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Gerhard Richter “Lines which do not exist”

92

THE D R AWI N G CENTER


The Drawing Center September 11 – November 18, 2010 M ain G a l l er y


Gerhard Richter “Lines which do not exist”

Curated by Gavin Delahunty


DR AW ING PA P ERS 92

Essay by Gavin Delahunty


Directors’ Foreword

The exhibition Gerhard Richter: “Lines which do not exist” marks the beginning of an exchange of exhibitions between The Drawing Center and Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (mima). Initiated by an award from The Art Fund that allowed mima to establish a collection of contemporary drawings from the Americas, the unique collaboration of our two institutions has flourished over the past three years. The Drawing Center’s partnership with mima has expanded beyond the initial advisory role, affording both institutions the opportunity for dialogue and an exchange of ideas that will continue to develop with future projects. In the fall of 2009, mima, in partnership with ARTIST ROOMS (National Galleries of Scotland and Tate), organized Gerhard Richter: Modern Times, which presented a selection of abstract works, watercolors, pencil and graphite drawings, oil paintings on paper, over-painted photographs, and a rarely shown sculpture spanning Richter’s five-decade career. The exhibition sparked great interest in Richter’s oeuvre and offered a unique opportunity to further explore the material. Gavin Delahunty, mima’s curator, has reconsidered the exhibition for The Drawing Center, focusing specifically on Richter’s complex relationship with drawing and showcasing his works on paper for the first time in the United States. First and foremost, we wish to thank Gerhard Richter for allowing The Drawing Center to present this body of work and for his invaluable insight into his practice. We laud the exhibition’s curator, Gavin Delahunty, for his superb effort in conceiving this exhibition and stimulating a new perspective on Richter’s prolific body of work.

9


This exhibition would not have been possible without generous loans from Kunstmuseum Winterthur; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Donna and Howard Stone, Chicago; a private collection on permanent loan at the Kunsthalle Emden; and a private collection in Berlin. We also greatly appreciate the advice and support of Marian Goodman; Dieter Schwarz and Ludmilla Sala, Kunstmuseum Winterthur; and Mark Pascale, Art Institute of Chicago. We are most grateful to Frances Dittmer for her generous support of this exhibition. The Drawing Center and mima both recognize their dedicated staff members for their commitment and enthusiasm in facilitating the presentation of this exhibition. From The Drawing Center, special thanks go to Rachel Liebowitz, Assistant Curator; Anna Martin, Registrar; Emily Gaynor, Public Relations and Marketing Officer; Dan Gillespie, Operations Officer; Nicole Goldberg, Director of Development; Jonathan T.D. Neil, Executive Editor; Joanna Ahlberg, Managing Editor; and Peter J. Ahlberg/AHL&CO. From mima, special thanks go to Alix Collingwood, Assistant Curator.

Brett Littman Executive Director, The Drawing Center Kate Brindley Director, mima

10


“Lines which do not exist” Gavin Delahunty


The only thing certain is nothing is certain. —michel de montaigne

How should we approach Gerhard Richter’s drawings? For a body of work in production since 1964, we know only a small amount about it. We know the artist offers the category of drawing for a multitude of techniques, including graphite on paper, ballpoint pen on paper, ink on paper, watercolor on paper, and colored ink on paper. We are aware that the drawings often appear in groups, sometimes consisting of only a few works: in the 1960s, clusters of representational drawings, mechanical drawings, and drawings from projected photographs; in the ’70s, abstract drawings; in the ’80s, drawings of persons and objects; in the ’90s, figurative and abstract drawings in India ink, amongst others. We recognize that their relationship to the artist’s primary practice of painting cannot be easily understood. The drawings appear to push out from his painting, almost as a distinct alternative. What’s more, the artist has expressed, at times, a certain contempt for drawing as a medium. One could summarize that Richter’s drawings resist their viewer on multiple levels, that they defy any effort to establish a clear rationale for how they stand in relation to the practice and history of drawing. Yet in what follows I would like to propose, with specific reference to the graphite on paper works, that we can discern two stages in this personal, often private activity by the artist: 1964 to 1999, when the artist cyclically tested the mechanism of drawing; and 1999 to 2005, when Richter departs from the intermittent explorations of that earlier phase and moves towards a resolution generated by the repeated use of the medium, a departure no doubt informed by his 1999 invitation from the Kunstmuseum Winterthur to originate a catalogue raisonné of his drawings.

15


1964 to 1999 The period between 1964 and 1999 is characterized by Richter’s tireless engagement with the loaded language surrounding drawing, which is due in part to his deep-rooted and multivalent skepticism towards the medium. This skepticism may well have had some unexpected outcomes, as by the ’90s Richter’s heterogeneous character was considered by many an act of resistance against any précis of his oeuvre, in either painting or drawing. To unpack this fertile period it is useful to consider not only the traditional rhetoric of drawing but also the artist’s political and ideological mood at the time. Skill, virtuosity, and technical brilliance, this is the kind of language that has traditionally escorted drawing since the conception of disegno during the Renaissance. By 1964 not much had changed. The following is a partial list of words used to describe and qualify drawing in an essay published that year by Lawrence Alloway, the English art critic and curator: sparkle, felicity, frequent charm, surprising and delightful, poignancy, dazzling, luminous, enchanted, airy, enhancing, graceful, fragile, spun from glass, fanciful.1 Richter’s disdain for drawing was based upon dissatisfaction with this clichéd lingua franca—as Richter notes, “it was completely mannerist” 2 —as well as upon his own impression of not being able to draw and his absolute commitment to painting: “Perhaps one day I shall find something that works better than painting! For the moment, however, I am used to working with brush and paint, and I find this both simpler and more full of potential.” Richter continues, “And even when I paint a straightforward copy, something new creeps in, whether I want it to or not: something that even I don’t grasp.”3 This last statement is worth noting for two reasons: it demonstrates Richter’s belief that 1

2

3

16

See Alloway’s introduction to American Drawings (New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1964). Birgit Pelzer, “Lines Escaping the Gaze,” in Gerhard Richter: Drawings 1964–1999. Catalogue raisonné (Düsseldorf: Richter Verlag, 2000), 69. Gerhard Richter, Text: Schriften und Interviews, Herausgegeben von Hans Ulrich Obrist (Frankfurt am Main: Insel Verlag, 1993), quoted in Gerhard Richter: Drawings 1964–1999, 10 n.12.


only painting offered any potential of the kind in which he was interested, and it offers that by a repeated deployment of the medium something extra or unfamiliar to the artist would appear. Richter’s frustrations with drawing did prompt a number of strategies in the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s for exploring drawing’s origins. For example, in 1966 he created a drawing by fitting a pencil instead of a drill bit into a drill, which he then moved back and forth across a page, allowing the uncontrolled rotation of the pencil to create erratic curling lines against the paper [PL. 10]. This curiously senseless act was an attempt to reject the loaded concept of the artist’s touch. Its allure for Richter lay in the abstract, meandering appearance of the drawing combined with its self-referentiality. Richter also made practical discoveries, for instance by carrying out studies and working and diagrammatic drawings [PL. 19]. Principally functional, these drawings describe the installation of works using a graphic language. They not only hold a technical function but, as Richter recognized, they could also be regarded as drawings in their own right. Photography, unsurprisingly, contributed to these investigations [PL. 12].4 Richter had long believed that copying something from a photograph or slide served to underscore how manual mimetic representation was outdated. Drawing directly from a photograph held an additional appeal for Richter, however, in that it had the effect of draining or emptying out any intrinsic artistic value from both the hand of the artist and the given subject matter. Here a return to the concept of disegno will be useful, for in tracing the conventional terms through which drawing has traditionally been conceived, we can identify the extent to which Richter succeeded through these experiments in releasing drawing from certain outmoded assumptions. Art historian Karen-Edis Barzman notes that disegno did not just signify the practice of drawing, in appealing to the artist’s manual dexterity, but it also entailed a “cognitive process, moving from perception of sensible particulars to 4

17

From the early 1960s on Richter replaced drawing with photography for his preliminary studies.


universal knowledge.”5 Copying a subject from photography in effect short-circuited this principle. In doing so, Richter highlights that there is no absolute form or essence that is universal. His drawings imply that we acquire our “universal knowledge” of those “sensible particulars” via a process of abstraction, that they can only ever be shadows or reflections of such universals. Take Gebirge/Mountains (1968) for example [PL. 5]. Although it is one of Richter’s more representational drawings, it could be said that its lines remain abstractions. To render them, the artist, with the limiting tools of focus, aperture, and shutter speed, takes a photograph, which registers the light that is either reflected or omitted by the mountain range. This registration is then processed by a developer into a visual image, in this case a specially mounted individual transparency or slide, which allows the photograph to be projected onto a screen. Only at this point does the artist trace a number of lines that, collectively, give the impression or semblance of the “mountain range.” In the period before 1999, processes of abstraction, such as the filtering of the drawn line through an apparatus such as a drill, camera, or projection, direct the work and establish drawing as always mediated. It is important to note that towards the end of the 1960s conceptions of drawing were undergoing radical changes in other parts of the world, for instance in New York. Though unaware of many of these activities, Richter was similarly interested in dismantling drawing as it had been traditionally conceived. It is also worth remembering that Richter had been trained as an artist in East Germany, and in the tradition of Socialist Realism, where representational drawing was not merely suggestive of the Academy but of the Academy’s complicity with a specific political regime. “Richter recalls how in Dresden he drew a bathing scene from a photograph with the guilty conscience 5

18

Karen-Edis Barzman, “Perception, Knowledge and the Theory of Disegno in Sixteenth-Century Florence,” in Larry J. Feinberg, From Studio to Studiolo: Florentine Draughtsmanship Under the First Medici Grand Dukes (Oberlin and Seattle: Allen Memorial Art Museum and University of Washington Press, 1991); quoted in Cornelia H. Butler, Afterimage: Drawing Through Process (Los Angeles: Museum of Contemporary Art, 1999), 33.


of someone academically trained, who knew that such a thing was not good form.”6 Encouragement in this direction may have come from Richter’s friend, the artist Sigmar Polke. By the mid-’60s Polke was already an extremely productive draftsman whose works were familiar to Richter as a result of their close personal relationship. Like Richter, irritated by drawing’s vaunted status, Polke set about deconstructing its provenance with works such as Dürer Hase (1968). Throughout the ’60s, Polke repeatedly appropriated historical artworks, and his now infamous treatment of Dürer’s hare is particularly self-confident. The master’s hare has been looked upon as the quintessence of German art, the highly realistic drawing of its pelt being regarded as an expression of perfect representation. Polke takes possession of the hare and copies the picture, including Dürer’s distinctive signature. With a few swift strokes he successfully trivializes the work, bestowing upon it an ironic and comical note. Richter, unlike Polke, was uninterested in irony, yet Polke’s example must have provided him with some belief that there was an alternative future for drawing, and that he could pursue it as a means to assert—as he would with painting—its materiality and nothing else. 1999 to 2005 In no small part due to an invitation in 1999 by the Kunstmuseum Winterthur and its Director, Dieter Schwarz, do we witness a significant change in the artist’s drawings. Schwarz proposed an exhibition focused exclusively upon the artist’s drawings to be accompanied by a catalogue raisonné. Before this point, the drawings had rarely been exhibited publicly. Their earliest key presentations took place in 1970 at the Städtisches Museum Leverkusen, Kunsthaus Hamburg, and Kunstverein Munich. Apart from the shows that included Richter’s Atlas (1962–Present), which does hold a number of collages and sketches, the next relatively large and important exhibition of Richter’s works on paper did not occur until 1987, at Museum Overholland, Amsterdam. Schwarz had already organized a num6

19

Dieter Schwarz, Gerhard Richter: Drawings 1964–1999, 167.


ber of exhibitions with artists, such as Roni Horn and Brice Marden, for whom drawing, although a less well-known part of their practice, had always played a significant role.7 Presumably aware of these achievements and the significance of the invitation, Richter may have found himself forced to engage with drawing in a manner previously unimagined. In preparation for the 1999 exhibition in Winterthur, Richter made some forty-five new drawings, which, aside from one drawing afforded a title, are simply identified by the date of their approximate completion. There is a curious uniformity to the complexity of this group, the likes of which we have not seen before [PLS. 18, 20, 30, 32, 50]. Stubbornly graphic, they appear the opposite of any display of manual dexterity or drawing “talent”; there is no attempt to represent a physical appearance but only what can occur automatically: a repetitive, machine-like precision. The flat impersonal graphite does away with any illusionistic space, drawing sharply into focus the materiality of the work, which is further called to attention by one’s uncertainty as to the best distance from which to view the work. What with their multi-directional trajectories, the lines appear to blend together at points where pseudo-reverberations occur. Some lines appear very crisp, very precise, while others are fuzzier and distorted, making it difficult to apprehend the drawing’s entire surface at once. Techniques such as frottage feature, as do various and deliberate erasure lines. More than in previous decades, the erasure lines perform as equivalents to the paint drawn across Richter’s canvases, with the frottage achieving a similarly textured, scared surface. Parallel techniques these may be, but in many respects drawing goes beyond painting. As Richter notes, “The paintings, even when they are abstract, are in a certain way more analogous to what is represented. That already happens through the colors, because everything is exactly executed, even in gesture painting. The drawings are always dissimilar to what is represented. They have lines which do not exist.” 7

20

See Dieter Schwarz, Roni Horn: Rare Spellings. Selected Drawings 1985–1992 (Düsseldorf: Richter Verlag, 1993), and Brice Marden: Work Books 1964–1995, ed. Dieter Schwarz and Michael Semff (Düsseldorf: Richter Verlag, 1997).


This concept, “lines which do not exist,” 8 has an important value, one rooted in the artist’s deliberate and sustained attempt in all media to move away from any aestheticism. It is an act of resistance that side-steps the traditional and, for Richter, one-time authoritarian discourse of drawing. Without lines, the integrity of the work of art is compromised. If the lines do not exist, they can avoid qualification, and in doing so, they place the work outside of any well codified discourse on drawing. With the 1999 drawings then we are confronted by an approach that encourages a disorganizing of its own forms and a confusion of its own methods. These drawings are consistent in their objective not to “express” a meaning, to “represent” a thing, or to “imitate” nature. There has been a distinct reduction in Richter’s production of drawings, at least of which we are aware, between the 1999 group and the present. Only four further works were publicly released in 2005; their date, auspicious titles, and scale advance the idea that the artist happened upon something that has retained his interest [PLS. 1, 15, 28, 54]. Measuring 151 by 102 centimeters, these drawings are the largest the artist has made since the mountain, seascape, and cloud drawings from 1968 and 1969. (A set of large-scale drawings was also produced in 1982, but it was considered a failure.) Unlike these earlier drawings, there is no pictorial experience intimated by the titles of the new works, which are straightforwardly distinguished by roman numerals: Drawing I through Drawing IV. This is also the first time we see the artist providing the mantle “drawing” for a work of graphite on paper. To further interrogate the appearance of the 2005 drawings, I would like to move outside of the specificity of the graphite line and toward another, elusive line offered by the artist, namely the artist’s glass and mirror works. Like the drawings, these pieces have been in production since the 1960s. Poised between architecture and painting, works such as 11 Scheiben (11 Sheets of Glass) (2004) are nothing more than panes of glass stacked in such a way as to induce an odd 8

21

Birgit Pelzer, interview with the artist, 7 May, 1999; quoted in Gerhard Richter: Drawings 1964–1999, 165.


mirroring effect. The first glass works, 4 Glasscheiben (4 Glass Panes) (1967), followed a group of some twelve technical drawings made between 1965–1967, and 11 Scheiben was followed relatively quickly by the Drawing series. Completely devoid of any lines, the panes of glass have a striking material presence which absorbs whatever is placed in front of them. Similar to the drawings, they address a dominant language, in this case western painting’s metaphorical relation to the window and the mirror. Both 11 Scheiben and the Drawing series elude definition and fixity via a certain open-endedness. They are empty of all form, impersonal, and determined ipso facto by their material means. The panes reflect only their viewer, surrendering any enforcement of meaning. Lines convene on their surfaces only on occasions when they are under inspection. The eleven panes of glass making up the work ensure that each line remains out of focus, blurred, off-register. Nothing of the artist is contained in the work. It is simply a management of material; and with both the Drawing series and 11 Scheiben, material is key. In each case the works are defined by the factual presence of the material, which is both explanatory and exploratory. They operate by assimilating the data of one’s cognition and the details of one’s environment respectively. Neither work offers the experience of a purely visual world, nor a picture of a reconstructed world, but the image of our world rendered, or even imagined, differently, since the material itself rearranges the facts. I have taken as a point of departure Richter’s long-held “deep skepticism” of drawing. “I used to snub such things [drawings] as too artistic, as too typical, as the type of thing artists would make— beautiful drawings and watercolors, outdated techniques.” 9 Far from being a slight aside, the exhibition, Gerhard Richter: “Lines which do not exist”, suggests that drawing has provided an important way forward for the artist. Despite his early intimations of drawing’s obsolescence and a personal ambivalence towards his own drawing practice, drawing has revealed itself as an important medium for Richter, one that allows us to draw closer to him. The set of drawings 9

22

From Dorthea Dietrich, “Gerhard Richter: An Interview,” The Print Collectors Newsletter, Vol. 16, No. 4 (1985), 128–132; quoted in Gerhard Richter: Drawings 1964–1999, 7.


brought together for this exhibition presents an entangled knot of actions and pauses, of impulses and continuities, to be experienced endlessly, in multiple combinations. In doing so the drawings will continue to appear enigmatic and saturated with considerations— their source, like their attitude, incomprehensible. Neither allegory, metaphor, nor theory can sum up this body of work. It asks its viewers to py attention to the labor involved in questioning the categories that have historically determined “great� drawing.

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PL . 1

Drawing I, 2005


PL . 2

3.11.1988, 1988


PL . 3

31.5.1999, 1999


PL . 4

G.EL.2, 18.1.1984, 1984


PL . 5

Gebirge/Mountains, 1968


PL . 6

30.5.1999, 1999


PL . 7

5.5.1975, 1975


PL . 8

5.5.1975, 1975


PL . 9

14.11.1977, 1977


PL . 10

Untitled, 1966


PL . 11

Nach abstraktem Bild/After Abstract Picture (CR 398-5), c. 1976


PL . 12

20.9.1985, 1985


PL . 13

23.2.91, 1991


PL . 14

13.2.1986 (3), 1986


PL . 15

Drawing II, 2005


PL . 16

28.2.1986 (2), 1986


PL . 17

23.3.88, 1988


PL . 18

5.5.1999, 1999


PL . 19

Study for Interior (recto and verso), 1970


PL . 20

27.4.1999 (5), 1999


PL . 21

31.5.1999, 1999


PL . 22

4.4.1983 (2), 1983


PL . 23

13.2.1986 (6), 1986


PL . 24

7.1991, 1991


PL . 25

4.5.1999, 1999


PL . 26

Studie f체r Ausstellungsr채ume/Study for Exhibition Halls, 1968


PL . 27

18.2.1985, 1985


PL . 28

Drawing III, 2005


PL . 29

19.12.1991, 1991


PL . 30

27.4.1999 (1), 1999


PL . 31

21.5.1986 (4), 1986


PL . 32

1.6.1999, 1999


PL . 33

16.8.1991, 1991


PL . 34

Himmel (Sky), 1984


PL . 35

4.5.1999, 1999


PL . 36

18.10.1988, 1988


PL . 37

R.O., 22.1.1984, 1984


PL . 38

1.6.1999, 1999


PL . 39

Untitled, 1978


PL . 40

11.4.88, 1988


PL . 41

17 Seest端cke/17 Seascapes, 1969


PL . 42

G.E.L.1, 18.1.1984, 1984


PL . 43

20.12.1991, 1991


PL . 44

8.12.1989, 1989


PL . 45

16.8.1991, 1991


PL . 46

7.1991, 1991


PL . 47

Tatlin, 17.11.1982, 1982


PL . 48

24.6.88, 1988


PL . 49

22.4.1990, 1990


PL . 50

27.4.1999 (2), 1999


PL . 51

22.3.88, 1988


PL . 52

22.5.1986 (1), 1986


PL . 53

13.2.1986 (1), 1986


PL . 54

Drawing IV, 2005


LIST OF WORKS

PL . 6

30.5.1999, 1999 PL . 1

Graphite on paper

Drawing I, 2005

11 7/8 x 8 1/4 inches

Graphite on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

59 1/2 x 40 3/8 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Collection of Donna and Howard Stone PL . 7 PL . 2

5.5.1975, 1975

3.11.1988, 1988

Ink (pen) on paper

Graphite on the back of a picture postcard

5 13/16 x 8 inches

with the reproduction of CR 439

Permanent loan from a German private

4 1/8 x 5 15/16 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

PL . 8

5.5.1975, 1975 PL . 3

Ink (pen) on paper

31.5.1999, 1999

5 13/16 x 8 inches

Graphite on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Private Collection PL . 9 PL . 4 / DETAIL PGS . 12–13

14.11.1977, 1977

G.EL.2, 18.1.1984, 1984

Watercolor on paper

Watercolor on paper

8 1/4 x 5 3/4 inches

7 x 9 5/16 inches

Private Collection, Berlin

Private Collection, Berlin PL . 10 PL . 5

Untitled, 1966

Gebirge/Mountains, 1968

Graphite on paper

Graphite on paper

8 13/16 x 6 7/16 inches

19 1/4 x 21 1/2 inches

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

Permanent loan from a German private

Winterthur, Permanent loan of the artist, 1997

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

106


PL . 11

PL . 16

Nach abstraktem Bild/After Abstract Picture

28.2.1986 (2), 1986

(CR 398-5), c. 1976

Graphite on paper

China ink (pen) on paper

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

5 5/8 x 8 1/16 inches

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds from

from the canton of Zurich, 1997

the canton of Zurich, 1996 PL . 17 PL . 12

23.3.88, 1988

20.9.1985, 1985

Colored ink and watercolor on paper

Graphite on paper

6 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

The Museum of Modern Art, New York,

Permanent loan from a German private

Gift of the International Council in honor of

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

H.R.H. Prinz Franz von Bayern, 1989

PL . 13

PL . 18

23.2.91, 1991

5.5.1999, 1999

Colored ink and watercolor on paper with

Graphite on paper

pencil on board

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

9 1/2 x 13 1/8 inches

Private Collection

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Gift of The Patsy R. Taylor Family

PL . 19

Trust, 1993

Study for Interior (recto and verso), 1970 Graphite on paper

PL . 14

9 9/16 x 12 13/16 inches

13.2.1986 (3), 1986

Permanent loan from a German private

Graphite on paper

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches Permanent loan from a German private

PL . 20

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

27.4.1999 (5), 1999 Graphite on paper

PL . 15

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

Drawing II, 2005

Private Collection

Graphite on paper 59 1/2 x 40 3/8 inches Collection of Donna and Howard Stone

107


PL . 21

PL . 26

31.5.1999, 1999

Studie für Ausstellungsräume/Study for

Graphite on paper

Exhibition Halls, 1968

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

Graphite and ballpoint pen on paper

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

11 13/16 x 15 3/4 inches

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds

Permanent loan from a German private

from the canton of Zurich, 2000

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

PL . 22 / DETAIL PGS .104–105

PL . 27

4.4.1983 (2), 1983

18.2.1985, 1985

Graphite on paper

Watercolor, pastel, pencil and oil on paper

7 1/8 x 9 5/8 inches

9 5/16 x 6 11/16 inches

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

Private Collection, Berlin

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds from the canton of Zurich, 1996

PL . 28

Drawing III, 2005 PL . 23

Graphite on paper

13.2.1986 (6), 1986

59 1/2 x 40 3/8 inches

Graphite on paper

Collection of Donna and Howard Stone

11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches Permanent loan from a German private

PL . 29

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

19.12.1991, 1991 Graphite on paper

PL . 24 / DETAIL PGS . 24–25

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

7.1991, 1991

Permanent loan from a German private

China ink (pen and brush) on paper

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

6 1/2 x 9 7/16 inches Permanent loan from a German private

PL . 30

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

27.4.1999 (1), 1999 Graphite on paper

PL . 25 / DETAIL PGS . 6–7

11 7/8 x 8 1/4 inches

4.5.1999, 1999

Private Collection

Graphite on paper 8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

PL . 31

Private Collection

21.5.1986 (4), 1986 Graphite on paper 8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

108


PL . 32

PL . 37

1.6.1999, 1999

R.O., 22.1.1984, 1984

Graphite on paper

Watercolor on paper

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

5 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches

Private Collection

Private Collection, Berlin

PL . 33

PL . 38

16.8.1991, 1991

1.6.1999, 1999

Graphite on paper

Graphite on paper

8 5/16 x 11 11/16 inches

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

Permanent loan from a German private

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds from the canton of Zurich, 2000

PL . 34

Himmel (Sky), 1984

PL . 39

Watercolor and pencil on paper

Untitled, 1978

11 13/16 x 16 9/16 inches

Graphite on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

8 x 9 15/16 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds

PL . 35

from the canton of Zurich, 1997

4.5.1999, 1999 Graphite on paper

PL . 40

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

11.4.88, 1988

Private Collection

Colored ink and watercolor on paper 6 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches

PL . 36

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art,

18.10.1988, 1988

New York, Gift of Walter Bareiss, 1990

Graphite on paper 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches

PL . 41

Courtesy of Winterthur, Kunstmuseum

17 Seest端cke/17 Seascapes, 1969

Winterthur, Purchase with lottery funds

Graphite and ballpoint pen on paper

from the canton of Zurich, 1997

8 1/2 x 12 inches Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

109


PL . 42

PL . 47

G.E.L.1, 18.1.1984, 1984

Tatlin, 17.11.1982, 1982

Watercolor on paper

Graphite on paper

6 1/2 x 9 5/16 inches

11 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches

Private Collection, Berlin

Collection of Joseph Masheck Photo by Tom Warren

PL . 43

20.12.1991, 1991

PL . 48

Graphite on paper

24.6.88, 1988

11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches

Colored ink and watercolor on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

11 3/4 x 15 5/8 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Gift of Walter Bareiss, 1990

PL . 44

8.12.1989, 1989

PL . 49

Graphite on paper

22.4.1990, 1990

8 1/4 x 11 inches

Graphite on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

PL . 45

16.8.1991, 1991

PL . 50

Graphite on paper

27.4.1999 (2), 1999

8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches

Graphite on paper

Permanent loan from a German private

8 1/4 x 11 7/8 inches

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

Private Collection

PL . 46

PL . 51

7.1991, 1991

22.3.88, 1988

China ink (brush) on paper

Colored ink and watercolor on paper

11 3/4 x 15 5/8 inches

6 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches

Permanent loan from a German private

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New

collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden

York, Gift of the International Council in honor of H.R.H. Prinz Franz von Bayern, 1989

110


PL . 52

22.5.1986 (1), 1986 Graphite on paper 8 1/4 x 11 11/16 inches Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden PL . 53

13.2.1986 (1), 1986 Graphite on paper 11 11/16 x 8 1/4 inches Permanent loan from a German private collection, Courtesy Kunsthalle Emden PL . 54

Drawing IV, 2005 Graphite on paper 59 1/2 x 40 3/8 inches Collection of Donna and Howard Stone

111


CONTRIBUTOR BIO

Gavin Delahunty (b. 1977, Ireland) completed his undergraduate studies at Crawford College of Art & Design before earning an MA in Visual Arts Practices (Criticism) at IADT, Dublin. Currently Curator at mima, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, Gavin leads mima’s Drawing Collection, in consultation with The Drawing Center, focusing on postwar drawing from the Americas. Recent acquisitions for the collection include works by Robert Breer, Robert Gober, Michael Heizer, Adrian Piper, Paul Sharits, Robert Smithson, Al Taylor, and Kara Walker. Recent curatorial projects include A certain distance, endless light: A project by Felix Gonzalez-Torres and William McKeown (2010), Ellsworth Kelly: Drawings: 1954–62 (2009), and Katy Moran: Paintings (2008). His exhibition Gerhard Richter: Modern Times won ‘Best Event 2009’ at the prestigious Journal Culture Awards. His monographic exhibition, Bonnie Camplin: Railway Mania, opened in July 2010 at mima.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Co-Chairs

Gerhard Richter: “Lines which do not exist” is

Frances Beatty Adler

made possible in part by the Frances R. Dittmer

Eric Rudin

Family Foundation. Additional support for the accompanying publication has been provided by

Dita Amory Melva Bucksbaum* Suzanne Cochran Anita F. Contini Frances Dittmer* Bruce W. Ferguson Stacey Goergen Steven Holl David Lang Michael Lynne* Iris Z. Marden George Negroponte Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro Elizabeth Rohatyn* Jane Dresner Sadaka Allen Lee Sessoms Kenneth E. Silver Pat Steir Jeanne C. Thayer* Barbara Toll Isabel Stainow Wilcox Candace Worth Executive Director Brett Littman *Emeriti

Dr. Benny Levenson and Prof. Henning Lohner.


E D WA R D H A LL A M T U C K P U B L I C AT I O N P R O G R A M

This is number 92 of the Drawing Papers, a series of publications documenting The Drawing Center’s exhibitions and public programs and providing a forum for the study of drawing. Jonathan T.D. Neil Executive Editor Joanna Ahlberg Managing Editor Designed by Peter J. Ahlberg / AHL&CO This book is set in Adobe Garamond Pro and Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk. It was printed by Shapco in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

L I B R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S C O N T R O L N U M B E R : 2 010 9 3 3 9 0 3 I S B N 9 7 8 - 0 - 9 4 2 3 24 - 6 2 - 4 Š 2 010 T he D rawing C enter


T H E D R AW I N G PA P E R S S E R I E S A L S O I N C L U D E S

Drawing Papers 91 Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage Drawing Papers 90 Leon Golub: Live & Die Like a Lion? Drawing Papers 89 Selections Spring 2010: Sea Marks Drawing Papers 88 Iannis Xenakis: Composer, Architect, Visionary Drawing Papers 87 Ree Morton: At the Still Point of the Turning World Drawing Papers 86 Unica Zurn: Dark Spring Drawing Papers 85 Sun Xun: Shock of Time Drawing Papers 84 Selections Spring 2009: Apparently Invisible Drawing Papers 83 M/M: Just Like an Ant Walking on the Edge of the Visible Drawing Papers 82 Matt Mullican: A Drawing Translates the Way of Thinking Drawing Papers 81 Greta Magnusson Grossman: Furniture and Lighting Drawing Papers 80 Kathleen Henderson: What if I Could Draw a Bird that Could Change the World? Drawing Papers 79 Rirkrit Tiravanija: Demonstration Drawings

T O O R D E R , A N D F O R A C O M P L E T E C ATA L O G O F PA S T E D I T I O N S , V I S I T D R AW I N G C E N T E R . O R G


THE D R AWI N G CENTER

3 5 W O O S T E R S T R E E T | N E W YO R K , N Y 10 013 T 212 219 216 6 | F 212 9 6 6 2 9 76 | D R AW I N G C E N T E R . O R G


Essay by Gavin Delahunty

D R AW I N G PA P E R S 9 2

$25.00 US

I S B N 9 78 0 9 42 3 24 6 24 52500

9

780942

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Profile for The Drawing Center

Gerhard Richter: Lines which do not exist  

The Drawing Center's Drawing Papers Volume 92 featuring an essay by exhibition curator Gavin Delahunty.

Gerhard Richter: Lines which do not exist  

The Drawing Center's Drawing Papers Volume 92 featuring an essay by exhibition curator Gavin Delahunty.

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