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The Drawing Center's

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B R O\T N

N I CHO LA S

HA VE N

VI CT O RI A

M O S E S HO S K IN S C A RRI E

J O HN S ON

JO RG E M A CC H I M ET T S

S T E P HE N JENNY

P E RL IN

CLA UDI A

S C H MA C K E

M A RCE LO

SOLi

JA NE S O UT H BA RT H6Lf , UY RO S E M A RY

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22 The Drawing Center SEPTEMBER 8 - O CTO ENN ZO . ZO O I

N I CHO I . A S V I CT O RI A

B R O\rN H AV EN

M O S E S HO SK IN S CA RRT E J O H N SON J O RG E M A CC H I S ' T E I ' T { E N M ET T S J E NNY

P E RL IN

C LA UDI A M A RCE I - O IA NE

S C H MA C K E SOL {

S O UT H

B ARTHfr "fu y rocu o R O S E M A RY

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B RO V N

NICHOLA S

My work dealswith constructsof time and space,memory and perception.The concePt dictatesthe physical manifestationof eachpiece.Materials such aswallpaper,dust, and plasterare used in continuing the dialogueof minimdism and formal abstraction. The instdlations are mro-dimensionaland createa closedenvironment.This placesthe viewer within the perceptud landscapeand, in turn, the viewer becomesa particiPant. The scde of the worls is naturalistic and basedon my horizon line. The liminal presenceof the work reflectsthe transient nature of memory perception,and time. Other qudities of theseconstructsare referencedthrough the abstractreconstructionof imagesas well as their fragmentary synecdochicalnature.

BORN IN VOLVERHAMPTON,

GREAT BRITAIN'

I97'i

LIVES IN CHICAGO.

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V IC TORI A

HA V E N

My recent drawingshover in ihe spacebenveentwo- and three- dimensions,energized by indeterminacy.Blurring the border betweendrawing and instdlation, rigorous formal structuresemergefrom the humblest of materialssuch as tape, whiteout, stickpins, and shadows.

Bo RN I N SE A T T L E ,t 9 6 4 3 t t ' zs

IN SBAT T L E.

Untithd# 1,2001 From the "L" series Thpe,ink, and pins on paper 27 x 24.5x I in. (68.6x 62.2x 2.54 cm) Untithd# 4,2001 From the "L" series Thpe,ink, and pins on paper 18x 16x I in. (45.7x 40.6x2.54 cm) Untitlzd# 7,2ool From tfie "L" series Thpe,ink, and pins on paper 23x29 x I in. (58.4x73.7x2.54cri


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MOSES HO S K I NS

For a number of years I have worked in a variery of media, usually in seriesor grouPs. I often produce projects concurrently, playing one off the other. I addressthe relationship of physical pro..rr., ro aesthetic developments through drawing, painting, collage, and mixed combinations, all of which I consider powerful vehiclesof depiction and expression. The initial act of drawing instigates an investigation of the use and reuse of line so as to imply, define, and refine. In the emergenceof each piece, I pay attention to form and shape, color relationships, and the positioning of mass and negative space' '$71th stasisat points in the continuum toward an ideal attainment, the suggestionof an ultimate presenceis the culminating objective, the return to the source of purpose. My work is not about things, but rather an aestheticenterprise, exposing drama through a seriesof exercises.Terms such as "permutation" or "icon" have been worn out by their hackneyed use in the proliferation of art-writing, leaving nothing but cultural byproducts and residues.Probably it is best to simply look and ponder-and not say much. Each piece is untitled.

BORN

IN

FAIRFIELD,

IOISTA' I9'J;

LIVES

IN

NE\T

YORK.

All drawings are Untitled, 1999-2000 paperassemblage, with acrylic, ink, pencil, and diversetapeson paPerand found materials 3l x21 314 in. (78.8 x 54.6 cm) 3O ll4 x 27 318in. (76.8x 69.5 cm) 4 0 ll2x25 71 8in. ( 102. 9x 65. 7 c m ) 28 13116x l8 5/8 in. (73.2 x 47.3 cm) 30 318x 24 in. (77.2x 6l cm) 29 l12 x 18 314 in. (74.9 x 47.6 cm) 32 314 x2l l12 in. (83.2 x 54'5 cm) 3 9 l12 x2 9 5l8in. ( 100. 3x 75. 3 c m )


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PaperNmblage, with acrylic, ink, pcncil, ud divetr tep6 on pepcr md foud materials, z4x gz in. (6r x 8r., cm).


CARRTE JOHNSON

The tension betweenthe manmadeand the naturdly occurring. You'redriving down the highway. Fragmentsyour eyepicks out of the landscapesuperimposethemselvesover fragmentsof things you've picked out of computer screens,TV screens,movie screens. You'removing through physicaland mental spacesimultaneously.Theseare the sPaces that I attempt to capture,link, and contain within abstraction.

BoRN rN KANsAs crtv,

196r; LIvBs rN NEv YoRK.

Forur Untithd drawings, 200 I Gouache and pencil on assortedpapers 50 x 38 ll4 in. (127 x 97.2 c:nr)eech (76.zxtot6m). CARRTE JoHNsoN, Untithd 2oor. Gouchemdpencilonmnedpapcs,3ox4oin.


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JOR GE M A CCHI

For some years now I have been keeping a news item cut from a London newsPaper: "Baby died beneath drunk babysitter." Apparently the babysitter had too many glassesof cider and sar on the sofa without realizing that the baby she was guarding was there as well (I wonder who, besidesthose involved in the tragedy and myself, remembers this story). It doesn't marter what I did with the story. I referenceit here becauseit exemplifies rwo issuesthat generally call my attention: the accident and the leftover. One alludes to the story itself,,the other to what happens when it becomes news. The tragic tale of the baby is one of the infinitely unlikely accidents that comprise realiry. It is dizzying to think of rhe variables that had to come together for the event to happen: The parents going our, rhe amount of alcohol, the place on the sofa, the time, the babyt small slide into the wrong place. The only difference between the story and other' lesstragic, events is its appearancein the news. But notoriety is fleeting: the news item quickly recedesas the readerrurns rhe page; the baby gets lost among politicians, race horses,and comic strip characrers,and becomesa leftover. The circle quickly closes:knowledge, terror, and forgetfulness. I cannot explain why I addressmy attention to that which invariably is left to one side: police blotter news, rhe poetically pretentiousphrasesthat illustrate horror scenes,words taken out of conrext, love messageslost in newspapers,advertising copy, obituaries, the names that appear afrer "rhe end" in the movies, texts that nobody reads.I can't explain my interest in the margin becauseI have not a clue about the reason,and I don't believe having an explanation is that important. Seeingwith detachment,there is not that much difference berween textual refuse and the wood planks I picked up on the street to make sculptures with ten years ago. They are remains belonging to different categories, but remains nonetheless. I wonder if my work with refuse is a primitive and degenerateform of photography; both try to stop or slow down deterioration and vanishing'

B o R N r N BU E N o s,ttn rs,

I96 3;

LIVES IN BUENoS AIREs'

Monoblock,2000 Newspapercollage 2 1 51 8x 2 7 9l1 6 in. ( 55 x 70 c m ) sin uida (Bodieswithout Li[e), 2000 Cuerpos Newspapercollage 39 31 8x 1 45 r 5116in. ( 100x 370 c m )

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S TEPH EN

METTS

To disappear does not mean ro become eliminated. Just like the Atlantic, which continues to be there even though you can no longer feel it as you fly over it. Or like the body that continues to exist without actually being needed-since we just swirch the channel. The same happens with architecture: it will continue to exist, b u t i n t h e s ta te o f d isa p p e a r a n ce ' -peul

vrnrl ro

The drawings in the series"Data and Distribution" are an attempt to chart and diagram the emergenr phenomena referred to as globalism. Postwar,post-industrial cities-Los Angeles and Tokyo are but fi^r6-h2vs undergone epochal upheaval, erasure,and rakeover.Strangely,the spatial results of these changesare experiencedas inevitable, thoroughly typical. If a time-lapse film existed of these new megalopolises,we would be able to witness their frenetic, startling pace of formation. Barred from historical perspective,we exist in global environments possessinglittle confidence in a collectiveconsensusbeyond consumerism.Abstracted,serialized, completely without referenceto a place, site, and time, there exists little by which to navigate. In their rapid, all-pervasiverise to prominence, these spaceshave become so predictable as ro become indecipherable-they have merged into the landscapebefore us. As inhabitants of theseglobal spaces,all modernist notions of truth, transparency, and progressare inadequate for marking the increasingly complex and feverish directions and speedswe take within them. Layer upon layer, the drawings of "Data and Distribution" are composites of emergent yet indererminate spacesthat form a hyper-consumerist matrix. Tiaces of lines and trajectories delineate imaginary territories. As the works develop, nodes of activity form organizational structures, composed of referents to both old and new technologies. Much of the sheetis left blank, allowing the areaof the drawing to play out a fantasy of efficiency and direction free from interruption. This show of activiry is all that remains in spacesthat have been cleared of all else. Taken together, these drawings render an imagined sysremof production, delivery and consumption againsta forgotten architecturalbackdrop that is by turns the blueprint, representation,and archeologyof globalism.

B o R N r N s AN D rE G o,

19 6 8 ; l lvr s

IN Los ANGELES.

All drawingsarepenciland acrylicon paper Distribution #2,2000 30 x 22 in. (76.2x 55.9 cm) Distribution #4,2000 30 x 22 in. (76.2x 55.9 cm) Distribution #6,2000 30 x 22 in. (76.2x 55.9cm) Distribution #9,2000 30 x2 2in . (76 . 2x 55. 9c m ) Scatter#1,2001 60 x 40 in. (1J2.4x 101.6 cm) Scatter#3,2001 60 x 40 in. (152.4x 101.6 cm)


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JE NNY

P E RLI N

The power of a country road is different when one is walking along it from when one is flying over it by airplane. In the same way, the power of a text is different when it is read from when it is copied out. -\fla11sp

BeN;nvlN,

One-\Vay Steet

\Vritten in the mid-1920s, One-WaySneetisa wide-rangingcollection of aphoristicreflections,at times highly personal,on everydaylife in the urban environment. Benjamin'snotoriously sharpeyewas alwaysin searcho[the overlookeddetail, the evocativefragment that spokevolumesabout modern exisrence.These particular lines, taken from a longer quote printed on a wrinkled and torn sheetof paper,havecloselyaccompaniedJenny Perlin as she'sgone about her businessin New York City. Placed in her waller, Benjamin'spithy and insightful remarkshaveliterally rubbed up againstthe daily accumularionof shopping receiptsand evidenceof random errands.The recordsof trips to the drug sroreor the artists'supply shop have intimately sharedspacewith Benjamin'sruminations,which routinely succeededin turning the mundane into the exceptional. she laboriouslytracesthe letteringof cashregisterreceiPtsin a Perlin enactsBenjamin'sobservarions: seriesof sreps,capruringeachphaseon film. The resultinganimation brings to life the faithFul the project'stitle, documentation of a generic rransaction,a straightforward exchange. PerseuerAnce, alludesto the seeminglylifelessintervalsbetweenmomentsof artisticproduction when countless minor purchasesmust be made.Such maintenanceactivitiestake up an enormousamount of time, and Perlin seemsro be rrying meraphoricallyto take someof it back, or at leasttrack its The remporalityof work in the studio or editing room is thus alignedwith the many disappearance. of life are hours spent simply preparingto work as materialsare collectedand the basicnecessities optimistic fulfilled. That the slogansprinted at the bottom of theseslipsof paperare often so ("lt's not just a store.It's a solution.") only adds to their banality.Yet Perlin'scarefuldrawing Process undertakesa rescueeffort: the small ways in which we seekto improveourselvesthrough She believesthat the most consumprionare highlightedand renderedquasi-permanent. inconsequentialand forgottenactionscarry weight and deserveto be scrutinized. In her effort to draw arrenrionro rheserelativelyisolatedpursuits,Perlin has alsolooked at the long history of books on self-betterment.Like the reproductionsof the salesslips,she hascopied out phrasesFromseveraltreatisesoffering tips for everythingFromgetting aheadin businessto funcrioning more effectivelyin the art world. One line in particularseemsto resonatein connection with this recenrwork: "Hobbies are a perfectmental antitoxin for the poison generatedby cerebral activity."The repetitiousact of the copyist,who had a lot more to do in the era beforemovabletype and, more recenrly,digital technologywere developed,had the liberatingeffectof virtually eliminating the need to make decisions.A text was chosen,presumablyby an authority figure,and that her own one rhen sardown ro carry our the task of duplication.Perlin'sfilm demonstrates in the studio. for making progress copying project is self-motivated,yet it providesa similar structure "cerebral body of imagesreducesthe burden on The job of merhodicallydrawing a pre-selected opensup the "power of a text" to discovery.Perlin in counter-move, a acrivity" and simultaneously, that no text is too trivial to warrant such hand-drawnanalysis. suggesrs G nnc onv \ T ll l l e l rs (lrcg6ry \(illiarls

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WILLIAMSTO\7N,

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CL A UDIA

S CHM A CK E

Over the last few yearsI haveworked on severallarge instdladons that use up to four transparenttubing with an animatedsystemof circulating kilometersof crisscrossing warer and air bubbles driven by pumps. The result is an active display of movement within containment, an open metaphor for networksand connectionsthat is informed by the spaceand the viewer. These functioning systemsoverlay and operatewithin the existing architecture, forming a dialogue with and within the space.The instdlations alwaysinclude different levels/layersof perceptionand producea hypnotic effect.I am interestedin the visual impressionof the installation, the acousticperceptionof sound, and the experienceof movementand time. The piecefor The Drawing Center consistsof a puddleJike formation on the floor. The lines of the hosesrelateto large-scaledrawing, the dynamic aspectsof the drawn gesture. the useof liquid and movementemphasizes

BoRN rN \TITTEN, cERMANI, 1963; Ltvns IN coLocNE

AND NEv YoRK.

Spin,200l Two configurationsof c.l 800 ft. of transparentvinyl hoses,water,air, pumps,andwatertanks,dimensionsvariable.


Igg g.T w oc onfi gur ar i ons ofr 8ooft.oftr ans par entv i ny l hos es ,w ater ,ai r ,pum ps ,andw ate rt a n k s , g S 1 8 x 9 8 y B i n . Lam bdaLam bdn, C L A U D IASCHM ACKE, (z5o x z5o cm) each. Installation at the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas.


M AR CEL O

S O L{

The Dust of the Language Leading us ro the idea of language,Marcelo Sold'sdrawings point to an essentialdebatewithin conremporary arr. Some critics have signaledthat the crisis of the visible datesfrom the appearance of abstractpainring, when the essenceof the image arrived at a flat surface,where nothing but a black squarecould be inserted.'The absenceof a possiblevisibility set off the notion of the "deathof painting," causingit be born again from its own asheswithin the realm of the "idea,"one that is "readable,"rather than "visible." Legibility is lireral in Soldt work: it embodiesthe crisis of modernism and comesto declarespecific aspecrsof the phenomenon of art, which surpasstangibility in order to move on to other forms of knowledge.The use of words, of literary statements,is separatefrom the subject of speech,of narrarive.Norhing, in Sold'sdrawings,is "literature,"and it is this distinction that causesthe complexity of languagewithin the field of art. The word insertsreadability but along with it prevails the illegible and open, redirecting the text to the metaphorical.Moreover,words take on the characteristicsof visual signs,belonging to the same nature of the other perceptibleinserts (illustrations, stains,colors) with which they co-habitate.

.

If there isn'r a way ro remake the unity of the classictimes; if this is not anymore the moment of monoliths, torems,or continuoussurfaces,how can the contemporaryartist manifest,in "language," of the the idea of the derhroningof the image?It is not anymoreabout proposinga representation limits of the images. Today, fragmenredworld, like the cubists who offered us causticand powerful visual experiencecoincide with the extreme extent of our uncertainty; the visual gets stretchedout and dematerializedby the renuousnessof its outline. Soldt drawings document a sPacelacking in of a univocal"reading"of art, completionand, as such, they do not pretendto the reestablishment or ro rhe creationof a "language"of closed,absolute,and perennialsigns.Sola'sline is sinuousyet inrerrupted;his "landscape"is displaced,it doesn'tland; his statementssilence,rather than declare; the senseis deaf and dumb. The image, fragile, ready to be dissolved,accentuates,in its fragility, the it needsto maintain some integrity,knowing that the announcedruPture minimum sustenance means the border irself beween being and not being. That idea goeswith the concept of the "anxiousobject,"'where modern creationwas destinedto live the uncertaintyof whether an artwork Soldt work is exemplary;it exposes,in a dense will be constirutedor not. Vithin that perspective, and inrelligent way, the anxiety of contemporary production. It is starting from that fine and imprecisesituarion-as of a drawing, as of life-where melancholy appearsin the works. After all, they have the constraining awarenessof introducing us to the weaknessand dispersionof the world in which we live. Nothing is cohesive,tied; nothing has a real body or volume. Everythingescapes, vanishesin spaceand in time, suggesting,rather than declaring.They are piecesof a remote and existentialmemory, followed by lapses,many lapses.And it is there, in those gaps,in that wandering and vaporous,so seeminglyinnocent structure,wherewe get breathless. LI c I a Ce. No N c Ie Ligia Oanongiais a critic and art hisrorianbasedin Rio de Janeiro,Brazil.l'his texr is excerptcdfrom ln essrypublishedto accompanySoli's by RubensSanrcs. exhibirion ar the "Referâ&#x201A;Źncia"Arr Gallery (2000). Translaredfrom rhc Porruguese Notes: du Readmade,ed. Jacqueline Chamon (Nimes, France: 1989). l. SeeThierry de Duve, Res:onances 2. 'I'he concept of "anxious objecr" was defined by Harold Rosenberg in "Desestetizagio," in: A Nova Arte (Slo Paulo: Ed. Perspectiva, 1975).

B o R N r N c o tA N Ie ,

B R A Z IL , I97oi

LIVEs IN cotANIe.

Nine Unititled drawings,200 I Oil on paper 45 x 30 cm (11 4. 3x 76. 2 c m ) rwo drawings:26x37 112in. (66 x 95.2 cm) each six drawings:9 112x 13 in. (24.13x 33 cm) each


M A R c tr .o so tA, Un title d , r 9 9 9 . Oil o n p a per,47 /4 x z7 ,y't6in. (rzo x 7o cm)

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JAN E SO UT H

Since 1997 I have been making a seriesof large, ballooning sculpturesin concreteand steel. These pieces begin by bending and welding lengths of steel rod into armatures, literally drawing their structural skeletons in space.

.

Making sketchesof these armatures, I became curious about the activity of drawing in relation to sculpture. I was particularly interested in the possibiliry of combining the two forms while retaining a simultaneous senseof two- and three-dimensionality. I began to simplify, distort, and manipulate the drawings: cutting out the spacesbetween the lines and assemblingthe remaining linear webs into sculptural elementsthat sometimes appear like models of the larger sculptures. I suspend these paper structures off the wall with tiny paper hooks and lines, a referenceto my use of hoists and cables in the construction of the concretepieces.These elementsare then combined with paper cutouts of imaginary floor plans and simple perspectivedrawings of various structures, playful allusions to the most common devicesused to describe a threedimensional spaceon a two-dimensional plane. Attached to the wall, the sculptural constructions cast shadows that flatten them out into rwo-dimensions again. Sometimes I trace these shadows and cut them out too, including them as additional elements in the overall composition. Looser, more narrative moments connect all these parts together to create a threedimensional drawing that describesa fragile and playful imaginary landscapeof ambiguous perspectivesand scales.The configuration of the piece on the walls and out into spaceis in itself a concise act of drawing. To strike a harmonious balance, both visual and structural, is like attempting an absurd sort of a puzzle, fraught with the anxiety that a "misplacedline" could bring the whole thing tumbling down.

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BARTHfLf,r"rvrocuo Here an armchair,there an animal in all its length; here a pair of socks,there a carPet; here domino pieces,there a srylizedeye "pearled" in tears. The drawingsin the series Das Bett (The Bed) were realizedin Diisseldorf and are constituted of all kinds of notations captured from daily life, but they do not have any didactic function. In fact they tell no story and intend in no way to chronicle hours and days. Through juxtaposition, they tell of how the artist lives, how he appreciatesand registershis life. The drawings are of simple pleasures,providing the viewer with totd freedom to knit together dl of the associationsthat crossour spirits. Achieved using ink, gouache,and bdlpoint pen on recycledpaper,the series,paradoxically, lacks temporality. Each work is a reconstructionwith no connection to reality.As fixed figures of souvenirs,phantoms, gestures,legendsand other insignificant elements concerningthe detours of life, it is impossibleto anchor them to a specificculture or tradition. PnrrrppsPrcunr Philippc Piguct is m art critic bmcd in Puis.

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Thirry-six Untithd dnwines, 1995 From the "Das Ben" (The Bed) series Ball-point pen, watercolor, and colored pencil on paper ll 13116x 8 ll/16 in. (30 x 22 cm) ach gerrHfrfMv

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ROSEMA RY I $( / I LLI A M S

Through expressiveline, my work translatesreal, observed spaceinto abstract pattern, flat gridded composition, and playful narrative. In light of my working methods, landscapeand architecture are ideal subjects, and I have consistently pursued these genres even as I have moved away from more traditional approachesto them. Upon moving into a new studio in 1999,I began a seriesof drawings responding to the view outside my window of Lower Manhattan, the East River, and the Brooklyn water'Working in a consistent square format, I explored an expanding narrative of the front. ferrying up and down the river; the arched doors of the tobacco and barges tug boats warehouses;the massivesteel structure of the Manhattan Bridge; and the trucks from Manhattan's Chinese markets lined up in the parking lot below. I responded strongly to this accumulation of detail, pursuing the immense variety of shapesand patterns and the strange architecture of the area.As the bodyof workgrew, the drawings began to gain meaning and resonancefrom each other, and a non-linear senseof story emerged from the group of drawings as a whole. The elements and motifs of these drawings have continued to appear in my later mixed media paintings, which incorporate more complex use of materials, but maintain the story line that originated with this body of work.

BOR N I N R OC H E S T E R , N E '\|(/YORK, I97I;

LIVES IN BROOKLYN.

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The Drawing Center is the only not-for-profit institution in the country to focussolelyon the exhibition of drawings,both historicaland contemporary.It was establishedin r976 ro provide opportunities for emerging and under-recognizedartists; to demonstratethe significanceof drawings throughout history; and to stimulatepublic dialogueon issuesof art and culture. This is number 22 of the Drawing Papers,a seriesof publications documenting The Drawing Centert exhibitionsand public programsand providing a Forumfor the study of drawing.The Drawing Paperspublication seriesis printed on Monadnock Dulcet 100# Smoorh Text and 80# Dulcet Smooth Cover. This publication is made possible,in part, with public funds from the Visual Arts Programof rhe New York State Council on the Arts, a stateagency. Srareot the Ail!

The Drawing Center gratefully acknowledgesthe following supportersfor their generosity. BenefactorsBooth FerrisFoundation,The CharlesEngelhardFoundation,FlemishCommunity of Belgium,The Getty Grant Program,The HoraceV. Goldsmith Foundation,Sarah-Annand'Werner H. Kramarsky,Robert Lehman Foundation,Inc., Estateof PaulaVial Lempert,The Henry Luce Foundation,New York StateCouncil on the Arts, The RockefellerFoundation,BlanchetteHooker RockefellerFund, The ScalerFoundation, Andy \Tarhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and Andrea Woodner. Major SponsorsThe AchelisFoundation,Lily AuchinclossFoundation,Inc., The Greenwall Foundation,The GreenwichCollection,Ltd., LEF Foundation,LVMH/Moâ&#x201A;Źt HennesseyLouis Vuitton, National Endowment for the Arts, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York-lsraelCultural CooperationCommission,The EdwardJohn Noble Foundation,and Rush PhilanthropicArts Foundation. SponsorsFrancesBeattyAdler and Allen Adler, agnts b., Dita Amory and Graham Nickson, Austrian Cultural Institute, AXA Nordstern Art InsuranceCorporation, AXA Foundation, and AXA Gallery,Adam Bartos, Anne H. Bassand Julian Lethbridge, Melva Bucksbaumand Raymond Learsy, ChaseManhattan Bank, JamesM. Clark and SusannaPorter, Cowles Charitable Tiusr, Jan Cowles, Cultural Servicesof the FrenchEmbassy,The Michel David-Weill Foundation,Debs & Co., Frances Dittmer, Katherine Farleyand Jerry l. Speyer,Foundation for Contemporary PerformanceArts, Furthermore,a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund, Larry Gagosian,Gulielmetti & Gesmer,P.C., BarbaraGladstone,AgnesGund and Daniel Shapiro,Polly V. and John H.J. Guth, Institut ftr Auslandsbeziehungen, Germany,Philip Isles,LafargeCorporation,Abby and Mitch Leigh, Ninah and Michael Lynne,J.P Morgan, GeorgeNegroponte,New York Community tust, The Ohrstrom Foundation,The Barbro Osher Pro SueciaFoundation,Philip Morris CompaniesInc., S. Rand and N. Wender,The May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, and Lily and Edward H. Tirck. FriendsThe ConsulateGeneralof Sweden,Annette and Oscarde la Renta,Elizabethand Mallory Factor,Lorna and LawrenceGraev, Home Box Office, Maisie and Jamie Houghton, Johnson & JohnsonFamily of Companies,Dorothy Lichtenstein,Wendy Mackenzieand AlexanderCorresi, StephenMazoh and Martin Kline, David Rockefeller,Mr. and Mrs. Felix G. Rohatyn,Lisa and David T. Schifl and Patsyand Jeff Tarr. National Council Allen Adler, JeFfreyBishop, ConstanceR. Caplan, SuzanneF. Cohen, Carol Eckman and David Nolan, Rebeccaand Martin Eisenberg,Kenneth L. Freed,Hugh J. Freund,Polly W'.and john H.J. Guth, Mimi and PeterHaas,SusanG. Jacoby,Allison Lasleyand Stuart Goode, Sallyand Howard Lepow,RachelMellon, Bridget Moore, Diane Nixon, Patriciaand Morris A. Orden, SarahA. Peter,Bonnie and Richard Reiss,A.G. Rosen,J.L.H. Simonds,Julie and Barry Smooke,JamesSollins,Ann Tenenbaumand Thomas Lee,Julie and David M. Tobey,and SusanJ. Weiler. \With thanks to all oFThe Drawing Centert members.


Board of Directorc

DitaAmory GeorgeNegroponte CeChairncn

FrancesBeatty Adler Melva Bucksbaum JamesM. Clark, Jr. FrancesDittmer Colin Eisler Elizabeth Factor Bruce W'.Ferguson Michael lovenko 'W'ernerH. Kramarsky Abby Leigh \Tilliam S. Lieberman Michael Lynne Elizabeth Rohatyn* Eric C. Rudin Dr. Allen Lee Sessoms JeanneC. Thayer* Edward H. Tuck Andrea '\tr?'oodner Catherine de Zegher Exmtive Dircctor rEmriu

Curatorial

Department

Viewing Program Committee Catlrerine

de Zegher, ErccutivcDirctor andchief Cuntor

Luis CamnitZâ&#x201A;Źf; Victoria

voing Prcgm cumtor

Noorthoorn,

Exhibitiom Assistant Cuntorof Contcmpomry

Exhibitions Staff Heidi

O'Neill,

negistrumd CuntorialAssistant

Linda MatdoD, Diretorof opcntioro Asistmt Marisa \07hite, Viming Prcgm andExhibitions Rachel Abramsr OpcntiomAsistant Publications Luc Derycke,

Daigncr

Katie Dyer, coordimtor The Drawing Center 35 Wooster Street NewYork, NY roor3 Tel: zrz-z19-2166 Fax. z.rz-966-2976 @ 2001 The Drawing Center

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