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts-Dallas Mountain View College Navarro College North Central Texas College North Lake College Northwood University-Texas Parker University Paul Quinn College Remington College-Dallas Campus Richland College South University-The Art Institute of Dallas Southern Methodist University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University Tarrant County College District Texas A & M University-Commerce Texas Christian University Texas Wesleyan University Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington

1,381 496 12,403 6,759 27,991 555 5,445 2,088 2,855 15,112 10,549 595 708 909 8,950 9,999 10,169 10,744 330 977 273 822 19,343 1,155 11,272 810 1,984 50,595 12,111 10,033 2,376 15,071 39,740

The University of Texas at Dallas Trinity Valley Community College University of Dallas University of North Texas University of North Texas at Dallas University of North Texas Health Science Center University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Wade College Weatherford College West Coast University-Dallas

23,095 4,983 2,548 36,486 2,575

ASSOCIATES

BACHELORS

MASTERS

78 14

386 56

785

554 404 299

2 841 554 2,339 106 7 72 944 926 107 169 250 798 865 922 897 30 97 1,764 98 6 205 5,323

399

DOCTORS 28

33 47 42

30 31

50 40

125 145 27 6

24

152 1,785 144 275

9 1,485 9 92

1,428 2,088 262 2,062 7,020 3,127

1,439 447 190 1,500 2,986 3,144

299 6,440 387

430 1,615 94

208

82

326

60 130 472

45 89 28 199 205 205

169 167

4 297

5

798

2,243

377

2,341

104

207 5,613 428

CERFIFCATES POST- BACHELORS OR MASTERS

82 742

286 7

365

21 137

SKILLS DEVELOPMENT FUND

INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING

This successful State grant program offers businesses, consortia of businesses, or trade unions an opportunity to identify a training need and then partner with a public community or technical college to fill its specific needs. Businesses work with college partners to submit proposals, develop curricula and conduct training. The Skills Development Fund pays for the training, the college administers the grant, and businesses create new jobs and improve the skills of their current workers.

Below is a sample of other institutions of higher learning in Dallas–Fort Worth.

http://skills.texasworkforce.org

ITT Technical Institute

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: National Center for Education Statistics,

Art Institute of Dallas/ Art Institute of Fort Worth

KD Conservatory College of Film and Dramatic Arts

The College of Health Care Professions

Kaplan College

Dallas Nursing Institute

Lincoln Tech

Dallas Theological Institute

Parker University

DeVry University

Paul Quinn College

Everest College

Remington College

Golf Academy of America

University of Phoenix

2017


DALLAS AREA EMPLOYERS ARE ABLE TO RECRUIT EASILY FROM THE 150+ UNIVERSITIES WITHIN TEXAS AND ADJACENT STATES, OFFERING A HIGHLY EDUCATED PIPELINE OF TALENT.

45,481

272,745

Number of Bachelors, Masters and PhD degrees awarded in 2015 by Dallas-area colleges and universities

Number of graduates in 2015 from the 150+ largest 4-year degree granting institutions within Texas and adjacent states.

DEGREES AWARDED 2014-2015 IN DFW, BY AREA OF STUDY AREA OF STUDY Agriculture, Agriculture Operations and Related Sciences Architecture and Related Services Area, Ethnic, Cultural, Gender, and Group Studies Biological and Biomedical Sciences Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs Communications Technologies/Technicians and Support Services Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services Construction Trades Education Engineering Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related Fields English Language and Literature/Letters Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics Health Professions and Related Programs History Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting, and Related Protective Service Legal Professions and Studies Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities Library Science Mathematics and Statistics Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies Natural Resources and Conservation Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies Personal and Culinary Services Philosophy and Religious Studies Physical Sciences Precision Production Psychology Public Administration and Social Service Professions Science Technologies/Technicians Social Sciences Theology and Religious Vocations Transportation and Materials Moving Visual and Performing Arts GRAND TOTAL

2017

ASSOCIATES

BACHELORS

MASTERS

43

56 101 12 1,580 5,428 1,353 759

12 53 11 306 5,235 93 42 1,251

240 1,086 110 610 209 360 4,346 387

1,963 1,194 218 78 46 35 1,576 72

438

761

71

178 12,795 10 2 135 1

58 1,350

87 130 383 67

9 1,280 29 43 506 13 391

6 399 58 33 2,169

58 473

334 2,354 39 821 21 107 274

363 37 135

CERTIFICATES POST-BACHELORS OR MASTERS 9 3 19 673 4 49 26 43 4 4 2 143 2

5 70

DOCTORS

134 60

58

WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

TALENT PIPELINE

160 152 4 38 9 5 1,016 11 241 16 24

24 6

4 11 7

14 106

2

6 72

26 44 10 5 17 151 1 391

1,252 512

399 549

1 37

104 58

1,420 343 36 1,682

272 627

15 50

49 56

345

23

51

19,714

28,001

15,770

1,214

2,346

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

75


WORKFORCE, EDUCATION AND TRAINING | TRAINING, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

STEM CERTIFICATES/DEGREES AWARDED 2014-15 IN DFW, BY CLASSIFICATION Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering Applied Mathematics Astronomy and Astrophysics Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology Biology, General Biomathematics, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology Biomedical/Medical Engineering Biotechnology Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer and Information Sciences, General Computer Engineering Computer Programming Computer Science Computer Software and Media Applications Computer Systems Analysis Computer Systems Networking and Telecommunications Computer/Information Technology Administration and Management Construction Engineering Data Processing

ACCOLADES U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT Texas had five schools listed in the 2014 U.S. News & World Report’s top 100 computer science grad schools.

66 8 1 190 1,504 23 125 12 92 169 157 1,422 379 129 130 85 113 404 349 17 246

Ecology, Evolution, Systematics, and Population Biology Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering Engineering Physics Engineering Science Engineering, General Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering Genetics Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences Industrial Engineering Information Science/Studies Manufacturing Engineering Materials Engineering Mathematics

Mechanical Engineering Microbiological Sciences and Immunology Neurobiology and Neurosciences Operations Research Physics Physiology, Pathology and Related Sciences Statistics Systems Engineering GRAND TOTAL

4 754 0 0 63 21 13 150 121 685 2 65 388 507 27 160 68 134 23 31 93 8,930

SOURCE: National Center for Education Statistics,

The 2016 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education lists three North Texas universities (UNT, UTA, UTD) belonging to the elite group of R-1: Doctoral Universities (Research 1 Universities). The institutions on the list, which include MIT, Stanford, Harvard, and Yale, are identified as the most productive research institutions in the nation.

#9 #20 #40 #70

Texas Research ALLIANCE TEXAS RESEARCH ALLIANCE was established to increase research in the DallasFort Worth Region through Industry-University Collaboration

#90 76

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Its mission is to actively grow the base of research capacity and technology commercialization in North Texas by engaging industry, philanthropic, university, and state support to implement programs that increase research at our local institutions of higher education and create economic benefit for the region. Telecommunications, manufacturing, big data, and technologies that enable smart cities are a primary focus.

2017


THE ECONOMY ECONOMIC FORECAST GLOBAL TRADE ACCOLADES ECONOMIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS COST OF DOING BUSINESS CORPORATE BUSINESS CLIMATE COMPARISON

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

77


ECONOMIC FORECAST The Metroplex economy continues to be a key driver of business activity in the state. The area’s business complex is diverse, including concentrations in corporate headquarters, logistics, technology and more. The Perryman Group’s most recent projections indicate expansion in the region at a rate exceeding most areas. Dallas-Fort Worth and the surrounding area remains one of the best-performing economic regions, a pattern expected to continue through the next fi ve years.

OUTLOOK FOR DALLAS-PLANO-IRVING MD  Economic Indicators 2016 - 2021 KEY INDICATOR

2016 LEVEL

2021 LEVEL

GROWTH RATE*

INCREASE

REAL GROSS PRODUCT*

353.190 billion

434,036.101

4.2%

$80.845 billion

POPULATION

4,736.043

5,158.643

1.7%

422.599

WAGE & SALARY EMPLOYMENT

2,585.490

2,898.438

2.3%

312.948

REAL PERSONAL INCOME*

231.117 billion

290,040.341

4.6%

$58.922 billion

74.407 billion

94,756.371

5.0%

$20.348 billion

42,183

43,425

0.6%

1,243

REAL RETAIL SALES* HOUSING PERMITS

OUTLOOK FOR FORT WORTH-ARLINGTON MD  Economic Indicators 2016 - 2021 KEY INDICATOR

2016 LEVEL

2021 LEVEL

GROWTH RATE*

INCREASE

REAL GROSS PRODUCT*

$118.429 billion

$144,914.58

4.12%

$26.485 billion

POPULATION

2,410.397

2,606.000

1.57%

195.603

WAGE & SALARY EMPLOYMENT

1,041.824

1,154.697

2.08%

112.873

REAL PERSONAL INCOME*

72.687 billion

90,989.444

4.59%

$18.30 billion

REAL RETAIL SALES*

41.159 billion

51,202.603

4.46%

$10.043 billion

11,189

11,857

1.17%

668

HOUSING PERMITS

*Compound annual growth rate, meaning that it reflects changes in the base from which growth is calculated. Real Gross Product and Retail Sales are computed in 2009 dollars. Real Personal Income by place of residence in in 2009 dollars.

TOTAL REAL GROSS PRODUCT ( DALLAS-FORT WORTH-ARLINGTON MSA) *

MILLIONS OF 2009 DOLLARS

$600,000

$500,000

$400,000

$300,000 2003

78

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: The Perryman Group

2005

2007

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

2019

2021

2017


THE ECONOMY | ECONOMIC FORECAST

KEY INDICATORS DALLAS-FORT WORTH- ARLINGTON MSA

WAGE & SALARY EMPLOYMENT

REAL RETAIL SALES*

$150,000

4000

MILLIONS OF 2009 DOLLARS

THOUSANDS OF PERSONS

3500

3000

2500

$120,000

$90,000

2000 2001

2003

2005

2007

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

2019

2001

REAL PERSONAL INCOME ( RESIDENCE ) *

2003

2005

2007

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

2019

HOUSING PERMITS

65,000

$450,000

60,000 55,000 NUMBER OF PERMITS

MILLIONS OF 2009 DOLLARS

$400,000 $350,000 $300,000 $250,000

50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000

$200,000

25,000 $150,000

20,000 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019

2001

2003

2005

2007

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

2019

POPULATION

THOUSANDS OF PERSONS

8,000 7,500 7,000 6,500 6,000 5,500 5,000 4,500 2001

2017

2003

2005

2007

2009

2011

2013

2015

2017

2019

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

79


GLOBAL TRADE In 2015, the Dallas metropolitan area was the eighth-largest export market in the U.S., with merchandise shipments totaling $27.4 billion. This accounts for 38 percent of Texas’s merchandise exports in 2015. During this period, Dallas benefited from existing trade agreements, exporting $8.8 billion to the NAFTA region and $391 million to the CAFTA-DR region. 32.1 percent of Dallas’s merchandise exports went to NAFTA countries. The latest data available (2014) indicates that 8,684 companies exported goods from the Dallas metropolitan area. Of these, 7,617 were small- or mediumsized exporters (SMEs) with fewer than 500 employees.

DFW TRADE AROUND THE WORLD 2015 TOP TRADING PARTNERS–DFW TRADE DISTRICT

CANADA $3.2 BILLION

4.6% EXPORTS 95.4% IMPORTS

36.2% EXPORTS 63.8% IMPORTS

UNITED KINGDOM $2.6 BILLION

DFW TRADE Total Value of Goods in U.S. Dollars

$73.9 BILLION 29.6% EXPORTS 70.4% IMPORTS

Data represents total value within the DFW Customs Trade District, which includes DFW International Airport, Austin, San Antonio, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Addison Airport, Amarillo, Midland International Airport, Lubbock, Oklahoma City, and Tulsa. The DFW region represents 97 percent of the total value of goods traded in the entire trade district.

Texas is the largest exporter in the United States, with 15 percent of the state’s merchandise exports coming from the Dallas–Fort Worth region. As a metropolitan area, Dallas–Fort Worth is the fifth-largest global exporter in the CAFTAand electronics country, with computer $0.5 goods accounting for 16.4 percent of exports. Africa $0.5

2015 EXPORTS FROM DFW TO SELECT ECONOMIC REGIONS

The region’s largestOPEC trading partner $1.1 is China, with more than 172 billion tons of imported andS. exported goods valued America $1.3 at $16.3 billion. On the basis of exports only, DFW was number 11 in the country, ASEAN $3.0 with sales of $22.5 billion. The biggest destination for goods exported from EU $5.7 Dallas is Canada, followed by Mexico and China. The North American Free Trade NAFTA $8.8 Agreement, or NAFTA, was a key driver for DFW, accounting for $6.7 billion—or Asia merchandise $9.3 30 percent—of the area’s exports.

APEC

$17.4

All Nations $0

80

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

$27.4 $5B

$10B

$15B

SOURCE: US International Trade Administration, 2015; USA Trade Online, US Census Bureau

$20B

$25B

$30B

2017


57.8% EXPORTS 42.2% IMPORTS

GERMANY $2.0 BILLION

CHINA $24.7 BILLION

5.9% EXPORTS 94.1% IMPORTS

43.1% EXPORTS 56.9% IMPORTS

TRADE DEFICIT

SOUTH KOREA $9.6 BILLION TAIWAN $3.2 BILLION

TRADE SURPLUS

SINGAPORE $1.9 BILLION

MALAYSIA $2.5 BILLION

THAILAND $2.1 BILLION

77.3% EXPORTS 22.7% IMPORTS

JAPAN $4.5 BILLION

THE ECONOMY | GLOBAL TRADE

Note on differing export measurements: USA Trade Online, a U.S. Census tool, reports exports from final port of exit (e.g. goods bound for export from DFW that pass through other ports, like LAX, will be counted as an export from LAX), while US International Trade Administration reports exports from port of origin.

40.3% EXPORTS 59.7% IMPORTS

61.3% EXPORTS 38.7% IMPORTS

33.6% EXPORTS 66.4% IMPORTS

21.6% EXPORTS 78.4% IMPORTS

DFW TRADE WITH NAFTA COUNTRIES

TRADE SECTORS TRADE VALUE (IN BILLIONS)

% OF DFW EXPORT

COMPUTER AND ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS

$6.7

24.7%

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT

$5.5

20.3%

CHEMICALS

$3.4

12.8%

MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL

$3.2

12.0%

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED COMMODITIES

$1.7

6.4%

2017

MEXICO $1,314.6 MILLION

38% EXPORTS 62% IMPORTS

CANADA $3,223.9 MILLION

4.6% EXPORTS 95.4% IMPORTS

DFW TRADE WITH BRIC COUNTRIES

BRAZIL $240 MILLION

56.4% EXPORTS 43.6% IMPORTS

RUSSIA $206 MILLION

94.8% EXPORTS 5.2% IMPORTS

INDIA $844.9 MILLION

38.9% EXPORTS 61.1% IMPORTS

CHINA $24,673.4 MILLION

5.9% EXPORTS 94.1% IMPORTS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

81


ACCOLADES Dallas–Fort Worth is one of the top regions in the nation for business, thanks to a low cost of living, a business-friendly environment, a strong base of welleducated and skilled employees and robust access to both U.S. and world markets through its transportation network. But don’t take our word for it. Year after year, the region’s selling points are lauded by prestigious business experts at publications such as Bloomberg Businessweek, Forbes, Fortune and Site Selection. And key metrics tracked by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, which measures economic indicators throughout Texas, northern Louisiana and southern New Mexico, show the region to be among the strongest in the country. Dallas–Fort Worth is consistently among the top places to work, the best places to live and the best places for investment.

11 ## 22 ##

ININTHE THECOUNTRY COUNTRYFOR FOR PERCENT PERCENTJOB JOBGROWTH GROWTH (3% (3%GROWTH) GROWTH) ININTHE THECOUNTRY COUNTRY IN INABSOLUTE ABSOLUTEJOB JOB GROWTH GROWTH(113,000) (113,000)

December December2015 2015--December December2016 2016

44 ##10 10

Dallas-FortWorth Worthcreated createdonly only7,100 7,100 Dallas-Fort fewerjobs jobsthan thanNew NewYork, York,aaregion region fewer withtriple triplethe thepopulation. population. with

20 20

“We “Weexplored exploredaanumber numberofoflocation locationoptions options that thatwould wouldoffer offerus uscompetitive competitiveoperating operating costs, costs,aaregion regionwith withextensive extensiveaccess accesstoto skilled skilledrestaurant restauranttalent, talent,an anattractive attractive cost costofofliving livingtotoour ourcurrent currentand andfuture future team teammembers…Texas members…Texasmeets meetsall allofof these thesecriteria.” criteria.”

BEST BESTSTATE STATEFOR FOR BUSINESS BUSINESS

CHIEF CHIEFEXECUTIVE EXECUTIVEMAGAZINE MAGAZINE

GLOBAL GLOBALFORTUNE FORTUNE 500 500COMPANIES COMPANIES BEST BESTPLACES PLACESFOR FOR BUSINESS BUSINESSAND ANDCAREER CAREER FORBES, FORBES,2016 2016 FORTUNE FORTUNE500 500COMPANIES COMPANIES 4th 4thMost Mostininthe theNation Nation among amongmetros metros

DAVID DAVIDPACE PACE

CEO, CEO,Jamba, Jamba,Inc. Inc.

“California “Californiahas hasbeen beengood goodtotous, us, but butititmakes makesbetter betterbusiness business sense sensefor forus ustotobe becentrally centrally located, located,and andwe welook lookforward forwardtoto achieving achievingadded addedoperational operational efficiencies efficiencieswith withthis thismove.” move.”

1212CONSECUTIVE CONSECUTIVEYEARS YEARS MASATO MASATOYOSHIKAWA YOSHIKAWA

President Presidentand andCEO, CEO, Kubota KubotaTractor TractorCorp. Corp.

##

33

MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

82

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

FOR FORCORPORATE CORPORATEEXPANSIONS EXPANSIONS DALLAS-FORT DALLAS-FORTWORTH. WORTH.2016 2016

U.S.DATA DATACENTER CENTERMARKET MARKET TOP TOP55 U.S.


BEST BESTPLACES PLACESTO TOLIVE LIVE DALLAS-FORT DALLAS-FORTWORTH WORTH

Kauffman KauffmanFoundation Foundation 2016 2016Index IndexofofGrowth Growth Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship

TOP TOP 20 20 #3 Plano Plano #3 Euless Euless#18 #18

Darko DarkoDejanovic Dejanovic

Chief ChiefExecutive ExecutiveOfficer Officer

OAG OAGAVIATION AVIATIONWORLDWIDE, WORLDWIDE,2016 2016

TOP TOP 55

1 1 AMERICA'S AMERICA'SMOST MOST

Hot HotHousing Housing Market, Market,2017 2017 Realtor.com Realtor.com

Moody’s Moody’s

##

BUSINESS BUSINESSFRIENDLY FRIENDLY CITIES CITIES DALLAS-FORT DALLAS-FORTWORTH WORTH Marketwatch, Marketwatch,2015 2015

33

DALLAS-FORT DALLAS-FORTWORTH WORTH SPORTS SPORTSILLUSTRATED ILLUSTRATED

360 360NEW NEWResidents Residents each eachday day

43% 43%

57% 57%

NET-MIGRATION NET-MIGRATION

U.S. U.S.Census, Census,2015 2015--2016 2016

THREE THREE RESEARCH RESEARCH11 UNIVERSITIES UNIVERSITIES

Carnegie CarnegieClassification ClassificationofofInstitutions Institutionsofof Higher HigherEducation EducationR-1: R-1:Doctoral DoctoralUniversities Universities

“The “Theadvantages advantagesPlano Planooffered offeredour ourcompany companyand and the thequality qualityof oflife lifeititoffered offeredour ouremployees employees became becameclear clear— —including includingthe thecost costof ofliving, living, access accessto totop-tier top-tierschools schoolsand andcultural culturalofferings, offerings, low lowtax taxrates ratesand andaawide widerange rangeof ofaffordable affordable urban urbanand andsuburban suburbanliving livingoptions optionswithin withinaashort short commute commuteof ofour ourheadquarters headquarterssite.” site.”

2017

The TheDFW DFWregion regionadds adds

NATURAL NATURALINCREASE INCREASE

##

BEST BESTSPORTS SPORTS CITIES CITIESIN INTHE THEU.S. U.S.

Dallas 93.17 Dallas 93.17

CARY CARYEVERT EVERT

President Presidentand andCEO CEO Hilti HiltiNorth NorthAmerica America

Thecost cost The doing ofofdoing businessisis business 7%lower lowerinin 7% Dallasthan than Dallas thenational national the average. average.

U.S. Average 100 U.S. Average 100

“Moving “Movingthe thecorporate corporateheadquarters headquarters totothe theDallas DallasMetroplex…gives Metroplex…givesus us greater greateraccess accesstotoaamuch muchlarger larger talent talentpool poolas aswe weexpand expandour ourbusiness business over overthe thenext nextdecade.” decade.”

San Francisco 123.93 San Francisco 123.93

WORLDS WORLDSMOST MOST CONNECTED CONNECTEDAIRPORTS AIRPORTS

U.S. U.S.News News&&World WorldReport Report

New York 160.68 New York 160.68

33

##

2017 2017

THE ECONOMY | ACCOLADES

TOP TOP10 10

“Wesee seeDallas Dallasas asan anopportunity opportunitytoto “We centralizeour ourlocation locationas aswe weexpand expandglobally, globally, centralize recruitgreat greattalent, talent,and andincrease increaseour our recruit operationalexcellence.” excellence.” operational

JIM JIMLENTZ LENTZ

Chief ChiefExecutive ExecutiveOfficer Officer Toyota ToyotaNorth NorthAmerica, America,Inc. Inc.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

83


ECONOMIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS Companies examine many different variables when choosing the part of the country to which they wish to locate. The Dallas–Fort Worth metropolitan area excels when compared economically to other major metro areas around the country. The low unemployment rate, growing labor force and low cost of living make it a prime destination for companies of all sizes. The absence of a state corporate income tax in Texas and the affordable real estate costs in the DFW region are very attractive to companies wishing to minimize operational costs.

DALLAS-FORT WORTH

ATLANTA

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 3.7% Employment (Dec. 2016) 3,610,564 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 3,749,215 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) None CPI (2016 annual) 220.677 COLI (2016 annual) 100.4 (DAL); 102.3 (FW) Personal Income per capita (2015) $51,099

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 5.0% Employment (Dec. 2016) 2,834,631 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 2,983,076 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 6.0% CPI (2016 annual) 225.463 COLI (2016 annual) 98.7 Personal Income per capita (2015) $45,092

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

29038 28108

Single-family Multi-family

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

18.7% $25.94

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

19,995 10,347

Single-family Multi-family

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

16.9% $23.91

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

HOUSTON

LOS ANGELES

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 5.3% Employment (Dec. 2016) 3,134,979 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 3,310,294 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) None CPI (2016 annual) 216.414 COLI (2016 annual) 98.8 Personal Income per capita (2015) $54,346

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.4% Employment (Dec. 2016) 6,394,697 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 6,691,537 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 8.84% CPI (2016 annual) 249.246 COLI (2016 annual) 142.3 Personal Income per capita (2015) $54,526

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

Single-family Multi-family

36,786 20,115

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016) Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

20.3% $30.78

8,447 25,587

Single-family Multi-family

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

14.6% $38.27

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA

CHICAGO

SAN FRANCISCO

DENVER

CHARLOTTE LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO

ATLANTA

PHOENIX DALLAS-FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

84

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


CHICAGO

DENVER

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.6% Employment (Dec. 2016) 1,222,134 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 1,280,758 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 3.0% CPI (2016 annual) * 147.311 COLI (2016 annual) 94.8 Personal Income per capita (2015) $44,935

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 5.4% Employment (Dec. 2016) 4,631,699 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 4,896,843 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 5.25% CPI (2016 annual) 229.302 COLI (2016 annual) 118.5 Personal Income per capita (2015) $53,886

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 2.6% Employment (Dec. 2016) 1,509,088 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 1,549,275 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 4.63% CPI (2016 annual) 246.643 COLI (2016 annual) 110.4 Personal Income per capita (2015) $55,975

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

Single-family Multi-family

12,389 7,154

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016) Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

7,676 8,137

Single-family Multi-family COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

12.5% $24.47

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

9,324 9,002

Single-family Multi-family COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

14.0% $30.00

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

13.8% $26.99

NEW YORK

PHILADELPHIA

PHOENIX

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.1% Employment (Dec. 2016) 9,573,058 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 9,985,555 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 6.5% CPI (2016 annual) 263.365 COLI (2016 annual) 228.2 Personal Income per capita (2015) $64588

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.4% Employment (Dec. 2016) 2,952,801 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 3,087,467 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 9.99% CPI (2016 annual) 245.290 COLI (2016 annual) 118.6 Personal Income per capita (2015) $57,173

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.1% Employment (Dec. 2016) 2,160,261 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 2,251,861 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 5.5% CPI (2016 annual) * 130.107 COLI (2016 annual) 97.0 Personal Income per capita (2015) $40,811

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

Single-family Multi-family

11,167 75,257

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016) Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

6,548 5,769

Single-family Multi-family COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

10.4% $73.01

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

SAN FRANCISCO

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 4.2% Employment (Dec. 2016) 1,513,869 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 1,579,420 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 4.9% CPI (2016 annual) 274.732 COLI (2016 annual) 144.4 Personal Income per capita (2015) $53,298

Unemployment Rate (Dec. 2016) 3.4% Employment (Dec. 2016) 2,461,490 Labor Force (Dec. 2016) 2,548,157 State Corporate Income Tax Rate (2017) 8.84% CPI (2016 annual) 266.344 COLI (2016 annual) 177.4 Personal Income per capita (2015) $79,206

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS (2015 ANNUAL)

3,222 6,661

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016) Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

2017

11.5% $2.62 FSG

4,804 8,582

Single-family Multi-family COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016) Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

16,621 5,781

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE (Q4 2016)

12.6% $26.25

SAN DIEGO

Single-family Multi-family

Single-family Multi-family

THE ECONOMY | ECONOMIC METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISONS

CHARLOTTE

8.2% $73.65

Total Vacancy Avg. Asking Lease Rate

19.7% $24.48

Sources: Thomson Reuters, Checkpoint, Bureau of Labor Statistics, C2ER , CBRE, Texas A&M Real Estate Center, BEA *Charlotte CPI data is not available - figure represents population-based South Urban regional data with base of 1996=100; Phoenix base is 2001=100; for all others, base is 82-84=100.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

85


DALLAS REGIONAL CHAMBER |  MOODY'S DIVERSITY INDEX

MOODY’S DIVERSITY INDEX FOR SELECT METROPOLITAN REGIONS

UNITED STATES DIVERSITY INDEX = 1

1 .9 .8 .7 .6 .5 .4 .3 .2 .1 0

* Metropolitan division. All others are metropolitan statistical areas. SOURCE: Moody’s, JLL

Dallas

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities

10.3%

Public Administration

DDAALLLLAASS ECONOMIC ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT GGUUIIDDEE

5.8% Financial Activities

11.5%

Professional and Business Services 2.3% Information

Health Services

MOODY’S DIVERSITY INDEX

Other Services 7.5% Manufacturing

10.5%

.80

Leisure & Hospitality

Natural Resources and Mining 1.2%Natural Resources and Mining

18.7%

Professional and Business Services

4.5%Manufacturing Other Services SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Moody’s

Leisure and Hospitality Information METRO-TO-METRO COMPARISON: 2016 EMPLOYMENT BY SUPERSECTOR

VARIANCE FROM PERCENT OF U.S. EMPLOYMENT

PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SERVICES

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

Health Services INFORMATION

NATURAL RESOURCES AND MINING

5%

5%

Financial Activities

4%

4%

3%

3%

2%

2%

Construction

1%

1%

-1%

-1%

-2%

-2%

0%

AUSTIN

HOUSTON

FORT WORTH*

DALLAS*

AUSTIN

HOUSTON

FORT WORTH*

DALLAS*

AUSTIN

HOUSTON

FORT WORTH*

DALLAS*

AUSTIN

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics, CES

HOUSTON

U.S. EMPLOYMENT

* Metropolitan division. All others are metropolitan statistical areas.

SOURCE: Moody’s

88 66

6.1% Construction Public Adminstration

21.6%

FORT WORTH*

Industrial diversity is an index used to gauge the extent to which an area’s economy resembles the national economy. Thus, it is useful in determining how closely the nation’s economic performance will be mirrored across regional economies. The diversity index for a given year is calculated using employment data at the four-digit NAICS level of industrial detail. A diversity index of one, the highest possible value, indicates that an area’s industrial structure—its distribution of employment across industries—is exactly the same as that of the nation. The lower the index, the less the region approximates the industrial structure of the nation. The index assumes that it is impossible for a regional economy to be more diverse than the national economy. Therefore, there are no diversity index values higher than 1. A state or metropolitan area with a higher diversity index is more likely to behave like the national economy, whereas a region with a very low diversity index will likely behave differently.

DALLAS-PLANO-IRVING METROPOLITAN DIVISION: 2016 EMPLOYMENT BY SUPERSECTOR

DALLAS*

MOODY’S DIVERSITY INDEX >>

Houston

2017


No matter who you are or where you’re from, when you Say Yes to Dallas, you’re Saying Yes to more than you might think. Fort Worth

s ayye stoda l l a s .co m Trade, Transportation, and Utilities Public Adminstration Professional and Business Services Other Services Natural Resources and Mining Manufacturing Leisure and Hospitality Information Health Services Financial Activities Construction

Austin


COST OF DOING BUSINESS

SEATTLE (103)

When it comes to doing business, you can’t get much more affordable than Dallas– Fort Worth in comparison to other major metropolitan areas. Thanks to Texas’ business-friendly tax approach, Dallas and Fort Worth both index well below other major U.S. business centers for state and local taxes. In terms of the largest corporate expenses—labor and rent—both Dallas and Fort Worth rank well below other major U.S. markets, making the region an attractive place to expand or relocate major operations. SAN FRANCISCO (124)

DENVER (96)

LOS ANGELES (107) PHOENIX (96) SAN DIEGO (120)

FORT WORTH METRO DIVISION 107 100

93

88

70

65

$

BOSTON

CHICAGO

LOS ANGELES

168

156 117 122

119 100

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: 2015 Moody's North American Cost Review

107

101 96

89

$

88

104 83

96

99

$

100 100

$

2017


THE ECONOMY | COST OF DOING BUSINESS

COST OF DOING BUSINESS

100=US AVERAGE

BOSTON (122) MINNEAPOLIS (103) NEW YORK (161) CHICAGO (99)

PHILADELPHIA (104)

7%

KANSAS CITY (93)

LOWER

CHARLOTTE (89) OKLAHOMA CITY (86)

THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS IS 7% LOWER IN DALLAS THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

ATLANTA (88) FORT WORTH (88) DALLAS (93)

AUSTIN (98) HOUSTON (101) SAN ANTONIO (88)

DALLAS METRO DIVISION 107 100

100

LABOR

UTILITIES

STATE & LOCAL TAX

$

OVERALL COST

OFFICE

NEW YORK

93

77

64

PHILADELPHIA

SAN DIEGO

SAN FRANCISCO

261 232

205

179

161 105

116

107

126

104 92

1040

2017

$

1040

116 120

105

97

99

88

$

1040

104 124

126

$

1040

100

$

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

89


CORPORATE BUSINESS CLIMATE COMPARISON

A GREAT PLACE TO DO BUSINESS

The Dallas area is home to a large and diverse array of corporate headquarters and for good reason. Our region has a tremendous set of assets that companies look for when choosing where to base. We have much to sell and our pitch is a good one, especially right now. Recovery from the Great Recession has been uneven throughout the U.S., but the Dallas-Fort Worth region not only weathered the downturn better than most other metro areas, we have thrived. Furthermore, the difficult business climates in California, Illinois and other heavily populated states are viewed in stark contrast to the operating environment in the Dallas area and in Texas. Leading corporate location magazines (Site Selection and Area Development) have noticed by naming Texas the Top State for doing business.

TEXAS

DALLAS

DFW METRO REGION

TEXAS CORPORATE INCOME TAX RATE 5

0%

PERSONAL INCOME TAX RATE 5

0%

FRANCHISE TAX 5

0.75%

SALES TAX RATE 5

8.25% 2

RIGHT TO WORK STATE

Yes

STATE LABOR FORCE 6

13,398,817

COST OF DOING BUSINESS 7

89.67

CNBC STATE BUSINESS RANK 8

#2

CEO MAGAZINE BUSINESS CLIMATE RANK 9

#1

COST OF LIVING INDEX 10

100.4 (Dallas)

HOUSING COST INDEX 11

88.0 (Dallas)

AVERAGE PRICE/SQFT FOR CBD OFFICE 12

$25.06 (Dallas)

AVERAGE PRICE/SQFT FOR SUBURB OFFICE 12

$25.02 (Dallas)

AVERAGE PRICE/SQFT FOR INDUSTRIAL 12

$4.30 (Dallas/Fort Worth)

1

TEXAS 1 The franchise tax rate is 0.75% of taxable margin. The tax rate is 0.375% of taxable margin for taxable entities primarily engaged in retail or wholesale trade division. Taxable entities with revenues of $1,110,000 or less owe no tax; taxable entities with tax due of less than $1,000 owe no tax. 2 The State of Texas sales tax rate is 6.25% + local rate of up to 2%. ALL STATES 5 Source: Thomson Reuters 6 Source: National Conference of State Legislatures 7 Source: LAUS, BLS, Dec 2016 (preliminary, not seasonally adjusted) 8 Source: 2016 Moody's North American Business Cost Review, Q4 2014 (U.S. average = 100) 9 Source: CNBC America's Top States for Doing Business in 2016 10 Source: CEO Magazine's 2016 Best and Worst States for Doing Business 11 Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index, 2016 Annual Average Data (U.S. average = 100). Note: Results are for the MSA primary city 12 Source: Jones Lang LaSalle, Commercial Real Estate Rents, Q4 2016 (North Bay Industrial cost p.s.f. is for Q3 2016)

90

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


SAN FRANCISCO

MANHATTAN

LOS ANGELES

6,597,478CALIFORNIA

ILLINOIS

NEW YORK

8.84% 1

5.25% 1

6.5% 1

1%-12.3% 2

3.75% 2

4% - 8.82% 2

0%

0.1% 3

.0%+ 3

9.75% 3

10.25% 3

8.875% 4

No

No

No

19,192,788

6,512,493

9,539,259

112.96

97.19

100.39

#32

#24

#29

#50

#48

#49

142.3 (Los Angeles)

177.4 (San Francisco)

118.5 (Chicago)

228.2 (Manhattan)

223.1 (Los Angeles)

323.1 (San Francisco)

144.8 (Chicago)

465.9 (Manhattan)

$41.14 (Los Angeles)

$74.79 (San Francisco)

$38.20 (Chicago)

$78.55 (Manhattan-Midtown)

$37.63(Los Angeles)

$69.07 (San Francisco)

$23.98 (Chicago)

$26.10 (Long Island)

$9.00 (Los Angeles)

$6.66 (North Bay)

$4.76 (Chicago)

$11.28 (Long Island)

CALIFORNIA

NEW YORK

1 Special rates for S corporations and financial institutions. 2 Income brackets are adjusted annually for inflation. Plus millionaire tax (i.e., 1% surcharge on taxable income exceeding $1 million). 3 The State of California sales tax rate is 6%, with an added mandatory local rate of 1.25% + local optional rate of up to 2.5%.

1 For tax years beginning before 1/1/2016, tax is 7.1% on taxpayer's entire net income base; for tax years beginning on or after 1/1/2016, tax is 6.5% on taxpayer's business income base. Taxpayers pay the highest tax computed on three alternate bases. 2 4% - 8.82% for tax years through 2017; 4% - 6.85% for tax year 2018 and later years. For tax years before 2018, income brackets are adjusted annually for inflation. 3 Franchise Tax Rate—no tax on subsidiary capital, plus the greatest of: 1) 6.5% of business income (tax rate on business income base for qualified New York manufacturers is 0%.); 2) 0.125% of the corporation’s capital (special rate for qualified New York manufacturers, cooperative housing corporations, and small business exemptions); 3) Fixed dollar minimum ranging from $25 up to $200,000 (reduced rates for S corporations, qualified New York manufacturers, and qualified emerging technology companies). 4 The State of New York sales tax rate is 4% + local rate of up to 4.75%. NYC total tax is 8.875% due to a0.375% Metropolitan Commuter Transportation District levy.

ILLINOIS 1 Tax rate is 5.25% for tax years 2015 through 2024; 4.8% for tax years after 2024. Additional 2.5% personal property replacement tax; 1.5% for S corporations, partnerships, and trusts. 2 Tax rate is 3.75% for tax years 2015 through 2024; 3.25% for tax years after 2024. 3 0.1% (0.15%, 1st time or added paid-in capital) allocated paid-in capital. Min. $25; max. $2 million plus 0.05% 1st time capital. 4 State of Illinois sales tax rate is 6.25% + local rate of up to 4%.

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

THE ECONOMY  | CORPORATE BUSINESS CLIMATE COMPARISON

CHICAGO

91


experience longevity

A National CPA & Advisory Firm

90+ YEARS With BKD’s first ledger entry in 1923, the CPA firm etched the beginnings of The BKD Experience. More than 90 years later, we’re a proud part of the growing DFW metroplex—still delivering unmatched client service to individuals and businesses. Experience trusted advice from a firm that was built to last. Tom Watson, CPA // Managing Partner 972.702.8262 // twatson@bkd.com bkd.com


THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY MAJOR COMPANIES AND HEADQUARTERS

|

FORTUNE 1000

THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

|

|

SMALL BUSINESS

INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES

MAJOR EXPANSIONS AND RELOCATIONS

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

93


MAJOR COMPANIES AND HEADQUARTERS Dallas–Fort Worth has been a magnet for corporate headquarters and major company operations, attracting 20 Fortune 500 company headquarters and 39 headquarters among the Fortune 1000. A diverse group of household names such as ExxonMobil, Texas Instruments, AT&T, American Airlines, J.C. Penney, KimberlyClark and Fluor call the region home, reflecting the area’s strong fundamentals when it comes to workforce, access, and cost of doing business. DFW’s corporate powerhouse companies are distributed throughout the region, an indication of its strength, quality of the workforce, and ease of navigation between cities and corporate centers. Scanning the roster of major employers located here, it’s easy to see the breadth and depth of the business community, from high-tech industry leaders, telecommunications, logistics and finance, to consumer brands that ease the daily lives of families across the globe. Dallas–Fort Worth’s diverse base of employers drives the region’s economic strength, pulling from a variety of industries so that growth is possible even during weak business cycles.

A CRITICAL MASS OF HEADQUARTERS AND MAJOR COMPANY OPERATIONS

DFW AND TEXAS CONSISTENTLY RANK AS LOW-COST, LOW-TAX AND HIGHQUALITY CORPORATE ENVIRONMENTS. BELOW ARE JUST A FEW OF THE COMPANIES THAT CALL DFW HOME.

CONSTRUCTION

Exco Resources

Ben E Keith Co.

Exxon Mobil Corp.

Brinker International

Austin Industries

HollyFrontier Corp.

Carlson Restaurants

Balfour Beatty

Hunt Oil USA

CEC Entertainment

Carter & Burgess

Luminant

Cheddar’s Casual Café

Centex Corp.

Matador Resource Co.

CiCi’s Pizza

DR Horton

Oncor Electric Delivery

Cinemark Holdings

DPR

Pioneer Natural Resources

Cinepolis

Entact

Range Resources

ClubCorp Holdings

Fluor Corp.

Regency Energy Partners

Dave & Buster’s

Higginbotham Construction

RSP Permian

Fiesta Restaurant Group

Hill & Wilkinson

Sharyland Utilities

Frito-Lay North America

Hunt Construction Group

Sunoco

Fuzzy’s Taco Holdings

Kiewit Corp.

Vistra Energy

Gaylord Texan

Lee Lewis Construction

XTO Energy

Glazer’s Distibutors Great Wolf Lodge

Lehigh Hanson Co. Manhattan Construction McCarthy Building Cos.

HEALTH CARE

MEDCO Construction

AMN Healthcare

Pogue Construction

Baylor Scott & White Health

Primoris Services Corp.

Children’s Medical Center

TD Industries

CHRISTUS Health

The Beck Group

CIGNA Healthcare

Thos S Byrne

Concentra Health Services

Turner Construction

Cook Children’s Health

VCC

Golden Living

ENERGY Alon USA Energy Ambit Energy Atmos Energy Corp. Basic Energy Services Bass Enterprises CoServ CrossTex Energy Denbury Resources

HCA Health Services of Texas HMS Holdings Home Care Services JPS Health Network Lone Star HMA

94

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Hotels.com La Madeleine Lone Star Park LQ Management LSG Sky Chefs USA NYLO Hotels Omni Hotels PepsiCo Pizza Hut Pizza Inn Six Flags Entertainment Taco Bueno Co. Texas Motor Speedway Topgolf

Outreach Health Services Tenet Healthcare Corp. Texas Health Resources UnitedHealthcare USP International Holdings

Dresser Energy Future Holdings Corp.

Hilton Reservations Worldwide

HOSPITALITY

Energy Transfer Equity

American Airlines Center

EnLink Midstream Partner

AT&T Stadium

MANUFACTURING Abbott Laboratories Airbus Helicopters Alcon Laboratories Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions Bell Helicopter Bimbo Bakeries USA/ EarthGrains

2017


RHE Hatco

JLL

loandepot.com

Builders Firstsource

Rockwell Collins

KPMG

Mary Kay

Celanese Corp.

SAFRAN Electrical & Power

L-3 Communications

Match.com

Cisco Systems

Sanden International USA

Liberty Mutual

Mattress Giant Corp.

Commercial Metals

Smith & Nephew

Lincoln Property Co.

MetroPCS

Corning Optical Communications

Solar Turbines

McAfee

Mexico Foods

STMicroelectronics NA Holding

McKesson

Minyard Food Stores

Strukmye

NTT Data

Moneygram International

Tetra Pak

PFSweb

Nebraska Furniture Mart

Texas Industries

PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Neiman Marcus Group

Texas Instruments

Primoris Services

ThyssenKrupp Airport Systems

Real Page

Nokia Solutions and Networks US

Trinity Industries

Research Now

ORIX USA

Triumph Aerostructures

Ryan

Pier 1 Imports

Turbomeca USA

Sabre Corp.

Radioshack Corp.

TXI

Safety-Kleen

Rent-A-Center

Tyson Prepared Foods

Sammons Enterprises

Sally Beauty Holdings

Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing

SAP America

Samsung Electronics America

Source HOV

Santander

State Farm Stream Realty Partners

Sewell Village Cadillac Company

Sun Holdings

Speed Commerce

Dallas Airmotive Dal-Tile Corp. Dean Foods Company Diodes Don Miguel Mexican Foods Dr Pepper Snapple Group Ericsson Essilor of America Flowserve Corp. Frito-Lay Fujitsu Network Communications General Dynamics Ordnance & Tactical Systems General Electric General Motors GKN Aerospace Greatbatch Honeywell International HOYA Vision Care North America

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

The Richards Group

Tandy Leather Co.

Accenture

VCE

The Container Store Group

ACTIVE Network

Verizon Business

The Michaels Cos.

Allstate AT&T

T-Mobile

TRADE & SERVICES

Torchmark Corp.

Interceramic

Atos

Interstate Battery

Bank of America

7-Eleven

Valhi

Justin Brands

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas

ACE Cash Express

Zale Corp.

Kelly-Moore Paint Co.

CA Technologies

Alcatel-Lucent

Kimberly-Clark

Carter & Burgess

Amazon

Kubota

CBRE

Amerisource Bergen

La Mexicana Tortilla Factory Inc

Comerica

Aviall

Lennox International

Comparex USA

Cash America International

Lockheed Martin

Compucom Systems

Madix

Conifer Health Solutions

Consolidated Electrical Distributors

MillerCoors

Core Logic

Mission Foods

CROSSMARK

Motorcycle Aftermarket Group

CVE Technology Group

NCH Corp.

CyrusOne

Nestle Waters North America

Deloitte & Touche

Occidental Petroleum Corp.

EY

Overhead Door Corp.

Federal Reserve of Dallas

Owens Corning

FedEX Office

Peterbilt Motors

HKS

Pioneer Frozen Foods

Copart USA Ennis

Tuesday Morning

TRANSPORTATION American Airlines Group BNSF Dallas Love Field Dallas Fort Worth International Aiport

Fidelity

Frozen Food Express Industries

First Cash Financial Services

Greyhound Lines

Fossil Group

MV Transportation

GameStop

Southwest Airlines

Gearbox Software

Stevens Transport

General Motors Financial Company

Toyota North America

HP Enterprise Services

Half Price Books, Records, Magazines

Union Pacific

Poly-America

Huawei Technologies

Hilti North America

Qorvo

Integrated Systems

J.C. Penney

Raytheon

Intuit

Lennox International

2017

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR COMPANIES AND HEADQUARTERS

BrassCraft Manufacturing

Trinity Industries XPO Logistics

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

9955


THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR COMPANIES AND HEADQUARTERS

TOP EMPLOYERS

Major employers are exceptionally influential in the health and vitality of a local economy. They make up disproportionately large contributions to an area in terms of both employment and production and they often bring national and international ties to a community.

10,000+ EMPLOYEES

Education

unt.edu

UPS

Transportation

ups.com

VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS

Services

verizon.com

ARMY & AIR FORCE EXCHANGE SERVICE

Government

aafes.com

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

bcbstx.com

2,500-4,999 EMPLOYEES

AMERICAN AIRLINES

Transportation

aa.com

BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIELD OF TEXAS

AT&T

Services

att.com

BNSF RAILWAY

Transportation

bnsf.com

BANK OF AMERICA

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

bankofamerica.com

CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

capitalone.com

CITIGROUP

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

citigroup.com

CVS/CAREMARK

Retail Trade

cvs.com

DILLARD'S

Retail Trade

dillards.com

ERICSSON

Manufacturing

ericsson.com

FANNIE MAE

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

fanniemae.com

FRITO-LAY

Manufacturing

fritolay.com

GAMESTOP

Retail Trade

gamestop.com

GENERAL MOTORS

Manufacturing

gm.com

GM FINANCIAL

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

gmfinancial.com

KOHL'S

Retail Trade

kohls.com

LIBERTY MUTUAL

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

libertymutual.com

MACY'S

Retail Trade

macys.com

MICHAELS STORES

Retail Trade

michaels.com

MR. COOPER

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

nationstarmtg.com

NEBRASKA FURNITURE MART OF TEXAS

Retail Trade

nfm.com

BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE

Healthcare

baylorscottandwhite.com

HCA NORTH TEXAS

Healthcare

hcanorthtexas.com

JPMORGAN CHASE

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

chase.com

LOCKHEED MARTIN

Manufacturing

lockheedmartin.com

NAVAL AIR STATION

Government

cnic.navy.mil

TEXAS HEALTH RESOURCES

Healthcare

texashealth.org

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Manufacturing

ti.com

US POSTAL SERVICE

Government

usps.com

UT SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER

Healthcare

utsouthwestern.edu

WALMART STORES

Retail Trade

walmartstores.com

WALMART STORES INC.

Warehouse Club and Supercenters

walmartstores.com

5,000-9,999 EMPLOYEES

96

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS SYSTEM

ALCON LABORATORIES

Manufacturing

alcon.com

CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER DALLAS

Healthcare

childrens.com

COOK CHILDREN'S HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

Healthcare

cookchildrens.org

NEIMAN MARCUS

Retail Trade

neimanmarcus.com

DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Education

dcccd.edu

PIZZA HUT

Retail Trade

pizzahut.com

Manufacturing

poly-america.com

FEDEX

Services

fedex.com

POLY-AMERICA

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

fidelity.com

SABRE

Professional Services

sabre-holdings.com

HOME DEPOT

Retail Trade

homedepot.com

SALLY BEAUTY SUPPLY

Retail Trade

sallybeautyholdings.com

HP ENTERPRISE SERVICES

Professional Services

hpe.com

TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE

Education

tccd.edu

Manufacturing

toyota.com/usa

JC PENNEY COMPANY

Retail Trade

jcpenney.com

TOYOTA NORTH AMERICA

utarlington.edu

Retail Trade

kroger.com

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON

Education

KROGER

Education

utdallas.edu

L-3 COMMUNICATIONS

Manufacturing

l-3com.com

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

LOWE'S COMPANIES

Retail Trade

lowes.com

VA NORTH TEXAS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

Healthcare

northtexas.va.gov

MEDICAL CITY HEALTHCARE

Healthcare

medicalcityhealthcare.com

WALGREENS

Retail Trade

walgreens.com

METHODIST HEALTH SYSTEM

Healthcare

methodisthealthsystem.org

WELLS FARGO

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

wellsfargo.com

PARKLAND HOSPITAL

Healthcare

parklandhospital.com

RAYTHEON

Manufacturing

raytheon.com

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

Transportation

southwest.com

1,500-2,499 EMPLOYEES

STATE FARM INSURANCE

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

statefarm.com

7-ELEVEN

Retail Trade

7-eleven.com

TARGET

Retail Trade

target.com

ACCENTURE

Professional Services

accenture.com

TOM THUMB

Retail Trade

tomthumb.com

ALCATEL-LUCENT USA

Manufacturing

lucent.com

UNITED PARCEL SERVICE

Professional Services

ups.com

ALLSTATE

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

allstate.com

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


Retail Trade

amazon.com

CONIFER HEALTH SOLUTIONS

Professional Services

BELL HELICOPTER TEXTRON

Manufacturing

bellhelicopter.com

coniferhealth.com

BEN E KEITH

Wholesale Trade

benekeith.com

CVE TECHNOLOGY GROUP

Services

cveusa.com

DEX MEDIA

Manufacturing

CISCO SYSTEMS

Manufacturing

cisco.com

dexmedia.com

COLLIN COUNTY COLLEGE

Education

collin.edu

DON MIGUEL MEXICAN FOODS

Manufacturing

donmiguel.com

ENCORE WIRE CORP

Manufacturing

CORELOGIC

Professional Services

corelogic.com

encorewire.com

DAL-TILE

Manufacturing

daltile.com

ESAB

Manufacturing

esabna.com

FDIC

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

DELL SERVICES

Professional Services

dell.com

fdic.gov

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLAS

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

DELOITTE

Professional Services

dallasfed.org

deloitte.com

FUJITSU NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Manufacturing

fujitsu.com

Transportation

dfwairport.com

DIALOG DIRECT

Professional Services

GEICO

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

dialog-direct.com

geico.com

DR PEPPER SNAPPLE GROUP

Manufacturing

drpeppersnapplegroup.com

GERDAU

Manufacturing

gerdau.com

GLAZERS DISTIRBUTORS

Wholesale Trade

glazers.com

EY

Professional Services

ey.com

INGRAM MICRO

Wholesale Trade

ingrammicro.com

INTEL SECURITY

Services

FOSSIL GROUP

Retail Trade

fossilgroup.com

intelsecurity.com

GAYLORD TEXAN

Accommodation

gaylordtexan.com

KINDRED HEALTHCARE

Healthcare

kindredhealthcare.com

genco.com

KPMG

Professional Services

GENCO

Transportation

kpmg.com

HALLIBURTON

Mining

halliburton.com

LENNOX INTERNATIONAL

Manufacturing

lennoxinternational.com

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

Government

irs.gov

marriott.com

Healthcare

jpshealthnet.org

MARRIOTT HOTELS, RESORTS & SUITES

Accommodation

JPS HEALTH NETWORK MARY KAY

Manufacturing

marykay.com

MONI

Services

mymoni.com

MCKESSON CORP

Services

mckesson.com

MOUSER ELECTRONICS INC

Wholesale Trade

mouser.com

METROPLEX SPORTSERVICE

Retail Trade

txbaseball.com

NOKIA SOLUTIONS & NETWORKS

Wholesale Trade

nsn.com

MICROSOFT

Services

microsoft.com

NTHRIVE

Services

nthrive.com

NORDSTROM

Retail Trade

nordstrom.com

PIONEER NATURAL RESOURCES

Mining

pxd.com

OMNI HOTELS

Accommodation

omnihotels.com

QORVO

Manufacturing

qorvo.com

PEPSICO

Manufacturing

pepsico.com

REPUBLIC NATIONAL DISTRIBUTING CO

Wholesale Trade

rndc-usa.com

PETERBILT MOTORS

Manufacturing

peterbilt.com

SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS AMERICA

Manufacturing

samsung.com/us

PWC

Services

pwc.com

SIGNET

Retail Trade

signetjewelers.com

REALPAGE

Services

realpage.com

STEVENS TRANSPORT

Transportation

stevenstransport.com

SANTANDER CONSUMER USA

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

santanderconsumerusa.com

TD AMERITRADE

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

tdameritrade.com

SEARS

Retail Trade

searsholdings.com

TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

Education

twu.edu

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

Education

smu.edu

THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

Manufacturing

dallasnews.com

TELEPERFORMANCE USA

Services

teleperformance.com

THOMSON REUTERS CORP

Services

thomsonreuters.com

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

Education

tcu.edu

TRAVELERS

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

travelers.com

VIZIENT INC

Services

vizientinc.com

TRINITY INDUSTRIES

Manufacturing

trin.net

TRIUMPH AEROSTRUCTURES

Manufacturing

triumphgroup.com

TUESDAY MORNING

Retail Trade

tuesdaymorning.com

UNITED AMERICAN INSURANCE CO

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

unitedamerican.com

WEIR OIL & GAS

Manufacturing

ups.com

XTO ENERGY

Mining

xtoenergy.com

1,000-1,499 EMPLOYEES AAA TEXAS

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

texas.aaa.com

AETNA

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

aetna.com

AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER

Services

americanairlinescenter.com

AMERISOURCEBERGEN SPECIALTY GROUP

Wholesale Trade

absg.com

BBVA COMPASS

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

bbvacompass.com

CHRISTUS HEALTH

Healthcare

christushealth.org

CIGNA HEALTHCARE OF TEXAS

Healthcare

cigna.com

2017

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR COMPANIES AND HEADQUARTERS

AMAZON

SOURCE: DRC Research

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

97


THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | XXXXXXX

39 FORTUNE 1000 HEADQUARTERS IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH (2016)

FORTUNE 1000 Dallas-Fort Worth continues to draw Fortune and Global 500 headquarters, by growth and expansion of local companies as well as by relocations of headquarter operations. It is both a testament to the vibrant, diverse economy in DFW today as well as a natural progression for this region that is so well-recognized internationally for its strengths in advanced services and headquarter operations.

2016 WORLD CITIES WITH THE MOST GLOBAL 500 HEADQUARTERS METROPOLITAN AREA

COUNTRY

Beijing Tokyo New York* London Paris Chicago* Seoul Shanghai Hong Kong Houston* Osaka Washington D.C.* Zurich Minneapolis* Toronto Boston* Madrid Moscow Mumbai San Francisco* San Jose* Shenzhen Amsterdam Atlanta* Dallas* Munich Taipei

China Japan U.S. Britain France U.S. South Korea China China U.S. Japan U.S. Switzerland U.S. Canada U.S. Spain Russia India U.S. U.S. China Netherlands U.S. U.S. Germany Taiwan

DENTON

COMPANIES

58 37 24 17 17 11 11 8 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4

* U.S. cities represented by their metropolitan area

8 FORBES TOP PRIVATE COMPANIES (2016) RANK COMPANY

CITY

70 78 86 95

Dallas Dallas Dallas Irving

107 123 134 144

98

Energy Future Holdings Neiman Marcus Group Sammons Enterprises Consolidated Elec Distributors Mary Kay Ben E. Keith Hunt Consolidated/ Hunt Oil Golden Living

Addison Fort Worth Dallas Plano

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

FORT WORTH / GRAPEVINE / IRVING / NORTH DALLAS / SOUTHLAKE EXXON MOBIL*

#2

AMERICAN AIRLINES GROUP*

#67

KIMBERLY-CLARK

#151

FLUOR

#155

GAMESTOP

#302

COMMERCIAL METALS

#417

CELANESE

#453

MICHAELS STORES

#517

PIONEER NATURAL RESOURCES

#522

FLOWSERVE

#539

DARLING INGREDIENTS

#664

SABRE CORP.

#736

NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE

#880

SALLY BEAUTY

#610

DOWNTOWN DALLAS (CBD & UPTOWN) FORT WORTH CBD DR HORTON

#260

AT&T INC.*

#10

ENERGY TRANSFER EQUITY* #65 TENET HEALTHCARE

#140

HOLLYFRONTIER CORP.

#214

DEAN FOODS

#336

TRINITY INDUSTRIES

#407

ENERGY FUTURE HOLDINGS

#475

NEIMAN MARCUS

#502

BUILDERS FIRSTSOURCE

#637

COMERICA

#765

PRIMORIS SERVICES CORP.

#985

* FORTUNE GLOBAL 500 COMPANIES SOURCE: DRC Research; Fortune Magazine; Forbes Magazine

2017


55

NEW YORK

51

CALIFORNIA

50

TEXAS

MCKINNEY

36

24

ILLINOIS

21

OHIO

VIRGINIA

PLANO

TORCHMARK CORP. #590

J.C. PENNEY

#228

ALLIANCE DATA SYSTEMS

#404

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | FORTUNE 1000

STATES WITH THE MOST FORTUNE 500 HEADQUARTERS (2016)

DR PEPPER SNAPPLE GROUP #413

RICHARDSON

RENT-A-CENTER

#675

CINEMARK HOLDINGS

#762

LENNOX INTERNATIONAL #655 FOSSIL

#683

DALLAS-LBJ CORRIDOR TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

#219

ALON USA

#569

ATMOS ENERGY

#579

BRINKER INTERNATIONAL

#731

DALLAS LOVE FIELD SOUTHWEST AIRLINES

#142

U.S. METROPOLITAN AREAS WITH THE MOST FORTUNE 500 HEADQUARTERS (2016)

SEATTLE / TACOMA / BELLEVUE, WA

10

SAN JOSE / SUNNYVALE / SANTA CLARA, CA

13

SAN FRANCISCO / OAKLAND / HAYWARD, CA

17

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL / BLOOMINGTON, MN-WI

11

PHILADELPHIA / NEW YORK-NEWARK CAMDEN / JERSEY CITY, WILMINGTON, NY-NJ-PA PA-NJ-DE-MD

69

12

BRIDGEPORTSTAMFORD-NORWALK,CT

16

13

BOSTON-CAMBRIDGE / NEWTON, MA-NH

CHICAGO / NAPERVILLE / ELGIN, IL-IN-WI LOS ANGELES / LONG BEACH / ANAHEIM, CA

18

34

DALLAS / FORT WORTH / ARLINGTON, TX

20

10

CINCINNATI, OH-KY-IN

9

HOUSTON / THE WOODLANDS / SUGAR LAND, TX

23

2017

DETROIT / WARREN / DEARBORN, MI

WASHINGTON / ARLINGTON / ALEXANDRIA, DC-VA-MD-WV ATLANTA / SANDY SPRINGS / ROSWELL, GA

15

16

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

99


SMALL BUSINESS According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), businesses with fewer than 500 employees represented roughly 99.7 percent of all employers nationally, made up 64 percent of net new private-sector jobs and accounted for 42 percent of private payroll. In Dallas– Fort Worth, small business is a vital part of our economic success because of its entrepreneurial spirit and drive for innovation.

97% OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN THE DFW REGION HAVE FEWER THAN 100 EMPLOYEES ESTABLISHMENT INDUSTRY (TOTAL ESTABLISHMENTS)

NORTH TEXAS SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS An SBDC conducts research, counsels and trains business people in managing, financing and operating small businesses, providing comprehensive information services and access to experts in a variety of fields. Each SBDC encourages unique local efforts to meet small business needs in its area.

M

MICRO Less than 10 employees

FORESTRY, FISHING, HUNTING, & AGRICULTURE SUPPORT (104)

89.4%

MINING (1,255)

70.7%

UTILITIES (268)

54.9%

CONSTRUCTION (10,461)

73.9%

MANUFACTURING (5,426)

51.0%

SMALL 10-99 employees

9.6% 25.8% 36.9% 23.7% 40.4%

MEDIUM 100-499 employees

LARGE More than 500 employees

0.0%

1.0%

3.1%

0.4%

6.3%

1.9%

2.2%

0.2%

7.8%

0.9%

D WHOLESALE TRADE (9,436)

68.8%

28.3%

2.7%

0.3%

D RETAIL TRADE (19,998)

67.2%

29.3%

3.5%

0.0%

TRANSPORTATION AND WAREHOUSING (4,139 )

65.9%

28.0%

5.1%

1.0%

INFORMATION (2,961)

63.1%

30.7%

5.3%

0.9%

FINANCE AND INSURANCE (11,529)

78.7%

18.5%

2.1%

0.6%

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AND LEASING (7,790)

85.4%

13.4%

1.1%

0.1%

PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL SERVICES (20,452)

83.0%

15.5%

1.4%

0.2%

MANAGEMENT OF COMPANIES AND ENTERPRISES (1,875)

49.8%

37.7%

9.9%

2.6%

NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS SBDC Serving: Cooke, Denton and Montague Counties Hosting Agency and Satellites: North Central Texas College; Denton Chamber Satellite; Flower Mound Campus Satellite

ADMIN, SUPPORT, WASTE MGT, REMEDIATION SERVICES (8,451)

68.2%

25.0%

6.0%

0.8%

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES (2,041)

64.5%

31.6%

3.4%

0.5%

HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE (18,257)

70.6%

26.5%

2.5%

0.4%

TARRANT SBDC Serving: Tarrant County Hosting Agency and Satellites: Tarrant County College; Arlington Chamber Satellite; North Richland Hills Satellite

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION (1,771)

62.5%

32.8%

4.4%

0.3%

ACCOMMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES (13,399)

40.9%

2.1%

0.1%

OTHER SERVICES (EXCEPT PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) (12,527)

77.9%

1.0%

0.1%

2.9%

0.3%

BEST SOUTHWEST SBDC Serving: SW Dallas County Hosting Agency and Satellites: Cedar Valley College COLLIN SBDC Serving: Collin County Area Hosting Agency and Satellites: Collin County Community College

I

DALLAS METROPOLITAN SBDC Serving: Dallas and Rockwall County Areas Hosting Agency and Satellites: The Bill Priest Institute of El Centro College; Addison Treehouse Satellite; Cedar Hill Satellite; Garland Chamber Satellite

SOURCE: North Texas SBDC Network

OTHER

= TOTAL 100

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

(152,400)

69.8%

SOURCE: 2014 DFW Small Business Patterns, US Census Bureau

56.9% 21.0% 27.0%

2017


14 COMPANIES MADE THE INC. 500 LIST IN 2016, AND A TOTAL OF 160 COMPANIES WERE LISTED IN THE INC. 5000

6

5

3 10 7 9 1

14 4

RANK

COMPANY

CITY

REVENUE

1

14

S2 Capital

Addison

$28.8 million

2

40

JM Bullion

Fort Worth

$661.2 million

3

138

Netvious

Frisco

$4 million

4

154 CPSG Partners

Dallas

$43.4 million

5

177

Alliance Family of Companies

McKinney

$28 million

6

210

Fire Line Services

McKinney

$15 million

7

242 Primal Health

Plano

$11.5 million

8

244

Fathom Realty

Irving

$29.6 million

9

255

freshbenies

Plano

$5.7 million

10

363 J.W. Logistics

The Colony

11

406 Koupon Media

North Richland Hills

$2.2 million

12

411 OrderMyGear

Dallas

$4.6 million

13

422 NextAfter

Dallas

$2.5 million

14

450

Addison

$22.6 million

13 8

11

2

12

Revere Capital

$107.8 million

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | SMALL BUSINESS

INC. 500

AMERICA’S FASTEST-GROWING PRIVATE COMPANIES

INC. 5000 RANK COMPANY

REVENUE

RANK COMPANY

REVENUE

RANK COMPANY

REVENUE

RANK COMPANY

REVENUE

14

S2 Capital

$28.8m

1257 HomeVestors of America

$48.3m

2429 EnSite Solutions

$24.3m

3925 KWA Construction

$71.7m

40

JM Bullion

$661.2m

1266 Commercial Fleet Financing

$6.6m

2479 GW Communications

$25.3m

3934 Improving

$42.5m

138

Netvious

$4m

1267 Poo~Pourri

$33.1m

2513 Namitus Technologies

$4m

3942 Viva Railings

$8.5m

154

CPSG Partners

$43.4m

1271 Knightvest Capital

$15.8m

2629 eDataWorld

$6.4m

4101 Oceans Healthcare

$77.7m

177

Alliance Family of Companies

$28m

1283 MyStartupCFO

$4.2m

2730 projekt202

$28.5m

4154 Ivie & Associates

$460.5m

210

Fire Line Services

$15m

1314 Gadberry Construction Company $9.9m

2741 Supreme Lending

$306.4m

4156 Silver Bullet Construction

$3.3m

242

Primal Health

$11.5m

1333 StraCon Services Group

$6.2m

2757 The Boardroom Salon for Men

$6.8m

4165 HealthMark Group

$2.7m

244

Fathom Realty

$29.6m

1366 Motivity Labs

$5.7m

2810 THMED

$28.9m

4215 Vertical Nerve

$3.6m

255

freshbenies

$5.7m

1371 Schlotzsky’s and Dairy Queen

$20.9m

2812 Impiger Technologies

$5m

4244 Masergy Communications

$254.3m

363

J.W. Logistics

$107.8m

1399 Trident Components

$7.2m

2861 MPACT Financial Group

$3.1m

4246 RPC

$15.3m

406

Koupon Media

$2.2m

1401 Innovative Surveillance Solutions $14.4m

$13.7m

OrderMyGear

$4.6m

1475 DECA Dental Group

$41m

2924 C-Level Marketing and Sales Consulting

4278 Maxim Management Group

411

$5.7m

4287 Sundance Healthcare

$24.6m

422

NextAfter

$2.5m

1500 Fruitables Pet Food

$10m

2926 Studio Movie Grill

$161.3m

4321 M&S Technologies

$44.3m

450

Revere Capital

$22.6m

1520 Dhaliwal Labs

$29m

3007 Faulkner Design Group

$17.8m

4337 Berrett Pest Control

$6.5m

501

Akorbi

$23.3m

1582 Nothing Bundt Cakes

$115.1m

3030 Solutions by Text

$2.7m

4379 interRel Consulting

$13.5m

548

Saxony Partners

$8.4m

1595 OpenRoad Lending

$14.6m

$2.2m

4428 MedicOne Medical Response

$12.2m

4444 ZAK Products

$30.6m

4452 Viverae

$37.1m

4458 Pariveda Solutions

$83.6m

577

Sports Marketing Monterrey

$2.6m

1674 Servesys

$7.4m

3060 Garland Heart Management Group

578

TruEnergy

$5.7m

1697 SYNERGEN Health

$5.9m

3099 Adaptive Medical Partners

$3m $1.4b

596

Tachyon Technologies

$6.6m

1705 Popular Ink

$18m

3105 SRS Distribution

677

WorldVentures

$567.4m

1709 70kft

$4.1m

3162 ExamSoft Worldwide

$15.5m

720

Metre22

$2.7m

1742 AustinCSI

$26.3m

3172 Architectural Fabrication

$5.9m

733

mortgage financial services

$7.1m

1776 Venus Construction

$34.7m

3206 Service Nation

$10.3m

747

King George

$4m

1809 YourCause

$6.2m

3219 UR Holdings

$96.4m

778

EnTouch Controls

$3.6m

1837 Paragon Healthcare

$146.7m

3278 Capital Title of Texas

$60.5m

789

Salt and Light Energy Equipment $11.9m

1845 Point 2 Point Global Security

$39.9m

833

PEG Bandwidth

$76.1m

1893 Granbury Solutions

841

Landmark Roofing

$3.8m

1935 Ideal Impact

847

Daseke

$678.8m

1938 G Systems

$8.1m

886

Nerium International

$515.7m

2055 Purple Land Management

$37.3m

989

Corvette Mods

$6m

2079 Sage IT

$1.1b

2090 Oven Bits

1018 Pinnacle Group

4464 Parkway Construction

$210.1m

4484 TSP

$63.6m

4555 Synerzip

$16m

4563 Town Square Financial

$12m

4597 Legacy Housing

$106.9m

3295 Anserteam Workforce Solutions $30.8m

4598 Meyer Dunlap

$5.8m

$21.3m

3310 HumCap

$3.8m

4600 The Trade Group

$32m

$10.3m

3349 National Association of Expert Advisors

$6.4m

4609 WatchGuard Video

$58.2m

3441 c2mtech

$12.1m

$35.4m

3496 GTN Technical Staffing

$33m

$5.4m

3508 Homecare Homebase

$108m $9.1m

1036 See Agency

$2.5m

2095 Perfect Tax

$3.2m

3520 W&M Environmental Group

1040 Simpli.fi

$51.5m

2139 VIVA Pediatrics

$17.9m

3521 ZeOmega

$32.2m

1078 ValuD Consulting

$6.8m

2169 Webyshops

$17.3m

3552 Staff One HR

$252.5m

1115 Armor

$48.6m

2228 NorthStar Anesthesia

$343.2m

3586 Switchplace

$27.5m

1137 Shop The BOSS

$5.7m

2237 Online Rewards

$35.7m

3597 Credera

$47.3m

1158 Cyber Group

$11.5m

2286 Idea Grove

$2.5m

3650 Infolob Solutions

$22.5m

1177 Alldaybot

$2.2m

2305 Standav

$17.9m

3807 A1 Security Cameras

$5m

1180 5

$8.6m

2344 Old Pro Roofing

$8m

3816 C1S Group

$11.9m

1183 Tasacom Technologies

$5m

2383 EST Group

$19.7m

3825 Goldfish Medical Staffing

1213 OneSource Virtual

$95.9m

2404 Records Solutions

$10.5m

3909 Point of Rental Software

4614 LiquidAgents Healthcare

$36.4m

4623 RealManage

$28.8m

4624 Thomas, Edwards Group

$4.3m

4653 ISNetworld

$124.7m

4667 Clearview Energy

$58.4m

4781 Hiatus Spa + Retreat

$5.3m

4786 COFFEE HOUSE CAFE

$2.4m

4808 Forrest Performance Group

$2.1m

4831 Romeo Music

$5.4m

4941 Sendero

$13.4m

4944 Platinum Intelligent Data Solutions

$4.2m

$20.4m

4946 Sharon Young

$48m

$9.7m

4972 US-Analytics Solutions Group

$17.9m

SOURCE: Inc. Magazine

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

101


THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM Texas is arguably the No. 1 state in the country in which to do business and Dallas-Fort Worth is one of the best places in the country to start a business. An explosion of new startups, coworking spaces, incubators and accelerators are building a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem in Dallas-Fort Worth.

DFW WORKS TOGETHER DALLAS IS THE BEST PLACE FOR STARTUPS — U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE FOUNDATION

DFW IS A TOP 10 REGION FOR FAST-GROWTH COMPANIES

Panther Lab Makerspace

— INC. MAGAZINE CoLAB The Backlot Criterion

The Makerspace at Walsh

Craftwork Coffee Co.

Benbrook Makerspace

TECH Fort Worth IDEA Works FW

Ensemble

Alcon Experience Center

THE DALLAS INNOVATION ALLIANCE The Dallas Innovation Alliance (DIA) is a public-private partnership dedicated to the design and execution of a smart cities plan for the city of Dallas. The mission is to develop a scalable smart cities model for the city of Dallas that leverages the city’s distinctive strengths for the benefit of Dallas that leaves a legacy of innovation, sustainability and collaboration for future generations. Initial efforts will be centered in the West End district of downtown, where a confluence of multimodal transit, walkability, historic buildings, and a burgeoning innovation district will serve as ground zero for the city as a living lab. A three-pronged strategy will center on infrastructure, mobility, and connected living. www.dallasinnovationalliance.com

102

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: DRC Research

2017


The Forge

!

TechMill Stoke

Creating In Cahoots

UNT Innovation UNT Collab Lab Greenhouse

North Texas Enterprise Center

The WERX in McKinney

!

Makerspace at Sci-Tech Discovery Center

iCode

Blue Star ! Accelerator Common Desk WeWork Ericsson Experience Center City Central Cowork ! INNOVATE Suites Flower Mound

INCUBATOR OR ACCELERATOR

Nokia Executive Experience Center

Catalyst by SoftLayer LIFT GameStop Technology Institute

NEC Executive Briefing Center

TheLab.ms AT&T Foundry

!

Nod

Venture Development Center (UTD) Collide Village Blackstone LaunchPad Accelerator Addison Treehouse

Collective Office

The Maker Spot

CORPORATE INNOVATION OR EXPERIENCE CENTER MAKERSPACE

Capital One Garage

HeadSpace

Sabre Innovation Hub

COWORKING

Dallas Makerspace IBM Innovation Center Dallas Cowork Microsoft Essilor Technology Center Innovation Center

Accenture Innovation Center

Samsung Research America

Rockwall Makerspace

TI Kilby Labs

Neiman Marcus iLab SMU DIG

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

UNT Factory

DFW Excellerator The Foundry Club

at ! Pipeline Biocenter

Spryrocket

The Mix

WELD

! Pinn Station UTA Technology Incubator

TechFW@UTA UTA FabLab StartupLounge

The Kessler Co-Op

!

The District

Common Desk

Tyler Station

UNTD

Paul Quinn College

Red Bird Entrepreneur Center

Industrious WeWork Spaces

35

717 Harwood Blue Cross Blue Shield C1 Innovation Lab

United Way Ground Floor

Dallas Entrepreneuer Center (The DEC) REVTECH

Cause Studio The Grove Level Office USPTO Regional Office

Common Desk

Kowork Health Wildcatters VENUE Fort Work AT&T Executive Briefing Center

Tech Wildcatters WeWork

GeniusDen

Frontier Nex

Dallas B.R.A.I.N. Goodwork The Cedars Union

45

Acme Creation Lab

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

103


THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

$3.9B

DFW COMPANIES HAVE BIG EXITS ... $5.7B IPO ACQUIRED

$53M $53M

2002 Gamestop

$110M

2010 Woot.com to Amazon

2010 ITKO to CA Technologies

2010 New Toy to Zynga

ACQUIRED

BIO VENTURES 2010HUNT Quickoffice to Google

huntbioventures.com LONE STAR ANGELS lonestarangels.weebly.com

ARISTOS VENTURES aristosventures.com

2013 Softlayer to IBM $2B MARK CUBAN COMPANIES

B4 VENTURES b4ventures.com

markcubancompanies.com

MOBILITY VENTURES BAYLOR ANGEL NETWORK mobilityventures.com/index.php baylor.edu/business/ 2013 Bottle Rocket to WPP angelnetwork NAYA VENTURES

ACQUIRED

nayaventures.com

BLOSSOM STREET VENTURES blossomstreetventures.com

NORTH TEXAS ANGEL NETWORK northtexasangels.org

CAPITAL SOUTHWEST capitalsouthwest.com

2015 ZS Pharma to AstraZeneca $2.7B PEROT JAIN

perotjain.com

COWTOWN ANGELS cowtownangels.org

SID R. BASS ASSOCIATION

$560M

CYPRESS GROWTH CAPITAL cypressgrowthcapital.com

SILVERSystems CREEK to VENTURES 2016 Mavenir Mitel STONEHENGE CAPITAL stonehengecapital.com

DELTA-V CAPITAL deltavcapital.com

TEAKWOOD CAPITAL teakwoodcapital.com

GREEN PARK & GOLF VENTURES gpgventures.com HANGAR VENTURES hangarventures.com HUGHES VENTURES hughesventures.com

104

silvercreekfund.com

DALLAS VENTURE PARTNERS dallasventurepartners.com

GOLDEN SEEDS - DALLAS goldenseeds.com

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

ACQUIRED ACQUIRED

TEXAS VENTURES texasventures.com TEXAS WOMEN VENTURES texaswomenventures.com TRUE WEALTH VENTURES truewealthvc.com TRAILBLAZER CAPITAL trailblazercap.com

2013 Softlayer to IBM 2013 Softlayer to IBM

2013 Bottle Rocket to WPP 2013 Bottle Rocket to WPP

$2.7B $2.7B

2002 Perot Systems to Dell

$330M PRIVATE EQUITY GROWTH FUNDS, VENTURE CAPITAL & $53M ANGEL GROUPS 2M COMPANIES 2m.com

2010 Quickoffice to Google 2010 Quickoffice to Google

$2B $2B

$13.9B

2009 Id Software to Zenimax

2010 ITKO to CA Technologies 2010 ITKO to CA Technologies

2010 New Toy to Zynga 2010 New Toy to Zynga

ACQUIRED ACQUIRED

2013 MetroPCS to T-Mobile

$3.9B

2010 Woot.com to Amazon 2010 Woot.com to Amazon

$330M $330M

2001 Broadcast.com to Yahoo

2008 EDS to HP

$105M

$110M $110M

2002 Perot Systems to Dell

$560M $560M

2015 ZS Pharma to AstraZeneca 2015 ZS Pharma to AstraZeneca

2016 Mavenir Systems to Mitel 2016 Mavenir Systems to Mitel

INNOVATION SUPPORT GROUPS 10,000 Small Businesses BioDFW BizOwnersED BridgeAlliance CodeCollective Dallas Innovation Alliance Dallas Social Venture Partners DFW ATW (Alliance for Technology and Women) Entrepreneurs for North Texas EO Dallas/Fort Worth Hackerspace Tech SBDC Centers SCORE Tech Titans TEDxSMU and TEDxTCU TexChange Texas Research Alliance TiE Dallas United Way of Tarrant County Kernel WiNGS EVENTS 1 Million Cups BigDesign Conference CodeLaunch Creative Mornings Dallas New Tech

Dallas Startup Week Digital Dallas HackDFW House of Genius Ignite Dallas InnoTech Open Coffee Clubs Startup Dallas Podcast Startup Grind TechFW Impact Awards CODE CAMPS Dallas Coding Academy Dev Mountain General Assembly Per Scholas Tech Talent South The Iron Yard MEDIA Dallas Innovates Dallas Morning News Dallas-Fort Worth Tech Events Newsletter Dallas - Startup Digest DBJ Tech Flash Launch DFW Tech.Co Texas Squared Xconomy 2017


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International Companies INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES

Dallas–Fort Worth is home to an impressive group of foreign-based subsidiaries, hosting North American headquarters or major operations. International corporate investment in the region reflects the strength and diversity of the DFW economy and stellar access to U.S. and global markets by ground or air, especially through DFW International Airport. Industries represented here create their own synergies with other U.S.-based operations and headquarters in the region. For example, the global community has recognized DFW as an important U.S. center for telecommunications, locating North American headquarters that include Korea’s Samsung, China’s Huawei Technologies, France’s Alcatel-Lucent, Sweden’s Ericsson, Japan’s Toyota, and Lichtenstein’s Hilti. The region also hosts the headquarters of Switzerland-based contact lens manufacturer Novartis AG-owned Alcon and France’s Essilor of America, as well as the North American headquarters for motor vehicle manufacturers like Japan’s Toyota and Kubota, and China’s Hisun.

COMPANY HOME COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN DFW AUSTRALIA AUSTRIA BAHRAIN BELGIUM BERMUDA BRAZIL BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS CANADA CHINA COLOMBIA COSTA RICA CYPRUS CZECH REPUBLIC DENMARK FINLAND FRANCE GEORGIA GERMANY GREECE INDIA IRELAND ISRAEL ITALY JAPAN KUWAIT

106

LIECHTENSTEIN LUXEMBOURG MEXICO NETHERLANDS ANTILLES NEW ZEALAND NORWAY OMAN RUSSIA SAUDI ARABIA SCOTLAND SINGAPORE SLOVENIA SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH KOREA SPAIN SWEDEN SWITZERLAND TAIWAN THE NETHERLANDS TURKEY UNITED ARAB EMIRATES UNITED KINGDOM VENEZUELA

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

DFW INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES

MORE THAN 200 COMPANIES FROM 40 COUNTRIES HAVE THEIR U.S. HEADQUARTERS LOCATED, OR HAVE SUBSTANTIAL OPERATIONS, WITHIN THE REGION.

VARIOUS U.S. HEADQUARTERS AND INTERNATIONAL SUBSIDIARIES IN THE DFW REGION 7-Eleven - JAPAN Accenture - IRELAND Associated Air Center - UAE Atlas Copco Secoroc - SWEDEN BBVA Compass - SPAIN Blackberry - CANADA Bimbo Bakeries USA/EarthGrains - MEXICO Bombardier - CANADA Bottle Rocket - UNITED KINGDOM Canon USA - JAPAN Comparex USA - GERMANY DHL Global Forwarding - GERMANY Eltek Inc - ISRAEL Fujitsu America - JAPAN Gerdau Corp - BRAZIL GKN Aerostructures NA - UNITED KINGDOM Greyhound Lines - SCOTLAND H&K International Americas - IRELAND Hisun Motors North America - CHINA Hitachi Consulting Corp - JAPAN Infosys - INDIA Jones-Blair - DENMARK KONE - FINLAND KPMG - THE NETHERLANDS

LG Electronics USA - SOUTH KOREA L’Oreal USA - FRANCE Luxottica Retail - ITALY MillerCoors - CANADA Mission Foods - MEXICO NEC Corp of America - JAPAN Nestle Waters NA - SWITZERLAND NTT Data - JAPAN ORIX USA - JAPAN Publicis - FRANCE Rolex Watch USA - SWITZERLAND SAFRAN Electrical & Power - FRANCE Santander Consumer USA - SPAIN Siemens Industry - GERMANY Signet Jewelers - BERMUDA Smith & Nephew - UNITED KINGDOM SMS Infocomm - TAIWAN STMicroelectronics - SWITZERLAND Telvista - MEXICO The Dannon Co - FRANCE T-Mobile - GERMANY Transamerica - THE NETHERLANDS Trend Micro NA - JAPAN ZTE USA - CHINA

HONORARY CONSULS & CONSULS GENERAL SERVING DALLAS-FORT WORTH BELIZE CAMBODIA CANADA CHILE COTE D`IVOIRE DENMARK ECUADOR EL SALVADOR FINLAND

FRANCE GERMANY HONDURAS ICELAND JAPAN REPBULIC OF KOREA MALTA MEXICO

MONACO MOROCCO THE NETHERLANDS NORWAY PERU PHILIPPINES ROMANIA SIERRA LEONE

SLOVAK REPUBLIC SOUTH AFRICA SPAIN SRI LANKA SWEDEN SWITZERLAND TAIWAN THAILAND

TUNISIA UNITED KINGDOM URUGUAY

EB-5 INVESTMENT VISA PROGRAM

EB-5 OPPORTUNITIES IN NORTH TEXAS:

The EB-5 Investment Visa Program is the immigrant visa category for foreign entrepreneurs and investors. Through the EB-5 program, a foreign national can obtain lawful permanent resident (LPR) status in the United States for himself/herself, a spouse and unmarried children under age 21, in return for making a qualified investment in a U.S. enterprise.

Civitas Texas Regional Center/Civitas Rio Grande Regional Center/Civitas Laredo Regional Center/ Civitas - El Paso Regional Center/ civitascapital.com CDRC | City of Dallas Regional Center cdrc.us CP Regional Center/CP Southern Regional Center cphomes.us ETRC | Encore Texas RC, LLC encoreeb5.com

SOURCE: DRC Research; Office of the Governor; USCIS; World Affairs Council

Frisco Texas International Development Center friscotxeb5.com North Texas EB-5 Regional Center LLC ntxregionalcenter.com Renewable Texas Energy Regional Center texaseb5rc.com Texas EB-5 Regional Center/US Freedom Capital-Texas usfreedomcap.com

2017


35W

12 4 6 7

35E

75

1

13

190

9

11

5 8 635 820

183 12

30

10

30 360

3

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | INTERNATIONAL COMPANIES

121

nternational Companies

VARIOUS U.S. HEADQUARTERS AND INTERNATIONAL SUBSIDIARIES IN THE DFW REGION

COMPANY PARENT COUNTRY 175 2 67 35E

35W

1 NOKIA is a Finland-based company which designs, develops and builds communications networks. It supplies equipment, software and related services to telecom carriers and network service providers, as well as enterprise and government customers. 2 ALCON is a manufacturer of intraocular lenses, pharmaceutical products and care solutions and ophthalmic surgical instruments and equipment. Majorityowned by Swiss based Novartis AG. 3 AIRBUS HELICOPTERS is a division of Airbus Group, a global leader in aeronautics, space, and related services headquartered in France. It is the world’s leading helicopter manufacturer, providing civil and military solutions for customers who serve, protect, save lives and safely carry passengers in highly demanding environments. 4 ERICSSON INC. is the subsidiary of Sweden-based global wireless network equipment leader Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson. Its core network products are antennas, transmitters, and switching systems used to build wireless networks.

2017

5 ESSILOR OF AMERICA is a subsidiary of Paris-based Essilor International, which operates about 250 prescription laboratories that manufacture corrective lenses worldwide. The company makes and distributes optical lenses under the Airwear, Crizal, DEFINITY, Transitions and Varilux brand names, among others. 6 HILTI CORP. is a Liechtenstein-based company that develops, manufactures, and markets products for the construction, building maintenance, and mining industries, primarily to the professional end-user.

HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES is China’s largest manufacturer of telecommunications equipment. It makes a broad range of products, including core voice and data switching platforms for communications service providers. 7

8 INTERCERAMIC manufactures and distributes ceramic and natural stone floor and wall tile throughout North America. Established in Mexico in 1979, it expanded into Dallas and other Texas cities in 1988. It has eight manufacturing plants in the U.S. and Mexico.

United Kingdom 20 Canada

Switzerland

Japan

Other

France

45

Germany

9 KUBOTA CORP. is a tractor and heavy equipment manufacturer based in Osaka, Japan. One of its notable contributions was to the construction of the Solar Ark. The company was established in 1890. 10 THE TURNER CORP., a subsidiary of German construction group HOCHTIEF, is one of the world’s leading general building and construction management firms. 11 SAMSUNG TELECOMMUNICATIONS AMERICA researches, develops and markets wireless handsets and telecommunication products in North America. 12 TOYOTA NORTH AMERICA announced its North American headquarters move from California to Plano in 2014. Included at the headquarters operations will be Toyota Motor Sales, Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing and Toyota Financial Services.

GALDERMA USA is a subsidiary of its Swiss-based parent, the world leader in providing science-based skin health solutions to healthcare professionals and their patients at all ages and stages of life. 13

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

107


MAJOR EXPANSIONS AND RELOCATIONS Dallas–Fort Worth is regularly identified as one of the nation’s top markets for new and expanded corporate facilities. DFW attracts an impressive list of companies that spans diverse industries. Recent relocations to Dallas– Fort Worth have included headquarters moves for Fortune 500 and Forbes Top Private companies such as Golden Living, Fluor, Comerica and AT&T. Expansions include important new distribution, logistics, or manufacturing centers for companies such as Amazon; Bed, Bath and Beyond; BMW; Galderma; and the single largest U.S. expansion in the U.S. in in 2015, General Motors. Other continuing expansions include new offices for 7-Eleven, American Airlines, Liberty Mutual, State Farm, and Mr. Cooper (formerly Nationstar Mortgage) to name a few.

SAMPLE OF HEADQUARTER RELOCATIONS TO DALLAS-FORT WORTH, 2010-2016

WASHINGTON Allied BioScience Blucora

MINNESOTA MoneyGram Speed Commerce (Navarre)

NEBRASKA Heartland Automotive Services

NEVADA CoreSpace

COLORADO Cagney Global Logistics Harris Broadcast

OKLAHOMA Global Power Equipment Group Inc. Hilti LinkAmerica

CALIFORNIA

Acacia Research Group AccentCare ACTIVE Network Ameriflight LLC C&S Propeller Caliber Collision Centers Channell Commercial Corp. Ciao Telecom Cinépolis Consolidated Electrical Distributors Copart Daegis Inc. Farmers Brothers Coffee Fluor* Fonality Glenmount Global Solutions Ironclad Performance Wear Corp. Jacobs Engineering Group Jamba Inc.

108

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: DRC Research

AUSTIN Greenstream Seven Hills Commercial Kubota Tractor Corp. loanDepot Mimi’s Cafe Monkey Sports Inc. Motorsport Aftermarket Group and MAG Retail MV Transportation Omnitracs Pacific Union Financial Primoris Raytheon Space and AirborneSystems (SAS) Rixi Recovery Services Solera Holdings Titan Laboratories

Toyota North America Toyota Industries Commercial Finance Trend Micro United Scientific Group (USG) Vendor Resource Management W3global 2017


NEW YORK

Bar Louie Restaurant Group Ferris Manufacturing Neovia Logistics Services TopGolf

Greatbatch HMS Holdings Signature Systems Group Six Flags Entertainment

MICHIGAN

MASSACHUSETTS

Comerica*

NTT Data Inc. VCE

CONNECTICUT MISSOURI GKN Aerostructures*

NEW JERSEY

Accudyne Industries iCall Inc. Revere Capital LLC

Comparex CVE Technology Group

TENNESSEE ARKANSAS

Dynamic Energy Alliance

Golden Living

GEORGIA NYLO Hotels

ALABAMA Torchmark* Zoes Kitchen

HOUSTON Inx Inc. Magnum Hunter Resources U.S. Concrete

SAN ANTONIO AT&T* Christus Health

2017

FLORIDA CCS Medical Fiesta Restaurant Group NOTE: Companies with an * moved to Dallas-Fort Worth prior to 2010

OTHER NEW HQ ESTABLISHMENTS Blackberry North American HQ (Canada)* Commemorative Air Force (Midland, TX) GuestLogix U.S. HQ (Canada) Hisun Motors North American HQ (China) Howard Hughes Corporation NGC Renewables North American HQ (China) Nutribiotech (South Korea) Triathlon Battery Solutions (Germany) Taleris

The Dallas Regional Chamber works closely with many companies that consider and decide to locate major corporate facilities here, particularly headquarters. Our team knows these decisions are critical to the futures of the companies and the employees. We help companies understand this region fully: from our demographics, labor costs, our transportation assets, our real estate options, or the taxes and incentives that might apply to a project. Often we do it face to face. We visit companies and host executives here: including multi-day visits during which we often engage Dallas area business and civic leaders or subject matter experts with the candidate company team to achieve the peer-to-peer conversations that are so meaningful in selling Dallas. But we’re not just about the cold, hard facts and the sales pitch. We are also about taking good care of the companies and particularly the employees, that make the decision to move here. Corporate moves often impact hundreds, even thousands, of employees and families. Those employees have lots of questions and each family situation is different. For all major corporate relocations, the Chamber offers to meet with employees and families that suddenly have the opportunity to become new Texans. We have held several “town hall” meetings with company employees around the U.S., sharing information and our experiences of living in the Dallas area. Our goal is to help the employees understand why our region is a great place to live, raise a family and prosper. Eyes light up when we show pictures of homes and affordable prices; the arts and cultural amenities; our parks and trees and lakes; our foodie places; the outstanding medical care offered here; dog parks, light rail, and bike trails; and the many facts and anecdotes that help them realize that DFW is a more robust, culturally and socially diverse place than they thought. And those that already know our area well or might be from here just get more excited about the move. Helping employees after a move has been announced is a great benefit to the company and its employees. It’s a lot of fun and very meaningful for the Chamber’s economic development team and an important part of the Dallas Regional Chamber’s corporate recruitment platform. D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR EXPANSIONS AND RELOCATIONS

SUPPORTING CORPORATE MOVES

ILLINOIS

109


THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR EXPANSIONS AND RELOCATIONS

SAMPLE OF 2015 AND 2016 DALLAS-FORT WORTH RELOCATIONS AND EXPANSIONS 2016 ANNOUNCEMENTS 14 Jacobs Engineering Group Inc

1 Amazon announces second Coppell

relocates Global Headquaters to Dallas to employ 700

fulfillment center employing 1,200

2 Anutak Products opens 500K sq ft

15 Jamba Inc relocates HQ to Hall Office

fulfillment center in Sherman

Denton to create 80 new jobs

West with 6,000-employee campus

4 Bed Bath and Beyond opens

17 McKesson Corp to invest $157M and

5 Blucora, a fintech firm, to move

18 Misys invest in a 23K sq ft office

6 C&S Propeller moves to Fort Worth

19 OKI Data Americas relocates HQ to

7 Calcomp, Inc., formerly a California

20 Parex USA expands by 100K sq ft to

30 Southwest Airlines ready to take off with $143M Love Field operations center expansion

create nearly 1,000 jobs in Texas expansion

e-commerce center in Lewisville; will employ more than 600

28 Sabre Corp gets $5M state grant for 29 Sally Beauty Supply expands in

16 JPMorgan Chase heads to Legacy

tech’ Dallas campus; to add 1,300 workers

builds 50K sq ft space for HQ

HQ expansion, creating 500 new jobs

Park in Frisco, to employ 100 people

3 AT&T spends millions on an ‘urban-

27 Saatchi & Saatchi advertising giant

31 Stand Rock Hospitality Resort builds new facility in Grapevine, bringing 1,000 new jobs to the area

expansion in Plano

headquarters, and 50 jobs to Irving

32 Sunoco LP moving Corporate HQ

18K sq ft

and builds 18K sq ft facility

from Philly to Dallas, into a 121K sq ft facility

33 TierPoint LLC establishes a 16K sq ft

meet industrial demand

aviation firm, to open an 18K sq ft facility in Fort Worth

office that will host a data center

21 Pegasus Foods establishes new 80k

8 Clayton Home Building Group

34 Toyota Connected Inc. expands Focus

sq ft facility, employing 325 people

establishes a 168K sq ft facility, creating 240 new jobs

on Software- and Data-Driven Mobility with Toyota Connected, new facility will be 20K sq ft and will house over 100 new employees

22 PennyMac Financial Services builds new 75K sq ft facility in Plano

9 CrossFirstBank establishes new facility that will employ 60

23 Peterbilt expands Denton plant by

35 Triathlon Battery Solutions Inc., a

102K sq ft

10 F-Wave moves 40 employees to new 35K sq ft HQ in Burleson

German battery, firm locates 19K sq ft U.S. headquarters in Coppell

24 Pratt Industries expands footprint

into North Texas by building 380K sq ft facility in Rockwall

11 Galderma expands to 100K sq ft facility to increase employment by 342 jobs

12 Heart & Science, a new media agency, lands AT&T, opens shop in Dallas and plans to hire 100 people

25 Precision-Hayes International

Dallas

37 United Scientific Group, LLC. (USG)

expands by 20K sq ft in Seagoville

relocates corporate HQ to Plano

26 Revere Capital LLC, a Connecticut

38 Wesco Aircraft Holdings Inc.

firm, relocates HQ to Uptown

13 J.P. Hart Lumber Company plans

36 Ulta builds new 76K sq ft facility in

California-based aviation company expands to DFW, and will occupy a 309K sq ft space

$5.5M expansion into Sherman

2015 ANNOUNCEMENTS COMPANY

110

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

39

Advanced Rehabilitation & Healthcare of Athens

106

40

Amazon

500

41

American Aero FTW

42

American Airlines

43

AMN Healthcare

30 3,000 500

44

Andersen Corp.

45

45

AREVA-Med

10

46

Bassett Furniture

70

47

BT Group Services

250

48

Charles Schwab

49

Ciber Inc.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

300

COMPANY

50

Comparex USA Inc.

51

CoreLogic

52

CVE Technology Group

53

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

COMPANY

200

62

Hilti North America

500

63

Hi-sun Motors

1200

64

HVAC Manufacturing, Inc.

Encore Wire

125

65

JQ

54

Facebook

100

66

Kathrein Group

55

Farmer Brothers

307

67

Kimberly Clark

56

GDC Technics

100

57

General Motors

68

Kubota Tractor Corp. and Kubota Credit Corp.

58

Georgia Pacific

69

59

Gold Financial services

Liberty Mutual Insurance Co.

60

HCL Technologies

300

70

Medline

61

Hilti (R&D facility)

65

71

Motorsports Aftermarket Group (MAG)

40

250 80 25 100

SOURCE: DRC Research

25

400 4,000

150

2017


Sherman

THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY | MAJOR EXPANSIONS AND RELOCATIONS

2

13

15 60 77 89 23

37 69 16 62 34 49

29

87 63 53

44 80

33

55

52 38 56

18

54 48

83 28 84

7

73

21 32

44 88

27 65 81 51 12 26 9 50 3 14

46

11

24

30

42

41

45 66 78 59 90

22

68 4 31 135 86 43 19 7447 71 61 5 17

57 79 36 67 6

40 75 58

72 85

25

70 76

82

10

27 65 81 51 12 26 9 50 3 14

8

41

Athens

20

COMPANY

72

National Freight, Inc.

73

Nitesite

74

OneSource Virtual

75

Pioneer Frozen Foods

76

Portacool

77

Quality Industries Inc.

78

RagingWire

2017

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

COMPANY

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

80

79

Smith & Nephew

3

80

Soccer Hall of Fame

1425

81

Spirit Realty Capital, Inc.

25

82

Tables Manufacturing

83

TD Ameritrade

40

84

TearLab Corp

200

85

Texas Nameplate Company

342 75 180 1200

NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED

COMPANY

86

Toyota Industries Commercial Finance Inc.

150

87

UPS

346

88

VPET USA

89

WinCo

90

Yankon Lighting

30 165 5

30

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

111


ARE YOU READY TO MAKE A DEAL?

Where Opportunities Are

Without Limits

45,000 Primary Trade Area Population Retail Sites Available 2,000 Acre Gateway Mixed-Use Development

21 Miles East of Dallas Access to U.S. 80 and IH-20

800+ Acres Light Industrial Land Available Forney economic Development corporation inFo@ForneytexaseDc.org

112

www.ForneytexaseDc.org 972.564.5808 2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS

ADVANCED SERVICES MANUFACTURING FINANCIAL LOGISTICS HIGH TECH HEALTH CARE LIFE SCIENCES AVIATION AND AEROSPACE TELECOMMUNICATIONS DATA CENTERS HOSPITALITY

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

113


ADVANCED SERVICES Advanced services traditionally have meant headquarters, but also include financial, professional, and technical services ranging from management consulting firms to business insurers, accountants, and legal services. Complex technologies and transnational operations have pushed most of the growth in advanced service activities into highly specialized firms and enterprises. This region has an exceptionally large number of these operations and is likely to continue to attract additional companies.

MANAGEMENT, CONTROL AND SUPPORT FUNCTIONS OF CORPORATE ACTIVITIES

35W

820

20

35W

Number of Advanced ServicesBUSINESSES Businesses NUMBER OF ADVANCED SERVICES 11

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

114

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

FINANCIAL MANAGERS 13,988 | $62.64

60 60

MANAGEMENT ANALYSTS 17,036 | $41.01

760760

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYSTS AND MARKETING SPECIALISTS 13,396 | $33.56

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

BUSINESS OPERATIONS SPECIALISTS 21,007 | $36.78

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | ADVANCED SERVICES

75 35E

121

190

30

635

183 360 30

12

20 175

67

INDUSTRY

35E 45

36,930

DATA PROCESSING, HOSTING, AND RELATED SERVICES

351

14,448

10,895

208,712

8,030

77,990

PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL SERVICES

24,000

267,672

TOTAL

44,072

605,752

REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AND LEASING

2017

FINANCIAL ANALYSTS 8,083 | $37.93

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

796

FINANCE AND INSURANCE

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS 32,611 | $34.57

ESTABLISHMENTS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 16,315 | $42.55

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS 9,453 | $39.38

APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS 21,834 | $49.13

NETWORK AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS 10,601 | $39.95

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

115


MANUFACTURING The Dallas–Fort Worth region often is associated with major headquarters, logistics, distribution and supply chain operations. But did you know that the manufacturing industry makes up nearly 8 percent of the regional economy? DFW has more manufacturing activity than any other metro area in Texas. The size and scope of operations here create a diverse manufacturing landscape across many sectors. Goods that are built here range from boots and clothing to bricks, steel, plastics, SUVs, and aerospace components. Just a few of the large manufacturing operations in DFW include the General Motors Assembly Plant in Arlington, Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth, and Texas Instruments in Dallas.

A CORNERSTONE OF THE DFW ECONOMY DFW HAS MORE MANUFACTURING ACTIVITY THAN ANY OTHER METROPOLITAN AREA IN TEXAS

MAJOR MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Alcon Laboratories Airbus Helicopters 35W Bell Helicopter ESAB Dal-Tile Corp. 11 Dean Foods Dr Pepper Group Farmer Brothers Frito-Lay Fujitsu Network Communications GE Manufacturing Solutions General Motors Huawei Device USA Interceramic 820 L-3 Communications Aerospace Systems L-3 Communications/Com Cept Division L-3 Mustang Technology Group 21 Labinal Lennox International Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control 20 35 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Madix Mary Kay 1 Maxim Integrated Products 25 Miller Coors Motorsport Aftermarket Group Peterbilt Motors Poly-America Qorvo SHARE OF STATEWIDE MANUFACTURING Raytheon Space and EMPLOYMENT BY METRO Airborne Systems 35W 31 Raytheon Consolidated Manufacturing Center 32 Raytheon EO Innovations 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Safran Samsung Electronics America Smith & Nephew Solar Turbines Texas Instruments Triumph Aerostructures TXI

ALL OTHER TEXAS METROS

31.4%

SAN ANTONIO

5.5%

DALLAS

30.9%

HOUSTON

26.0%

AUSTIN

6.3%

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

116

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION MANAGERS 3,777 | $46.97

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS 6,495 | $43.99

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 6,174 | $44.33

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MECHANICS 6,782 | $23.41

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | MANUFACTURING

31

18

4

75

27 35E

121

13

190

23 19

24

26

15

17

29

10

34 32

30 37

16 14

39 183

3

635

9

360

8 12 28 2 33 20

30

6 30

12

22

5 7

20 175

36 67 35E 38 45

Number Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER OFof MANUFACTURING BUSINESSES 1

5 60

1

INDUSTRY MANUFACTURING

FIRST-LINE SUPERVISORS OF PRODUCTION AND OPERATING WORKERS 12,904 | $28.08 2017

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT ASSEMBLERS 6,380 | $12.60

TEAM ASSEMBLERS 26,977 | $12.60

ASSEMBLERS AND FABRICATORS, ALL OTHER 6,139 | $11.78

ESTABLISHMENTS 6,265

41

760

AVG. EMPLOYMENT 270,101

HELPERS — PRODUCTION WORKERS 9,600 | $10.38

PRODUCTION WORKERS, ALL OTHER 5,776 | $13.13

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

117


FINANCIAL The Dallas–Fort Worth region is a key U.S. financial center, hosting the corporate headquarters of the banking company Comerica Inc., as well as major operations and call centers for banks such as Bank of America and Fidelity Investments. Major centers for JPMorgan Chase & Co., Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo & Co. also are among the top employers in the region. And Capital One operates an Innovation Center that is helping to drive advances coming out of the fintech industry Financial firms are distributed throughout the region, but the biggest concentration is centered in downtown Dallas and its northern suburbs of Addison and Plano. Downtown Fort Worth also has a strong array of financial firms. Dallas also is home to the Federal Reserve Bank of the 11th District, one of 12 regional Reserve Banks in the U.S. As for the insurance industry, Dallas is home to most major providers, and a number of global and regional headquarters. Notably, both State Farm and Liberty Mutual are expanding their footprints in the area with the construction of two high-tech regional facilities.

THE DFW REGION IS A KEY U.S. FINANCIAL CENTER FINANCIAL COMPANIES IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH FINANCE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

INSURANCE

Alliance Data Systems Allianz Global Investors U.S. Amegy Bank Bank of America BNP Paribas Broadridge Financial Solutions Capital One Auto Finance Cash America International Charles Schwab Citibank Comerica Bank Deutsche Bank Fannie Mae Fidelity Investments Ford Motor Credit GM Financial Goldman Sachs Grant Thornton Heartland Payment Systems Invesco Real Estate Jefferies JP Morgan Private Bank Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA Merrill Lynch MoneyGram International Nationstar Mortgage Holdings PlainsCapital Bank Raymond James/Carter Financial Management Santander Consumer USA TD Ameritrade Toyota Industries Commercial Finance UBS

820

35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

AAA Texas ACE Westchester Texas Aegon USA AIG Allied World Assurance Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Texas Chartis Insurance Chubb Group of Insurance Companies CIGNA HealthCare of Texas Crum & Forster FM Global & Affiliated FM Geico Libery Mutual Insurance MetLife New York Life Insurance State Farm Insurance Swiss Re Texas Health Spring Torchmark Corp. Travelers UnitedHealthcare of Texas USAA Zurich Opitmal Blue Whitley Penn

36

20

32 33 Wells Fargo Bank

Number of Advanced ServicesBUSINESSES Businesses NUMBER OF FINANCIAL INDUSTRY 11

12 60

170760

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

118

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

FINANCIAL MANAGERS 14,616 | $69.71

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS 35,107 | $38.27

CREDIT ANALYSTS 2,822 | $41.68

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

FINANCIAL ANALYSTS 8,389 | $44.42

2017


35E

43 23

37

121

27 44 7 55 1 57

35W

14

6 34

9

183

15

42 30

56

26

40

31 10

13 47

36 54 49 19 39 45 46 53

190

50

51

35

58

183

820

38 4

635

48

360

60 8

30

33 16

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | FINANCIAL

75

52

30

3 22 21 25 17 32 5 21 20 12 24 2 29 28 18 11

12

UPTOWN / DOWNTOWN DALLAS 41

20

30

175

67

12

INDUSTRY

MONETARY AUTHORITIESCENTRAL BANK 35E CREDIT INTERMEDIATION AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

35W

SECURITIES, COMMODITY CONTRACTS, AND OTHER FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

ESTABLISHMENTS

45

INSURANCE CARRIERS AND RELATED ACTIVITIES FUNDS, TRUSTS, AND OTHER FINANCIAL VEHICLES TOTAL

PERSONAL FINANCIAL ADVISORS 8,372 | $55.29

2017

LOAN OFFICERS 12,662 | $37.31

FINANCIAL SPECIALISTS 3,615 | $33.94

INSURANCE SALES AGENTS 14,737 | $30.58

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

5

977

3,672

105,415

2,626

30,260

4,547

71,820

45

240

10,895

208,712

SECURITIES, COMMODITIES AND FINANCIAL SERVICES SALES AGENTS 10,775 | $46.92

INSURANCE CLAIMS AND POLICY PROCESSING CLERKS 8,175 | $18.17

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

119


LOGISTICS Dallas–Fort Worth’s central U.S. location provides an advantageous distribution hub, with quick access to rail, air, and over-the-ground truck transportation. The region is a global inland port with two airports capable of large-scale cargo operations, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and Fort Worth Alliance. Major rail logistics hub operations for the two primary western U.S. railroads, Fort Worth–based BNSF Railway Co. and Union Pacific Corp., tap into major east-west arteries and provide important links to Mexican markets. By truck, distributors can efficiently move products throughout the central part of the United States, reaching 93 percent of the population within 48 hours.

ALLIANCE GLOBAL LOGISTICS HUB The 9,600-acre Alliance Global Logistics Hub is the nation’s premier inland port, offering multi-modal transportation options, economic advantages and supply chain services. > Fort Worth Alliance Airport (AFW) – A 100% industrial airport anchored by FedEx

BNSF Intermodal Yard

> BNSF Railway’s Intermodal Facility > BNSF Railway and Union Pacific Class I rail lines

Fort Worth Alliance

> Interstate Highway 35W connects from Mexico to Canada > Foreign-Trade Zone No. 196 > U.S. Customs and Border Protection

INCENTIVES FOREIGN-TRADE ZONES (FTZs) provide duty-free or deferred payment of goods processed at plants engaged in international trade. The DFW area currently has four FTZs. Under a new approval, the six-county DFW area (Dallas, Tarrant, Collin, Denton, Grayson and Rockwall counties) has been preapproved by the federal government as eligible foreigntrade zone property. With the agreement of local officials, the federal government will provide any eligible business with a foreigntrade zone designation on an expedited and simplified basis. Company-specific FTZ’s sponsored by DFW Airport include: GM, Sanden, Fossil Partners, Zale, Turbomeca U.S.A., Dal-Tile, The Apparel Group, Matrix Network, Brighton Best International, Lasko and BMW. FREEPORT TAX EXEMPTIONS allow local governing bodies the option to exempt personal property consisting of goods, wares, merchandise or ores other than oil, natural gas and petroleum. Eligible property must be transported out of the state within 175 days of acquisition, but may be assembled, stored, manufactured, processed or fabricated locally. Triple Freeport zones are exempt from city, county and school district property taxes on inventory.

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

120

DFW: A GLOBAL INLAND PORT

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Fort Worth Meacham International

> Transload facilities immediately adjacent to intermodal yard planned > Container yard planned > Located within the 18,000-acre AllianceTexas development that includes office, retail, and residential development. Alliance Foreign-Trade Zone #196 consistently ranks as one of the top General Purpose Foreign-Trade Zones in the United States, in terms of the value of foreign goods admitted.

Centennial Yard

LEGEND PRE-DESIGNATED FOREIGN TRADE ZONE “MAGNET SITES”

Any company may locate on this land and simply activate with Customs.

COMPANY/SITESPECIFIC FOREIGN TRADE ZONES For companies wanting FTZ status but which cannot locate in an existing magnet site.

RAIL YARD / INTERMODAL FACILITY DISTRIBUTION CENTERS CUSTOM PORT OF ENTRY RAIL LINE

LABORERS AND FREIGHT, STOCK AND MATERIAL MOVERS 3,000 | $48.22

HEAVY AND TRACTORTRAILER TRUCK DRIVERS 17,648 | $14.18

STOCK CLERKS AND ORDER FILLERS 46,358 | $12.50

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed, JobsEQ

TEAM ASSEMBLERS 26,977 | $14.13

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | LOGISTICS

McKinney National Airport

Kansas City Southern Wylie Rail Yard

Addison Airport

D/FW International Airport

Kansas City Southern Garland Rail Yard

Dallas Love Field

Union Pacific Rail Yard Union Pacific Rail Yard -GM

Union Pacific Miller Intermodal Facility Union Pacific Dallas Intermodal Terminal

Lancaster Regional Airport

SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY INLAND PORT The southern Dallas County inland port region is recognized for its premier rail service and interstate highway connections supporting regional access to North American and international ports. > Unsurpassed access to Interstates 20, 35 and 45 > Large acreage sites for manufacturing and distribution > Heavy redundant electricity > Lancaster Airport (306 acres)

Railport

> 360-acre Union Pacific Intermodal Terminal (DIT) > Planned BNSF Intermodal facility > Foreign Trade Zone availability Union Pacific Rail Yard

> Inland Port of Pre-clearance > Triple Freeport availability > Located in Southern Dallas County, Prime Pointe is a 3,000-acre master-planned development for manufacturing and distribution.

SOURCE: 2015.3-QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees and Self-Employed

SHIPPING, RECEIVING AND TRAFFIC CLERKS 11,848 | $19.66

2017

LIGHT TRUCK OR DELIVERY SERVICES DRIVERS 53,318 | $20.48

PACKERS AND PACKAGERS, HAND 25,171 | $16.20

INDUSTRIAL TRUCK AND TRACTOR OPERATORS 14,247 | $14.18

INSPECTORS, TESTERS, SORTERS, SAMPLERS, AND WEIGHERS 70,387 | $12.60

TRANSPORTATION, STORAGE AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGERS 16,813 | $10.96

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

121


HIGH TECH Dallas led the nation into the new era of information and communication technologies in 1958 with Nobel Laureate Jack Kilby’s invention of the microchip at Texas Instruments. These are the very technologies that enable many of the core activities and processes in the global economy. The technology industry in the DFW region encompasses four general categories: manufacturing, information services, professional technical services, and bio-life sciences. The region’s activity in key emerging technologies such as nanotech, wireless and broadband telecommunications and medical, bio and life sciences is gaining increasing recognition.

DFW HAS THE 7 TH LARGEST CONCENTRATION OF HIGH-TECH JOBS IN THE U.S. 2016 HIGH-TECH EMPLOYMENT

NEW YORK-NEWARK-JERSEY CITY, NY-NJ-PA LOS ANGELES-LONG BEACHANAHEIM, CA WASHINGTON-ARLINGTONALEXANDRIA, DC-VA-MD-WV CHICAGO-NAPERVILLEELGIN, IL-IN-WI BOSTON-CAMBRIDGENEWTON, MA-NH SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLANDHAYWARD, CA DALLAS-FORT WORTHARLINGTON, TX HOUSTON-THE WOODLANDSSUGAR LAND, TX SAN JOSE-SUNNYVALESANTA CLARA, CA SEATTLE-TACOMABELLEVUE, WA

471,241 319,014 305,289 240,062 221,322 217,825 208,293 179,125 177,330 173,746

DFW HOSTS ONE-THIRD OF ALL HIGH-TECH JOBS IN TEXAS DFW

31.0%

HOUSTON

26.7%

AUSTIN

12%

SAN ANTONIO

6.9%

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

122

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

THE INFORMATION AGE WAS BORN IN DFW TOP SEMICONDUCTOR & SEMICONDUCTOR MACHINERY MANUFACTURERS WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW Creation Technologies (Plano) Maxim Integrated Products (Dallas) Texas Instruments (Dallas, Plano, Richardson) Qorvo (Richardson) TOP FABLESS SEMICONDUCTOR COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW Diodes Inc. (Plano) Micron Technology (Allen) Qorvo (Richardson) STMicroelectronics (Coppell) TOP TELECOM COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW Alcatel-Lucent (Plano) AT&T (Dallas) BlackBerry (Irving) BT Global Services (Dallas) Cisco Systems (Richardson) Ericsson (Plano) Frontier Communications (Richardson) Fujitsu Network Communications (Richardson) GENBAND (Frisco, Plano) Goodman Networks (Plano) Huawei Technologies (Plano) MetroPCS (Richardson) NEC Corp. (Irving) Nokia (Dallas, Irving) Nokia Solutions and Networks (Irving) Raytheon (McKinney, Dallas, Plano) Rockwell Collins (Richardson) Samsung Telecommunications (Richardson, Coppell) Verizon Communications (Irving, Richardson) ZTE (Richardson) TOP ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENT COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW BAE Systems (Fort Worth) DRS Technologies (Dallas) Elbit Systems (Fort Worth) Emerson Process Management (McKinney) Garrett Electronics (Garland) Honeywell (Richardson) Schneider Electric (Plano) Megger Group (Dallas)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 16,964 | $45.43

SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS, SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 13,208 | $49.52

TOP COMPUTER SYSTEMS & SOFTWARE COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW Accenture (Irving ) Capgemini (Dallas) Cognizant (Irving) Computer Sciences Corp (Irving) HP Enterprise Services (Plano) IBM (Dallas) Infosys (Plano) L-3 Communications (Rockwall) Microsoft (Irving) NTT Data (Plano) Oracle (Dallas) Raytheon (Garland, McKinney) RealPage (Richardson) SAP AG (Irving) Siemens PLM Software (Plano) TEKsystems (Irving) Trend Micro NA (Irving) Xerox (Dallas) TOP CLOUD SERVICES & DATA CENTER COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW ADP (Dallas) Amazon.com (Dallas/Fort Worth) AT&T (Dallas) Atos (Dallas) Cisco Systems (Allen, Richardson) Comparex USA (Dallas) CyrusOne (Carrollton) Equinix (Dallas) Facebook (Fort Worth) Fujitsu Ltd. (Richardson) HP Enterprise Services (Plano) IBM (Dallas) Level 3 Communications (Dallas) Rackspace Hosting (Dallas) Raging Wire (Garland) SAVVIS (CenturyLink) (Dallas) SoftLayer (Dallas) T5 Data Centers (Plano) Verio (NTT Communications) (Dallas) Verizon Terremark (Irving) ViaWest (Plano) XO Communications (Dallas) TOP ONLINE SERVICES COMPANIES WITH OPERATIONS IN DFW Amazon.com (Coppell, Dallas, Haslet) Expedia (Hotels.com) (Dallas) Facebook (Fort Worth) IAC/InteractiveCorp (Match.com, Chemistry.com) (Dallas) SuperMedia/DEX One (Superpages.com) (Irving) Sabre Holdings (Travelocity) (Southlake)

COMPUTER NETWORK ARCHITECTS 4,614 | $51.11

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

COMPUTER NETWORK SUPPORT SPECIALISTS 5,606 | $36.59

2017


1

17

1

88

60

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | HIGH TECH

Number of TECH Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER OF HIGH INDUSTRY BUSINESSES

75 35E

760

121

35W

190

820

30

635

183 360 30

12

20

20 175

67

HIGH-TECH MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

SEMICONDUCTOR MACHINERY MANUFACTURING

BIO SCIENCES35E& MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY ESTABLISHMENTS 35W

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

INDUSTRY

6

192

BASIC CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING

10

263

COMPUTER AND ELECTRONIC PRODUCT MANUFACTURING

433

AEROSPACE PRODUCT AND PARTS MANUFACTURING SUB-TOTAL

OPTICAL INSTRUMENT AND LENS MANUFACTURING

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

68

2,165

PHARMACEUTICAL AND MEDICINE MANUFACTURING

54

2,086

40,545

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES MANUFACTURING

217

5,222

103

32,650

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

298

5,464

552

73,650

SUB-TOTAL

637

14,938

INFORMATION SERVICES INDUSTRY

ESTABLISHMENTS 45

PROFESSIONAL-TECHNICAL SERVICES ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

INDUSTRY

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

SOFTWARE PUBLISHERS

281

8,174

ENGINEERING SERVICES

1,351

22,219

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

796

36,544

TESTING LABORATORIES

169

2,525

13,867

COMPUTER TRAINING

49

261

COMPUTER SYSTEMS DESIGN AND RELATED SERVICES

5,966

63,359

SUB-TOTAL

7,535

88,364

10,332

236,976

DATA PROCESSING, HOSTING, AND RELATED SERVICES

351

INTERNET PUBLISHING AND BROADCASTING AND WEB SEARCH PORTALS

180

1,438

1,608

60,024

SUB-TOTAL

AEROSPACE ENGINEERS 2,724 | $52.16

2017

COMPUTER HARDWARE ENGINEERS 2,496 | $51.73

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 4,712 | $46.78

TOTAL FOR ALL SECTORS

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 6,174 | $48.17

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS 1,907 | $34.28

SEMICONDUCTOR PROCESSORS 1,231 | $17.55

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

123


HEALTH CARE XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXX

Health industry companies are located throughout the Dallas–Fort Worth region, making it easy for themtem to tap into a broad BUga. Icilign imagnihic andebit base of skilled employees. health-care entempore dest dist erum,The conet ut fugit industry in DFW genihit is moreaturias than healthevel ipis volendi atatem hit care it also is qui manufacturing, auditservices; re iniscil laudam, te molum eum research and goodsexcepel distribution. The quo ommoluptiunt mint quam, activities cluster other, volum eumoften quatem ute around sandigeeach ntorro creating a synergy within thefuga. health-care idicides desequassit, sequat community.

HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS IN DFW 7 NOT-FOR-PROFIT SYSTEMS > Baylor Scott and White Health > Texas Health Resources > Methodist Health System > Parkland Health & Hospital System > JPS Health Network > UT Southwestern Hospital System > Children’s Medical Center 2 NATIONAL FOR-PROFIT SYSTEMS > HCA North Texas > Tenet Healthcare Corp.

82 ACUTE CARE HOSPITALS AND NUMEROUS OTHER MAJOR MEDICAL CENTERS

22 30

NEARLY 20,000 BEDS SERVING THE DFW REGION

SERVICES

ESTABLISHMENTS

HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE

AVG. EMPLOYMENT 35W

18,472

HOME HEALTH EQUIPMENT RENTAL PHARMACIES AND DRUG STORES

3

350,335

35

534

1,199

12,076

OTHER HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE STORES

234

1,438

OPTICAL GOODS STORES

389

2,667

81

1,338

20,410

368,388

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN BIOTECHNOLOGY SUB-TOTAL

GOVERNMENT

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMS

35

17,000

SUB-TOTAL

35

17,000

INSURANCE

ESTABLISHMENTS

28 PHYSICIAN-OWNED AND INDEPENDENT HOSPITALS

DIRECT HEALTH AND MEDICAL INSURANCE CARRIERS

54

1 MAJOR VETERANS HOSPITAL

SUB-TOTAL

54

18

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

8,892 8,892

23

820

4 NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS IN DFW > Tenet Healthcare Corp. > Legacy Hospitals > Cirrus Health > CHRISTUS Health System

14 12 17 4 7 8

20

15 27 35W

26

NumberOF of LIFE Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER SCIENCES BUSINESSES 11

4 60

14760

LEGEND: OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

124

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES MANAGERS 5,768 | $43.63

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS 1,712 | $50.34

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS 2,925 | $44.75

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

REGISTERED NURSES 56,145 | $34.82

2017


MAJOR HOSPITALS 1 2 3 4 5

21

35E 121

75

16 13

24

190

29

24 25 26 27

25

5 3

75

19

635

28

112 6

360

28 29 30 31

SOURCE: Texas Department of State Health Services

30

1 9

30

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Baylor University Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1079 Parkland Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas. . . . . . . . . . . . 888 Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth . . . 726 Medical City Dallas (includes Medical City Children’s Hospital). . . . . . . . . . . . 668 Children’s Medical Center of Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 591 Baylor All Saints Medical Center at Fort Worth. . . . . . . . 574 John Peter Smith Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 Methodist Dallas Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Dallas VA Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488 UT Southwestern Medical Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459 Cook Children’s Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 Medical Center of Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Medical Center of Arlington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Plaza Medical Center of Fort Worth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine . . . . . . . . . .314 Baylor Medical Center at Irving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Methodist Charlton Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Medical Center of McKinney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Denton . . . . . . . . . . 255 Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Hurst-Euless-Bedford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Baylor Medical Center at Carrollton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Baylor Medical Center at Garland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Texas Health Huguley Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Southwest Fort Worth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Doctors Hospital at White Rock Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Methodist Richardson Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Denton Regional Medical Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Dallas Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202

31

MANUFACTURING

ESTABLISHMENTS

PHARMACEUTICAL AND MEDICINE MFG.

12

175 LABORATORY INSTRUMENT MFG. ANALYTICAL

10 67

20

35E

20

45

IRRADIATION APPARATUS MFG.

4,590

4

621

5

33 6,262

SUB-TOTAL

297

11,506

20

WHOLESALE TRADE

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

437

5,356

39

1,439

DRUGS AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES MERCHANT WHOLESALERS

314

7,534

SUB-TOTAL

790

14,329

TOTAL FOR ALL SECTORS

2017

54

234

OPHTHALMIC GOODS MERCHANT WHOLESALERS

DENTAL HYGIENISTS 4,378 | $36.99

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES MFG.

MEDICAL, DENTAL AND HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES MERCHANT WHOLESALERS

MEDICAL AND CLINICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGISTS 3,750 | $28.94

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | HEALTH CARE

(with more than 200 beds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . NUMBER OF BEDS

SURGICAL TECHNOLOGISTS 2,823 | $22.01

LICENSED PRACTICAL AND LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSES 17,233 | $23.82

21,586

MEDICAL RECORDS AND HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNICIANS 4,182 | $18.34

420,115

NURSING ASSISTANTS 22,808 | $11.81

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

125


LIFE SCIENCES More than 1,000 firms employing more than 26,000 people make up the life sciences industry in the Dallas–Fort Worth region. DFW’s life sciences industry is dominated by pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturers, such as Alcon Inc. and Essilor of America Inc. Medical equipment and supplies, and scientific research and development innovation are hallmarks of DFW’s life sciences industry. UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas is among the nation’s best in biology and biochemistry research, boasting countless clinical breakthroughs and innovations.

CORE STRENGTHS BRAIN RESEARCH, NEUROLOGY & NEUROSURGERY > 7 Institutes and Centers are focused on brain research in DFW. > Baylor Scott & White and UT Southwestern ranked 38th and 42nd, repectively, in neurology and neurosurgery (2016 U.S. News & World Report). CANCER RESEARCH > Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded $352M to DFW institutions since 2009 to spur cancer research innovation and commercialization and to increase access to prevention programs and services. > UT Southwestern Medical Center is leading a Texas consortium of researchers to establish the country’s first National Center for Heavy Ion Radiation Therapy by 2021 that could provide clinical care and research using heavy particles for innovative new cancer treatments. > The Texas Center for Proton Therapy opened in Irving in 2016 joining only 23 existing or planned centers across the U.S. > Mary Crowley Cancer Research Center located at Medical City Dallas Hospital is one of the world’s largest gene therapy investigative facilities. > UT Southwestern’s Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center earned a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation, bestowed upon toptier cancer centers nationwide. > Baylor University Medical Center’s T. Boone Pickens Cancer Hospital is the first dedicated cancer hospital in North Texas and the second in the state. CHILDREN’S CARE > Texas Scottish Rite Hospital Spinal System manufactured and marketed by Medtronic is the most widely used implant system in the world for spinal deformity. > Children’s Medical Center Dallas is one of only 14 national pediatric research centers sanctioned by the National Institutes of Health. > Children’s Medical Center Dallas-Texas Scottish Rite Hospital 20 ranked 6th in the country for Pediatric Orthopedics and 7th for Gastroenterology & GI Surgery (2016 U.S. News and World Report). DENTAL RESEARCH > Texas A&M’s Baylor College of Dentistry (TAMBCD) is a nationally recognized center for oral health sciences education, research, specialized patient care, and continuing dental education. WELLNESS > The Cooper Institute and Clinic Longitudinal Study is one of the most highly referenced databases on physical fitness and health in the world. UT SOUTHWESTERN > UT Southwestern Medical Center ranks among the top academic medical centers in the world, training nearly 4,600 students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows each year. > UT Southwestern claims five Nobel Prize recipients; 20 members of the National Academy of Sciences; and has received over $1 billion in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding since 2007. REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS > Major participants/competitors in the sector collaborate in many ways including the DFW Hospital Council, Health Industry Council, Dallas Medical Resources, and Teaching Hospital Forum. > The North Texas Accountable Healthcare Partnership (NTAHP), designated as the regional health information exchange (HIE) entity is located in Arlington.

126

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SAMPLE OF THE LIFE SCIENCES COMPANIES IN DFW Abbott Laboratories Abeona Therapeutics Alcon AmerisourceBergen Drug Corp. AREVA Med Argon Medical Devices Atrion Corporation Flex Medical Disposables Benchmark Research Biomat USA Bio-Synthesis Inc. Bledsoe Brace Systems Boval BioSolutions Brady Precision Converting LLC Cardinal Health 200 Inc. Caris Diagnostics Inc. Ceutical Labs Covance Dallas Pathology Associates Inc. DFB Pharmaceuticals Essilor of America Flextronics Food Safety Net Services Galderma Laboratories LP GlaxoSmithKline Gradalis Greatbatch Hanger Inc. Healthpoint Ltd. Humanetics II Ltd. MacuClear Mary Crowley Cancer Research Med Fusion LLC Medtronic Mitas Rex Mentor Texas LP

Metroplex Clinical Research Center Middlebrook Pharmaceuticals Inc. Miraca Life Systems MRI Medical Inc. Natural Like Dental Inc. NCH Corporation-Chemsearch Division Nurse Assist Inc. Omni Hearing Systems OraMetrix Inc. Orthofix 35W OsteoMed Oxysure Systems Inc. Pathologists Bio Medical Lab Plexon Inc Prestige Ameritech Ltd. Professional Clinical Laboratory Inc. Progressive Laboratories Quest Diagnostics Inc. Quest Medical Inc. RBC Life Sciences Inc. Reata Pharmaceuticals Reliance Mobile Diagnostic Services Retractable Technologies Inc. Royal Baths Manufacturing Co. Inc. Smith & Nephew St. Jude Medical Stryker Imaging Corp. Telecris Plasma Resources Texas Oncology Texas Pharmaceutical Research LP Texel Industries TissueGen United Surgical Partners 820

20

35W

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS 335 | $42.12

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 635 | $55.34

MEDICAL SCIENTISTS, EXCEPT EPIDEMIOLOGISTS 1,494 | $29.42

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

CHEMISTS 1,364 | $38.13

2017


THE DFW REGION IS ON THE CUTTING EDGE OF DEFINING NEW RESEARCH TRENDS AND OPPORTUNITIES IN LIFE SCIENCES. > CPRIT’s goal is to expedite innovation and commercialization in the area of cancer research and to enhance access to evidence-based prevention programs and services throughout Texas.

35E 121

> CPRIT accepts applications and awards grants for a wide variety of cancer-related research and for the delivery of cancer prevention programs and services by public and private entities located in Texas.

75

> CPRIT collaborates with a variety of entities, including public and private institutions of higher education, academic health institutions, universities, governmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations and public and private companies.

190

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | LIFE SCIENCES

MAKING MORE OF LIFE

635 183

75

360 30

30 INDUSTRY

12

45 67

35E

NumberOF of LIFE Advanced Services Businesses NUMBER SCIENCES BUSINESSES 11

4 60

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

BASIC CHEMICAL 175 MANUFACTURING

68

2,165

PHARMACEUTICAL AND MEDICINE MANUFACTURING

54

2,086

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES MANUFACTURING

217

5,222

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

298

5,464

MEDICAL LABORATORIES

239

4,807

20

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING CENTERS TOTAL

221

3,045

1,097

22,789

14760

LEGEND: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTISTS AND SPECIALISTS, INCLUDING HEALTH 1,744 | $44.23 2017

PHARMACISTS 5,881 | $57.64

DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHERS 1,338 | $36.15

PHARMACY TECHNICIANS 7,509 | $15.87

OPHTHALMIC LABORATORY TECHNICIANS 689 | $15.10

OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

127


DFW’S ECONOMIC ENGINE

AVIATION AND AEROSPACE The Dallas–Fort Worth area is among the nation’s top regions for aviation and aerospace activity. The region is headquarters to two mainline airlines, American Airlines Inc. and Southwest 35E Airlines Co., and regional jet operator (and 35W American Airlines partner) Envoy Air, which flies as American Eagle. Southwest also operates a major maintenance base here, creating a strong foundation of aviation employment. Aerospace is a key source of economic strength for the region, comprising more than 900 companies and accounting 820 for one of every six jobs in North Texas. Lockheed Martin Corp., whose F-16 and F-35 Joint Strike Fighters are30 360 the region’s flagship products, and 35W Bell Helicopter Textron are the largest 20 aerospace employers, with more than 15,000 employees between them. Airbus Helicopters is headquartered in Grand Prairie.

35E 35W

121

190

75 30

183 12 635

175

20 67 45

820

35E

30

AVIATION-AEROSPACE EMPLOYMENT CLUSTERS

360

20

35E 35W

121

35W

190

75 30

183

820

12 635

30 360

20 35W

175

20 67

Number of Advanced ServicesEMPLOYEES Businesses NUMBER OF AVIATION - AEROSPACE

45 35E

50 1

750 60

9700760

AEROSPACE ENGINEERS 2,657 | $52.16

128

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 4,647 | $46.78

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS, EXCEPT COMPUTER 4,319 | $49.62

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 6,079 | $48.17

2017


AVIATION-AEROSPACE EMPLOYMENT SECTORS ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

18

3,820

SEARCH, DETECTION, AND NAVIGATION AEROSPACE PRODUCT AND PARTS MANUFACTURING

103

32,650

121

AIR TRANSPORTATION

129

SUPPORT ACTIVITIES FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION SATELLITE TELECOMMUNICATIONS FLIGHT TRAINING

34,445

LINE OF BUSINESS

A.E. Petsche

Aerospace electrical equipment

United Rotorcraft

Air transportation, nonscheduled

Airbus Helicopters

Helicopter parts

Orbital ATK

Missile electronics, space propulsion units

American Airlines Inc.

Air transportation

Applied Aerodynamics

Maintenance & repair services

Associated Air Center

Aircraft servicing and repairing

256

14,116

Aviall

Parts distribution and maintenance

13

135

BAE Systems Controls

Aircraft parts and equipment

1,726

Bell Helicopter Textron

Helicopters, Aircraft parts and equipment

Boeing Co.

Commerical and military aircraft

Bombardier Aerospace

Aviation services

CAE

Vocational school

Cessna Aircraft Co.

Aircraft

Chromalloy Component Services

Aircraft parts and equipment

Cooperative Industries Aerospace

Aircraft engines and engine parts

Dallas Airmotive

Aircraft engine repair

EFW

Aircraft and helicopter repair

Envoy Air

Air passenger carrier, scheduled

Federal Aviation Administration

Regulation, administration of transportation

Federal Express

Air cargo services

GDC Technics

Renovation of aircraft interiors

General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems

Aircraft and military components

Gulfstream Aerospace

Corporate jets and modification

Honeywell International

Aircraft parts and equipment

L-3 Communications Aerospace Systems

Aircraft parts and equipment

Labinal

Aircraft parts and equipment, nec

Lockheed Martin Missles & Fire Control

Aircraft, missles, military programs

Lockton Dunning Benefits

Aviation consulting services

Mayday Manufacturing

Aircraft parts and equipment

Million175 Air Dallas

Charter & nonscheduled services

Northrop Grumman Systems

Airplanes, fixed or rotary wing

Pratt & Whitney

Aircraft parts and equipment

Ranger Aerospace

Aviation services

Raytheon

Aircraft parts and equipment

Regent Aerospace

Maintenance & repair services

Reliant Worldwide Plastics

Plastic components for aerospace

Rockwell Collins

Communications and aviation electronics

Sikorsky Aircraft

Aircraft

Southwest Airlines

Air transportation

Texas Air Composites

Maintenance & repair services

Triumph Aerostructures

Aircraft parts and equipment

Turbomeca USA

Repair services

Weatherford Aerospace Inc.

Aircraft parts and equipment

38 190

TOTAL

COMPANY

557

86,893

75

30

183

12

635

20

67

45

35E

Number of Advanced ServicesBUSINESSES Businesses NUMBER OF AVIATION - AEROSPACE 11

4 60

INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | AVIATION AND AEROSPACE

INDUSTRY

MAJOR AEROSPACE COMPANIES

14760

LEGEND: AEROSPACE ENGINEERING AND OPERATIONS TECHNICIANS 455 | $28.65 2017

AIRCRAFT MECHANICS AND SERVICE TECHNICIANS 6,988 | $29.33

AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE, SURFACES, RIGGING, AND SYSTEMS ASSEMBLERS 2,666 | $22.16

ELECTRICAL, ELECTRONICS, AND ELECTROMECHANICAL ASSEMBLERS 6,090 | $13.17

MACHINISTS 7,464 | $18.32

OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

129


TELECOMMUNICATIONS

THE DFW AREA IS A CRUCIAL U.S. CENTER FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS FIRMS

PHOTO: CITY OF RICHARDSON

Dallas–Fort Worth is a crucial U.S. center for telecommunications firms. The bulk of them are located along the “Telecom Corridor” that stretches north of downtown Dallas through its suburbs of Richardson and Plano. The industry’s biggest names call the DFW region home, among them the global headquarters for the Fortune 100 ranked AT&T Inc., and the North American headquarters for Ericsson Inc., Alcatel-Lucent and Samsung Telecommunications America. New York– based Verizon Communications maintains a major business unit here employing some 8,000 workers in the area.

CROSSROADS OF COMMUNICATIONS

THE TELECOM CORRIDOR Located 15 miles north of downtown Dallas, the Telecom Corridor encompasses approximately 30 square miles and includes the city of Richardson along with the Texas Instruments campus and the west side of Waterview Parkway near the University of Texas at Dallas campus. The Telecom Corridor area is one of the most significant and unique high-tech business concentrations in the United States. Various telecommunications industries are represented in the area, including:

20

> Carriers/service providers > Telecom equipment manufacturers > Consulting firms > Wireless communications companies > Photonics/optics networking firms Companies located here include AT&T, Fujitsu, Cisco Systems, Verizon, Samsung Mobile and MetroPCS.

OMPUTER AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGERS

9,728 | $71.97

130

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

16,964 | $45.43

SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS, SYSTEMS SOFTWARE

13,208 | $49.52

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

NETWORK AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS

10,805 | $41.30

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | TELECOMMUNICATIONS

75 35E

121

35W

190

183

820

30

635

360 30

12

20 175

67 INDUSTRY

COMMUNICATIONS 35E EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

78

7,445

45 177

19,515

35W

SEMICONDUCTOR AND OTHER ELECTRONIC COMPONENT MANUFACTURING TELECOMMUNICATIONS

796

36,930

Number of Advanced ServicesBUSINESSES Businesses NUMBER OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS

DATA PROCESSING, HOSTING, AND RELATED SERVICES

351

14,448

1,402

78,338

TOTAL

11

4 60

39760

LEGEND: COMPUTER NETWORK ARCHITECTS

4,614 | $51.11

COMPUTER HARDWARE ENGINEERS

2,496 | $51.73

RADIO, CELLULAR, AND TOWER EQUIPMENT INSTALLERS AND REPAIRS

502 | $22.07

2017

TELECOMMUNICATIONS LINE INSTALLERS AND REPAIRERS

4,325 | $25.05

SEMICONDUCTOR PROCESSORS

1,231 | $17.55

OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

131


CONNECTING TO THE WORLD

DATA CENTERS Dallas–Fort Worth is located in a near-perfect geographic region for IT hosting and data center operation from the Central Time Zone: the workday is extended for companies operating on both coasts. DFW’s temperate climate and low risk of natural disaster help minimize construction and operation costs. It’s no coincidence that Dallas–Fort Worth is considered a major Internet “peering point.” Both speed and reliability are important for any IT operation, and high-speed fiber connectivity is plentiful in the area. Compared to other peering-point cities, DFW has some of the lowest power rates for large industrial users.

DFW IS A TOP 5 U.S. MARKET FOR DATA CENTERS. MAJOR U.S. INTERNET PEERING POINTS

SEATTLE

NEW YORK CITY CHICAGO WASHINGTON, D.C.

SAN FRANCISCO

LOS ANGELES

ATLANTA DALLAS / FORT WORTH

LOCATION North Texas’ central location in the U.S. is a significant attraction for data centers that service major companies and headquarters across financial services, energy, health care, and other sectors.

HOME TO 39 FORTUNE 1000 COMPANIES

LOW POWER COSTS

AVAILABILITY OF NETWORK PROVIDERS

Dallas-Fort Worth has some of the lowest energy costs per kWh compared to other metros in the U.S.

TYPICAL LARGE INDUSTRIAL POWER RATES

One of the highest accumulated network provider hubs in the world – 3 major carrier hotels (400 S. Akard, 2323 Bryan, 1950 Stemmons)

MAP: ERCOT

TEXAS ELECTRIC POWER GRID - ERCOT The Texas electric power grid, ERCOT, gives data center operators a competitive advantage due to its independence from electric grids in other states. This autonomy reduces the risk of rolling power outages, improves reliability and reduces volatility in prices.

132

MIAMI

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

CITY

2015 POWER RATE (Cents per kWh)

Boston Los Angeles New York City San Francisco & Silicon Valley Austin & San Antonio Denver & Colorado Springs Houston Chicago Phoenix Seattle Dallas District of Columbia Atlanta

$.200 $.145 $.134 $.120 $.074 $.071 $.065 $.063 $.062 $.060 $.054 $.052 $.048

The numerous network providers operating in North Texas ensure redundancy and the concentration of fiber access and total bandwidth guarantees low latency.

MAJOR CARRIERS LOCATED IN DFW Alpheus Communications AT&T CenturyLink Cogent Communications GTT FPL Fibernet InnerCity Fibernet Level 3 Communications Spectrum Sprint Triton Networks Verizon XO Communications Zayo

LOW OCCURRENCE OF NATURAL DISASTERS The probability of a natural disaster in the North Texas region reduces operational risk considerably. The region is geographically dormant and the likelihood of business disruption resulting from inclement weather remains low.

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGERS 9,728 | $71.97

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS 16,964 | $45.43

INFORMATION SECURITY ANALYSTS 2,581 | $42.60

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed, JobsEQ

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS 9,962 | $42.16

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | DATA CENTERS

Data Centers Data Centers Clusters

FOR MAP: Dallas-Fort Worth is home to data centers of all types and sizes that specialize in various activities from internet hosting for multiple clients to large IT services for one company. The list below includes a sample of both colocation and enterprise data centers in the region.

121

35W 35E 190 75

635 183

1600 Plano Parkway Ltd 2020 Live Oak AIG Aligned Data Center Allied Marketing Group, Inc Ally Financial Alpha Data Center Alpheus Fort Worth Ameritrade Asset Acquisition I LP Associated Solutions Inc AT&T Inc. Atos Aurum Technology Inc. Bank of America Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas Broadridge Financial Solution C I Host Dallas Carrier-1 Cassiopeia Internet Dallas (Constellate) CEB CenturyLink Cisco Systems Inc. Citigroup Club Billing Services Inc. Cogent Cologix ColoGuys ColoMart Comcast Corp. Companion Data Services, LLC Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC)

12

30

30 360

820

175

20

CoreSpace Inc. 35W CoreXchange Countrywide Crescent Processing Co. LP Crestside Facilities Corp. Cuban Cyberverse CyrusOne Dallas Data Center Data Specialists Inc. DataBank Dataflow Services DCI Technology Holdings LLC Dedico Delm2 Inc. Digital Realty Trust Duggan Realty Advisors EarthLink - Dallas Data Center Enterhost Equinix Espenel Inc. Facebook First Data Corp. Fiserv Inc.

Global IP Networks GNAX H5 Colo Health Care Services (BCBS) Horizon Data Center Solutions, LLC Dallas I HP Enterprise Services LLC IBM Ignite Technologies Inc. Infomart Data Centers Input of Texas Inc. Internap International Capital JP Morgan Kaneb Information Services Inc. LBJ Data Center Level 3 Limestone Networks Lincoln Rackhouse M&A Technology MBNA Technology Inc. MMC Group LP Nationwide Internet NaviSite Dallas

45

ND ITG (Clearview) Negma Business Solutions Inc. NeoSpire Inc. NTT Data Opus-3 Pilgrim’s Pride Quality Technology Services Rackspace Raging Wire Rapid Reporting Verification Co. LP Regulus Group LLC (Transcentra) Ricoh USA Savvis Communications Secure One Data Solutions LLC Serverphase Simba Ventures Plano LTD Skyrise Properties SoftLayer SourceHOV Statement Systems Inc. Stratus Computer Inc. Stream Data Centers

SunGard Switch & Data Dallas T5 Data Centers LLC TEL-X Dallas The Cambay Group The Planet TierPoint Texas LLC TLCurban TNA North America Unified Infrastructure Services Unifocus LP Union Datacom Universal Cadworks Inc. Vazata VeriCenter Verizon ViaWest Viceroy Investments Washington Mutual Waymark Communications Xerox XO Communications zColo

DATA CENTER SALES AND USE TAX EXEMPTION A data center exemption applies to state sales and use tax on certain items necessary and essential to the operation of a qualified data center. The program provides 100 percent exemption of sales taxes on business personal property essential to data center operations. This property includes items such as computers,

electrical equipment, cooling systems, power infrastructure and software. The sales tax exemption may be available for 10 to 15 years and can be accessed by owners and tenants in singleor multitenant data center properties. To qualify for the sales tax exemption, the data center must meet the following minimum requirements:

> Consist of at least 100,000 square feet of gross building area in an entire of portion of a facility > Capital investment of at least $200 million over a five-year period > Create 20 new direct jobs > Pay wages equivalent to at least 120% of the county average

LEGEND: SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS, SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 13,208 | $49.52

2017

NETWORK AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS 10,805 | $41.30

COMPUTER NETWORK ARCHITECTS 4,614 | $51.11

COMPUTER NETWORK SUPPORT SPECIALISTS 5,606 | $36.59

COMPUTER HARDWARE ENGINEERS 2,496 | $51.73

OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

133


HOSPITALITY The Dallas–Fort Worth region has a robust hospitality infrastructure that can handle meetings and convention events of all sizes and types, whether it’s an annual meeting for a major national association or a shortlead executive board meeting that needs the utmost security and service. The market includes a large base of hotel facilities, ranging from budget to luxury within 15 minutes of Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, making it an efficient destination for meetings that require travel from points throughout the United States. Downtowns in both Dallas and Fort Worth, each just half an hour from the airport, offer major convention facilities with flexible space as well as robust entertainment and lodging amenities at a wide range of price points.

MAJOR HOTELS AND RESORTS Adolphus Hotel Crowne Plaza Hotel Dallas Near Galleria-Addison Embassy Suites by Hilton Dallas Frisco Hotel Convention Center & Spa Fairmont Dallas Four Seasons Resort and Club Dallas at Las Colinas Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center Grand Hyatt Dallas Fort Worth Great Wolf Lodge Hilton Anatole Hilton Dallas Lincoln Centre Hilton DFW Lakes Executive Conference Center Hotel ZaZa Dallas Hyatt Regency Dallas Hyatt Regency DFW Airport Hyatt Regency North Dallas InterContinental Hotel Dallas Le Meridien Dallas, The Stoneleigh Magnolia Hotel Dallas Downtown Dallas/Addison Marriott Quorum by the Galleria Dallas Marriott City Center Marriott Dallas Fort Worth Airport North Marriott Dallas Las Colinas Marriott Dallas Plano at Legacy Town Center Marriott DFW Hotel & Golf Club at Champions Circle NYLO Dallas South Side Omni Dallas Hotel Omni Fort Worth Hotel Omni Mandalay Hotel at Las Colinas Renaissance Dallas Hotel The Worthington Renaissance Fort Worth Hotel Ritz-Carlton Dallas Rosewood Crescent Hotel Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek Sheraton Fort Worth Downtown Hotel Sheraton Arlington Hotel Sheraton Dallas Hotel The Joule The Westin Stonebriar Hotel & Golf Club W Hotel Dallas Victory Westin Dallas Downtown Westin Dallas Fort Worth Airport Westin Dallas Park Central The Westin Galleria Dallas

134

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

DFW IS THE MOST VISITED METROPOLITAN AREA IN TEXAS

OVER 318,000 ARE EMPLOYED IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN THE DFW AREA, AMONG THOUSANDS OF EMPLOYERS.

MAJOR ANNUAL EVENTS AND ATTENDANCE EVENT

ATTENDANCE

STATE FAIR OF TEXAS

3,503,268

FORT WORTH STOCK SHOW & RODEO

1,248,500

ADDISON KABOOM TOWN

500,000

CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER HOLIDAY PARADE

400,000

MAIN STREET FORT WORTH ARTS FEST

400,000

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY PARADE AND FESTIVAL

300,000

METROPCS DALLAS MARATHON

273,000

AT&T BYRON NELSON CHAMPIONSHIP

270,000

GRAPEFEST

250,000

FORT WORTH MAYFEST

225,000

SCARBOROUGH FAIRE

200,000

DUCK COMMANDER 500 - NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES

154,000

TASTE OF DALLAS

150,000

GREENVILLE AVENUE ST. PATRICK'S DAY PARADE

125,000

DALLAS BLOOMS

115,000

AT&T RED RIVER SHOWDOWN

91,546

GOODYEAR COTTON BOWL CLASSIC

82,812

MEGAFEST 2013

75,000

FAN EXPO DALLAS COMIC CON

75,000

ADDISON OKTOBERFEST

70,000

RICHARDSON WILDFLOWER FESTIVAL

70,000

NORTH TEXAS IRISH FESTIVAL

55,000

DALLAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

33,000

TURKEY TROT

26,000

RECENT MAJOR CONVENTIONS AND THEIR ECONOMIC IMPACT WWE

$129,226,078

ALL-STAR NATIONALS (NATIONAL CHEERLEADERS ASSOCIATION)

$49,620,802

CEDIA EXPO 2016

$38,871,256

MARY KAY, INC. 2016 ANNUAL SEMINAR

$37,146,750

DALLAS SAFARI CLUB 2016 CONVENTION & SPORTING EXPO

$36,240,955

USA VOLLEYBALL 2016 WORLD LEAGUE

$33,035,141

TEXAS VOLLEYBALL TOUR

$29,031,905

AVIATION WEEK 2016

$22,155,833

POWER & ENERGY SOCIETY TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION

$21,955,561

GENERAL AND OPERATIONS MANAGERS 54,383 | $66.73

MARKETING MANAGERS 5,269 | $69.62

SALES MANAGERS 10,527 | $67.07

SOURCE: 2016.3 – QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, and Self-Employed,; OES, 2015, Jobs EQ

FOOD SERVICE MANAGERS 7,511 | $30.19

2017


INDUSTRY CLUSTERS | HOSPITALITY

15 13

16 35W

121

35E 75 19

4 190

20

10 12

820

17

183 12

9

20

30

5

30

635

18

2

14

7 8 6 11 1

3

175

67

35E

35W

45

OTHER CIVIC AND CONVENTION SITES

MEETING AND EXHIBITION FACILITIES INDUSTRY:

1

The Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center

12

Addison Conference Centre

ACCOMMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES

2

Hilton Anatole Hotel

13

Allen Event Center

3

Music Hall at Fair Park

14

Arlington Convention Center

ESTABLISHMENTS

AVG. EMPLOYMENT

4

Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center

15

Denton Expo Center

12,965

318,355

5

Fort Worth Convention Center

16

Frisco Conference Center

6

Sheraton Dallas Hotel

17

Hurst Conference Center

7

Dallas Market Hall

18

8

Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion

Irving Convention Center at Las Colinas

9

Will Rogers Memorial Center

19

Plano Centre

20

Richardson Civic Center

Number Services Businesses NUMBERof OFAdvanced HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES 11

10 60

112760

10

InterContinental Dallas

11

Omni Dallas Hotel

LEGEND: CHEFS AND HEAD COOKS 2,867 | $22.93

2017

FIRST-LINE SUPERVISORS OF FOOD PREPARATION AND SERVING WORKERS 22,544 | $17.40

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES 76,912 | $17.26

HOTEL, MOTEL, AND RESORT DESK CLERKS 4,700 | $9.95

OCCUPATION JOBS | MEDIAN HOURLY EARNINGS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

135


Rise and Shine Come be a part of Arlington’s historic growth! Join the winning corporations, sports franchises, and world-class developments that call Arlington home. The future is bright and the economy is strong in The American Dream City.

ARLINGTON

IDEAL LOCATION | VIBRANT ECONOMY | CAN-DO CULTURE Office of Economic Development ArlingtonTX.gov/ecodev | ecodev@arlingtontx.gov | 817-459-6155


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE OFFICE CLUSTERS INDUSTRIAL CLUSTERS RETAIL CLUSTERS

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

137


OFFICE CLUSTERS Office space is concentrated in key areas, including downtown Dallas and Fort Worth, along the Interstate 35E, North Central Expressway and Dallas North Tollway corridors between downtown Dallas and its northern suburbs, and in Irving’s Las Colinas master-planned development. The Dallas–Fort Worth office market slowed with the economic recession, but like many other parts of the regional economy, didn’t reach the depths of market weakness experienced in other major U.S. metropolitan areas. As a result, the market has recovered more quickly than elsewhere in the nation, and has continued to add hundreds of thousands of high quality square footage.

138

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

DFW COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE:

ATTRACTIVE RENTS WITH AN ABUNDANCE OF CHOICES The DFW region offers a multitude of options for companies looking to operate here. From multitenant buildings in the urban core and CBDs, to office parks throughout the region, many companies have discovered DFW to be a strategic and cost-effective location.

LARGEST OFFICE PARKS 1 Las Colinas 2 Legacy Business Park 3 Dallas Market Center 4 AllianceTexas 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

Park Central Galatyn Park CentrePort Business Park Sundance Square CityLine Hall Office Park Urban Center The District of Harwood Solana Office Park Mercer Crossing Lincoln Centre Quorum Galleria Office Towers Riverbend Properties Towers at Williams Square The Crescent Office Towers Enterprise Business Park Plano Gateway Regent Center Granite Park International Business Park The Campus at Legacy Wingren Colonnade Twin Creeks Business Park Parkway Centre The Offices of Austin Ranch Cypress Waters Office Park Mercantile Center (Office) Campbell Centre Convergence Galatyn Commons Royal Tech Allen Place/Millenium Technology Park Fossil Creek Business Park Victory Park International Center Cedar Hill Business Park Forest Plaza Exchange Park The Crossings The Apex at Las Colinas Crossing Pegasus Place Royal Bridge Office Park

SOURCE: Dallas Business Journal, DRC Research

SQUARE FEET

NUMBER OF BUILDINGS

26,000,000 15,500,000 4,727,739 4,297,681

221 52 4 35

3,765,935 3,739,550 3,000,000 3,000,000 2,585,000 2,200,000 2,194,013 2,000,000 1,873,542 1,751,630 1,586,132 1,558,050 1,418,800 1,406,846 1,344,022 1,333,876 1,300,000 1,300,000 1,300,000 1,258,653 1,200,000 1,200,000 1,105,535 1,079,181 995,000 974,829 953,303 906,208 882,261 873,036 819,000 801,923 794,000 758,399 668,018 662,940 606,955 564,676 562,764 530,242 529,128 526,604 518,656 505,948

14 16 113 42 7 16 44 6 14 9 3 15 3 32 27 27 9 10 9 6 11 3 22 3 34 5 7 18 46 4 10 4 14 16 13 13 12 10 11 11 11 11 10 5

2017


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE | OFFICE CLISTERS

35E

FAR NORTH DALLAS

35W

121

LEWISVILLE/DENTON

75

RICHARDSON/PLANO

LBJ FREEWAY CENTRAL PRESTON EXPRESSWAY CENTER STEMMONS        635 FREEWAY

LAS COLINAS NORTH FORT WORTH 820

NORTHEAST FORT WORTH

DALLAS CBD

MID-CITIES

EAST DALLAS

30

FORT WORTH CBD 287

360

SOUTHWEST DALLAS

20

45 35E

SOUTH FORT WORTH

MAJOR OFFICE BUILDING/PARK

MARKET VIEW 35W

MARKET

NET RENTABLE AREA SF

DIRECT VACANCY RATE (%)

AVG ASKING LEASE RATE

CENTRAL EXPRESSWAY

11,781,333

10.8%

$25.96

DALLAS CBD

25,397,715

27.9%

$25.97

3,236,552

12.8%

$16.45

FAR NORTH DALLAS

EAST DALLAS

38,566,494

16.2%

$24.46

LAS COLINAS

29,180,281

14.7%

$24.48

LBJ FREEWAY

19,257,473

24.1%

$18.95

LEWISVILLE/DENTON

4,426,602

9.2%

$22.46

PRESTON CENTER

3,989,556

10.7%

$36.53

21,352,657

18.9%

$22.63

1,519,515

13.8%

$16.51

RICHARDSON/PLANO SW DALLAS STEMMONS FREEWAY UPTOWN/TURTLE CREEK FORT WORTH CBD

9,328,345

29.7%

$15.01

11,259,935

12.6%

$40.38

8,082,765

16.3%

$25.49

14,088,975

20.0%

$17.83

NORTH FORT WORTH

1,646,762

12.8%

$18.06

NE FORT WORTH

2,883,153

56.5%

$19.27

MID CITIES

SOUTH FORT WORTH MARKET TOTALS

2017

6,606,274

13.0%

$23.46

212,644,387

18.6%

$23.86

SOURCE: CBRE Office Real Estate Market Report, Q4 2016

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

139


INDUSTRIAL CLUSTERS Industrial space is distributed throughout the Dallas–Fort Worth region, with concentrations in Fort Worth’s Alliance Texas development, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Arlington, Garland, Grand Prairie, Coppell and along the Interstate 35E corridor between Dallas and Lewisville. The market for industrial space has strengthened over the past couple of years with significant new developments throughout the region. In fact, CBRE ranks DFW as the 3rd top market for industrial warehouse construction during the past six years, and DFW ranks 6th among metros for construction underway. Market watchers credit the strength of the regional economy, its low taxes and its low labor costs for sustaining DFW as a desirable market for real estate investment.

DFW INDUSTRIAL SPACE: A LOGISTICS, DISTRIBUTION, AND MANUFACTURING HUB

Dallas–Fort Worth’s central U.S. location provides an advantageous distribution hub, with quick access to rail, air and over-the-ground truck transportation.

LARGEST INDUSTRIAL PARKS TOTAL SQUARE FEET

1

Great Southwest Industrial Park

82,227,215

2

AllianceTexas (Industrial)

30,651,468

3

Valwood Business Park

26,424,782

4

CentrePort Business Park (Industrial)

14,750,000

5

Pinnacle Industrial Center

7,925,904

6

Railhead Industrial Park

6,550,000

7

International Commerce Park

5,939,000

8

Carter Industrial Park

5,500,000

9

Turnpike Distribution Center

5,018,307

10 DFW Trade Center

5,000,000

11 Mercantile Center (Industrial)

4,052,292

12

RiverPark Business Park

3,846,971

13

Fossil Creek Business Park

3,635,215

14

Ennis Industrial Rail Park

3,529,409

15

Freeport North

3,434,585

16 ProLogis Park 20/35

3,406,245

17

3,100,000

Mountain Creek Business Center

18 Majestic Aiport Center DFW

3,000,000

19

Arlington South Industrial Park

2,950,000

20

Frankford Trade Center

2,877,134

21

Sentry Industrial Park

2,850,000

22

Waters Ridge Business Park

2,700,000

23 RailPort Industrial Park 24

140

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Westport @ Alliance

2,500,000 2,451,936

25 Lakeside Trade Center

2,238,072

26

2,186,000

Northlake Business Center

27 Stellar Way Business Park

2,175,997

28

2,106,550

Point West

29 Southfield Park 35

2,087,706

30 Austin Ranch Distribution Center

1,903,951

31

Grand Lakes Distribution Center

1,815,430

32

PointSouth Logistics & Commerce Centre

1,700,000

33

Skyline Business Park

1,645,624

34 Stoneridge Business Park

1,620,097

35

1,406,850

Riverbend Business Park

SOURCE: Dallas Business Journal, DRC Research

2017


35W

35 24

26 18 25 10 15

2

NORTH FORT WORTH

820

20

30

NORTHEAST DALLAS

3 27

DFW AIRPORT 4

121

22

30 28

6 13 11

30 75

7

635

SOUTH SOUTH STEMMONS STEMMONS

12 31

1

33

9 5

SOUTH DALLAS 17

SOUTH FORT WORTH

8

287

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE | INDUSTRIAL CLUSTERS

NORTHWEST DALLAS 35E

GREAT SOUTHWEST/ 19 ARLINGTON

34 29

EAST DALLAS

20

32 16

35E

45

21 35W

23

MAJOR INDUSTRIAL BUILDING/PARK

14

MARKET VIEW

AVERAGE ASKING LEASE RATE TOTAL VACANCY RATE (%)

INDUSTRIAL

FLEX

DFW AIRPORT

5.0%

$4.35

$8.14

EAST DALLAS

6.0%

$4.05

$9.31

NORTHEAST DALLAS

5.2%

$4.49

$8.66

4.8%

$4.85

$8.61

12.0%

$3.95

$8.00

MARKET

NORTHWEST DALLAS SOUTH DALLAS SOUTH STEMMONS

5.3%

$5.96

$11.68

GREAT SW/ARLINGTON

6.2%

$4.00

$7.16

NORTH FORT WORTH

7.4%

$3.91

$9.00

SOUTH FORT WORTH

3.9%

$3.91

$6.83

MARKET TOTALS

6.0%

$4.48

$8.99

2017

SOURCE: CBRE Industrial Real Estate Market Report, Q4 2016

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

141


DeSoto Chamber of Commerce

Kohl’s E-Commerce Center 951,480 SF – Completed 2012

1650 & 1700 LAKESIDE PKWY

ECONOMIC INCENTIVES

www.southfieldpark35.com

Interchange Distribution Center is a heavily incentivized site with Real Property Abatement up to 90% for years 1-10 and Business Personal Property Abatement up to 90% for years 1-10 followed by up to 75% for years 11-12. There is potential for Freeport Exemption. Located amongst a deep and dependable labor pool and there is a Skills Development Fund Grant, on behalf of the Texas Workforce Commission.

ed industrial park oto, Texas

26,320 SF available

ABOUT KTR CAPITAL PARTNERS KTR Capital Partners is a full-service real estate investment, development and operating company focused exclusively on the industrial property sector. KTR has an 80 person platform that manages a series of discretionary value-add investment funds that target opportunities throughout major markets DW Distribution in North America. KTR funds currently own a portfolio of approximately 65 million square feet across Door Fabrication Plant & Warehouse North America and provide nearly $7.0 billion of investment capacity. Since 1997, KTR has developed 500,000 SF – Completed 1Q 2014 nearly 25 million square feet of speculative and build-to-suit industrial projects. In addition, KTR owns and controls land positions in North American major markets that can support approximately 7 million SF of additional development. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Dave Anderson Executive Vice President O: 214.979.6500 C: 214.533.9009 dave.anderson@cbre.com

© 2014 CBRE, Inc. This information has been obtained from sources believed reliable. We have not verified it and make no guarantee, warranty or representation about it. Any projections, opinions, assumptions or estimates used are for example only and do not represent the current or future performance of the property. You and your advisors should conduct a careful, independent investigation of the property to determine to your satisfaction the suitability of the property for your needs. CBRE and the CBRE logo are service marks of CBRE, Inc. and/or its affiliated or related companies in the United States and other countries. All other marks displayed on this document are the property of their respective owners. Photos herein are the property of their respective owners and use of these images without the express written consent of the owner is prohibited.

MULTIPLE CONFIGURATIONS POSSIBL

Southfield Park 35 1.1 Million SF – 1Q 2015

BUIL Solar Turbines – Caterpillar 45,000 SF – 1Q of 2016 Rendering

le Road | DeSoto, Texas 75115

:

Interchange Distrib 675,000 SF and 874 Up to 1.6 Million SF


PAID ADVERISEMENT

| FLOWER MOUND, TX

THE DESOTO DIFFERENCE

bution Centers 4,500 SF F Build-To-Suit

DISCOVER HOW COST-SAVING INCENTIVES CAN MAKE DESOTO, TEXAS THE

LE

BEST PLACE FOR YOUR BUSINESS.

DeSoto Heliport – 35,000 SF Opened August 2014

LDING 3

Crossroads Trade Center 948,392 SF - Build-To-Suit

DeSOTO, TX - EAGLE BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL PARK continues to thrive, as evidenced by site pads going vertical along with several recent facility and workforce expansions. Located 15 minutes south of downtown Dallas, DeSoto’s competitive advantage lies in a great business park location, excellent transportation access, low-cost shovelready land with existing space inventory, a skilled workforce and development plans that ensure our partners achieve maximum return on investment. In addition, DeSoto offers a wide variety of competitive incentives to help your business grow and prosper. Eagle Business & Industrial Park offers more than 400 acres for industrial and commercial development. Our pro-business leadership is dedicated to making your site-selection search easy and your investment in DeSoto a success.

• INDUSTRIAL STRENGTH • STRATEGIC LOCATION • QUALITY DEFINED • ALL-AMERICA CITY®

For more information contact Murphy Cheatham, CEO, at 972-230-9611

www.dedc.org

DESOTO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 211 E. PLEASANT RUN RD. DESOTO, TX 75115


RETAIL CLUSTERS The DFW region has extensive retail development, with 17 centers or malls that have more than 1 million square feet of space or more. Most major retail brands are represented, with developments focused on the largest population centers.

DALLAS’ WEST WILLAGE

LIVE, WORK AND PLAY The development of higher density, mixed-use centers offers unique opportunities to both businesses and residents of the Dallas–Fort Worth region. Examples include: Addison Circle – Addison Bishop Arts – Dallas CityLine – Richardson Cypress Waters – Dallas Eastside – Richardson Frisco Station – Frisco Frisco Town Square – Frisco Granite Park – Plano Highland Park Village – Highland Park Legacy Town Center – Plano McKinney Urban Village – McKinney Magnolia Street – Fort Worth Midtowne – Midlothian Mockingbird Station – Dallas Montgomery Place – Fort Worth Museum Place – Fort Worth Park Lane Place – Dallas Parker Square – Flower Mound Rockwall Commons – Rockwall Southlake Town Square – Southlake Southside on Lamar – Dallas Sundance Square – Fort Worth Victory Park – Dallas Waters Creek at Montgomery Farm – Allen West Village – Dallas In addition, historic downtowns are being redeveloped into attractive regional destinations, including downtowns in Plano, McKinney, Denton, Carrollton and Grapevine.

144

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

DFW RETAIL CENTERS

OPPORTUNITIES AT EVERY INTERSECTION

LARGEST RETAIL CENTERS SQUARE FEET

1

NORTHPARK CENTER

2,000,000

2

GRANDSCAPE

1,900,000

3

NORTHEAST MALL

1,649,019

4

STONEBRIAR CENTRE

1,600,000

5

THE PARKS AT ARLINGTON

1,500,000

6

GRAPEVINE MILLS MALL

1,440,000

7

GALLERIA

1,420,000

8

SOUTHWEST CENTER MALL

1,390,000

9

THE SHOPS AT WILLOW BEND

1,380,000

10

RIDGMAR MALL

1,270,000

11

TOWN EAST MALL

1,250,000

12 COLLIN CREEK MALL

1,120,000

13 VISTA RIDGE MALL

1,110,000

14 LA GRAN PLAZA

1,100,000

15

IRVING MALL

1,053,000

16

THE VILLAGES AT ALLEN

1,000,000

17

THE VILLAGES AT FAIRVIEW

1,000,000

18 HULEN MALL 19

940,000

FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

904,755

20 ARLINGTON HIGHLANDS

900,000

21 WEST 7TH - FORT WORTH

890,424

22

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

840,680

23

PLAZA CENTRAL

814,049

24 GOLDEN TRIANGLE MALL

766,000

25 CENTRE AT PRESTON RIDGE

730,000

26 ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER

700,000

27 UPTOWN VILLAGE AT CEDAR HILL

615,000

28 THE SHOPS AT PARK LANE

600,000

NATIONAL RETAIL FEDERATION - TOP RETAILERS IN DFW RANK

COMPANY

HEADQUARTERS

35

7-Eleven

Irving

$13,957,000

37

AT&T Wireless

Dallas

$13,868,000

39

J.C. Penney

Plano

$12,548,000

57

Army Air Force Exchange

Dallas

$7,455,000

65

GameStop

Grapevine

$6,513,000

78

Neiman Marcus

Dallas

$4,972,000

90

Michaels Stores

Irving

$4,479,000

96

Exxon Mobil Corp.

Irving

$4,371,000

SOURCE: 2016 Top 100 Retailers, National Retail Federation

2015 US RETAIL SALES

2017


75

35W

FAR NORTH DALLAS

2 9

12

13 6 22

SUBURBAN FORT WORTH

19

WEST DALLAS

26

7

NEAR NORTH DALLAS 28

820

3

MID-CITIES 21

23

CENTRAL FORT WORTH 18

5 20

14

11

1

CENTRAL DALLAS

30

10

EAST DALLAS OUTLYING

15

635

SOUTHWEST DALLAS 8

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE | RETAIL CLUSTERS

1617

NORTH 25 CENTRAL DALLAS 4

20

SOUTHEAST DALLAS

27

45 35E

35W

MAJOR RETAIL CENTERS

MARKET VIEW NET RENTABLE AREA SF

CENTRAL DALLAS

VACANT SF

TOTAL OCCUPANCY RATE

AVERAGE LEASE RATES

13,879,294

373,547

97.3%

$25.26

3,607,505

60,882

98.3%

$20.25

FAR NORTH DALLAS

54,868,240

3,599,237

93.4%

$14.51

NEAR NORTH DALLAS

20,887,570

1,009,140

95.2%

$16.45

NORTH CENTRAL DALLAS

33,507,776

1,806,783

94.6%

$17.24

SOUTHEAST DALLAS

13,472,130

663,902

95.1%

$11.18

EAST DALLAS OUTLYING

SOUTHWEST DALLAS

17,305,531

1,376,610

92.0%

$10.64

WEST DALLAS

30,676,294

2,070,027

93.3%

$13.24

CENTRAL FORT WORTH

24,111,810

1,425,959

94.1%

$12.29

MID-CITIES

51,277,259

2,777,003

94.6%

$13.61

SUBURBAN FORT WORTH

23,365,446

1,138,228

95.1%

$13.00

286,958,855

16,301,318

94.3%

$14.57

MARKET TOTALS

2017

SOURCE: CBRE Retail Real Estate Market Report, Q4 2016

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

145


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UTILITIES WATER, SEWER, GAS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ELECTRICITY

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

147


WATER, SEWER, GAS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

RATES AND INFRASTRUCTURE WITHIN DFW WATER AND SEWER PRICE PER 1,000 GALLONS

Dallas–Fort Worth is expected to continue growing at a rapid rate. In order to keep up with projected demands for utilities, the region’s leaders have made it a priority to secure reliable sources of water and gas. The area’s many lakes and the abundant natural gas reserves located in the geologic formation known as the Barnett Shale ensure that DFW will have available access to these resources in the decades to come. The centralized location on a major telecommunications hub allows for multiple levels of connectivity to exist in the region. Dallas–Fort Worth makes up a larger information and communications hub that spans the globe. The redundancy in connectivity that this affords translates to minimal risk of downtime for any business operating in the vicinity.

RESIDENTIAL

WATER

SEWER

UP TO 4,000

$1.90

$5.31

4,001 TO 10,000

$4.25

$5.31

10,001 TO 15,000

$6.03

$5.31

ABOVE 15,000

$8.55

$5.31

PRICE PER 1,000 GALLONS

GENERAL SERVICES

WATER

SEWER

$3.47

$3.95

ABOVE 10,000

$3.71

$3.95

ABOVE 10,000 AND 1.4 TIMES ANNUAL AVERAGE

$5.63

$3.95

UP TO 10,000

*Prices reflect prompt-pay discount and are effective Oct. 1, 2016 SOURCE: Dallas Water Utilities

RANDELL LAKE Pottsboro ! ! Denison

LAKE TEXOMA

HUBERT H MOSS LAKE

Callisburg ! Muenster ! Lindsay !

Gainesville !

Cooke

Knollwood

Sadler ! Whitesboro

Oak Ridge !

Red Riv er

REGIONAL WATER PLANNING AREA – REGION C

!

VALLEY LAKE Bells ! Savoy !

!

Southmayd !

LAKE KIOWA

Grayson

Sherman

!

RED

Collinsville

COFFEE MILL LAKE Ravenna

!

LAKE BONHAM

Fannin Ector

Bonham

!

!

Dorchester Howe !

Valley View !

Tioga

!

Van Alstyne

Pilot Point !

er

Bridgeport !

Wise

Decatur

Denton!

!

!

Lake ! Runaway Bridgeport Bay

!

Boyd

BRAZOS

!

!

New DISH ! Fairview Argyle Copper ! ! Corral City! Canyon ! Justin ! ! ! Rhome Northlake Bartonville

!

Springtown !

EAGLE MOUNTAIN LAKE

Flower Mound !

Haslet!

!

GRAPEVINE LAKE

Southlake ! Keller ! ! Grapevine Colleyville !

Frisco

Allen

!

Lucas

!

Parker St. Paul ! ! Wylie Murphy !

Plano

Hebron

!

!

Carrollton Addison

!

Josephine ! Nevada ! !

Lavon

Richardson !Sachse

!

!

LAVON LAKE

!

The Colony

!

Lewisville

Coppell

!

Westlake

New Hope Princeton ! Farmersville!

!

Fairview

!

Hackberry

Lake Dallas ! Hickory Creek Highland Village !

!

Lowry Crossing !

Little Elm !

!

Double Oak

Roanoke! Trophy Club !

Newark

!

!

!

!

Aurora

Melissa

!

Collin

Cross Roads

Blue Ridge

!

LEWISVILLE ! LAKE Prosper ! McKinney Lincoln Park !

Oak Point ! Shady Shores ! Lakewood Village Corinth ! !

Ponder

Denton

Paradise

!

Weston

Celina

!

Aubrey! Krugerville !

Krum

!

SABINE

! Jacksboro LOST CREEK RESERVOIR

Bryson

!

!

!

Anna !

!

Ri v nity Tri

Chico

LAKE BRIDGEPORT

Ladonia

!

Leonard

!

!

Jack

Bailey

Trenton

!

!

Sanger

Alvord

Whitewright

!

SULPHUR

Gunter

!

LAKE RAY ROBERTS

!

!

Windom

Tom Bean !

!

Honey Grove

Dodd City

!

!

!

Royse City !

!

Fate ! Rowlett Rockwall! ! Garland ! ! Mobile Sanctuary Pelican Bay WHITE ! City Azle ROCK Mineral Wells ! Saginaw! Watauga! North Richland Hills ! ! University! LAKE LAKE Bedford ! Blue Mound ! LAKE RAY ! ! ! Irving Park ! Euless ! MINERAL LAKE Heath McLendon-Chisholm Lakeside! HUBBARD Haltom City Lake Worth Hurst ! Highland WELLS ! WEATHERFORD ! LAKE Sunnyvale ! Sansom Park ! ! Park Richland ! WORTH Cool NEW TERRELL ! Willow Dallas ! Fort Worth Hills Mesquite Westworth Village Cockrell CITY LAKE ! Park ! Weatherford ! MOUNTAIN ! ! Forney ! ! Balch Hill ! White Settlement ! ! Terrell ! Hudson Oaks LAKE CREEK LAKE Millsap Westover Springs Pentego ! ! Hills ARLINGTON Annetta North ! Arlington Talty ! ! ! ! ! ! Forest Annetta Benbrook Aledo Dalworthington ! ! Grand Hill ! Seagoville Post Oak Gardens Annetta South Edgecliff Village ! ! Hutchins Prairie ! ! ! Bend Kennedale ! BENBROOK Crandall ! Duncanville Oak ! ! Brazos Rive Everman LAKE Ridge Cedar DeSoto Wilmer ! ! Combine ! ! LAKE Hill Crowley Kaufman ! Lancaster ! ! GRANBURY Mansfield ! ! Cresson Oak Glenn Heights! Ferris Grove ! ! Red Oak Ovilla ! JOE ! Scurry ! ! POOL Oak Leaf Grays ! Pecan LAKE ! Rosser !Prairie Hill ! ! Midlothian Cottonwood Kemp ! Palmer ! Waxahachie ! Reno !

!

!

NORTH LAKE

!

Farmers Branch

Rockwall

Tarrant

Parker

TRINITY

Dallas

Kaufman

r

LAKE WAXAHACHIE Maypearl

2060 SUPPLIES FOR THE LARGEST WHOLESALE WATER PROVIDERS IN REGION C

Mabank!

Garrett

Ellis

!

Ennis

!

BARDWELL LAKE

!

Trini ty

Alma

!

Seven Points! ! Gun Barrel City Ri Tool v er !

(ACRE FEET PER YEAR)

Italy

!

Rice

!

Emhouse

AVAILABLE

NEW STRATEGIES

TOTAL

DALLAS WATER UTILITIES

506,363

414,323

920,686

TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT

489,024

483,702

972,726

NORTH TEXAS MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT

383,146

580,122

963,268

Frost !

Blooming Barry ! Grove !

NAVARRO MILLS LAKE

Powell

LAKE Corsicana! HALBERT Oak Retreat ! Valley ! Mustang ! Angus !

Navarro

!

Eureka

! !

Navarro

Richland

RICHLAND-CHAMBERS RESERVOIR

!

Dawson !

Streetman

Wortham

257,422

UPPER TRINITY REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT

41,002

130,566

171,568

Fairfield

!

Freestone Teague

!

S

540,758

142,426

O AZ

257,766

114,996

FAIRFIELD LAKE Kirvin

!

BR

282,992

Henderson

Mildred

!

TRINITY RIVER AUTHORITY

! Malakoff Trinidad Kerens Goodlow ! TRINIDAD LAKE

!

!

!

CITY OF FORT WORTH

!

!

!

WHOLESALE WATER PROVIDER

Milford

!

Eustace

Payne Springs

! FOREST ! Enchanted Oaks GROVE CEDAR CREEK RESERVOIR RESERVOIR Log Cabin ! TRINITY Caney City ! Athens ! ! Star Harbor

!

Bardwell

SOURCE: Source: Region C Water Planning Group, Final 2016 Region C Water Plan

148

Regional Water Planning Area - C - Region C

«

A

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

O

B C

E

D

G

F K J

L

I H

MISSION The Texas Water Development Board's (TWDB) mission is to provide leadership, planning, financial assistance, information, and education for the conservation and responsible development of water for Texas.

0

5

10 Miles

C - Region C

2017

County Boundaries 20

DISCLAIMER This map was generated by the Texas Water Development Board using GIS (Geographical Information System) software. No claims are made to the accuracy or completeness of the information shown herein nor to its suitability for a particular use. The scale and location of all mapped data are approximate. Map date: JAN-2014

!

Cities, Towns and Villages Major Reservoirs and Lakes Major River Basins


MAJOR U.S. INTERNET PEERING POINTS

SEATTLE

Connectivity is a core strength of Dallas–Fort Worth. It is one of the primary peering points of all U.S. Internet traffic, enabling companies located here to have fast and reliable access to the world’s telecommunications infrastructure.

NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO

WASHINGTON, D.C.

LOS ANGELES

ATLANTA DALLAS / FORT WORTH

UTILITIES | WATER, SEWER, GAS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

MIAMI

NATURAL GAS THE BARNETT SHALE

NATURAL GAS RATES* CUSTOMER CHARGE PER MONTH

COMMODITY CHARGE/MCF

RESIDENTIAL

$20.00

$0.09774

COMMERCIAL (<3,000 AVG. McF/YR)

$40.25

$0.07143

INDUSTRIAL

$735.00

$0.1891 to $0.0218

**Rates are for Dallas only - different rates apply to other cities and unincorporated areas. Excludes additional charges such as gas cost recovery, weather normalization, taxes and fees. Rate is current as of July 1, 2016 and is subject to change. SOURCE: Atmos Energy Corp. Tariffs for Mid-Tex

The Barnett Shale is one of the largest natural gas fields in North America. Exploration, drilling, and production in the Barnett Shale have transformed the economy with thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in investment and contributed to opportunities and prosperity for the entire region.

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

149


ELECTRICITY The Dallasâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fort Worth region ranks close to the national median in terms of overall electric rates. Reliability in the system is preserved by operating on a separate power grid from that of the rest of the country. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) manages the flow of electric power to 24 million Texas customers. Since Texas has a deregulated electricity market, consumers can shop around and choose their service providers giving them flexibility in pricing and service.

RATES AND RELIABILITY COMPETITIVE BILLING (DALLAS)

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL 500 kWh

75 kW 15,000 kWh

$58.00

$1,058

1,000 kWh

75 kW 30,000 kWh

$105.00

$2,117

40 kW 10,000 kWh

75 kW 50,000 kWh

$748

$3,012

40 kW 14,000 kWh

1,000 kW 200,000 kWh

$1,044

$10,020

500 kW 150,000 kWh

1,000 kW 400,000 kWh

$10,508 500 kW 180,000 kWh

$12,608

150

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

INDUSTRIAL

$18,056 1,000 kW 650,000 kWh

$26,112

2017


UTILITIES | ELECTRICITY

U.S. ELECTRIC GRID

The U.S. electric grid is a complex network of independently owned and operated power plants and transmission lines. The state of Texas has a competitive advantage due to independence from other grids in other states.

ERCOT

(The Electric Reliability Council of Texas)

TEXAS ELECTRIC GENERATION BY SOURCE NET ELECTRICITY GENERATION

GwH

% TOTAL

U.S. AVERAGE

5

0.01%

0.30%

Natural Gas-Fired

16,670

53.60%

35.10%

Coal-Fired

12,029

27.70%

31.10%

3,002

6.90%

19.40%

Petroleum-Fired

Nuclear Hydroelectric

NA

Other Renewables

5,678

TOTAL NET ELECTRICITY GENERATION

37,384

5.30% 10.90%

8.00%

SOURCE: US Energy Information Administration

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

151


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Location

Careers

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Culture 1/24/2017 4:06:20 PM

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Denton Economic Development Partnership

www.dentonedp.com 152

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


TAXES & INCENTIVES TAXES AND UNION ACTIVITY

STATE AND LOCAL INCENTIVES TEXAS ENTERPRISE FUND

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

153


TAXES AND UNION ACTIVITY

SALES TAX RATE STATE: 6 1/4% (0.0625) CITY: 1/4% (0.0025) - 2% (0.02), depending on local option rate

Rising business costs and constrictive regulatory environments raise the risks and costs to a business. Stability of the political, economic and legal systems is vital for success. The tax burdens and labor requirements imposed on businesses create barriers to market entry and real estate development. Texas is a low-tax, business-friendly state attracting large numbers of companies from all over the United States and globally due to the low cost of doing business. As a “right-towork” state, Texas places high in favorable tax climate rankings while the Dallas–Fort Worth metro area exhibits extremely low union activity.

COUNTY: 1/2% (0.0025) - 1 1/2% (0.015), depending on local option rate TRANSIT: 1/4% (0.0025) - 1% (0.01), depending on local option rate SPECIAL PURPOSE DISTRICTS: 1/8% (0.00125) - 2% (0.02), depending on local option rate

DFW COMMUNITIES SALES TAX SAMPLE CITY

STATE RATE

CITY RATE

OTHER RATE

OTHER TYPE

TOTAL RATE

PLANO

0.0625

0.0100

0.0100

MTA

0.0825

DALLAS

0.0625

0.0100

0.0100

MTA

0.0825

DENTON

0.0625

0.0150

0.0050

CTA

0.0825

FORT WORTH

0.0625

0.0100

0.0050

MTA

0.0825

0.0050

CCD

MTA = Metropolitan Transit Authority; CCD = Crime Control District; CTA = County Transit Authority Source: Texas Comptroller’s Office

T EXAS

UNION ACTIVITY IN SELECTED METROS

ATLANTA

4.2%

DALLAS

5.6%

HOUSTON

5.6%

PHOENIX

6.2%

MIAMI

7.5%

DENVER

8.4%

KANSAS CITY

9.3%

BOSTON

12.7%

SAN DIEGO

13.6%

PHILADELPHIA

13.9%

MINNEAPOLIS

14.2%

DETROIT

14.7%

LOS ANGELES

14.8%

CHICAGO

16.2%

SAN FRANCISCO

17.1%

SEATTLE

17.2%

NEW YORK

21.3%

0%

TEXAS FRANCHISE TAX Each taxable entity formed in Texas or doing business in Texas must file and pay franchise tax, such as corporations, LLCs, banks, partnerships and business associations. The tax does not apply to sole proprietorships, general partnerships with individual owners, nonprofits, or entities with $1.1 million in gross reciepts or less.

TEXAS FRANCHISE TAX RATES ∫ 0.75% (0.0075) of margin for most taxable entities ∫ 0.375% (0.00375) for qualifying wholesalers and retailers ∫ 0.331% (0.00331) for those entities with $20 million or less in Total Revenue (annualized per 12-month period on which the report is based) More information is available by contacting the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts at 1-800-252-1381 or visiting http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/ franchise/

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

% EMPLOYED WORKERS COVERED BY COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENTS

TEXAS DOES NOT COLLECT ∫ Personal Income Tax (State or Local) ∫ Local Occupation Tax ∫ Local Wage Tax ∫ State Property Tax

SOURCE: Current Population Survey (CPS) Outgoing Rotation Group (ORG) Earnings Files, 2015, compiled by unionstats.com

154

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


COUNTIES Collin Dallas Denton Ellis Hood Hunt Johnson Kaufman Parker Rockwall Somervelll Tarrant Wise CITIES Addison Allen Anna Arlington Azle Balch Springs Bedford Benbrook Burleson Carrollton Cedar Hill Celina Cleburne Cockrell Hill Colleyville Commerce Coppell Corinth Crowley Dallas Decatur Denton DeSoto Duncanville Ennis Euless Everman Fairview Farmers Branch Fate Flower Mound Forest Hill Forney Fort Worth Frisco

RATE $0.225000 $0.243100 $0.261990 $0.380091 $0.368066 $0.490379 $0.422663 $0.588700 $0.333780 $0.375900 $0.461590 $0.285693 $0.346400

$0.560472 $0.520000 $0.629000 $0.644800 $0.679500 $0.803000 $0.476509 $0.650000 $0.735000 $0.603700 $0.698760 $0.645000 $0.804018 $1.119407 $0.339130 $0.820000 $0.579500 $0.581930 $0.739270 $0.782500 $0.703000 $0.683340 $0.744900 $0.758447 $0.699000 $0.462500 $1.230000 $0.359999 $0.602267 $0.291100 $0.439000 $0.990000 $0.651111 $0.835000 $0.450000

Garland Glenn Heights Granbury Grand Prairie Grapevine Greenville Haltom City Heath Hickory Creek Highland Park Highland Village Hurst Hutchins Irving Joshua Kaufman Keene Keller Kennedale Krum Lake Dallas Lake Worth Lancaster Lewisville Little Elm Lucas Mansfield McKinney Melissa Mesquite Midlothian Murphy North Richland Hills Parker Plano Princeton Prosper Providence Red Oak Richardson Richland Hills River Oaks Roanoke Rockwall Rowlett Royse City Sachse Saginaw Sanger Sansom Park

$0.704600 $0.935530 $0.397584 $0.669998 $0.289271 $0.699000 $0.699990 $0.417311 $0.387319 $0.220000 $0.569630 $0.587900 $0.682459 $0.594100 $0.775270 $0.777725 $0.897823 $0.430000 $0.767500 $0.647489 $0.668068 $0.460660 $0.867500 $0.436086 $0.661687 $0.317948 $0.710000 $0.573000 $0.610000 $0.687000 $0.708244 $0.510000 $0.610000 $0.365984 $0.478600 $0.689890 $0.520000 $0.857815 $0.649000 $0.625160 $0.595633 $0.794444 $0.375120 $0.454300 $0.787173 $0.677100 $0.757279 $0.513000 $0.679500 $0.767304

Seagoville $0.743800 Southlake $0.462000 Sunnyvale $0.407962 Terrell $0.724200 The Colony $0.667500 Trophy Club $0.473000 University Park $0.248761 Watauga $0.618411 Waxahachie $0.680000 Weatherford $0.511600 White Settlement $0.755693 Willow Park $0.536700 Wylie $0.848900 SCHOOLS Aledo ISD $1.595000 Allen ISD $1.590000 Alvarado ISD $1.461000 Alvord ISD $0.013540 Anna ISD $1.670000 Argyle ISD $1.570050 Arlington ISD $1.390080 Aubrey ISD $1.510000 Avalon ISD $1.233400 Azle ISD $1.203000 Birdville ISD $1.412952 Bland ISD $1.488000 Blue Ridge ISD $1.571490 Bluff Dale ISD $1.090000 Brock ISD $1.550000 Burleson ISD $1.540000 Carroll ISD $1.390000 Carrollton Farmers Branch ISD $1.391700 Castleberry ISD $1.376600 Cedar Hill ISD $1.516000 Celina ISD $1.640000 Cleburne ISD $1.630000 Collin College (CCD) $0.081222 Community ISD $1.625000 Coppell ISD $1.492700 Crandall ISD $1.520000 Crowley ISD $1.650000 Dallas Co. Community College (CCD) $0.122933 Dallas ISD $1.282085 DeSoto ISD $1.460000 Duncanville ISD $1.521480 Eagle MountainSaginaw ISD $1.540000 Ennis ISD $1.540000

Era ISD $1.308000 Everman ISD $1.525000 Farmersville ISD $1.390000 Ferris ISD $1.355000 Forney ISD $1.540000 Fort Worth ISD $1.352000 Frisco ISD $1.460000 Frost ISD $1.220800 Garland ISD $1.353300 Glen Rose ISD $0.974000 Godley ISD. $1.540000 Granbury ISD $1.250000 Grand Prairie ISD $1.595000 Grandview ISD $1.400000 GrapevineColleyville ISD $1.396700 Gunter ISD $1.620000 Highland Park ISD $1.152700 Hurst-EulessBedford ISD $1.316000 Irving ISD $1.445000 Italy ISD $1.584972 Joshua ISD $1.610000 Kaufman ISD $1.460000 Keene ISD $1.430000 Keller ISD $1.520000 Kennedale ISD $1.486724 Krum ISD $1.540000 Lake Dallas ISD $1.670000 Lake Worth ISD $1.670000 Lancaster ISD $1.540000 Leonard ISD $1.266200 Lewisville ISD $1.420000 Lipan ISD $1.505000 Little Elm ISD $1.540000 Lovejoy ISD $1.670000 Mansfield ISD $1.510000 Maypearl ISD $1.317000 McKinney ISD $1.620000 Melissa ISD $1.670000 Mesquite ISD $1.460000 Midlothian ISD $1.540000 Milford ISD $1.170000 Millsap ISD $1.665000 Mineral Wells ISD $1.430000 Northwest ISD $1.452500 Palmer ISD $1.475000 Peaster ISD $1.400000 Perrin Whitt ISD $1.240000 Pilot Point ISD $1.370000 Plano ISD $1.439000 Ponder ISD $1.467840

Poolville ISD $1.383500 Princeton ISD $1.620000 Prosper ISD $1.670000 Quinlan ISD $1.240000 Red Oak ISD $1.540000 Richardson ISD $1.390050 Rio Vista ISD $1.600000 Rockwall ISD $1.465000 Royse City ISD $1.670000 Sanger ISD $1.372067 Boles ISD $1.542940 Bland ISD $1.488000 Campbell ISD $1.040000 Celeste ISD $1.490060 Caddo Mills ISD $1.455000 Commerce ISD $1.543600 Cooper ISD $1.490000 Community ISD $1.625000 Cumby ISD $1.300000 Scurry-Rosser ISD$1.250000 Fannindel ISD $1.260000 Greenville ISD $1.309170 Leonard ISD $1.266200 Slidell ISD $1.135000 Lone Oak ISD $1.318950 Springtown ISD $1.429000 Sunnyvale ISD $1.426000 Wolfe City ISD $1.344000 Tarrant County College (CCD) $0.144730 Terrell ISD $1.600000 Tolar ISD $1.441200 Trenton ISD $1.460000 Van Alstyne ISD $1.520000 Venus ISD $1.587600 Waxahachie ISD $1.553900 Weatherford ISD $1.469000 White Settlement ISD $1.540000 Whitewright ISD $1.350000 Wylie ISD $1.640000

TAXES AND INCENTIVES | TAXES AND UNION ACTIVITY

2016 DALLAS-FORT WORTH PROPERTY TAX RATES

OTHER Dallas County Parkland Hospital (HD) $0.286000 Dallas County School Equalization (SET)$0.010000 Tarrant County Water District (WD)$0.020000 Tarrant County Hospital (HD) $0.227897

SOURCES: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, and Wise County Appraisal Districts

SAMPLE PROPERTY TAX INFORMATION FOR DFW COMMUNITIES 2016 RATE Per $100 of Taxable Valuation CITY

PLANO DALLAS DENTON FORT WORTH

CITY RATE

COUNTY

COUNTY RATE

$0.478600

COLLIN

$0.208395

$0.782500 $0.683340 $0.835000

DALLAS

$0.243100

DENTON

$0.248409

TARRANT

$0.254000

SCHOOL DISTRICT

PLANO ISD DALLAS ISD DENTON ISD FORT WORTH ISD

SCHOOL DISTRICT RATE

$1.439000 $1.282085

OTHER TYPE RATE

TOTAL RATE

CCD

$0.081960

$2.256060

SET

$0.009271

$2.742960

HD

$0.279400

CCD

$0.122933

WD

$0.019400

HD

$0.227897

CCD

$0.144730

OTHER TYPE

$1.540000 $1.352000

$2.501950 $2.838397

SET = School Equalization Tax; HD = Hospital District; WD = Water District; CCD = Community College District 2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

155


STATE AND LOCAL INCENTIVES Dallas–Fort Worth has a strong business culture, and a variety of state and local incentive programs are available to expanding or relocating businesses, ranging from tax abatements and tax increment financing to development of infrastructure and free-trade zones. The programs help keep the cost of doing business low, enabling companies that are creating jobs in the DFW region to gain a competitive advantage. Locally, several programs exempt qualifying companies from certain taxes, in some cases for up to 10 years. Programs vary by city, but they offer a breadth that can provide value for a variety of projects. Additional statewide programs assist companies with job training, obtaining capital and expanding venture capital investment.

DEVELOPING AREAS THE COUNTY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT SALES TAX: Enables counties of less than 400,000 residents to create county assistance districts and adopt local sales taxes. Eligible counties must not contain a 4A or 4B city or any transit authority territory. TEXAS CAPITAL FUND: Programs within this fund provide financial resources to non-entitlement communities for public infrastructure or for real estate development needed to assist a business that commits to creating and/or retaining permanent jobs, primarily for low and moderate-income persons. The maximum award is $750,000, and may not exceed 50 percent of the total project cost. THE RURAL MUNICIPAL FINANCE PROGRAM Assists in the economic development of rural areas. Eligible applicants include city and county governments, economic development corporations, hospital districts, rail districts, utility districts, special districts, agricultural districts and private water and wastewater corporations.

LOCAL INCENTIVES FREEPORT EXEMPTION: Property tax exemption offered by cities, school districts, and counties, or all three. It applies to various types of property detained in Texas for no more than 175 days, to be transported out of state. Goods must be in Texas for assembling, storing, manufacturing, repair, maintenance, processing, or fabricating purposes. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACT (CHAPTER 313): An appraised value limitation may be extended to a taxpayer who agrees to build or install property and create jobs in exchange for an eight-year limitation on the taxable value of the property. The value limitation applies to the local school district maintenance and operations tax (M&O) portion of the property tax and a tax credit. Projects must be located in a reinvestment zone or enterprise zone. TAX INCREMENT FINANCING DISTRICT: A tool that local governments can use to publicly finance needed improvements to infrastructure and buildings within a designated area known as a reinvestment zone. The cost of improvements to the reinvestment zone is repaid by the future tax revenues of each taxing unit that levies taxes against the property. TAX ABATEMENTS: A local agreement between a taxpayer and a taxing unit that exempts all or part of the increase in the value of the real property and/or tangible personal property from taxation for a period not to exceed 10 years. CHAPTER 380/381 AGREEMENTS: Allow municipalities and counties to offer grants and loans for economic development, or a variety of other economic incentives. TYPE A AND B ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATIONS: Cities located within a county of fewer than 500,000 residents can form economic development corporations and institute a sales tax, if the new combined tax doesn’t exceed 2 percent. Some cities in more populated counties may also participate under certain conditions. Type A is generally for industrial and manufacturing, while Type B is for qualityof-life projects. Voters must approve the creation of a Type A or Type B tax.

STATE INCENTIVES TEXAS ENTERPRISE FUND: TEF is the largest “deal-closing” fund of its kind in the nation. The fund is a cash grant used as a financial incentive tool for projects that offer significant projected job creation and capital investment where a single Texas site is competing with another viable out-of-state option for relocation or expansion. Funds can be used for infrastructure development, community development, job training, and business incentives. MANUFACTURING EXEMPTIONS: Exemption from state sales-and-use tax for taxpayers who manufacture, fabricate, or process tangible property for sale. It generally applies to tangible personal property involved in the manufacturing process. NATURAL GAS AND ELECTRICITY: Manufacturing companies may be exempt from paying state salesand-use tax on electricity and natural gas used in manufacturing, processing, or fabricating tangible personal property. DATA CENTER INCENTIVES: This new incentive allows data centers that meet certain conditions on or after Sept. 1, 2013, to qualify for an exemption on state sales-and-use tax on certain items necessary and essential to the data center operation. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT: Companies can choose a state sales tax exemption for property purchased, stored, or used by a person engaged in qualified research or a franchise tax credit. Local communities can also consider providing a sales tax exemption for R&D using tools such as a Chapter 380 agreement. SKILLS DEVELOPMENT FUND: Assists with customized job training. Businesses and trade unions must partner with a community or technical college, the Texas Engineering Extension Service or a community-based organization working with one of these establishments. Businesses should have a training plan and pay wages that are equal to or greater than current wages in the local market. Grants for a single business may be limited to $500,000. GOVERNOR’S UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (GURI): GURI was enacted in 2015 with a goal of bringing the best and brightest distinguished researchers in the world to Texas. This matching grant program will enable eligible Texas academic institutions to build expertise in key research areas; attract and inspire students to pursue advanced degrees in math, science, engineering, and medicine; and foster innovation and commercialization in the state. TEXAS PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND SMALL BUSINESS INCUBATOR FUND (PDSBI): PDSBI is a revolving loan program to aid in the development, production and commercialization of new or improved products and to foster and stimulate small business in the state. Loan proceeds can be used for a broad range of capital and operating expenditures. Applicants must have at least three years of operating history and have unencumbered assets available for collateral. Preference for funding is given to the state’s defined industry clusters including, but not limited to: nanotechnology, biotechnology, biomedicine, renewable energy, agriculture and aerospace.

FEDERAL INCENTIVES FOREIGN TRADE ZONES: A restricted-access site located in or near a U.S. Customs Service port of entry that provides users, such as importers, manufacturers, and distributors, with cost-saving benefits.

156

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2017


TAXES AND INCENTIVES | STATE AND LOCAL INCENTIVES

RELOCATION AND EXPANSION SUPPORT ECONOMIC INCENTIVES HAVE HELPED SUPPORT OFFICE, INDUSTRIAL, AND MIXED-USE PROJECTS THROUGHOUT NORTH TEXAS. GE TRANSPORTATION SIZE: Nearly 1 million s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Industrial CITY: Fort Worth DETAILS: GE’s new locomotive manufacturing facility opened in 2013. JOBS: 550 INCENTIVES: $4.2 million from Texas Enterprise Fund, 85 percent city tax abatement, expected to be worth $5.4 million over 10 years; and a $744,845 worker training grant from the Texas Workforce Commission.

KOHL’S

SIZE: 230,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Office CITY: Dallas DETAILS: New customer 35 service contact center JOBS: 1,700 INCENTIVES: $500,000 city of Dallas economic development grant.

TOYOTA

JAMBA JUICE

SIZE: 1 million to 1.5 million s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Office CITY: Plano DETAILS: Headquarters relocation from California JOBS: 4,000 INCENTIVES: $40 million from the Texas Enterprise Fund, $6.75 million grant from the city of Plano, 50 percent property tax abatement for 2018-2027, and 50 percent tax35E rebate for 10 years after abatement.

SIZE: 25,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Office CITY: Frisco DETAILS: The company Will move its headquarters from from Emeryville, California. JOBS: 100+ INCENTIVES: $800,00 from the Texas Enterprise Fund. Additional incentives were provided by the City of Frisco.

CITYLINE

SIZE: 186 acres PRODUCT TYPE: Mixed-use CITY: Richardson DETAILS: Mixed-use campus anchored by State Farm (2 million s.f.) and Raytheon (450,000 s.f.) JOBS: 8,000+ (State Farm) and 1,700 (Raytheon) INCENTIVES: A tax increment financing district set up by the city of Richardson reimburses KDC, CityLine’s developer, for public infrastructure, such as streets and sidewalks.

75 121 35E

114

35W

CHARLES SCHWAB

DETAILS: Building a $100 million campus. JOBS: 1,200 new jobs by 2026, potential for 5,000 jobs SIZE: 500,000 s.f. INCENTIVES: $6 million grant from the Texas PRODUCT TYPE: Enterprise Fund. The Town of Westlake provided Office a 10-year property tax abatement plan that includes a 100 percent abatement in year one, LOCATION: scaling down to a 10 percent abatement in Westlake year 10. Denton County approved a 50 percent abatement on county ad valorem taxes over a 10820 year period. Charles Schwab is required to invest at least $80 million in real property improvements 35Wand business equipment by 2022.

635 75

DALLAS

183

78

30

161 80

FORT WORTH

30

35E

360

FACEBOOK

SIZE: Up to 2.5 million s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Data Center LOCATION: Fort Worth DETAILS: $1 billion Facebook data center campus in Alliance, will eventually include 5 buildings and will be powered by 100% renewable energy. JOBS: 100+ 35W INCENTIVES: City grants on real and business personal property taxes over 20 years. A 10 year abatement of up to 60 percent of new real and business personal property value for Tarrant County taxes and 40 percent for Tarrant County Hospital District taxes. The site will also use the state sales tax incentive on data centers.

2017

12

RESTORATION HARDWARE SIZE: 850,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Industrial CITY: Grand Prairie DETAILS: A new Southwest regional distribution hub for the company JOBS: 300 INCENTIVES: Workforce Solutions of Tarrant County helped with an advertising campaign to attract job applicants. The city of Grand Prairie provided a nine-year, 75 percent partial tax abatement on combined business personal property, and real estate improvements, as well as a separate contract to provide a partial sales tax rebate on construction materials used to build the new 850,000-squarefoot distribution center. A Chapter 380 agreement rebate of 50 percent on the first $50 million of taxable Internet sales and 75 percent on taxable Internet sales over $50 million.

20

20

175

20

JACOBS ENGINEERING BMW OF NORTH AMERICA

SIZE: 282,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Industrial CITY: Lancaster DETAILS: The new center replaces a regional facility in Mississippi. JOBS: 65 INCENTIVES: 10-year, 50 percent business personal property tax grant from the city of Lancaster.

L’OREAL

SIZE: Expanding from existing 75,000 s.f. to 100,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Office LOCATION: Downtown Dallas DETAILS: Jacobs will expand its existing operations here and move its headquarters from Pasadena, California, to Downtown Dallas JOBS: 100+ INCENTIVES: Jacobs received $1.3 million in Texas Enterprise Fund and $277,500 economic incentive grant from the City of Dallas.

SIZE: 513,000 s.f. PRODUCT TYPE: Industrial CITY: Dallas DETAILS: The new center, which opened in May 2014, is a distribution hub for goods produced at L’Oreal’s manufacturing facility in 45 Mexico. JOBS: 100+ INCENTIVES: City of Dallas incentives, valued at about $4.5 million, include a tax abatement and a grant. The city also agreed to reimburse the company for road improvements.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

157


TAXES AND INCENTIVES | STATE AND LOCAL INCENTIVES

TEXAS ENTERPRISE FUND

35

LOCATION OF RECIPIENTS IN THE NORTH TEXAS REGION

30

REGION TOTALS (AS OF DECEMBER 2016)

20

REGION LOCATION

TOTAL RECIPIENTS: 48 TOTAL GRANT AMOUNT: $234 mil.

635

FORT WORTH

20

DALLAS

35W

35E

TOTAL NEW JOBS: 26,318 NOTE: Some awards and job totals may be divided between more than one region.

45

35

DIRECT JOBS

CAPITAL INVESTMENT

TEF GRANT

Semiconductors Automotive HQ Relocation

n/a 3,650

$3,000,000,000 $345,000,000

$50,000,000 $40,000,000

Triumph Aerostructures Bank of America* McKesson Corporation Active Network LLC Fidelity Global Brokerage Tyson Foods Sabre GLBL, Inc. Omnitracs LLC Kubota Tractor Corporation Comerica Klein Tools T-Mobile* Golden Living (GGNSC) GE Transportation Galderma Laboratories, L.P. Torchmark Maxim Integrated Products* Health Management Systems (HMS) Thomson Reuters Ruiz Foods* Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Consolidated Electrical Distributors (CED) TDAmeritrade Frito-Lay Raytheon* VCE* USAA* Pactiv OKI Data Americas, Inc. Kohl's Department Stores Rockwell Collins* Forum Production Jamba Juice Company Authentix* Vendor Resource Management

Aerospace Manufacturing Financial Services Pharmaceutical Distribution IT Services Financial Services Food Processing Travel Arrangement and Reservations IT Services Agricultural Machinery Manufacturing Financial Services Hand Tool Manufacturing Wireless Communications Health Care Facilities Locomotive Manufacturing Pharmaceuticals Insurance Semiconductors Health Care Data Services Software Publishers Food Processing Engineering Services Electrical Components Wholesale Financial Services IT for Food Manufacturing Aerospace & Defense Computer Systems/IT Insurance Plastic Product Manufacturing Printers & Peripheral PC Equip Management of Retail Operations Aerospace Manufacturing Oil & Gas Production Retail Smoothie Company Security Technology Financial Services

3,000 3,876 975 1,000 850 1,600 500 450 344 200 585 855 100 330 343 500 n/a 350 250 423 111 120 490 125 200 130 680 200 104 144 105 200 126 120 275

REGION $35,000,000 $598,000,000 LOCATION $200,000,000 $20,000,000 $157,000,000 $9,750,000 $13,000,000 $8,600,000 $200,000,000 $8,500,000 $97,150,000 $7,000,000 $37,900,000 $5,000,000 $10,000,000 $3,900,000 $57,000,000 $3,800,000 $16,250,000 $3,500,000 $18,000,000 $2,800,000 $20,700,000 $2,150,000 $8,400,000 $2,100,000 $96,000,000 $2,100,000 $22,000,000 $2,052,000 $26,600,000 $2,000,000 n/a $2,000,000 $17,687,439 $1,600,000 $6,154,889 $1,538,000 $48,880,413 $1,500,000 $ 4,000,000 $ 1,332,000 $3,300,000 $1,200,000 $11,000,000 $1,200,000 $4,500,000 $1,125,000 $21,700,000 $1,000,000 $40,000,000 $1,000,000 $31,400,000 $1,000,000 $58,000,000 $930,000 $ 3,580,000 $ 895,000 $54,900,000 $864,000 $6,782,500 $839,196 $16,325,000 $800,000 $2,000,000 $800,000 $6,550,000 $750,000 $4,600,000 $750,000

Dallas Richardson Irving Dallas Town of Westlake Sherman Westlake Dallas Grapevine Dallas Mansfield Frisco Plano Fort Worth Fort Worth McKinney Irving Irving Carrollton Denison Dallas Irving Fort Worth Plano McKinney Richardson Plano Corsicana Irving Dallas Richardson Gainesville Frisco Addison Carrollton

Nationstar Mortgage* Associated Hygienic Products Sanderson Farms* Ferris Manufacturing Cabela's* TEKsystems Global Services* Gulfstream* JTEKT Automotive US Bowling Congress* Superior Essex Communication Coll Materials

Mortgage Lending Paper Products Manufacturing Poultry Processing Medical Equipment Manufacturing Destination Retail IT Outsourcing Services Aerospace Manufacturing Automotive Parts Athletic Association Telecom Equipment Manufacturing Plastics Recycling

400 115 1,112 80 241 500 n/a 200 198 50 111

$2,000,000 $31,078,039 $73,000,000 $5,500,000 $120,000,000 $4,865,000 n/a $30,000,000 $13,000,000 $7,600,000 $5,900,000

Lewisville Waco McLennan County Fort Worth Fort Worth Irving Dallas Ennis Arlington Brownwood Waco

COMPANY

INDUSTRY

1 2

Texas Instruments/Univ. of Texas at Dallas* Toyota Motor North America, Inc.

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 17 18 18 20 21 22 23 24 24 26 27 27 27 30 31 32 33 34 34 36 36 38 39 40 41 42 42 44 45 46 47 48

$560,000 $520,000 $500,000 $420,000 $400,000 $400,000 $375,000 $333,000 $305,000 $250,000 $200,000

CITY Richardson Plano

*project has reached completion of TEF contract

158

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: Texas Governor's Office of Economic Development and Tourism,2015

2017


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The Real Estate Review is the only quarterly magazine exclusively focused on a lay of the land view of the commercial real estate market in North Texas. It’s the latest power player in town from the Dallas Regional Chamber, The Real Estate Council, and D Magazine Partners. HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE THINGS YOU’LL FIND IN EVERY ISSUE:

5 ANATOMY OF A DEAL Go deep and get all the details that everyone wants to know about the hottest developments in town. 5 THE CRANE REPORT Want the inside scoop on all the new developments? This visual map of projects lets you see all the biggest projects in Dallas-Fort Worth at a glance. 5 ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION In each issue, the biggest names in Dallas real estate discuss a different segment of the local market. 5 FOUNDATIONS Facts and figures that provide valuable market insight. 5 SCORECARD Track the latest sales and lease transactions to keep your finger on the pulse of the market and forecast how it will affect your business. AVAILABLE IN PRINT AND DIGITAL. | WWW. DFWREALESTATEREVIEW.COM To advertise, contact Publisher Quincy Curé Preston at 214.523.5215 or quincy.preston@dmagazine.com.

160

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


HOUSING HOUSING COSTS | HOUSING CHOICES

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

161


HOUSING COSTS Based on the cost of housing compared to median family income, home prices in the DFW region are some of the most affordable in the country according to the Urban Institute. Stability characterizes the DFW housing market. Its ability to remain strong during global economic fluctuations has been sustained through a combination of a lower cost of living compared with other major metropolitan areas and a diverse economic base that has kept unemployment figures well below national levels. The bottom line for families is that a dollar buys more square feet per home in DFW. The ease of travel between smaller cities and major job centers means that employees can choose from a wide variety of communities and neighborhoods to accommodate their lifestyles and price points.

HOME PRICES AROUND THE REGION

Median home prices by ZIP code as of the fourth quarter of 2016 in the DallasFort Worth area as determined by North Texas Real Estate Information System

Sa

N 10 miles

Krum 380

Decatur

Bridgeport

Dallas/Fort Ponder Worth c Fortune and Global headquarters, by gr expansion of local c as by relocations of Justin operations. It is bo the vibrant, diverse 35W as a n today as well progression for this Roanoke well-recognized int DENTON CO. our strengths in adv Westl and headquarter op Haslet

Runaway Bay Paradise New Fairview

Aurora

WISE CO.

Springtown Reno

Keller Azle Saginaw

Watauga North Richland H Haltom City

820

Lake Worth

Richland H

River Oaks White Settlement

Weatherford

Fort Worth

20

Aledo Benbrook Edgecliff Village

Forest Hill Kenne

35W

PARKER CO.

TARRANT CO.

JOHNSON CO.

HOOD CO.

Rendon

Crowley Burleson

Cross Timber Granbury

162

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

SOURCE: North Texas Real Estate Information System

Godley

Joshua

2017


$250,001-$500,000

$100,001-$250,000

> $500,000

anger

Aubrey

380

McKinney

380

Frisco Allen 35E

Fairview

The Colony Lewisville

Plano Wylie

Coppell

Bedford Euless

Northwest Dallas Irving

Hurst

Hills

Fate

North Dallas Northeast Dallas

Garland

Rowlett

Rockwall 30

HUNT CO.

Park Cities

635

Heath

McLendon-Chisholm ROCKWALL CO.

East Dallas

Oak Lawn

Sunnyvale

Dallas

KAUFMAN CO.

Mesquite

30

30

Royse City

Sachse

Richardson 75

Farmers Branch

D/FW Airport

COLLIN CO.

Far North Dallas

Carrollton

Grapevine

Hills

Princeton

Little Elm

Southlake

Colleyville

75

Prosper

Cross Roads

Denton

Celeste

Melissa

Krugerville

continues to draw l 500 rowth and Corinth companies Argyle as well f headquarter oth a testament to e economy in DFW natural Flower Mound s region that is so ternationally for vanced services lake perations.

Forney

Grand Prairie Oak Cliff

Terrell

Balch Springs 20

Arlington

20

South Dallas

Duncanville

edale

n

Weston

Celina

35

HOUSING | HOUSING COSTS

< $100,000

Mansfield

Cedar Hill

DeSoto

35E

Lancaster

Southeast Dallas

Wilmer-Hutchins

67

Red Oak Oak Leaf Pecan Hill

Kaufman

DALLAS CO.

Glenn Heights Ovilla

Combine

Ferris

ELLIS CO.

45

Midlothian Kemp Venus

2017

Waxahachie

Palmer

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

163


HOUSING CHOICES

HOW MUCH HOUSE CAN I BUY? 2 ,3

01 S

QF

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1,8 0

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QF

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T

PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

The Dallas and Fort Worth areas boast convenience and charm in lifestyle and housing opportunities. Whether you are a temporary business traveler or a family of five, the region offers diverse housing options for individuals and families of all sizes. If you lean toward urban chic, relocate to a trendy urban loft complete with skyline views and downtown ambience. The newest trend in DFW housing takes place above shops, restaurants and movie theaters in numerous condominium and loft communities scattered throughout the area. Established neighborhoods with abundant choices of single-family homes abound. Or, for a more relaxed small-town feel, neighboring communities provide homegrown pride mixed with big-city conveniences and friendly neighbors. Dallas and Fort Worth offer unique options perfect for any size family. Whatever your style, Dallasâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fort Worth has the home for you.

3 BEDS 2 BATHS

$220,000 2 ,6

4 BEDS 2 BATHS

89

SQ

[2 M A 50 SQ NS FIE M] LD

$232,500 23 7

8S

QF

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FT

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$259,900 2,7 40

PHOTO: JUDGE FITE CENTURY 21

PHOTO: JUDGE FITE CENTURY 21

4 BED 2 BATH

4 BEDS 2 BATHS

SQ

[2 LE W 55 SQ ISV M] ILL E

$264,900 NO

FT

RT

1,9 91

164

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

$279,500

FT LS

PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

PHOTO: JUDGE FITE CENTURY 21

4 BEDS 3 BATHS

SQ

[ H R 18 5 S ICH Q M LA ] ND HIL

3 BEDS 3 BATHS

$281,000 2017


84

SQ

[25 9 PL SQ M AN ] O

4 ,2

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SQ

[3 9 2 IRV SQ M ING ]

FT

QF

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$415,000

2 BEDS 2.5 BATHS

4 ,6

42

SQ

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T

02

SQ

[20 5 DA SQ M LL A ] S

$749,000

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32

SQ

[4 2 PR 1 SQ OS M] PE R

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$775,000 3,3

89

$899,000

FT

PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

4 BEDS 4.5 BATHS

SQ

[3 1 5 DA SQ M LL A ] S

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PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

2017

$779,000

3 BEDS 3.5 BATHS

4 ,5

PHOTO: BRIGGS FREEMAN

3 BEDS 2 BATHS

SQ

PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

4 BEDS 4 BATHS

2 ,2

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$499,990

$430,000 3,3

PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

4 BEDS 4 BATHS

PHOTO: EBBY HALLIDAY

5 BEDS 3 BATHS

3, 4 16 [3 S

FT

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$350,000

SQ

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4 BEDS 3 BATHS

2,1 53

HOUSING | HOUSING CHOICES

2,7

4 BEDS 4 BATHS

$1,015,000 D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

165


HOUSING | HOUSING CHOICES

APARTMENT COSTS Apartment dwelling in the DFW area depends on your preferences. All types and sizes are found throughout our region. Communities range from traditional apartment complexes to luxury high-rise buildings to large-scale communities with every bell and whistle imaginable (including someone who will come and change a blown light bulb!). Some newer apartment communities offer amenities such as dog runs, workout facilities, tanning services and community activities ranging from movies on the lawn to wine tastings to Monday Night Football parties. In recent years, mixed-use communities— which include not only multiple apartment buildings, but also restaurants, shops, movie theaters and underground parking—have popped up all over, appealing to a segment of people who desire an urban, walkable neighborhood experience without the responsibilities of homeownership.

TWO-BEDROOM RENT RATES

35

35E 121

75

35E

121 114

35W

635 75 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30 360

175

20 20

35E 35W

45

AVERAGE MONTHLY RENT < $902 $903-$1,114 $1,115-$1,381 $1,382-$1,925 $1,926-$3,485

SOURCE: Axiometrics, December 2016

166

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


HOUSING | HOUSING CHOICES

NEW SUBDIVISIONS TOP 25 SUBDIVISIONS ( 2016 )

RANKED BY NUMBER OF NEW HOME STARTS

7

4 35

17

3 23 2 15 19

22 1

13 10 6

35E

9 12 121

5 14

75

25 35E

20

11

8

121 114

35W

24 635 75

16 35W

78

30

183

820

161 80

12

30

21

360

18 175

20 20

35E 35W

AVERAGE SALES PRICES

(Ranked by new home starts) 45

SUBDIVISION (STARTS)

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

SUBDIVISION (STARTS)

AVERAGE SALES PRICE

1 WESTRIDGE (520) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $319,680

14 CANYON FALLS (233) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $391,113

2 PALOMA CREEK (486) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$279,428

15 SAVANNAH (232). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $310,026

3 ARTESIA (364) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$337,631

16 WEST FORK RANCH (232). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$253,490

4 LIGHT FARMS (345) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $469,638

17 CROSS OAK RANCH (220) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $258,013

5 HARVEST (329) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$340,758

18 HEARTLAND (217) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $234,821

6 PHILLIPS CREEK RANCH (326) . . . . . . . . . . . . .$619,435

19 FRISCO HILLS (205). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$384,149

7 TRINITY FALLS (297) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$389,730

20 SENDERA RANCH (203) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $236,375

8 CASTLE HILLS (281) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$447,855

21 WINDMILL FARMS (203) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $233,108

9 RICHWOODS (280) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650,531

22 PRESTWYCK (184) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $354,001

10 FRISCO LAKES (271) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$326,407

23 UNION PARK (183) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $381,033

11 ABBEY CROSSING (260). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $215,865

24 CARUTH (175) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $315,865

12 CRAIG RANCH (255). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $462,217

25 INSPIRATION (172) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $373,284

13 RIVENDALE BY THE LAKE (234) . . . . . . . . . . . $309,682

SOURCE: Metrostudy

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

167


SCHOOLS SCHOOL DISTRICTS | PRIVATE SCHOOLS

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

169


ALVORD ISD 713 | 1442

SCHOOL DISTRICTS School districts in the Dallas–Fort Worth region are locally administered and independent of each other. District lines generally relate to city boundaries, but are not exclusive to them. For example, the Richardson ISD includes students in Richardson and parts of Dallas and Garland. The Dallas Independent School District—or Dallas ISD, as it is known locally—is the region’s largest school district, with about 160,000 students. Students attending Dallas ISD schools live in Addison, Balch Springs, Carrollton, Cockrell Hill, Dallas, Farmers Branch, Garland, Highland Park, Hutchins, Mesquite, Seagoville, University Park and Wilmer. Since 2007, the district has more than quadrupled the number of schools receiving an Exemplary rating, the state’s MILLSAP ISD highest rating. In Tarrant County, the Fort 943 | 1393 Worth ISD dominates, with about 85,000 students. Dallas ISD hosts 15 magnet schools, including several that have been nationally recognized. Its Booker T. Washington BROCK ISD 1,295 | 1522 High School for the Performing and Visual Arts is located in the heart of the LIPAN ISD Dallas Arts District and includes several 358 | 1478 internationally known artists among its alumni. The arts magnet, along with the School for the Talented and Gifted and the School of Science and Engineering at Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Center in Dallas, were recognized as among the best high schools in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. Other area schools recognized by U.S. News include Highland Park High School, Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts, Uplift Academy, and Harmony charter schools. In 2016, 45 area high schools received seven of seven available distinctions from the Texas Education Agency, and 5 area schools were recognized as Blue Ribbon Schools, a national honor awarded to schools that have achieved academic excellence or made significant progress in closing the achievement gap.

170

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

PILOT POINT ISD 1,392 | 1427

SANGER ISD 2,686 | 1440

SLIDELL ISD 269 | 1320

CHICO ISD 616 | 1414 AUBREY ISD 2,315 | 1485

KRUM ISD 2,055 | 1434 DECATUR ISD 2,992 | 1462

PR 8,2

DENTON ISD 27,296 | 1476 PONDER ISD 1,273 | 1527

FRIS 53,1

LITTLE ELM ISD 7,171 | 1421

BRIDGEPORT ISD 2,090 | 1427 PARADISE ISD 1,135 | 1452

LAKE DALLAS ISD 3,958 | 1459 ARGYLE ISD 2,227 | 1600

BOYD ISD 1,174 | 1387

LEWISVILLE ISD 53,396 | 1611

NORTHWEST ISD 20,900 | 1491 POOLVILLE ISD 506 | 1319 SPRINGTOWN ISD 3,402 | 1449

CARROLL ISD 8,056 | 1740

AZLE ISD 6,229 | 1447

PEASTER ISD 1,057 | 1529

KELLER ISD 34,099 | 1548

EAGLE MT-SAGINAW ISD 19,158 | 1421

GRAPEVINE-COLLEYVILLE ISD 13,768 | 1624

BIRDVILLE ISD 24,245 | 1468

IRVING ISD 34,872 | 1238

HURST-EULESS-BEDFORD ISD 22,780 | 1501

CASTLEBERRY ISD 4,044 | 1281

WEATHERFORD ISD 7,840 | 1465

CARROLLTON-FARME 25,724 |

HIGHLAND PAR 7,054

LAKE WORTH ISD 3,296 | 1279 WHITE SETTLEMENT ISD 6,697 | 1373

COPPELL ISD 11,851 | 1704

FORT WORTH ISD 86,869 | 1232 ALEDO ISD 5,229 | 1592

GRAND PRAIRIE ISD 29,309 | 1334

ARLINGTON ISD 63,167 | 1433

DUNCANVILLE ISD 12,761 | 1306

KENNEDALE ISD 3,134 | 1445 EVERMAN ISD 5,609 | 1225

CROWLEY ISD 15,050 | 1335

CEDAR HILL ISD 8,018 | 1346

MANSFIELD ISD 33,738 | 1457

DE SOTO ISD 9,716 | 1249

RED 5,82

BURLESON ISD 11,342 | 1434

GRANBURY ISD 6,971 | 1485

GODLEY ISD 1,765 | 1402

MIDLOTHIAN ISD 8,125 | 1492

JOSHUA ISD 5,125 | 1457 KEENE ISD 1,018| 1265

ALVARADO ISD 3,588 | 1367

VENUS ISD 1,990 | 1318

WAXAHACHIE 8,107 | 146

CLEBURNE ISD 6,670 | 1408 TOLAR ISD 779 | 1473

GRANDVIEW ISD 1,134 | 1430

MAYPEARL ISD 1,062 | 1473

GLEN ROSE ISD 1,726 | 1419 RIO VISTA ISD 726 | 1385

CHOOSING A DISTRICT You have lots of choices for schooling in the Dallas area: public, public charter, private or parochial, or home schooling. Should you want to send your kids to public school, rest assured that the Dallas-Fort Worth area has many fine public schools. In Texas, public school districts operate independently and are governed by locally elected school boards that locally implement state guidelines through a selection of instructional programs, curriculum and local expectations that often exceed state minimums. Local districts are governed by an independently elected school board of trustees that hires a superintendent as CEO; sets a district philosophy (vision and mission) and local policies; selects a curriculum within the state guidelines; and sets the local ISD tax rate, budget and district boundaries. Here’s what you need to consider in finding the right school district for you.

SOURCE: Texas Education Agency

MILFORD ISD 255 | N/A

1

ITALY ISD 573 | 1303

THE DISTRICT AND SCHOOL’S PHILOSOPHY VS. YOUR FAMILY’S INTERESTS AND NEEDS > Vision, mission, goals > Size of school and class size > Grade level alignment (K-4, K-5, K-6, etc.) > Curriculum variations > Parent engagement

2

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING STAFF AND TEACHER PERFORMANCE) The Dallas County area education coalition, COMMIT! and its partners offer a way of best assessing student achievement within schools and districts. Find it online at commit2dallas.org.

2017


ANNA ISD 3,051 | 1453

CELINA ISD 2,349 | 1505

RANK

ROSPER ISD 254 | 1561

SCO ISD 130 | 1609

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT BEST HIGH SCHOOLS (2016)

COMMERCE ISD 1,603 | 1408

CELESTE ISD 499 | 1395

BLUE RIDGE ISD 699 | 1333

MELISSA ISD 2,327 | 1475

MCKINNEY ISD 24,626 | 1576

ALLEN ISD 20,739 | 1605

1 2

BLAND ISD 608 | 1608 PRINCETON ISD 3,859 | 1437

FARMERSVILLE ISD 1,559 | 1503 GREENVILLE ISD 5,208 | 1385

LOVEJOY ISD 3,925 | 1677

COMMUNITY ISD 1,916 | 1392

PLANO ISD 54,322 | 1693

CADDO MILLS ISD 1,680 | 1557

WYLIE ISD 14,562 | 1467

ERS BRANCH ISD 1476

ROYSE CITY ISD 5,209 | 1422

RICHARDSON ISD 38,671 | 1541

GARLAND ISD 57,418 | 1434

BOLES ISD 516 | 1401

ROCKWALL ISD 15,344 | 1551

RK ISD (DALLAS) | 1792

QUINLAN ISD 2,571 | 1378

SUNNYVALE ISD 1,633 | 1540 MESQUITE ISD 40,718 | 1337

TERRELL ISD 4,253 | 1360

FORNEY ISD 9,364 | 1434

WILLS POINT ISD 2,411 | 1426

DALLAS ISD 158,495 | 1279

CRANDALL ISD 3,443 | 1460

KAUFMAN ISD 3,825 | 1352

LANCASTER ISD 7,315 | 1198

D OAK ISD 23 | 1441

FERRIS ISD 2,497 | 1317 SCURRY-ROSSER ISD 1,010 | 1388 PALMER ISD 1,162 | 1362

E ISD 63

KEMP ISD 1,496 | 1344

MABANK ISD 3,386 | 1493

ENNIS ISD 5,799 | 1458

LEGEND ISD NAME

AVALON ISD 379 | 1291

3

2016 ENROLLMENT | 2014 SAT SCORE

PROGRAM OFFERINGS AND COMPATIBILITY WITH YOUR CHILD’S INTERESTS AND NEEDS > Athletics > Career and technology > Dual credit > Extracurricular activities > Fine arts

4

CITY BOUNDARIES

DISTRICT CHARACTERISTICS Each district has a unique profile. Visiting district websites and reading the expanded district profiles at mydallasmove.com will reveal their distinct features and offerings.

> Gifted and talented > Performing arts > Special education CHARTER SCHOOLS In 1995, the 74th Texas Legislature passed legislation giving the state the authority to create open-enrollment charter schools. These schools are subject to fewer state laws than other public schools with the idea of ensuring fiscal and academic accountability without undue regulation of instructional methods or pedagogical innovation. Like school districts, charter schools are monitored and accredited under the statewide testing and accountability system.

2017

1 4

CAMPBELL ISD 353 | 1650

3

22

4

58

5

97

LONE OAK ISD 988 | 1429

6

118

7

139

8 9 10 11 12 13

146 155 176 212 222 259

14

264

15 16 17 18

267 289 376 418

19

447

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38

653 660 664 674 675 677 702 769 773 794 878 885 894 922 923 977 1050 1201 1239

39

1263

40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

1271 1274 1280 1393 1503 1543 1590 1597 1682 1693 1709 1742 1801 1942 1993

SCHOOL

CITY

School For The Talented And Gifted School of Science and Engineering Magnet Uplift Education - Summit International Preparatory Westlake Academy Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women's Leadership School Uplift Education - North Hills Prep HS Booker T. Washington HS for the Performing and Visual Arts Highland Park HS Harmony Science Academy - Euless Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet Uplift Williams Preparatory Lovejoy High School Uplift Peak Preparatory Harmony School of Innovation Forth Worth Harmony School of Innovation - Dallas Harmony Science Academy - Dallas School of Health Professions Coppell HS Rosie Sorrells School of Education and Social Services HS Colleyville Heritage HS School of Business and Management Liberty HS Grapevine HS Richardson HS Pearce HS Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts Creekview HS Prosper HS McKinney North HS McKinney HS Keller HS Argyle HS Wakeland HS McKinney Boyd HS Frisco HS Flower Mound HS Aledo HS Marcus HS Trinidad Garza Early College At Mountain View Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy Byron Nelson HS Heritage HS Timber Creek HS Centennial HS Allen HS Central HS Lone Star HS John Dubiski Career HS Guyer HS Mansfield HS Woodrow Wilson HS Martin HS L. D. Bell HS North Garland HS

Dallas Dallas Arlington Westlake Dallas Irving Dallas Dallas Euless Dallas Dallas Lucas Dallas

SCHOOLS | SCHOOL DISTRICTS

WOLFE CITY ISD 662 | 1520

Fort Worth Carrollton Dallas Dallas Coppell Dallas Colleyville Dallas Frisco Grapevine Richardson Richardson Fort Worth Carrollton Prosper McKinney McKinney Keller Argyle Frisco McKinney Frisco Flower Mound Aledo Flower Mound Dallas Dallas Trophy Club Frisco Fort Worth Frisco Allen Keller Frisco Grand Prairie Denton Mansfield Dallas Arlington Hurst Garland

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

171


PRIVATE SCHOOLS Parents choose to send their children to private schools for a variety of reasons. Some elect private schools for religious or moral reasons. Others are concerned about having smaller class sizes and more individual attention for the students. Others still are focused on the highest possible learning standards and rigorous college prep.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS RANKED BY ANNUAL TUITION* 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 38 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

St. Mark's School of Texas, $29,496 The Episcopal School of Dallas, $29,475 Greenhill School, $29,450 The Hockaday School, $29,375 Shelton School, $27,300 Parish Episcopal School, $27,220 The Winston School Dallas, $27,075 Oak Hill Academy, $24,750 The Lamplighter School, $23,928 Alcuin School, $23,810 Fort Worth Country Day, $23,100 Ann and Nate Levine Academy-A Solomon Schechter School, $23,000 The Oakridge School, $22,275 The St. Anthony School , $22,000 Trinity Valley School, $21,630 Dallas International School, $21,400 Trinity Christian Academy Addison, $21,020 All Saints Episcopal School Fort Worth, $20,780 Lakehill Preparatory School, $20,700 Prestonwood Christian Academy, $20,650 Dallas Academy, $20,310 Ursuline Academy of Dallas, $20,050 The Westwood School, $19,695 Cistercian Catholic Preparatory School, $19,625 Good Shepherd Episcopal School Dallas, $19,577 Hill School of Fort Worth, $19,440 The Cambridge School of Dallas, $19,175 Novus Academy, $19,000 Great Lakes Academy, $18,600 Liberty Christian School, $18,480 The Fairhill School, $18,400 Canterbury Episcopal School Desoto, $18,250 Key School, $17,800 The Selwyn School, $17,780 Jesuit College Preparatory School, $17,635 John Paul II High School Plano, $17,550 Southwest Christian School-Prep Campus, $17,375 Focus on the Future Training Center, $17,200 Providence Christian School of Texas, $17,200 The Highlands School, $15,500 Dallas Christian Academy, $15,397 Bishop Lynch High School, $15,200 Bethany Christian School, $14,995 First Baptist Academy of Dallas, $14,650 Fort Worth Christian School, $14,635 The Clariden School, $14,300 Cedar Hill Preparatory Academy, $14,000 The Anderson Private School for the Gifted Talented and Creative, $13,690 McKinney Christian Academy, $13,600 Lake Country Christian School, $13,595

51

Bishop Dunne Catholic High School, $13,575

PRIVATE SCHOOL CALENDAR

> Testing for private schools often takes place in the fall > Enrollment is in January or February > School typically starts earlier in August

172

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

* Tuition shown for highest grade offered

SOURCE: Source: Texas Private School Accreditation Commission and School websites

2017


LEGEND

SCHOOLS | PRIVATE SCHOOLS

35

PRIVATE SCHOOL

34

49

35E 121

30

35E

75

43

20 46 114

35W

17

121

28

50

35W

45 183

820

24 40

12

36

14 3 23 35 6 10 16 635 25 9 2 7 14 27 8 22 38 75

161

19

37

30

42 80

360

33 26

78

12

30

11

21

44

48 13

38

31 5

41

18

29

51 175

20 20

15 32

35E

35W

47 45

RESEARCHING SCHOOLS

The Dallas region offers a variety of private school options. Some of the terms you will encounter as you look at private school options include: > Learning differences schools – These schools provide for students with learning differences across the spectrum and can range from pre-K through 12th grade. > Boarding schools – Several of the single-gender private schools offer full-time boarding as well as day student options. > Language/culture specific – Some schools offer immersion in specific languages, such as French, Chinese and Japanese. Many of these schools offer Saturday and summer options for

2017

families who want students to attend a traditional school and supplement with cultural and language immersion. > Montessori method – This is a childcentered educational approach based on scientific observations of children from birth to adulthood. Schools incorporating this self-direction and discovery method are located across the region, but they generally do not extend beyond elementary. A number of public districts also have a Montessori choice option within the district.

> Classical – These schools are usually characterized by small class sizes and a classics-based education, normally with fewer team athletic options. > College preparatory – Prep schools focus on academic rigor in preparation for demanding collegiate programs. > Religious/parochial – Some schools are associated with specific religious denominations or churches and incorporate religious teaching as part of the curriculum.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

173


QUALITY OF LIFE COST OF LIVING ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT LIVE-WORK-PLAY ATTRACTIONS AND AMENITIES PARKS AND RECREATION

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

175


COST OF LIVING XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXX

SEATTLE (145.1)

Quite simply, it’s easy to live in DFW. The Dallas–Fort Worth region is one of the most affordable in the BUga. Icilign imagnihic temcountry, andebit a competitive advantage for companies as entempore dest dist erum, conet ut fugit they seekvolendi both to keep labor costs low and evel ipis genihit aturias atatem hit to recruit the best workers. audit re iniscil laudam, qui teEmployees molum eum in DFW enjoy a higher standard living, quo ommoluptiunt excepel mintofquam, with consistently lower costs forntorro housing, volum eum quatem ute sandige groceries, transportation, and health care idicides desequassit, sequat fuga. compared with workers in other major U.S. business centers. The region’s relatively low housing prices provide the strongest edge for companies that operate here, coming in more than 24 percent lower than the national average and more than 50 percent lower than many other major metropolitan areas.

SAN FRANCISCO (177.4)

DENVER (110.4)

LOS ANGELES (142.3) PHOENIX (97.0) SAN DIEGO (144.4)

FORT WORTH +3.4%

+12.6% +2.3% MISC.

-7.4%

IF YOU LIVED IN ONE OF THESE CITIES AND MOVED TO DALLAS, HERE’S HOW YOUR COST OF LIVING WOULD CHANGE.

176

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

-4.4%

-1.9%

-2.0%

BOSTON

CHICAGO

+3% -10% -20%

-19%

0%

LOS ANGELES +4%

+4%

-38%

COMP.

-3%

-7%

-4% -24%

-39% -56%

SOURCE: C2ER

For example, housing costs in Dallas are 56% lower than in Boston

-61%

2017


100=US AVERAGE

BOSTON (148.1) MINNEAPOLIS (105.6) NEW YORK (MANHATTAN) (228.2) CHICAGO (118.5) WASHINGTON DC (149.2)

QUALITY OF LIFE | COST OF LIVING

ACCRA COST OF LIVING INDEX

KANSAS CITY (93.1)

CHARLOTTE (94.8)

DALLAS

OKLAHOMA CITY (84.6) ATLANTA (98.7)

+8.5%

DALLAS (100.4) FORT WORTH (102.3)

+1.5%

-12.0%

+6.3%

+6.6%

+.4%

MISC.

COMP.

-1.3%

AUSTIN (96.7) HOUSTON (98.8) SAN ANTONIO (86.0)

MIAMI (111.0)

MISC. GROCERIES

NEW YORK

-6%

-20%

-22% -24% -35%

-81%

2017

UTILITIES

PHILADELPHIA

-8% -15%

HOUSING

-12% 0%

For example, utilities costs in Dallas are 20% lower than in Philadelphia

TRANSPORTATION

HEALTH CARE

SAN DIEGO

-4% -12%

MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITE

SAN FRANCISCO

-1% -23%

COMP.

-8% -17%

-25%

-11%

-63% -73%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

177


THE DEE AND CHARLES WYLY THEATRE, PART OF THE AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Ballet Folklorico Bass Performance Hall Casa Mañana Charles W. Eisemann Center Circle Theatre City of Dallas Performance Hall Dallas Black Dance Theatre Dallas Children’s Theater Dallas Summer Musicals The Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre Grapevine Opry Irving Arts Center Kalita Humphreys Theater Latino Cultural Center Majestic Theater The Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center The Patty Granville Arts Center Texas Ballet Theater

178

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

African American Museum Amon Carter Museum Cavanaugh Flight Museum The Children’s Aquarium at Fair Park Dallas Heritage Village Dallas Holocaust Museum Dallas Museum of Art Fair Park Fort Worth Museum of Science & History Frontiers of Flight Museum Heritage Farmstead International Bowling Museum & Hall of Fame

PHOTO: TMICHAEL MCGARY

MUSIC AND THEATER OF DFW

MUSEUMS OF DALLAS-FORT WORTH

TURTLE CREEK CHORALE - DALLAS

Kimbell Art Museum The Meadows Museum Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Museum of the American Railroads Nasher Sculpture Center National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame National Scouting Museum Perot Museum of Nature & Science The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealy Plaza The Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art

PHOTO: TDALLAS CVB

Dallas-Fort Worth has not one but two major arts districts. The Dallas Arts District, which is anchored by the Dallas Museum of Art, Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, and AT&T Performing Arts Center, is nearly 70 acres—the largest urban arts district in the country. Here you can catch a performance of Texas Ballet Theater, a Broadway touring production, classical or local musicians, a night of live storytelling, TED talks, movies and music under the stars, festivals, art exhibits, and so much more. We’d be willing to bet you could spend every weekend in our Arts District and never run out of new things to do. The Fort Worth Cultural District claims fi ve internationally recognized museums, including the Kimbell Art Museum, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, and The Modern. Beyond our fantastic cultural centers, DFW is home to hundreds of smaller museums and public galleries; scores of professional and community theaters; and dozens of local symphony and chamber orchestras, dance troupes, and opera associations. DFW is Texas’ most arts intensive metro area on a per capita basis—meaning we spend a lot of money per person on cultural arts. No matter what artistic pursuits you enjoy, you can find them here.

PHOTO: TIM HURSLEY

ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE

2017


QUALITY OF LIFE | ARTS, CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

PHOTO: JASON JANIK

PHOTO: NIGEL YOUNG, FOSTER + PARTNERS

MARGOT AND BILL WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE

DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT

MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH

Dallas Museum of Art Nasher Sculpture Center Crow Collection of Asian Art Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center The Perot Museum of Nature and Science The AT&T Performing Arts Center: The Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House The Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre City Performance Hall Annette Strauss Artist Square

FORT WORTH CULTURAL DISTRICT Amon Carter Museum of American Art Kimbell Art Museum & Renzo Piano Pavilion Darnell Street Auditorium Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Casa Mañana National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

2017

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Fort Worth Community Arts Center W.E. Scott Theatre

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

179


LIVE-WORK-PLAY IN DALLAS-FORT WORTH Modern developments in every corner of the metroplex make the transition of a Dallas move easier than ever. These wellthought-out living centers make it possible to have an insta-community, where you literally walk from the place you live to shopping, dining, entertainment, green space, public transport and sometimes even your workplace. Imagine how much time that frees up, and how flexible your schedule becomes, not to mention the social opportunities it affords. In DallasFort Worth, you are lucky enough to have many options for this new style of living. We highlight just a few notable locations. As we speak, many more are in the process of being built.

1

WEST VILLAGE

VICTORY PARK

Centered around a park & ride DART Station. Houses an Angelika Theatre, restaurants, shopping, loft-style offices and dwellings.

Pioneering walkable district in the heart of Uptown. Accessed by DART and the M-Line Trolley. Magnolia Theatre joins scenepacked dining and unique retail.

Anchored by the American Airlines Center with a big crowd-gathering screenfilled plaza. High-rise living is upscale and service-oriented.

DALLAS

4

DALLAS

5

DALLAS

6

BISHOP ARTS

MAIN STREET DISTRICT

SOUTHSIDE ON LAMAR

First built in the 1920s around Dallas’ busiest trolley stop. Recent redevelopment maintains the vintage artsy character with 160 one-off shops and restaurants.

Downtown Dallas urban revival at its best. Preserved buildings let hotels pair with residences. Active nightlife and dining.

Conversion of an old Sears distribution center into lofts with community space for artists, hip bars, and retail.

7

DALLAS

8

DALLAS

9

WEST 7TH

SUNDANCE SQUARE

FRISCO SQUARE

The former headquarters of Acme Brick is now a pedestrian-friendly urban entertainment district not far from downtown, near TCU.

Park free on the 35 blocks of brick-paved streets in Downtown Fort Worth. Features restored turn-ofthe-century buildings and an expansive plaza.

Incorporates Frisco’s City Hall and public library along with lots of shopping, apartment buildings and office space.

FORT WORTH

10

FORT WORTH

11

FRISCO

12

LEGACY & LEGACY WEST

ADDISON CIRCLE

WATTERS CREEK

The Shops at Legacy is the vibrant heart of the Legacy Business Park. Legacy West is the newest addition to the area with 250+ acres retail, dining, residential, hotel and offices.

You’ll remember it for the giant blue steel sculpture in the center of a roundabout. You’ll visit for events like Kaboom Town and Oktoberfest.

The first LEED-certified retail complex in Texas offers open-air shopping, dining, office space and apartments along with weekend concerts and events.

PLANO

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

3

MOCKINGBIRD STATION

DALLAS

180

2

ADDISON

ALLEN

2017


McKINNEY URBAN VILLAGE

20 FRISCO SQUARE

9

THE GATE WADE PARK

FRISCO STATION THE STAR LEGACY WEST GRANDSCAPE

DOWNTOWN McKINNEY

12 WATTERS CREEK

10 LEGACY TOWN

CENTER

HIGHLAND VILLAGE

15

17 DOWNTOWN PLANO

PARKER SQUARE

18

CITYLINE AMLI GALATYN STATION

ADDISON CIRCLE

DOWNTOWN ROANOKE

14

DOWNTOWN GRAPEVINE

CYPRESS WATERS

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

13 ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER

19

16 EASTSIDE

11

FIREWHEEL TOWN CENTER

BRICK ROW

DOWNTOWN CARROLLTON MIDTOWN DALLAS

VILLAGE AT ROWLETT

PRESTON HOLLOW VILLAGE

PARK LANE PLACE

ROCKWALL COMMONS

QUALITY OF LIFE | LIVE-WORK-PLAY

DOWNTOWN DENTON

1 MOCKINGBIRD STATION VIRIDIAN

VICTORY PARK 3

TRINITY RIVER VISION WEST 7TH

7

MAIN ST THE CANYON IN OAK CLIFF

8 SUNDANCE SQUARE

DEEP ELLUM

5

6 SOUTHSIDE ON LAMAR

4

BISHOP ARTS DISTRICT

ARLINGTON CITY CENTER

MAGNOLIA AVENUE

LOWER GREENVILLE

WEST VILLAGE/CITYPLACE 2

LANCASTER URBAN VILLAGE

DESOTO TOWN CENTER DOWNTOWN MANSFIELD DOWNTOWN BURLESON

13

14

15

16

ALLIANCE TOWN CENTER

SOUTHLAKE TOWN SQUARE

PARKER SQUARE

EASTSIDE

National large retailers shoulder grocery stores, a Cinemark movie theater, casual restaurants and three residential complexes.

The city recreated a modern oldtyme town square with City Hall and post office in the center of sidewalk shopping and eating.

Newly-built but antique-looking awning-covered storefronts surround a park with gazebo. Also home to the campus of North Central Texas College.

Next to a DART line for a downtown commute and the Telecom Corridor. Services plus a variety of dining options on-site could render you car-free.

FORT WORTH

17

SOUTHLAKE

18

FLOWER MOUND

19

RICHARDSON

20

DOWNTOWN PLANO

DOWNTOWN ROANOKE

CYPRESS WATERS

DOWNTOWN McKINNEY

Named as one of America’s best downtowns, it includes a vibrant community of urban living, arts, unique shops and restaurants.

They redesigned the town’s established Oak Street and plaza, but maintained the historic downtown feel.

This thousand-acre planned community sits around a 36-acre lake near Coppell. Includes one of the nation’s first “net-zero” elementary schools.

The revamped original historic town square sits in the middle of quaint shops, local restaurants and entertainment venues.

PLANO

2017

ROANOKE

DALLAS

MCKINNEY

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

181


PARKS AND RECREATION The Dallas–Fort Worth region offers a bevy of recreational opportunities, with several lakes and state parks that feature boating, water sports, hiking trails, and trails for both mountain biking and road biking. The Dallas Arboretum and the Fort Worth Botanical Gardens, located in the heart of Dallas and Fort Worth respectively, provide a peaceful escape from hectic everyday responsibilities.

PARKS

HILL STATE PARK 1 CEDAR Cedar Hill 7 Fishing, boating, and kayaking on Joe Pool Lake 7 1,200 acres with 15 miles of mountain biking trails 7 Walking trails through open fields and wooded areas 7 More than 350 wooded campsites 7 Penn Farm Agricultural History Center

GREEN SPACE IN DFW

PARKS AND NATURE CENTERS Cedar Ridge Preserve Children's Aquarium at Fair Park Dallas Arboretum Dallas World Aquarium Dinosaur Valley State Park Dogwood Canyon Audubon Center at Cedar Hill Fort Worth Botanic Garden Fort Worth Japanese Garden Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge Fossil Rim Wildlife Center HEARD Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary River Legacy Park and Science Center The Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden Trinity Forest Adventure Park Trinity River Audubon Center

4 RIVER LEGACY PARK Arlington 7 1,300 acres of forests and greenbelts 7 10 miles of cross-country trails 7 A treetop playground that looks like a giant treehouse 7 A canoe launch with access to up to 8 miles of paddling 7 River Legacy Living Science Center

2

2 5

ZOOS Dallas Zoo Fort Worth Zoo

1

RODEO Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo Mesquite Rodeo Stockyards Championship Rodeo

AUTO RACING Texas Motor Speedway Texas Motorplex

GOLF

ARBOR HILLS NATURE PRESERVE Plano 7 200 acres of rolling hills for exploring 7 Off-road biking trails 7 Picnic pavilion and kids playground 7 Butterflies, birds, and other wildlife 7 Dog friendly

3

PHOTO: CITY OF PLANO

PGA Tour - AT&T Byron Nelson Championship PGA Tour - Dean & Deluca Invitational

PROFESSIONAL SPORTS Allen Americans (Minor League Hockey) Dallas Cowboys (NFL) Dallas Diamonds (Women's Football) Dallas Mavericks (NBA) Dallas Sidekicks (Soccer) Dallas Stars (NHL) Dallas Wings (WNBA) FC Dallas (Major League Soccer) Fort Worth Cats (Minor League Baseball) Frisco RoughRiders (Minor League Baseball) Grand Prairie Air Hogs (Minor League Baseball) Texas Legends (NBA Development League) Texas Rangers (MLB) Texas Tornado (Minor League Hockey)

182

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

MEADOWMERE PARK Grapevine 7 252 acres on the shore of Lake Grapevine 7 Sloping sandy beaches and camping 7 Swimming, paddleboarding, kayaking 7 Large, colorful children’s playground area

4

2017


TRINITY PARK Fort Worth 7 Next to the Fort Worth Zoo, along the banks of the Trinity River 7 Annual events such as Mayfest and the National Veterans Day Run 7 Miniature Railroad 7 Natural surface trails for hiking, biking, and running 7 Fishing and duck feeding

5

3

WHITE ROCK LAKE PARK Dallas 7 9.33-mile hike and bike trail 7 Shoreline picnic areas 7 Kayak and paddleboard rentals 7 Audubon Society bird watching area 7 Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden

6

6 7

Walking, running, hiking, and biking are popular here, and we’ve got plenty of places to explore outdoors. The city of Dallas has more than 100 miles of hike and bike trails—and outside the city, where urban life gives way to more pastoral pursuits, you’ll find so many more. The Katy, Santa Fe, and White Rock trails are lovely paved paths, but if a walk (or ride) in the woods is more to your liking, it’s only a matter of effort. Certified Master Naturalist Bill Holston recommends Cedar Ridge Preserve in South Dallas for its wooded hills and wildlife; Dogwood Canyon in Cedar Hill for its hilly terrain and flowering trees in spring; and Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve in Plano for its creeks, ponds, and easy-to-follow routes.

QUALITY OF LIFE | PARKS AND RECREATION

NORTH TEXAS TRAILS

TRAILS 1 2

3

4 6

5 9

8

7

10

KLYDE WARREN PARK Dallas 7 5.2 acres downtown 7 Performance pavilion, walking trails, dog park, children’s playground, games area 7 Free events such as book signings, group exercise, movies, music, and more 7 Food trucks every day 7 Accessible by M-Line Trolley, DART, and D-link

7

SOURCE: DRC Research

ARBOR HILLS NATURE PRESERVE

2017

12

11 13 15

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

14

16

Erwin Park Frisco NW Community Park Trail Knob Hills Arbor Hills Northshore Trail Katie Jackson Squabble Creek Rowlett Creek Preserve Horseshoe Harry Moss Park L.B. Houston Nature Trails River Legacy Oak Cliff Nature Preserve Boulder Park Big Cedar Goat Island Preserve

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

183


AROUND THE REGION TRAFFIC COUNTS

|

MAJOR TRANSPORTATION CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS DALLAS

|

|

FUTURE PROJECTS

EASTERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA |

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY PARK CITIES AND VICINITY

|

WESTERN COLLIN COUNTY

|

URBAN CORE

NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY

SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

ARLINGTON/GRAND PRAIRIE AREA |

FORT WORTH AND VICINITY

|

|

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY

|

DENTON AREA

EASTERN COLLIN COUNTY

PHOTO: MICHAEL SAMPLES

2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

185


TRAFFIC COUNTS Traffic counts are often essential elements of any site selection process. Retailers, in particular, use traffic counts to establish their operations in highly visible and easily accessible locations. In DFW, I-635, I-35 and Highway 75 are some of the most traveled major roads in the region. Heavy arterial traffic is often centered around major centers of retail activity and along corridors that connect the region’s business centers. Preston Road in Collin County, Collins and Cooper Roads in Arlington and Northwest Highway in Dallas are just a few examples around the region.

DAILY TRAFFIC COUNTS

Traffic counts are provided by the Texas Department of Transportation and local municipalities and compiled by the North Central Texas Council of Governments. Data represent 24-hour counts on various dates and years.

35E

35W 114

183

820 360

12

30 161

35W 67

ARTERIALS DAILY TRAFFIC COUNTS

186

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

1-2530

36,287 – 47,626

19,938-27,992

2,531-6,038

9,922-14,290

27,993-39,871

6,039-9,921

14,291-19,937

39,872-96,922

SOURCE: North Central Texas Council of Governments

2017


4-16,266

121

16,267-26,353 26,354-38,185

75

38,186-51,494

190

51,495-65,620 65,621-81,517 81,518-102,594 102,595-150,573

635

DNT

AROUND THE REGION | TRAFFIC COUNTS

DAILY TRAFFIC COUNTS

30

FREEWAYS

35E 121

175

20

75 35W 190

35E

114

45 635

DNT

30

183

820 360

12

30 161 175

20 35E

35W 67

2017

45

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

187


HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

MAJOR TRANSPORTATION CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

5

Key Projects Awarded or Under Construction Key Projects (Procurement)

1

DAL/FTW Key Projects (Development)

Transportation is essential to Texas’ future. The movement of goods and people in an efficient manner ensures that the economy remains competitive and economically prosperous. North Texas continues to experience tremendous population growth, and this places increased demand on the region’s transportation infrastructure. Billions of dollars are being invested to maintain existing infrastructure, prevent congestion, and ensure mobility and safety by relieving chokepoints and expanding critical corridors. Dozens of projects currently are under underway with many more planned for the future.

7

3

16 22

23 21

15

10

2

11

2

3

4

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

4

8

1

6

14

9

188

1

10

20

I-35E MANAGED LANES North of I-635 to US 380; Phase 1: Add additional lane each direction in Denton Co, add rev toll managed lanes IH 635 to Turbeville, add bridge over Lake Lewisville; Scheduled completion: 2017 NTE SEG. 3A I-30 to north of I-820; Reconstruct highway and add toll managed lanes; reconstruct remainder of I-35W/I-820 interchange; Scheduled completion: 2018 NTE SEG. 3B North of I-820 to U.S. 81/287; Reconstruct and widen highway and add toll mgd and expand lanes; Scheduled completion: 2016 HORSESHOE I-35E (8th St. to Commerce St.) I-30 (Sylvan Avenue to east of I-35E); Reconstruct I-35E and I-30 bridges over Trinity River; rebuild/widen existing highway; Scheduled completion: 2017

5

US 75 North of Melissa Road to FM 455; Reconstruct and widen highway; Scheduled completion: 2019

6

I-345 REHABILITATION (PHASE I) I-345 from I-30 to SP 366; Rehabilitation of existing overhead highway; Scheduled completion: 2018

SOURCE: Texas Department of Transportation

13

19

12

7

SH 121 SEG. 13 (DAL) South of FM 2499 to Business 121 H; Reconstruct and widen highway;13 Scheduled completion: 2017

8

I-30 West of Fielder Rd. to Sylvan Ave.; Construct toll managed lanes with wishbone ramps; Scheduled completion: 2017/2020

9

US 67 CLEBURNE EAST LOOP SH 174 to Spur 102; Widen to 4 lane facility; Scheduled completion: 2017

10 MIDTOWN EXPRESS SH 183; SH 114; Loop 12; Rebuild/widen portions of the highway and add toll managed lanes; Scheduled completion: 2018 11 SH 360 (NTTA/TXDOT) US 287 to south of I-20; Phased 2 to 4 lane new toll road; Scheduled completion: 2018 12 I-35E (WAXAHACHIE) PHASE I US 77 south of Waxahachie to US 77 north of Waxahachie; Reconstruct and widen highway from 4 to 6 lanes; Scheduled completion: 2019 15 US 175 (SM WRIGHT FREEWAY) US 175; I-45; Extend US 175 to I-45; Scheduled completion: 2019 16 SH 360/I-30 INTERCHANGE At interchange; Reconstruct and widen existing interchange; Scheduled completion: 2020

17 SH 199 Nine Mile Bridge Rd. to Western Center Blvd.; Construct mainlanes, bridges and ramps; Scheduled completion: 2019 19

18 DFW CONNECTOR SH 121/360 Interchange; Construct 14interchange; Scheduled completion: 2018 20 19 I-35E/US 67 (SOUTHERN GATEWAY) I-35E and US 67; Widen highway and add reversible express lanes; Scheduled completion: 2021 20 I-35W SEG. 3C US 81/287 to north of Eagle Parkway; Reconstruct and widen highway and add toll managed lanes; Scheduled completion: 2019 21 I-35E Dallas North Tollway to Woodall Rodgers; Construct collector/distributor lanes; Scheduled completion: 2019 22 I-635 LBJ FREEWAY EAST I-30 to east of US 75; Reconstruct and widen highway and add toll managed lanes/express lanes; Scheduled completion: 025 23 I-820 SEG. 4 I-820/SH 183/SH 121 to Randol Mill Rd.; Reconstruct and widen highway; Scheduled completion: 2021

2017


19

30

8

28

29

24

31

1 12 18

36

44

39

45 48

34

2

23 11

26

16 7

2

46

41

25

5 15

38

27

4 6

35

37

17

3

14 22

13

42

21 32

49

33

40

20

47

SOURCE: Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT)

1 I-35E MANAGED LANES Phase 2: Widen 6 to 8 gen. purpose lns and 2 to 4 concurrent toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2019-2024 2 SL 12/I-35E Reconstruct & widen hwy. / add toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2025-2028 3 I-35E Reconstruct and widen from 6 to 8 lanes; Scheduled construction: 2025-2028 4 I-35E PEGASUS/PART OF LOWER STEMMONS Reconstruct highway and add toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2025 5 I-30 PEGASUS/ THE CANYON Reconstruct highway and add toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2025 6 I-35E (LOWEST STEMMONS) Construct 5 collectordistributor roads and reconstruct frontage roads; Scheduled construction: 2025

2017

9 10

7 I-35E/US 67 (THE SOUTHERN GATEWAY) Widen highway and add reversible non-tolled managed express lanes; Scheduled competion: 2025 8 I-35 (NORTH) Reconstruct and widen highway; Scheduled construction: 2028 9 I-35E (WAXAHACHIE) PHASE I Reconstruct and widen highway from 4 to 6 lanes; Scheduled competion: 2017 10 I-35E (WAXAHACHIE) PHASE II Add interchanges and improve ramps; Scheduled construction: 2025 11 SH 183/SH114 Build remaining portions of ultimate to include 6/8 hwy. lanes & 4/6 toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2035 12 I-35W Reconstruct/widen hwy. & add toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2028

13 US 175/SM WRIGHT (II-A) Reconstruct highway to six-lane arterial; Scheduled construction: 2020 14 US 175/SM WRIGHT (II-B) Reconstruct interchange & extend frontage roads; Scheduled construction: 2020 15 I-345 REHAB. (PHASE II) Rehabilitation of existing overhead highway; Scheduled completion: 2017

20 LOOP 9 Construct 6 lane toll road with 4/6 lane frontage roads; Scheduled construction: 2021 21 SH 190 (THE EAST BRANCH) Construct new location toll road; Scheduled construction: 2022 22 TRINITY PKWY. (NTTA PROJ.) Construct new location toll road; Scheduled completion: 2019

16 JEFFERSON MEM. VIADUCT Reconstruct existing viaduct in new location; Scheduled construction: 2023

23 SH 161 Add toll managed lanes. Reconstr. NB hwy. lanes; Scheduled completion: 2019

17 I-635 LBJ FREEWAY EAST Reconstruct & widen hwy. / add toll managed lanes; Scheduled completion: 2025 18 US 75 Reconstruct & widen hwy.; corridor study started ‘12; Scheduled completion: 2025 19 US 75 Reconstruct and widen highway; Scheduled construction: 2028

24 SH 121 Reconstruct & widen 2 to 4 lanes w/ interchanges; Scheduled completion 2018 25 I-30/US 80 (EAST CORRIDOR) Reconstruct & widen hwy. / add toll managed lanes; Scheduled construction: 2028 26 I-30 (ROCKWALL CO.) Reconstruct and widen 4 to 6 lanes; Scheduled construction: 2028

27 SH 205 Widen 2 lane rural to 4 lane divided (Ultimate 6); Scheduled construction: 2025 28 US 380/US 377 Widen 4 to 6 lane div. urban w/ IC improvements; Scheduled completion: 2020 29 US 380 Conduct Feasibility Study; Scheduled completion: 2016 30 SH 5 Widen 2 lane rural highway to 4 lane urban (Ultimate 6); Scheduled construction: 2020-2023 31 SH 5 Widen 4 lane undivided to 4/6 lane divided; Scheduled completion: 2023 32 I-20 CORRIDOR EAST Add continuous frontage roads 33 US 67 WIDENING Widen highway from 4 to 6 lanes; Scheduled completion: 2019 34 NTE SEGMENT 3A PHASE 2 Widen highway/add toll managed lane connections at downtown 35 NTE SEGMENT 2E Build ultimate configuration of phased toll managed lane project; Scheduled completion: 2025 36 DFW CONNECTOR Construct configuration 3/ ultimate project 37 I-30 Reconstruct and add 2 additional lanes 38 I-30 Expand to 6/8 lane highway and add interchange 39 I-35W SEGMENT 3C ULTIMATE Reconstruct and widen highway and add toll managed lanes 40 I-35W Add 4 additional lanes 41 I-20/I-820/US 287 INTERCHANGE Reconstruct and widen existing interchange 42 I-20 Add 4 lane toll connection between SH 360 and SH 161 43 I-20 Add 1 additional highway lane 44 SH 170 Build 6-lane highway in new location 45 I-820 SEG. 4 Reconstruct and widen highway and add toll managed lanes 46 SH 360 Add one mainlane each direction, ramp improvements 47 SH 360 SOUTH Build ultimate configuration, 6 to 8 lane divided toll road 48 SH 199 Expand to 6/8 lane highway and 3 interchanges 49 I-20 Reverse ramps and other operational improvements 2017-2021

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

AROUND THE REGION | MAJOR TRANSPORTATION CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

PLANNED HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

189


SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS The Dallas–Fort Worth region is well known for taking on very large construction projects. They range from public infrastructure projects, such as the expansion of Interstate 35 and extending and connecting regional transit systems, to the creation of entirely new business parks and mixed-use developments like Cypress Waters and CityLine, to land reclamation for parks and recreational development. No matter where you travel in North Texas, large-scale construction projects are underway to improve the quality of life for area residents.

1 THE HORSESHOE PROJECT & MARGARET McDERMOTT BRIDGE A $798 million design-build roadway construction project to improve traffic flow through the heart of downtown Dallas. Dubbed the “Horseshoe Project” due to its U shape, construction improvements include the expansion, repaving and addition of several new bridges and roadways along Interstates 30 and 35E; and the construction of a new signature bridge, the Margaret McDermott Bridge, over I-30. Completion is scheduled for summer 2017.

2 FRISCO - $5 BILLION MILE

> FRISCO STATION is a 242-acre mixed-use project, plans call for 4 million square feet of office space, 2,400 multifamily residences, restaurant and entertainment venues, medical and wellness facilities and open spaces. > THE GATE could ultimately include 4 million square feet of office space, a hotel, multifamily units, single-family homes, nearly 200,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space and medical offices. > WADE PARK is a 175-acre mixed-use project will have 600,000 square feet of retail space, up to 6 million square feet of office space, more than 500 hotel rooms, 1,300 residential units. > THE STAR encompasses 1.7 million square feet and is home to the Dallas Cowboys world headquarters, 12,000-seat events center and training facility, plus two hotels totaling 480 rooms.

3 CYPRESS WATERS A 1,000-acre master-planned development, five minutes from DFW Airport. Centered around a 362-acre lake, full build-out will feature 4 million square feet of office, up to 10,000 multifamily units and 400,000 square feet of retail.

4 35EXPRESS The 35Express project extends approximately 30 miles, through eight cities and two counties, from US 380 in Denton County to I-635 in Dallas County. The project is expected to relieve traffic congestion in one of the most heavily traveled corridors in the North Texas region. Completion is scheduled for summer 2017.

5 FACEBOOK Facebook is creating a $1.5 billion data center campus containing five buildings that will total 2.5 million square feet at Alliance in north Fort Worth. The first building will open in early 2017. The facility will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy.

6 THE MUSIC FACTORY A 17-acre entertainment district near the Irving Convention Center is being developed by North Carolina based ARK Group. It will feature an 8,000 seat music pavilion, 25 restaurants and bars, and an Alamo Drafthouse. Also part of the project is 100,000 square feet of office space that has been leased by the Ethos Group.

190

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


AROUND THE REGION | SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS

● OFFICE UNDER CONSTRUCTION ● ANNOUNCED OFFICE PROJECTS ● INDUSTRIAL UNDER CONSTRUCTION ● ANNOUNCED INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS

2

4 7

9

5 3 6 8 1

DATA SOURCE: Xceligent Inc., a commercial real estate research firm in partnership with NTCAR

7 121 CORRIDOR Legacy West, located at the corner of the Dallas North Tollway and the Sam Rayburn Tollway (SH121), is a new $2 billion, 250-acre mixed-use development with 280,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, a 300-room Renaissance hotel, and hundreds of apartments and offices . It is home to the J.C. Penney headquarters and the 265,000 square foot headquarters for FedEx Office. It will be home to the $350 million headquarters for Toyota North America, the 1-million-squarefoot regional campus for JPMorgan Chase, and the 900,000- square foot regional office Liberty Mutual Insurance. Nearby, Grandscape, a $1.5B, 400+ acre project will have 3.9 million square feet of mixed-use development, anchored by Nebraska Furniture Mart.

8 UPTOWN OFFICE TOWERS PARK DISTRICT Situated along Klyde Warren Park in Uptown, the 19-story office tower and adjacent 34-story, 257-unit residential tower will both feature ground-floor retail space.

2017

9 CITYLINE

ROLEX BUILDING The seven-story 138,857 square-foot building will be home for Swiss watch manufacturer Rolex. The building is Harwood’s ninth project within the 18-block Harwood District.

The $600 million, 2.3 millionsquare-foot initial phase opened in 2015. At full buildout, the project will contain approximately 6 million square feet of office space; two hotels; 3,200 multifamily residential units; 300,000 square feet of grocery, restaurant, entertainment and retail space; and three parks. State Farm Insurance will be the anchor of the transit-oriented development adjacent to the DART Bush Turnpike Station on its Red Line.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

191


FUTURE PROJECTS For the Dallas–Fort Worth region, there is no time like the present to ensure that the bustling metro area remains an innovative, forward-thinking place for generations to come. Future developments spanning more than 10 years in planning and construction are helping to ensure that DFW is at the forefront of industry and livability. The future of the metro area is rife with innovative developments, impactful architectural feats, and continually improved design to strengthen the region’s appeal.

1

FORT WORTH TRINITY RIVER VISION

Totaling $909 million in completion dollars, the Fort Worth Trinity River Vision project will connect every neighborhood in the city to the Trinity River corridor, adding amenities, improved environmental sustainability and pioneering design. The project will reroute the Trinity River in Fort Worth to provide needed flood protection, while simultaneously doubling the size of the central business district.

3

TRINITY RIVER CORRIDOR PROJECT DALLAS

The Trinity River Project, covering 20 miles or approximately 10,000 acres, is an effort to redevelop the Trinity River as it runs near downtown and into Southern Dallas. The project is meant to provide flood protection as well as create numerous multi-use fields, hiking, biking and walking trails and other recreational opportunities. One component, The Trinity River Park, will encompass more than 285 acres of land near the heart of downtown Dallas.

5

SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY INLAND PORT

The Southern Dallas County inland port region is recognized for its rail service and interstate highway connections supporting regional access to North American and international ports. With unsurpassed access to Interstates 20, 35 and 45 and thousands of acres of available land, developers and companies are creating a premier logistics, distribution and manufacturing cluster.

192

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2

TEXAS LIVE!

The Texas Rangers and The Cordish Companies are developing a $1.25 billion mixed-used district on 7 acres next to Globe Life Park in Arlington. The district will feature a new, 38,000 seat retractable-roof ballpark, dining and entertainment venues, and a 300-room hotel with a 35,000-square-foot meeting and covention facility. The entertainment space and hotel will open in 2018, and the new ballpark is expected to open for the 2020 baseball season.

4

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Focusing on more than 5,200 acres available for commercial use and the open space in the airport’s total of 18,000 acres of land within Euless, Irving, Grapevine and Coppell, the DFW International Airport Land Use Plan is a “framework for the long-term development of the commercial areas within the airport.” The project will change the face of the airport from being solely a transportation hub to that of commerce and international business.

6

DALLAS MIDTOWN

The massive redevelopment district in North Dallas eventually will include millions of square feet of retail, residential, hotel and office space across 430 acres. Its centerpiece will be an 20-acre central park. Beck Ventures is leading the project. The first phase will include a theater, a 250-room hotel, office buildings, shops and restaurants, and 600 units of apartments on 70 acres.

2017


AROUND THE REGION | FUTURE PROJECTS

6 4

1

9 3

2

7 10

8

7

DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT

Multiple development projects are under construction or have been announced within the Dallas Arts District. Lincoln Properties is building 1900 Pearl, a 25-story, 260,000square-foot office building, and ZOM Holdings has announced a 40-story apartment tower at Flora and Olive streets. The Hall Financial Group multiphased development spans 5 acres. The next phase will include a 44-unit residential tower and a boutique hotel. Two Arts Plaza, a 12-story, 290,000 sqft office building is phase two of the Billingsley Co.’s Arts Plaza project. The Spire Development will create a 12-acre contiguous neighborhood. Phase one will be anchored by a 21-story mixed-use tower.

8

5

RED BIRD

Red Bird is the redevelopment of Southwest Center Mall located in Southern Dallas. Positioned at two major highways, Interstate 20 and Highway 67, Red Bird is at the heart of Oak Cliff and consists of 90 acres. Southwest Center Mall will be transformed into a vibrant mix-use development consisting of retail, office, residential, a hotel, and community amenities for southern Dallas. In addition, Red Bird will serve as the home base for the newly launched Southern Dallas Entrepreneurial Network.

9 HIDDEN RIDGE Hidden Ridge is an exciting new venture by Verizon to develop a unique 157-acre campus in the heart of Las Colinas (the largest office park in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex). This mixed-use project will feature over 3 million square feet of office space, 80,000 square feet of retail/restaurants, 1,800 residential units, a full-service boutique hotel, a dedicated Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) station, and public space and amenities.

2017

10 TEXAS CENTRAL RAILWAY Texas Central Partners (TCP) is a private Texas company working to bring high-speed rail between Dallas and Houston. With trains capable of 205 mph, the trip between these cities will take under 90 minutes. Service is expected to begin as early as 2022. Two potential station sites have been identified near downtown Dallas.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

193


URBAN CORE FORT WORTH FORT WORTH 35W CENTRAL BUSINESS CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT DISTRICT

121

River

Trinity

121

199 N

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199

ap lkn d Be erfor ap lkn d h t a Be erfor We h t a We th 5th 6 287 Fort Worth 7th5th 6th 287 10th Convention Fort Worth 7th Texas Center 10th Convention Texas Center Fort Worth Lancaster City Hall Fort Worth Lancaster City Hall Vickery Fort Worth Vickery 30 Water Fort Worth 30 Gardens Water35W Gardens 35W iver

ty R

Trin i

Cle ar F ork

Cle ar F ork

Trin i

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1/2 mile 1/2 mile

DALLAS CBD BY THE NUMBERS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

30

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2016

Briaroaks

Oak Trail Shores CDP

2016

Granbury

33,385

De Cordova Bend21,953 19,375

Households Average Household Size Tolar

Median Age

1.47

1.48

32.3

33.1

Pecan Plantation CDP $82,620 $89,857

Median Household Income Average Household Income Per Capita Income

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

2021

29,382

$113,005

$122,259

$75,850

$81,590

Godley

Food

$97,555 Cross Timber

$12,487

Joshua

Housing

$31,709

Apparel and Services Transportation

$3,244 Keene

Travel Health Care

Alvarado $11,649

$2,521 Cleburne

$6,590

Entertainment and Recreation

$4,144

Personal Care Products/Services

$1,079

Education

$2,377 Grandview

FORT WORTH CBD BY THE NUMBERS Glen Rose

2016

2021

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount Rio Vistaspent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food

5,903

6,338

Housing

Households

2,420

2,620

Apparel and Services

1.66

1.70

Average Household Size Median Age

2016

$71,346 $9,200

Population

$23,201 $2,354

Transportation

$8,618

Travel

$1,801

Health Care

$4,894

Entertainment and Recreation

$3,033

35.8

36.2

Median Household Income

$50,259

$52,195

Average Household Income

$81,930

$86,974

Personal Care Products/Services

Per Capita Income

$42,111

$43,951

Education

$787 $1,712

SAMPLE OF HEADQUARTERS IN THE FORT WORTH URBAN CORE Basic Energy Services LP Bass Enterprises Production Co Ben E Keith Co Cash America International Inc DR Horton Inc Fort Worth Star-Telegram Inc

194

FORT WORTH

30

Burleson

Cresson

Population

nity River West Fork Tri

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N

35W

nity River West Fork Tri

ork West F

n hou Cal es on Jon erce Main mort m ock Com ton ouTnhr us lh Ho Ca es on Jon rce Main mort me ock Com ton Thr us Ho

The Dallas downtown area is home to many of the city’s most prestigious companies and is a center for commerce in North Texas. Bounded along and near Interstates 35E and 30, North Central Expressway and Woodall Graford Rodgers Freeway, downtown offers easy transportation access to the rest of the region. It is home to the headquarters for Comerica, AT&T, ACTIVE Network, and Energy Future Holdings. It also is home to the city’s largest law firms and major offices for Ernst & Young, KPMG Mineral Wells City and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Dallas Cool Hall and the Dallas County Court buildings are located downtown, as is the Dallas Area Rapid Transit headquarters building. Millsap Downtown Dallas also has several large hotels and meeting facilities, including the Dallas Convention Center, Omni Dallas Hotel, and Sheraton Dallas Hotel. Downtown also is home to the Dallas Arts District, a 19-block zone that includes the city’s most prestigious arts venues, among them the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Urban centers increasingly are Gordon becoming destinations for residential Lipan neighborhoods, and Dallas is no different. With new and redeveloped condo and apartment buildings bringing the area vibrance day and night, the Uptown portion of the urban core is teeming with restaurants, fashionable retail stores, and bars linked by the McKinney Avenue Trolley, and is attracting a diverse group of new residents. The Victory Park development is home to the American Airlines Center, where the Dallas Mavericks NBA and Dallas Stars NHL teams play, along with high-rise office and luxury residential towers. Downtown Fort Worth is bordered by Interstate 30 and Interstate 35W, offering Stephenville easy north-south and east-west access to the region. The downtown encompasses several of the city’s largest firms, including Americredit, Texas Pacific Group and XTO Energy. Downtown’s Sundance Square offers a district of retail, restaurants and nightlife. Dublin Fort Worth’s premier performing arts venue, the Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Performance Hall, hosts the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, the Texas Ballet Theater, Fort Worth Opera and the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.

Frost Bank FTS International Inc Fuzzy’s Taco Holdings LLC GM Financial Hallmark Financial Services Inc Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP

Pier 1 Imports Inc PlainsCapital Bank Range Resources Corp USHEALTH GROUP Inc Whitley Penn LLP XTO Energy Inc

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; ESRI forecasts based on 2011 and 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, BLS

2017


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McKinn ey

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Riv er

Br

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AROUND THE REGION | URBAN CORE

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Comm

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DALLAS

35E

e Riv

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35E

DALLAS DALLAS CENTRAL BUSINESS CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT DISTRICT

Cedar Springs

Cedar Springs

UPTOWN UPTOWN DISTRICT DISTRICT

c Pacifi Main

Elm erce Elm Comm c erce ifi c Pan Comm o d Jacks ainWoo aood M ung cksMoanriW ll Ja Yo a Marill Young Dallas City Hall Dallas City Hall

N

Dallas Convention Dallas Center Convention Center Riv erf ron Riv e t

30 30

45 45

N

1/2 mile 1/2 mile rfr

35E

on

t

35E

Red Oak

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Oak Leaf

White Midlothian Alone

2016

PERCENT

3,091

American Indian Alone

148 Waxahachie1,791

Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

28

77.5%

6.1%

772

2.6%

781

2.7%

3,508

11.9%

Ennis

2016

11.4%

169

0.5% 7.5%

44

0.1%

1,006

3.0%

1,036

3.1%

4,650

13.9%

Alma

24,899

Grays Prairie

Rosser

2,505

0.1%Garrett

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

74.4% Cottonwood TOTAL

3,795

Palmer 0.5%

Some Other Race Alone Maypearl

PERCENT

24,829

10.5%

Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

2021

Scurry

Pecan Hill

22,771

Black Alone Venus

Oak Grove

Ferris

Ovilla

Kemp Less Than 9th Grade

0.9%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

1.0%

High School Graduate

5.0%

GED/Alternative Credential

1.1%

Mabank

Some College, No Degree

10.9%

Associate Degree

3.8%

Bachelor’s Degree

45.6%

Graduate/Professional Degree

31.8%

Bardwell

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2016

White Alone Italy

Black Alone American Indian Alone Asian Alone

Milford

Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

PERCENT

Rice

2021

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

PERCENT

3,936

66.7%

3,999

63.1%

TOTAL

1,340

22.7%

1,579

24.9%

Less Than 9th Grade

23

0.4%

25

0.4%

102

Emhouse

1.7%

3Blooming Grove 0.1% Barry

121

1.9%

4

0.1% Corsicana 7.6%

Frost 388

6.6%

479

111

1.9%

132

1,241

21.0%

1,528

5.8%

Kerens

High School Graduate Powell

7.0%

Some College, No Degree

24.1% Mustang

9.4% 12.1%

Goodlow GED/Alternative Credential

2.1%

Angus

4,744

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

Retreat Oak Valley

2016

16.2%

Associate Degree

8.5%

Mildred Degree Bachelor’s

22.4%

Graduate/Professional Degree

18.6%

Eureka

Navarro

SAMPLE OF HEADQUARTERS IN THE DALLAS URBAN CORE ACTIVE Network LLC AH Belo Corp. AT&T Inc. Baylor Scott & White Health Builders FirstSource Inc.

2017

Comerica Bank Comerica Inc. Comparex USA Inc. Corgan Associates Inc. Harwood International Inc.

HKS Inc. HollyFrontier Corp. Hunt Oil Co. Jackson Walker LLP MoneyGram International

Neiman Marcus Inc. Omnitracs LLC Oncor Electric Delivery Co. ORIX USA Corp. Santander Consumer USA

Stream Realty Partners LP Tenet Healthcare Corp. The Beck Group Thompson & Knight LLP

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

195


DALLAS Downtown serves as the hub for Dallas, with key transportation links emanating like spokes from the center. It is also the cultural center of the city, with the 19-block Dallas Arts District and the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major arts venues, including the AT&T Center for the Performing Arts. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport sits just northwest of the city. Dallas is home to several general-use airports, such as Dallas Love Field, which includes commercial passenger service via Southwest Airlines and Virgin America. The corporate headquarters for a number of Fortune 500 companies are in Dallas, such as AT&T, Dean Foods, Southwest Airlines, Tenet Healthcare, and Energy Future Holdings. Dallas also is the home to major educational institutions such as UT Southwestern Medical Center, Southern Methodist University and the Dallas campus of the University of North Texas.

DALLAS LOVE FIELD

White Rock Lake

DALLAS Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

DALLAS BY THE NUMBERS 2016

Population Households Average Household Size Median Age Median Household Income

196

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

1,283,763

2021

1,371,618

487,023

519,088

2.59

2.60

32.7

33.2

$44,016

$45,890

Average Household Income

$73,813

Per Capita Income

$28,584

$78,969 $30,429

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food Housing Apparel and Services

2016

$64,332 $8,164 $20,575 $2,061

Transportation

$7,921

Travel

$1,675

Health Care

$4,718

Entertainment and Recreation

$2,758

Personal Care Products/Services Education

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

$712 $1,377

2017


ROCKWALL CO.

AROUND THE REGION | DALLAS

SAMPLE OF EMPLOYERS IN DALLAS ADP LLC Aetna Inc. American Airlines Center American Leather Inc. Atmos Energy Corp. Aviall Inc. Baylor University Medical Ctr at Dallas BBVA Compass Brinker International Inc. Chase Paymentech LLC Children’s Medical Center Dallas ClubCorp Holdings Inc. Copart Inc. Dean Foods Co. Energy Transfer Partners LP Essilor of America Inc. EY Fannie Mae Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. Haynes & Boone LLP Hotels.com LP Interstate Battery System of America Inc LabCorp Luxottica Retail Maxim Integrated Products Inc. Nestle Waters North America Inc. Oak Farms Dairy Omni Hotels Corp. Parkland Health & Hospital System Raytheon Co. Ryan LLC SoftLayer Stevens Transport Inc. TDIndustries Inc. Texas Instruments Inc. The Richards Group Inc. TopGolf USA Trinity Industries Inc. Tuesday Morning Corp. UT Southwestern Medical Center

HUNT COUNTY

KAUFMAN COUNTY

S

DALLAS COUNTY RACE AND ETHNICITY

ELLIS COUNTY 2016

PERCENT

2021

PERCENT

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

2016

White Alone

631,127

49.2%

658,168

48.0%

TOTAL

Black Alone

320,644

25.0%

343,050

25.0%

Less Than 9th Grade

13.1%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

11.4%

High School Graduate

19.0%

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

2017

8,132

0.6%

8,619

0.6%

45,045

3.5%

55,942

4.1%

582

0.0%

663

0.0%

240,986

18.8%

263,089

19.2%

37,247

2.9%

42,086

3.1%

562,413

43.8%

622,033

45.4%

819,245

GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree Associate Degree

3.2% 17.8% 4.5%

Bachelor’s Degree

19.1%

Graduate/Professional Degree

11.9%

HENDERSON

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

197


EASTERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Garland, Rockwall, Rowlett, Forney, Terrell, Kaufman, and Mesquite comprise the major communities in the East Dallas area. These eastern Dallas suburbs are fast growing, with easy access to job centers west on Interstates 30 and 20, and the LBJ/Interstate 635 loop. Lake Ray Hubbard sits at the center of the area, and offers lakefront living and recreational amenities. Companies in the area include manufacturers such as Sanden International USA, Extruders and Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. Wholesalers include Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Automotive Distributors, Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions and America Marazzi Tile.

Rockwall Heath DALLAS LOVE FIELD

RO

White Rock Lake

Sunnyvale

Mesquite

DALLAS

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

Forney

Seagoville

EASTERN DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

RACE AND ETHNICITY

DALLAS COUNTY

2016

Population Households

2021

270,782

297,058

89,854

98,045

ELLIS COUNTY

Average Household Size

2.97

2.99

Median Age

33.7

33.9

Median Household Income

$58,912

$66,425

Average Household Income

$77,492

$84,123

Per Capita Income

$26,060

$28,088

2016

PERCENT

2021

PERCENT

White Alone

170,006

62.8%

181,194

61.0%

Black Alone

48,108

17.8%

53,437

18.0%

American Indian Alone

2,222

0.8%

2,482

0.8%

Asian Alone

9,709

3.6%

12,364

4.2%

200

0.1%

242

0.1%

31,685

11.7%

36,774

12.4%

8,853

3.3%

10,564

3.6%

83,632

30.9%

98,053

33.0%

Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Balch Springs

Cockrell Hill

198

Fate

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; ; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017

NAV COU


RAINS COUNTY

HUNT COUNTY

OCKWALL COUNTY

Bimbo Bakeries USA/EarthGrains Dallas Plastics Corp.

Dallas Regional Medical Center Dal-Tile Corp. Eastfield College FedEx Freight Corp.

KAUFMAN COUNTY

Future Telecom LLC H&K International Americas Hatfield & Co Inc. IntegraColor Inc. L-3 Communications Aerospace Systems Multi-Metal & Manufacturing Co Inc. Pepsi Beverages Co. Smurfit Kappa Paper Steve Silver Co. Strukmyer LLC

AROUND THE REGION | EASTERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE EASTERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

Texas Health Presbyterian Hosp Rockwall Texas Regional Medical Center UPS/United Parcel Service Inc Whitmore

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

2016

$66,806

Food

$8,221

Housing

$20,777

Apparel and Services

$2,060

Transportation

$8,247

Travel

$1,857

Health Care

$5,143

Entertainment and Recreation

$2,929

Personal Care Products/Services Education

$741 $1,342

The Accessible Destination that Provides an Authentic Community to Pioneer the Next Chapter of Your Life. •Trade the Commute for Community • • Access to 3 Major Highways • • Business Friendly Atmosphere •

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

TOTAL

2016

168,679

Less Than 9th Grade

6.6%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

9.2%

High School Graduate

HENDERSON COUNTY

GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree Associate Degree

VARRO UNTY

Bachelor’s Degree Graduate/Professional Degree

2017

VAN ZANDT COUNTY

22.8% 4.2%

24.9%

7.7%

16.5% 8.1%

BALCH SPRINGS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Chris Dyser Community Development Director 972-286-4477 (ext: 212)

Effie Donaldson ED Administrative Services Manager 972-913-3004

www.CityofBlachSprings.com

www.BalchSpringsEDC.com

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

199


NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY Northwest Dallas County includes Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and its surrounding development of warehouses, distribution centers and office space. It is served by Interstate 35E, LBJ/Interstate 635 and State Highway 121. Northwest Dallas County includes Las Colinas, a mixed-use, master-planned office park in the city of Irving. Las Colinas is an upscale business center and home to several Fortune 500 companies, including ExxonMobil, Kimberly-Clark, Celanese and Fluor. Amazon.com operates a fulfillment center in Coppell, with plans for a second one in the city. Also in Coppell, AAA of Texas has moved to a new headquarters building near DFW Airport. And soon, the area will be the home of The Music Factory development adjacent to the Irving Convention Center.

ADDISON AIRPORT

Carrollton

Coppell

Addison Farmers Branch

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT DALLAS LOVE FIELD

Irving

DA Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

RKER UNTY

TARRANT COUNTY

NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

JOHNSON COUNTY RACE AND ETHNICITY

447,467

479,987

169,199

181,134

Average Household Size

2.64

2.64

Median Age

34.0

34.5

Median Household Income

$60,890

$67,808

Average Household Income

$86,485

$93,069

Per Capita Income

$32,846

$35,255

Population Households

2016

PERCENT

2021

PERCENT

248,937

55.6%

250,849

52.3%

Black Alone

46,796

10.5%

51,967

10.8%

3,054

0.7%

3,227

0.7%

71,347

15.9%

87,918

18.3%

413

0.1%

467

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

60,822

13.6%

67,201

14.0%

Two or More Races

16,097

3.6%

18,361

3.8%

162,973

36.4%

182,047

37.9%

Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2021

White Alone

American Indian Alone

200

2016

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


AROUND THE REGION | NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE NORTHWEST DALLAS COUNTY AREA 7-Eleven Inc.

Michaels Stores Inc.

AAA Texas LLC

Microsoft Technology Center

Abbott Laboratories

Mr. Cooper

Accenture

NCH Corp.

Allstate Insurance Co.

NEC Corp. of America

CEC Entertainment Inc. Celanese Corp. Fate

Nokia Solutions & Networks Pioneer Natural Resources Co.

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT CHRISTUS Health

Quest Diagnostics Inc Schneider Electric HUNT Signet Jewelers COUNTY Sprint Corp.

Commercial Metals Co. Rockwall Concentra Inc. CyrusOne Inc. Heath Darling Ingredients Inc.

ROCKWALL Dallas Fort Worth International Airport COUNTY

White Rock Lake

Sunnyvale

Mesquite

ALLAS

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Balch Springs

STMicroelectronics The Container Store Group Inc.

FASTSIGNS International Inc.

KAUFMAN COUNTY University of Dallas

Flowserve Corp.

Verizon Communications Inc.

Fluor Corp. Forney Kimberly-Clark Corp.

Vizient Inc.

Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc.

Thomson Reuters Corp.

Exxon Mobil Corp.

Trend Micro NA

Wells Fargo Dealer Services

Mary Kay Inc. McKesson Corp.

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

$74,609

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food Housing Apparel and Services Transportation

Seagoville 2016

$9,309

DALLAS COUNTY

$23,591 $2,370 $9,079

Travel Health Care

$2,040

ELLIS COUNTY

Entertainment and Recreation

Personal Care Products/Services Education

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

TOTAL

$5,498

$3,232

$831

$1,625

2016

292,811

Less Than 9th Grade

8.3%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

7.1%

High School Graduate GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree

17.0% 2.4%

Make time in Coppell.

6.2%

Bachelor’s Degree

25.4%

Graduate/Professional Degree

14.1%

VAN ZAND COUNTY

Find out how moving to Coppell can put time on your side. Visit coppelltx.gov or call Mindi Hurley of the Office of Economic Development at 972-304-3677.

HENDERSON COUNTY

19.5%

Associate Degree

2017

DOORWAY TO RUNWAY IN NO TIME FLAT.

NAVARRO COUNTY D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

201


McKinney Oak Point

Little Elm Frisco

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY Corinth

McKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT

Shady Shores

Lowry Crossing

Princeton

Fairview

Hickory Creek Lucas Allen Lewisville Copper The Lake Canyon Highland Northeast the Village Dallas County is home toColony University of Texas at Dallas in Richardson, uble Oak Parker which has a well-respected engineering Hebron Plano Lewisville St. Paul program. UT Dallas provides an important Flower synergy Mound with the numerous technology Murphy Wylie firms in the area. The area is served by the North Central Expressway, LBJ/Interstate 635 and the President George Bush Grapevine ADDISON Turnpike. Sachse Carrollton AIRPORT Lake Richardson Texas Instruments, Coppell which spurred the e growth of high-tech innovation with the Addison Garland Grapevine invention of the microchip by JackFarmers Kilby, Branch maintains its headquarters, research Rowlett facilities, and a silicon wafer fabrication DFW INTERNATIONAL plant in the area. AIRPORT e Northeast Dallas County includes the Lake region’s “Telecom Corridor,” named for the DALLAS LOVE Ray Irving FIELD University concentration of such fi rms as Verizon Hubbard Euless rd Park White Communications and Fujitsu Network Rock Highland Lake Park Communications, Nokia, and the North American headquarters for Ericsson. Sunnyvale

Mesquite

DALLAS Grand Prairie

on

gton

Mountain Creek Lake

Cockrell Hill

Cedar Hill

Nevada Lavon Royse City

Heath

McLendonChisholm

ROCKWALL COUNTY

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Forney

Terrell

Seagoville Hutchins

Post Oak Bend City

Crandall

Lancaster SAMPLE OFLANCASTER EMPLOYERS INDALLAS NORTHEAST DALLASCombine COUNTY REGIONAL

Glenn Heights

COUNTY Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions

Baylor Scott & WhiteFerris Med Ctr Lake Pointe Red Oak Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Texas

Oak Leaf Midlothian

Kaufman

Cisco Systems Inc. Pecan Hill Inc. Fossil Group

Waxahachie

Cottonwood Samsung Electronics America Inc. Rosser Grays Prairie State Farm Insurance Co.

Halff Associates Inc. Palmer Hill & Wilkinson

Texas Instruments Inc.

Honeywell International Inc.

UnitedHealthcare of Texas

id Software Inc.

University of Texas at Dallas

Interceramic Inc.

Garrett

Travelers

Verizon Business

Lennox International Inc.

Virtual Computing Environment

Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. Ennis

ZTE USA Inc.

H C

Plastipak Packaging Inc. Qorvo Inc.

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Scurry

Safety-Kleen Inc.

Fujitsu Network Communications Inc.

Venus

Raytheon Intelligence Information & Svcs Oak Grove RealPage Inc.

ELLIS RHE Hatco Inc. COUNTYRockwell Collins Inc.

General Dynamics Ordnance & Tactical Sys

Maypearl

O Rid

Wilmer

DeSoto

Ovilla

202

HU CO

Rockwall

AIRPORT

ansfield

Union

Fate

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Talty

Duncanville

Joe Pool Lake

Ca

Josephine

Balch Springs

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Farmersville

Alma

NAVARRO COUNTY

Bardwell SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; ; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics Rice

2017


Greenville

addo Mills

Population Households

2021

426,268

453,255

146,025

Average Household Size

2.90

Lone Oak

Median Age

35.7

Median Household Income

n Valley

UNT OUNTY

Quinlan Hawk Cove

KAUFMAN COUNTY

2.92

36.2

$71,343

$83,151

$89,568

Per Capita Income

$28,674

$30,696

RAINS COUNTY

West RACE AND Tawakoni

2016

ETHNICITY

PERCENT

2021

$8,690

Housing

$22,191

Apparel and Services

$8,661

Travel

$2,030

Health Care

$5,489

Entertainment and Recreation

$3,125

PERCENT

$1,518

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

250,216

58.7%

251,414

55.5%

TOTAL

56,208

13.2%

61,760

13.6%

Less Than 9th Grade

2,833

0.7%

2,975

0.7%

Pacific Islander Alone

$793

Education

Black Alone

Asian Alone

$2,200

Transportation

White Alone

American Indian Alone

$71,298

Food

Personal Care Products/Services

54,146

12.7%

66,577

14.7%

208

0.0%

240

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

47,485

11.1%

52,834

11.7%

Two or More Races

15,172

3.6%

17,456

3.9%

128,493

30.1%

145,108

32.0%

2016

275,959 8.2%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

7.8%

High School Graduate

18.8%

GED/Alternative Credential

3.1%

Some College, No Degree

22.2%

Associate Degree

7.4%

Bachelor’s Degree

21.6%

Graduate/Professional Degree

11.0%

LABOR 900 K

REGIONAL HUB

CORRIDOR

80 MW ON 69 KV LINES

$994 M RETAIL SALES

11 MGPD EXCESS

SH

O

P P IN

G

M A N U FA C TU RI N G

HOPKINS COUNTY

Average Household Income

2016

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

154,435

$62,999

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

Oak dge

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2016

AROUND THE REGION | NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY

Campbell

NORTHEAST DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

Oklahoma City

Kemp

ZANDTindustrial Get in onVAN groundbreaking and booming retail growth. Whatever you need ... COUNTY

Little Rock

Dallas

Shreveport

Mabank

HENDERSON OUNTY

Economic Development

Economic Development 7.375x4.875.indd 1 2Manuf,retail 017

Austin Houston

greenvilletxedc.com • 903.455.1197 2/2/17 G4:03 D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT U I D PM E

203


SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA Southern Dallas County is a booming area known for transportation and logistics. Local communities have joined together to form the “Best Southwest” partnership to coordinate economic development activities. Best Southwest encompasses the suburban communities of Cedar Hill, Duncanville, DeSoto, Wilmer, Hutchins, Midlothian, and Lancaster. The area offers key transportation links through Interstates 20, 45, and 35E, as well as U.S. Highway 67. Access to highways and rail links, including a major Union Pacific terminal, provide the foundation for the Dallas Logistics Hub, a multimodal development in southern Dallas County. Transportation access is also a key selling point for many of the other companies in the area, including manufacturers such as Fujikoki America, BrassCraft, Solar Turbines, Triumph Aerostructures and Consolidated Casting. The area also is home to Paul Quinn College, an innovative HBU; two Dallas County Community College campuses; and the Dallas campus of the University of North Texas, the first pubilc university chartered in Dallas.

DALLAS Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

Hutchins

Duncanville Lancaster

DeSoto

Cedar Hill

LANCASTER REGIONAL AIRPORT

Glenn Heights Ovilla Red Oak Midlothian

SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

2016

275,867

Population

94,297

101,204

Average Household Size

2.87

2.89

Median Age

35.0

35.1

Median Household Income

$59,847

$67,713

Average Household Income

$75,427

$81,883

$26,342

$28,381

2021

PERCENT

42.9%

122,837

41.3%

Black Alone

119,522

43.3%

130,719

43.9%

American Indian Alone

1,431

0.5%

1,574

0.5%

Asian Alone

3,296

1.2%

4,062

1.4%

157

0.1%

194

0.1%

25,608

9.3%

29,332

9.9%

7,413

2.7%

8,717

2.9%

63,103

22.9%

73,155

24.6%

Two or More Races Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

PERCENT

118,443

Some Other Race Alone

204

2016

White Alone

Pacific Islander Alone

TY

297,435

Waxahachie

Households

Per Capita Income

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2021

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


KAUFMAN COUNTY

Sunnyvale

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Balch Springs

Seagoville

Wilmer

DALLAS COUNTY ELLIS COUNTY HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food Housing

$7,900 $20,093

$1,822

Health Care

$5,097

Entertainment and Recreation

$2,855

$1,308

2016

175,514 5.0%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

7.1%

GED/Alternative Credential

Masco Cabinetry LLC

Baylor Scott & White Med Ctr Waxahachie

Owens Corning

BrassCraft Manufacturing Co.

Pioneer Frozen Foods

Cedar Valley College

Proctor & Gamble

Dart Container Corp.

Solar Turbines Inc.

FedEx Ground

Swift Transportation Co. Inc.

Frozen Food Express Industries Inc.

Target/Distribution Ctr

Gerdau Corp.

Triumph Aerostructures

Glasfloss Industries LP

United Natural Foods Inc.

Holcim Inc.

US Aluminum

HENDERSON COUNTY

22.1% 4.0%

NAVARRO COUNTY

If you are looking for the ideal location to do business … look no further than Duncanville … a community where you will find a wealth of business opportunities. Duncanville provides business owners and business professionals with the tools they need to succeed. When it comes to geographic location, a qualified employment base, aggressive incentive programs, and a mature infrastructure system ― no other community delivers like Duncanville.

Strategically located between I-20 and Hwy 67 Pro-business enviroment Rail access DCEDC n

n

Some College, No Degree

27.9%

Associate Degree

7.6%

Bachelor’s Degree

17.3%

Graduate/Professional Degree

VAN COUN

Grow Your Business in Duncanville!

$717

Less Than 9th Grade

High School Graduate

Amazon.com

$64,873

Travel

TOTAL

Martin Marietta Materials Inc.

2016

$7,983

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

Ash Grove Cement Co.

Kohl’s/Fulfillment Ctr

Transportation

Education

La Mexicana Tortilla Factory

JC Penney Co. Inc.

$1,973

Personal Care Products/Services

ADESA Inc

International Extrusion Inc.

Apparel and Services

2017

AROUND THE REGION | SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE SOUTHERN DALLAS COUNTY AREA

Mesquite

n

Duncanville Community and Economic Development Corporation 972.780.4997 DuncanvilleEDC.com

8.9%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

205


Plano

PARK CITIES AND VICINITY The cities of Highland Park and University Park are minutes from downtown Dallas and the uptown Dallas area, but are contained within the boundaires of the City of Dallas. The Park Cities maintain their own governance, city services and schools. Situated north of downtown Dallas, the Park Cities are linked via the North Dallas Tollway and Northwest Highway. Southern Methodist University is centered in University Park, and is known for its wellrespected Cox School of Business and Dedman School of Law. Adjacent to the Park Cities is a major hospital complex, including UT Southwestern Medical Center, Presbyterian Hospital, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medical Center, Parkland Health and Hospital System and Texas Scottish Rite Hospital. The area includes Dallas Love Field, which hosts the headquarters of the Fortune 500 firm Southwest Airlines. Highland Park is home to the historic Highland Park Village, a high-end retail center that was built in 1931, the first planned shopping center of its kind in the U.S. Highland Park was designed by Wilbur David Cook, the same planner who laid out Beverly Hills, California. The name was derived from the fact that the area sits at a higher elevation than Dallas and from plans of the city founders to set aside 20 percent of area land for parks.

ADDISON AIRPORT

Carrollton

Coppell

Richardson

Addison Farmers Branch

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT DALLAS LOVE FIELD

Irving

White Rock Lake

DALLAS Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

PARK CITIES BY THE NUMBERS Population Households Average Household Size Median Age

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2021

34,559

37,257

11,509

12,366

2.78

2.80

37.1

39.2

Median Household Income

$179,646

$191,368

Average Household Income

$242,930

$258,554

$82,867

$87,642

Per Capita Income

206

2016

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

2016

$198,219

Food

$22,391

Housing

$60,962

Apparel and Services Transportation Travel Health Care

$6,037 $22,047 $6,611 $15,173

Entertainment and Recreation

$8,813

Personal Care Products/Services

$2,227

Education

$5,551

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


Parker

SAMPLE OF EMPLOYERS IN OR NEAR PARK CITIES

Wylie

AROUND THE REGION | PARK CITIES

Murphy

Bank of Texas BNY Mellon Wealth Management

Sachse

Caiman Energy

Garland

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Rowlett

Fate

Dallas Country Club Energy Transfer Partners George W. Bush Presidential Library

HUNT COUNTY

Highland Park Village

Rockwall

Hilton Dallas Park Cities Hunt Properties JLL

Heath

ROCKWALL COUNTY

Match.com Mc Cutchin Petroleum Neiman Marcus

Sunnyvale

KAUFMAN COUNTY

Mutual of Omaha Nordstrom

Northpark Center

Mesquite

Sammons Enterprises Site Selection Group

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Forney

Southern Methodist University Tolleson Wealth Management

Balch Springs

US Risk Insurance Group Virginia Cook Realtors Whitley Penn

Seagoville

DALLAS COUNTY RACE AND ETHNICITY

ELLIS COUNTY 2016

PERCENT

2021

PERCENT

White Alone

32,017

92.6%

33,928

91.1%

Black Alone

319

0.9%

378

1.0%

American Indian Alone

81

0.2%

92

0.2%

1,253

3.6%

1,711

4.6%

3

0.0%

4

0.0%

Some Other Race Alone

278

0.8%

352

Two or More Races

608

1.8%

1,689

4.9%

Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

2017

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

TOTAL

2016

19,870

Less Than 9th Grade

0.5%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

0.5%

High School Graduate

3.4%

GED/Alternative Credential

0.1%

Some College, No Degree

9.6%

0.9%

Associate Degree

2.0%

791

2.1%

Bachelor’s Degree

45.6%

2,199

5.9%

Graduate/Professional Degree

38.4%

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

V C 207


ARLINGTON / GRAND PRAIRIE AREA The area around Arlington and Grand Prairie is the home to major league sports teams, well-known manufacturers, and an important research university. It sits directly between Dallas and Fort Worth, and offers easy access to both cities’ job centers and key transportation links for distribution operations. The area includes major operations for aerospace giants Lockheed Martin and Triumph Aerostructures. Arlington is the home to one of General Motors largest assembly plants, which is currently undergoing a multi-million dollar expansion to incorporate the lastest innovations in robotics assembly. Arlington also is home to the University of Texas at Arlington, which is among three Dallas– Fort Worth area schools striving to reach Tier 1 status as research institutions. Arlington offers residents easy eastwest access to Dallas and Fort Worth along Interstates 20 and 30. North-south access is available via Highway 360 and the expansion of Highway 161. Arlington is home to two of the region’s top sports venues and family-friendly theme parks operated by Grand Prairiebased Six Flags Entertainment. The NFL’s Dallas Cowboys play at the massive AT&T Stadium and MLB’s Texas Rangers play at the nearby Globe Life Park. Grand Prairie hosts the horse racing complex Lone Star Park.

TARRANT COUNTY

DA L F

Pantego

Cockrell Hill Dalworthington Gardens

ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Arlington

DALLAS EXECUTIV AIRPORT

Grand Prairie

Duncanville

DeSo

Cedar Hill Mansfield

Glenn Ovilla

NSON NTY

Midlothian

W

208

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


S VE T

oto

2016

2021

Population

635,981

668,260

Households

220,170

229,855

Average Household Size

2.87

2.89

Median Age

32.9

33.3

Median Household Income

$57,851

$63,965

Average Household Income

$76,306

$82,133

Per Capita Income

$26,633

$28,458

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Find the perfect spot in DFW

Fate

HUNT COUNTY

Rockwall Heath

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES White (Average annual amount spent)

2016

Rock Lake

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

$65,976

Food

TOTAL

$8,204

Housing

$2,068

Transportation

$8,121

Travel

$1,804

DALLAS

Health Care

$4,970

Entertainment and Recreation

$2,873

Personal Care Products/Services

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

7.7%

Mesquite

Bachelor’s Degree

24.1%

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

7.4% Forney 20.5%

Balch Graduate/Professional Degree Springs

2016

PERCENT

2021

9.3%

PERCENT

White Alone

350,184

55.10%

350,461

52.40%

Black Alone

129,580

20.40%

144,119

21.60%

4,240

0.70%

4,341

0.60%

45,599

7.20%

51,934

7.80%

0.10%

781

0.10%

Hutchins

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

Seagoville

Wilmer

717

Lancaster Some Other Race Alone

82,779

13.00%

90,978

13.60%

Two or More Races

22,884

3.60%

25,646

3.80%

207,110

32.60%

231,011

34.60%

LANCASTER REGIONAL AIRPORT

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

n Heights

DALLAS COUNTY

SAMPLE OF EMPLOYERS IN THE ARLINGTON / GRAND PRAIRIE AREA

Red Oak

ELLIS COUNTY

AE Petsche Co.

General Motors Co.

Primerica

AF Technologies Inc.

GM Financial

Progressive Inc.

Airbus Helicopter Inc.

Lockheed Martin Missles & Fire Control

Six Flags Entertainment Corp.

Lone Star Park Grand Prairie

Texas Health Resources

Martin Sprocket & Gear Inc.

Trinity Forge Inc.

All-Pro Fasteners Inc. AmeriGroup Texas Ashley Furniture HomeStore AT&T Stadium

ATK North America Waxahachie Bancroft & Sons Transportation LLC

Mouser Electronics Inc. Oil States Industries Co. Petmate

Come. Sit. Stay. Live. Work. Play.

Texas Rangers Baseball LLC Turbomeca USA University of Texas at Arlington

Poly-America Inc.

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017

KA C

3.9%

Some College, No Degree Associate Degree

ROCKWALL COUNTY

19.9%

GED/Alternative Credential

$1,371

RACE AND ETHNICITY

7.1%

High School Graduate

$732

Education

395,325

Less Than 9th Grade

Sunnyvale

$20,705

Apparel and Services

2016

AROUND THE REGION | ARLINGTON / GRAND PRAIRIE AREA

ALLAS LOVE FIELD

ARLINGTON / GRAND PRAIRIE AREA BY THE NUMBERS

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

301 S. Main St. Mansfield, TX 76063 Main: 817-728-3650 medc@mansfield-texas.com www. mansfield-texas.com

209 HENDE


FORT WORTH AND VICINITY K Y

The city of Fort Worth, affectionality known as “Cowtown” by residents, is the 16th largest city in the United States. The Fort Worth vicinity was one of the fastest growing areas in the U.S. during the past decade. It is often recognized by Money, Fortune and other magazines as one of the “Best Places to Live and Work.” The Alliance area in north Fort Worth serves as a major intermodal distribution center for many large companies and is the home of a new $1 billion Facebook data center. This area has been the catalyst for the most recent growth. The city-owned Fort Worth Alliance Airport sits 14 miles north of downtown Fort Worth and is the world’s first 100 percent industrial airport that was designed for cargo and corporate aircraft. Several companies call Fort Worth home, including American Airlines, Pier 1 Imports, XTO Energy and BNSF Railway. Other companies in the area include Justin Brands, FedEx, Ben E. Keith and Williamson Dickie. Health care, finance, telecommunications, education, tourism, retail trade and services are also significant economic sectors for the area. Fort Worth also has numerous cultural and entertainment attractions, including the nationally ranked Fort Worth Zoo, a world-class museum district, the Bass Performance Hall, the Historic Stockyards District, Sundance Square and the Texas Motor Speedway.

FORT WORTH ALLIANCE AIRPORT

Haslet

Blue Mound

Lake Worth

NAS FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE BASE

White Settlement

210

River Oaks Westover Hills

Benbrook

Pantego

TARRANT COUNTY

Crowley

Dalworth Gardens

Forest Hill Kennedale Everman

Edgecliff Village

JOHNSON COUNTY

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Haltom City

FORT WORTH MEACHAM INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

FORT WORTH

PARKER COUNTY

D NTY

Watauga

Saginaw

FORT WORTH SPINKSL AIRPORT

Rendon CDP

Burleson

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Arlington

Mansfi


Population

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2016

2021

1,083,359

1,180,957

Households

378,881

2016

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$62,148

Food

410,358

$7,714

Housing Average Household Size

2.82

Median Age Median Household Income

2.84

33.0

33.2

$54,393

$59,489

$19,378

Apparel and Services

$1,920

Transportation

$7,713

Travel

$1,687

Health Care

$4,798

Entertainment and Recreation Average Household Income

$71,744

$77,759

Per Capita Income

$25,520

$27,414

ROCKWALL Personal Care Products/Services

Fate

MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Education

$2,717 $685 $1,247

Rockwall RACE AND ETHNICITY

PERCENT

2021

White Alone LOVE

674,786

711,868

60.3%

TOTAL

Black Alone

185,544

White 62.3% Rock 17.1% Lake

211,526

17.9%

Less Than 9th Grade

6,958

0.6%

7,426

0.6%

DALLAS FIELD

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone Some Other Race Alone Two or More Races Cockrell Hispanic Origin (Any Race) Hill

hington s

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)Heath

2016

PERCENT

44,700

4.1%

54,597

4.6%

1,301

0.1%

1,558

0.1%

DALLAS

Grand Prairie

n

Mesquite

MESQUITE METRO Associate Degree AIRPORT

36,259

3.3%

42,849

3.6%

Bachelor’s Degree

362,957

33.5%

417,336

field

Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. Glenn Heights BNSF Railway Co. Ovilla Cook Children’s Health Red Oak Care System Midlothian

Wilmer Inc. JPS Health Network

MillerCoors

PDX Inc.

First Command Financial Services Inc.

Pier 1 Imports

Freese & Nichols Inc.

6.6%

Forney

17.5% 8.6%

Seagoville

Texas Health Harris Methodist Fort Worth Texas Motor Speedway Texas Wesleyan University ThyssenKrupp

ELLIS Airport Systems Inc COUNTY TTI Inc

NAS Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base

Elbit Systems of America LLC

23.6%

Graduate/Professional Degree

DALLAS Lockheed Martin COUNTY

LANCASTER Justin Brands Inc. REGIONAL AIRPORT

4.5%

Some College, No Degree

12.8%

Balch 35.3% Springs

21.4%

GED/Alternative Credential

151,133

Smith & Nephew Biotherapeutics

Galderma Laboratories LP Waxahachie GE Manufacturing Solutions

Tandy Leather Factory Inc

GM Financial

Texas Christian University

TD Ameritrade

Union Pacific UNT Health Science Center Weir Oil & Gas Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Co

Harbison-Fischer Inc.

2017

H C

9.2%

High School Graduate

12.4%

SAMPLE OF EMPLOYERS IN THE FORT WORTH AREA Hutchins Duncanville Cedar Hill

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

133,810

Alcon Laboratories Inc. Lancaster DeSoto American Airlines Inc.

673,843 ROCKWALL 8.6% COUNTY

Sunnyvale

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

ARLINGTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

2016

AROUND THE REGION | FORT WORTH AND VICINITY

FORT WORTH AREA BY THE NUMBERS

H C NAVARRO COUNTY 2 1 1

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E


NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY Northeast Tarrant County, located northeast of downtown Fort Worth, includes the Alliance Texas development to the north — soon to be home to a $1 billion Facebook data center — and Dallas Fort Worth International Airport to the east. The area is home to several Fortune 1000 firms, including GameStop in Grapevine. Bell Helicopter Textron, travel technology firm Sabre Holdings in Southlake, and aviation parts supplier Aviall also are based in the area, building on the synergy of the region’s aviation and aerospace firms and proximity to DFW Airport. Japan-based Kubota, the maker of tractors and heavy equipment, is locating its North American headdquarters in Grapevine. Westlake is home to a large Fidelity Investments campus, the Deloitte University, and soon will have a large Charles Schwab regional campus rising from the pastures of the Circle-T Ranch. The area also is home to several key distribution points for major companies, including UPS and FedEx, which operate major hubs at DFW Airport and Fort Worth Alliance Airport.

PARKER COUNTY

Roanoke Trophy Club Westlake

Colleyville North Richland Hills

DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Bedford

DALLAS LOVE FIELD

Euless

Hurst

FORT WORTH

Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

TARRANT COUNTY

JOHNSON COUNTY

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY AREA AmerisourceBergen Corp.

Gaylord Texan

Sabre Holdings Corp.

Automotive Resources International

General Mills Inc.

SMS Infocomm Corp.

Carter BloodCare

Grainger Industrial Supply Great Wolf Lodge

Texas Health Harris Methodist HEB

CoreLogic Inc Corning Optical Communications LLC Dallas Airmotive Inc. Daystar Television Network eMortgage Logic LLC Fidelity Investments GameStop Corp.

212

Grapevine

Southlake

Keller

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Hawaiian Falls Waterparks HealthMarkets Inc.

Tyson Prepared Foods XPO Logistics Inc.

Heritage Bag Co. HM Dunn AeroSystems Inc. Kelly-Moore Paint Co Inc. LEGOLAND Discovery Center

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


Population Households

2021

387,278

413,165

148,976

Average Household Size

2.60

39.8

40.6

$77,664

Average Household Income Per Capita Income

$85,286

$106,895

$114,615

$41,269

$43,994

RACE AND ETHNICITY

2016

White Alone

304,852

78.7%

314,665

76.2%

Black Alone

22,662

5.9%

27,062

6.5%

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

PERCENT

2021

PERCENT

2,305

0.6%

2,460

0.6%

22,380

5.8%

27,550

6.7%

1,988

0.5%

2,261

0.5%

2016

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$90,988

Food

$11,013

Housing

$28,190

Apparel and Services

ROCKWALL CO.

Median Household Income

DALLAS

158,106

2.59

Median Age

White Rock Lake

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2016

Transportation

$2,801 $10,933

Travel

$2,628

Health Care

$7,015

Entertainment and Recreation

$3,986

Personal Care Products/Services

$1,010

Education

$2,054

HUNT COUNTY

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

TOTAL

2016

263,390

KAUFMAN COUNTY

Less Than 9th Grade

2.7%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

4.2%

High School Graduate

15.6%

GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree

AROUND THE REGION | NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY

NORTHEAST TARRANT COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

3.0% 24.2%

Some Other Race Alone

20,928

5.4%

24,505

5.9%

Associate Degree

7.7%

Two or More Races

12,166

3.1%

14,659

3.5%

Bachelor’s Degree

29.2%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

62,301

16.1%

74,876

18.1%

Graduate/Professional Degree

13.6%

| DALLAS COUNTY ELLIS COUNTY

DFW Airport Downtown Fort Worth Alliance Airport

VAN COU

ALLIANCE DFW

HENDERSON COUNTY 2017

NAVARRO COUNTY

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

213


DENTON AREA Drive north along Interstate 35W in Fort Worth or Interstate 35E in Dallas, and their confluence will find you in Denton. The Denton County area provides a key connection point for the two highways, offering easy access to both Dallas and Fort Worth job centers, as well as points north. Denton is home of the University of North Texas, which is one of the three Dallas–Fort Worth universities vying for Tier 1 status as a research institution, and to Texas Woman’s University. Fortune 1000 company Sally Beauty calls Denton home, and the area hosts a number of manufacturing facilities, including those operated by Overhead Door, Peterbilt Motors and Jostens. The fast-growing Denton County area offers several communities from which to choose, such as Argyle and Flower Mound, that are close to job centers but offer a small-town lifestyle.

DENTON MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

JOHNSON COUNTY

214

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Shady Shores

Little Elm

Corinth Argyle Northlake

Copper Canyon

Bartonville

Lake Dallas Hickory Creek

The Colony

Highland Village

Double Oak

Lewisville Flower Mound

RACE AND ETHNICITY

TARRANT COUNTY

Oak Point

Ponder

DENTON AREA BY THE NUMBERS

PARKER COUNTY

Cross Roads

Denton

2016

DALLAS LOVE FIELD

2021

441,146

491,415

158,983

176,869

Average Household Size

2.71

2.72

Median Age

32.8

33.6

Median Household Income

$72,925

$80,445

Average Household Income

$93,960

$100,381

Per Capita Income

$34,282

$36,509

Population Households

2016

PERCENT

2021

Cockrell Hill DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

PERCENT

White Alone

315,425

71.5%

332,624

67.7%

Black Alone

43,661

9.9%

55,679

11.3%

3,005

0.7%

3,260

0.7%

30,297

6.9%

40,716

8.3%

388

0.1%

475

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

33,645

7.6%

40,447

8.2%

Two or More Races

14,722

3.3%

18,211

3.7%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

94,481

21.4%

111,482

22.7%

American Indian Alone Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


AROUND THE REGION | DENTON AREA

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Fate

Rockwall Heath

HOUSEHOLDWhite EXPENDITURES (Average annual Rockamount spent)

2016

Lake

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food Housing Apparel and Services

DALLAS Transportation Travel

Health Care Entertainment and Recreation Personal Care Products/Services Education

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE ROCKWALL DENTON AREA COUNTY

$80,542

Sunnyvale Caliber Collision Centers $9,897

$25,106

Mesquite $2,522 $9,783 $2,260 Balch Springs $6,032 $3,527 $889 $1,831

ESAB HOYA Vision Care North America med fusion Mohawk Industries Inc. Nebraska Furniture Mart of Texas Orthofix Inc. Overhead Door Corp. Seagoville

Less Than 9th Grade 9th-12th Grade, No Diploma High School Graduate GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree Associate Degree

SAFRAN Electrical & Power

Beauty Holdings Inc. DALLAS Sally Sysco North Texas COUNTYTetra Pak Inc. 274,281 4.0%

4.3%

15.8%

Texas Health Presbyterian Hosp Denton

ELLIS Texas Woman’s University University of North Texas COUNTY 3.0%

24.2%

8.2%

Bachelor’s Degree

27.6%

Graduate/Professional Degree

13.0%

2017

Prime Controls LP

Vinson Process Controls Xerox Corp.

BIGGER, BETTER GREEN SPACES PRESERVING HISTORIC OLD TOWN BUILDING NEW, THRIVING NEIGHBORHOODS GROWING EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES INCREASING SUSTAINABILITY

TOTAL

2016

KAUFMAN COUNTY

MESQUITE METRO Ivie & Associates Inc AIRPORT Forney

Peterbilt Motors Co. EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

HUNT COUNTY

For over 150 ye a rs p eop l e have flocked t o Le wi svi l l e t o g row b usi nesses a nd set t l e d own w ith t hei r f a mi l i e s. You d on ’t g et ro ots t hi s d ee p without a vi si on for the f ut ure . Wi t h the Le wi svi l l e 2025 p l a n, we ’re cont i nui ng to b ui l d on wh a t ma kes our communi t y g re a t. Vi si t our we bsi te t o see t he f ul l vi si on.

EcoDevLewisville.com D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

VAN 215


WISE COUNTY

WESTERN COLLIN COUNTY Booming. That’s the best way to describe western Collin County, one of the fastest-growing and most-affluent areas in the Dallas–Fort Worth region. The area’s growth is being driven by corporate relocations, consolidations and expansions. Most notable among the relocations is Toyota’s North American headquarters in West Plano that will employ thousands of workers. The Star development in Frisco is the headquarters and training facility of the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys and attracts visitors daily. The development is a collaboration between the Cowboys, the city of Frisco and the Frisco Independent School District, whose football teams will play their games at the Ford Center at the Star, an indoor stadium. The western portion of Collin County is home to several Fortune 1000 firms, including J.C.Penney, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, and Alliance Data Systems. The area also is home to the North American headquarters for several other major firms, including Ericsson and Frito-Lay North America. Located north of Dallas, the area is served by North Central Expressway, the North Dallas Tollway, President George Bush Turnpike and State Highway 121.

DENTON COUNTY

Coppe

WESTERN COLLIN COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

2016

2021

462,890

523,588

167,178

187,818

Average Household Size

2.76

2.78

Median Age

36.5

36.8

$97,001

$103,438

$120,950

$128,631

$43,822

$46,272

Population Households

Median Household Income Average Household Income Per Capita Income

RACE AND ETHNICITY

216

2021

PERCENT

304,685

65.8%

321,181

61.3%

Black Alone

40,692

8.8%

50,995

9.7%

2,057

0.4%

2,187

0.4%

77,697

16.8%

103,729

19.8%

287

0.1%

367

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

21,771

4.7%

25,499

4.9%

Two or More Races

15,703

3.4%

19,631

3.7%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

67,253

14.5%

80,277

15.3%

Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

TARRANT COUNTY

JOHNSON COUNTY

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

PERCENT

Ir

White Alone

American Indian Alone

PARKER COUNTY

2016

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT


AROUND THE REGION | WESTERN COLLIN COUNTY

COLLIN COUNTY Celina

Prosper

Frisco

Plano

ADDISON AIRPORT

Carrollton

ell

rving

FANNIN COUNTY

Addison

Fate

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES Farmers (Average annual amount spent)

2016

Branch

$102,069

TOTAL EXPENDITURES Food

$12,256

Housing

$31,587

DALLAS LOVE Apparel and Services FIELD

$3,168

White Rock $12,119 Lake

Transportation

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE WESTERNROCKWALL COLLIN COUNTY AREA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT Denbury Rockwall Resources Inc.

JC Penney Co. Inc.

Alcatel-Lucent

Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc Heath Ericsson Inc.

loanDepot.com LLC

Alliance Data Systems Corp. Ambit Energy LP

Health Care

$7,715

AmerisourceBergen Specialty Group Sunnyvale

Entertainment and Recreation

$4,509

Beal Bank

Personal Care Products/Services

$1,141

Brierley & Partners MesquiteInc.

Travel

$3,035

DALLAS

Education

$2,290

Cockrell EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Hill (Population 25+)

2016

301,258

Less Than 9th Grade

2.8%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

2.4%

TOTAL

High School Graduate GED/Alternative Credential Some College, No Degree

10.7% 1.7% 18.6%

Associate Degree

7.0%

Bachelor’s Degree

36.0%

Graduate/Professional Degree

20.8%

2017

CA Technologies

FedEx Office & Print Services Inc.

MESQUITE METRO AIRPORT

Capital OneBalch Auto Finance Springs Inc.

NTT Data Inc.

ROCKWALL PepsiCo Inc. COUNTY

Pizza Hut Inc.

Fiserv Credit Union Solutions

Raytheon Co.

KAUFM COUN

Rent-A-Center Inc.

Frito-Lay Inc.

CIGNA HealthCare of Texas

DALLAS EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

HUNT COUNTY

Abbott Laboratories

Research Now

GE Energy Connections Forney Gearbox Software LLC

T-Mobile Toyota North America

Genband US LLC

Transamerica

Golden Living

HCL America Inc. Cinemark Holdings Inc. Seagoville Hewlett Packard Enterprise CompuCom Systems Inc. Conifer Health Solutions Inc.

Hilti

CROSSMARK

Huawei Technologies USA

DALLAS Dallas Stars Hockey Team COUNTY Dell Services Dallas Cowboys

ELLIS COUNTY

Infosys Intel Security Intuit Inc.

SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

217


COUNTY COLLIN COUNTY

EASTERN COLLIN COUNTY The face of eastern Collin County is constantly changing as farms and ranchland is converted into homes, corporate campuses and retail centers. Residential development has been fueled by job growth in the area that is home to Fortune 1000 firm Torchmark. Numerous well-known companies have offices here, including Raytheon, Atlas Copco, Experian and Sanden International USA. Major roads nearby, including North Central Expressway, the North Dallas Tollway, President George Bush Turnpike and State Highway 121, provide convenient access to other portions of the area.

Celina

Prosper McKinney

Frisco

McKINNEY NATIONAL AIRPORT

Fairview Lucas

Allen

Plano

Parker Murphy

Coppell

Carrollton

ADDISON AIRPORT

Addison Farmers Branch

DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN THE EASTERN COLLIN COUNTY AREA Ascend Custom Extrusions LLC Atlas Copco Drilling Solutions Baylor Scott & White Med Ctr McKinney DALLAS LOVE Collin College FIELD CVE Technology Group Inc.White Emerson Process Mgmt. Rock Lake Encore Wire Corp. Experian Finisar Corp Forte Payment Systems Independent Bank KONE Inc. Medical Center of McKinney Micron Technology Inc.

Irving

DALLAS

218

Wylie

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

Cockrell Hill

ROCKWALL MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

Rockwal

PFG Customized Distribution PFSweb Inc. Photronics Inc. Heath ProfitStars Quest Medical Inc. Raytheon Space & Airborne Systems SAF-HOLLAND Inc. Sanden International USA Inc. Sunnyvale Smith System Manufacturing Co. Spectocor LLC Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Allen Torchmark Corp. Mesquite MESQUITE United American Insurance METROCo. AIRPORT Forney Xtera Communications Inc.

Balch Springs SOURCE: ESRI forecasts based on 2010 US Census; 2011 & 2012 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics

2017


Population Households

2021

346,753

397,189

113,600

Average Household Size

Average Household Income Per Capita Income

34.9

$94,993

$102,545

$113,613

White Alone

239,784

Asian Alone Pacific Islander Alone

38,339 2,070

PERCENT

69.2% 11.1% 0.6%

2021

258,291 48,310 2,263

$95,950

Food

$11,496

Housing

$29,432 $2,951

Transportation

$11,529

Travel

$40,028

PERCENT

$2,857

Health Care

$7,335

Entertainment and Recreation

$4,275

Personal Care Products/Services

$1,070

Education

$2,014

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Population 25+)

65.0%

TOTAL

12.2%

Less Than 9th Grade

0.6%

35,969

10.4%

50,755

12.8%

249

0.1%

328

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

18,571

5.4%

22,143

5.6%

Two or More Races

11,770

3.4%

15,098

3.8%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

54,325

15.7%

66,160

16.7%

2016

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Apparel and Services

$121,998

$37,442

2016

American Indian Alone

3.04

34.6

RACE AND ETHNICITY

Black Alone

129,681

3.03

Median Age Median Household Income

HOUSEHOLD EXPENDITURES (Average annual amount spent)

2016

DELTA COUNTY

2016

213,725 2.7%

9th-12th Grade, No Diploma

3.0%

High School Graduate

13.5%

GED/Alternative Credential

2.3%

Some College, No Degree

21.3%

Associate Degree

8.1%

Bachelor’s Degree

33.2%

Graduate/Professional Degree

15.9%

YOUR NORTH DALLAS BUSINESS CONNECTION

AROUND THE REGION | EASTERN COLLIN COUNTY

FANNIN COUNTYEASTERN COLLIN COUNTY BY THE NUMBERS

HOPKIN COUNTY

Fate

RAINS COUNTY

HUNT COUNTY

ll

ROCKWALL COUNTY

McKINNEY AIR CENTER KAUFMAN COUNTY

AT M c K I N N E Y N AT I O N A L A I R P O R T / T K I STRATEGICALLY LOCATED ON THE FRINGE OF DALLAS/FORT WORTH CLASS B AIR SPACE| ON-SITE U.S. CUSTOMS AWARD-WINNING FULL-SERVICE FBO & TOWER | DIRECT ACCESS TO CENTRAL EXPRESSWAY (U.S. 75) AND SAM RAYBURN TOLLWAY (S.H. 121) www.FlyTKI.com | 1-855-I-FLY-TKI 2017

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

219


ADVERTISER INDEX

ADVERTISER INDEXâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;|â&#x20AC;&#x201A;2017 McKinney Economic Development Corporation ............................................ Inside Front Cover Allen Economic Development ............................................................................................................1 The Colony ..............................................................................................................................................2 Dallas, City of .........................................................................................................................................5 Cedar Hill Economic Development ....................................................................................................7 Frisco Economic Development Corporation ..................................................................................9 Waxahachie ......................................................................................................................................... 10 Midlothian Economic Development ............................................................................................... 12 Garland, TX .......................................................................................................................................... 19 DART ..................................................................................................................................................... 35 Westlake .............................................................................................................................................. 46 Downtown Dallas Inc. ....................................................................................................................... 46 Southern Methodist University ...................................................................................................... 62 Dallas Regional Chamber ................................................................................................................. 87 QTS ......................................................................................................................................................105 Burleson, TX Economic Development .........................................................................................112 Forney Economic Development Corporation ............................................................................112 Arlington ............................................................................................................................................136 DeSoto Economic Development Corporation .......................................................................... 142 ONCOR ................................................................................................................................................146 Richardson, TX .................................................................................................................................152 Denton Economic Development ...................................................................................................152 Dallas Innovates...............................................................................................................................159 Landon Homes ..................................................................................................................................160 Rockwall Economic Development Corporation .......................................................................168 Grapevine Economic Development .............................................................................................. 174 Fairview Economic Development Corporation .........................................................................184 Balch Springs ....................................................................................................................................199 Coppell, City of .................................................................................................................................201 Greenville Economic Development ..............................................................................................203 Duncanville Economic Development Corporation ..................................................................205 Mansfield Economic Development Corporation .......................................................................209 North Richland Hills Economic Development ...........................................................................213 Lewisville Economic Development ..............................................................................................215 McKinney Airport .............................................................................................................................219 Plano Economic Development ............................................................................Inside Back Cover Addison Economic Development ................................................................................... Back Cover

220

D A L L A S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G U I D E

2017


DFW METROPLEX

YOU FOUND THE SWEET SPOT. Welcome to Addison, where you’re 15 minutes from anywhere in Dallas. There are more than 1,600 businesses here, surrounded by 180 restaurants, 24 hotels and the top-ranked general aviation airport in Texas. With over 10 million square feet of office space, highly qualified workers in every field close by and a city government dedicated to helping you succeed, it’s no wonder NerdWallet voted Addison the #1 city in Texas to start a business. AddisonED.com • 972.450.7076

Dallas Economic Development Guide - 2017  

A financial and logistics overview of the Dallas-Fort Worth market.

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