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THE D R AWI N G CENTER

101

José Antonio Suárez Londoño The Yearbooks


The Drawing Center November 3 – December 9, 2012 Drawing Room


José Antonio Suárez Londoño The Yearbooks

Curated by Claire Gilman


D R AW I N G PA P E R S 101

Essay by Claire Gilman


PL. 1

A Year With Swollen Appendices: Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997


PL. 2

A Year With Swollen Appendices: Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997


PL. 3

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998


PL. 4

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998


PL. 5

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998


PL. 6

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998


PL. 7

The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, January 1999


PL. 8

The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, January 1999


PL. 9

Evan S. Connell, The Diary of a Rapist, 2000


P L . 10

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000


P L . 11

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000


P L . 12

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000


P L . 13

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000


P L . 14

Salvador Pรกniker, Segunda memoria, 2001


P L . 15

Salvador Pรกniker, Segunda memoria, 2001


P L . 16

Salvador Pรกniker, Segunda memoria, 2001


P L . 17

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002


P L . 18

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002


P L . 19

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002


PL. 20

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002


P L . 21

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004


PL. 22

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004


PL. 23

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004


P L . 24

Popol Vuh, 2005


PL . 25

Sam Shepard, Motel Chronicles, 2005


PL. 26

Sam Shepard, Motel Chronicles, 2005


PL. 27

W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn, 2006


PL. 28

W.G. Sebald, Vertigo, 2006


PL. 29

Michael Kimmelman, The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa; Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close; John Berger, Keeping a Rendezvous; Robin Brooks, Mystery of the Portland Vase, 2007


PL. 30

Jorge Luis Borges, Artificios; Margarita RodrĂ­guez, Los Mejores Relatos de Derviches; John Berger, The Shape of a Pocket; W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants; Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red, 2008


P L . 31

Jorge Luis Borges, Artificios; Margarita RodrĂ­guez, Los Mejores Relatos de Derviches; John Berger, The Shape of a Pocket; W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants; Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red, 2008


PL. 32

Patti Smith, Early Work: 1970–1979, 2009


PL. 33

Patti Smith, Babel; Patti Smith, The Coral Sea, 2009


PL. 34

Patti Smith, Babel; Patti Smith, The Coral Sea, 2009


PL. 35

Arthur Rimbaud, Poésies Complètes, 2010


PL. 36

Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complètes, 2010


PL. 37

John Berger, King: A Street Story; Craig Highberger, Superstar in a Housedress: The Life and Legend of Jackie Curtis; Maxence Fermine, Neige; Henri Michaux, Ecuador, 2011


PL. 38

Henri Michaux, Ecuador; Sam Shepard, Day out of Days: Stories, 2011


José Antonio Suárez Londoño: A Drawing a Day

Claire Gilman

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As Colombia emerges from decades of devastating civil strife, the country has become a force on the international art scene. Almost overnight it seems, work from the fourth largest South American nation has become a staple of biennials, triennials, and major thematic exhibitions. The city of Bogotá, as described by a recently visiting journalist, is fast becoming a “requisite pit stop on the international art circuit.”1 This dynamism extends to the field of drawing, where artists such as Nicolás Paris, Mateo Lopez, Bernardo Ortiz, and Johanna Calle are making names for themselves with a conceptual yet highly skilled method that offers an alternative to the high production values and digital mechanics typical of much contemporary art.2 Colombia’s cultural emergence has benefited from the country’s changing economic and political fortunes, and from the art-world savvy of a new generation of artists. But it also draws upon a deeper heritage. Ask any of the aforementioned artists to discuss their inspirations and one name predominates: that of an artist who came of age during an earlier and in many ways equally exciting cultural moment, one who, for the past forty years, has worked quietly and steadfastly in his hometown of Medellín, but who has thus far remained outside the international spotlight. That artist is José Antonio Suárez Londoño, or “JASL,” as the artist alternately calls himself. 1 2

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Eric Banks, “Bogotá Modern,” Wmagazine (March 2012), 216–222. Just in the last year, Calle participated in group shows at SF MoMA and the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco, as well as the 12th Istanbul Biennial, while Paris was included in the 2011 Venice Biennale, the New Museum Triennial, and the 30th São Paolo Biennial. Lopez, who has exhibited extensively internationally, was recently selected by William Kentridge as his protégé for the 2012–2013 Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, and Ortiz also appeared in the São Paolo Biennial. Lopez, who refers to José Antonio Suárez Londoño as the “maestro” of Colombian drawing, recently did a collaborative book project with JASL, entitled Ping Pong, at the latter’s invitation.


Born in 1955, JASL grew up during the heyday of the Latin American drawing boom of the 1960s and ’70s, a period during which institutional initiatives such as drawing biennials, drawing-focused gallery exhibitions, and an emphasis on technical instruction swept the continent. Material economy of pencil and paper, steadfast discipline and quiet communication over ostentatious experimentation, awareness of tradition vs. novelty for novelty’s sake—these were the values championed by artists and critics alike, making the nation’s draftsmen and printmakers, in the words of renowned art theorist Marta Traba, “the only true, operational vanguard reconnected with a specific society.”3 These too are the hallmarks of JASL’s own work, including the fifteenyear-old daily drawing practice that is the subject of this exhibition. JASL was introduced to art at an early age by his mother, who had attended school for interior decoration, and he spent his childhood drawing pictures and looking at images in his family’s library. Among his favorite volumes was a big Larousse Spanish dictionary, in which the letter headings for each section appeared in a landscape surrounded by miscellaneous items whose names began with that letter, and a world art history book filled with thumbnail pictures. This early love of close visual study inspired a life-long interest in botany, and impelled the artist to pursue studies in biology before becoming a full-time art student in Geneva after his father was appointed to a diplomatic post there. Always dissatisfied with painting because of the production delay involved (he says that he does not have the patience to wait for paint to dry), JASL took up drawing as his artistic métier. Indeed, since his early days in Switzerland, JASL has spent his career trying to find ways to organize and control his time. Hence self-regulatory initiatives such as etching on Wednesdays and portrait drawing sessions with local artists on Fridays, rituals that contribute as much to JASL’s sense of well-being as they do to that of the artists he mentors. 3

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Though raised in Argentina, Traba spent her mature career in Bogotá at the Universidad de los Andes in the 1950s and 60s, until her exile in 1968 for her support of the Cuban revolution. Marta Traba, “Two Vulnerable Decades in Latin American Art, 1950-70” (excerpts) in Re-Aligning Vision: Alternative Currents in South American Drawing, ed. Mari Carmen Ramírez (Austin: Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, University of Texas at Austin, 1997), 226.


In 1994, JASL received a call from renowned Colombian writer Héctor Abad, the author of a magazine essay that JASL had illustrated several years before. The two met, became friends, and hit on an idea for a collaboration. Over the course of a year, JASL would execute one drawing per day. Abad would then visit the studio once a month to review the works for the purpose of composing a corresponding text. The first month Abad came and completed his text as planned. Unable to make it for the second visit, Abad was confronted one month later with sixty drawings. Overwhelmed, he abandoned the project. Nevertheless, JASL was hooked. For three months he had made drawings regularly but with no fixed schedule or agenda. He decided that with the first calendar day of the next year, he would commence a disciplined practice of beginning each morning with a drawing. He determined moreover that the drawings would derive from something other than his own imagination, and that his source of inspiration would be a book. Over Christmas, a holiday JASL typically spends with his family in Daytona Beach, Florida, he went to the local Barnes & Noble. While browsing the shelves, he came upon what seemed to him the perfect candidate: rock musician and composer Brian Eno’s 1996 memoir A Year with Swollen Appendices. Already a fan of Eno’s music, JASL saw that the book was fortuitously organized as a diary with one entry per day from January 1 through December 31. JASL decided that he would use cheap notebooks and black-and-white drawing materials so as to make his procedure as strict and routine as possible, and that he would stick with diaries as his source material going forward. A year later he returned to the book store and came home with The Diaries of Paul Klee. This time, however, he introduced color and more elaborate compositions. Gradually, he began to test the boundaries of his project, broadening his materials and textual sources even as he adhered to a hand-rendered, smallscale format and his assignment of a drawing a day. To date, JASL has completed over sixty-five notebooks (also referred to as yearbooks) containing more than 5,000 drawings that reference sources ranging from the diaries of Klee, Franz Kafka, and Eugène Delacroix; Ovid’s Metamorphosis; Orhan Pamuk’s My Name is Red; W. G. Sebald’s Rings of Saturn; and the poems of Blaise Cendrars,

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Arthur Rimbaud, and Patti Smith. Typically, JASL selects a source book to read over the course of a year, often deriving inspiration from the previous book he has read. For instance, JASL became interested in Rimbaud because of Patti Smith’s discussion of the French poet, and took up Sam Shepard because of the latter’s relationship with Smith. Every day, prior to beginning his regular studio practice, JASL begins reading until he arrives at a place where he feels inspired to make an image. He then renders a drawing in his artist’s notebook and carefully labels it with a number as well as the date, time, and place of its making. His source books are similarly annotated with date, time, place, and image number. Both yearbooks and source books contain occasional musings and bits of quoted text so that they become their own kind of diaries, except that the information conveyed is less confessional than it is situational. For instance, we learn that JASL executed image number 175 from Patti Smith Book 5 [PL. 34] by a cold swimming pool (“piscina Fria”) in Medellín, and that he completed image number 20 from Patti Smith Book 1 [PL. 32] on the “Inauguration day the 44th president of the United States: first black one.” (Notably, JASL writes in English, Spanish, and French depending on his location and the language of the source book, which is usually English). Sometimes the notes follow the artist over the course of an entire day. On page 253 of the Ovid source book [opposite], for example, one reads: “7:31 pm Museum of Natural History; 2:00 pm Lina Vietnam for lunch; at 4:00 Lalo’s for herb Tea; Beads.” In making his drawings, JASL often relies on the objects around him, gathering inspiration not only from the text he is reading but also from photographs in his library or scraps of material lying about his studio, such as calling cards, ticket stubs, flower petals, and teabags.4 His drawing style is similarly varied. While tending towards figuration, his manner of rendering ranges from hyperrealist to loose and sketchy, and decorative motifs as well as abstract compositions abound. In many cases JASL allots one notebook sheet 4

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Notably, JASL never uses digital imagery as source material and does not even own a computer.


Ovid, Metamorphosis, Penguin Books 1955 edition, page 253 Colecci贸n Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, Photograph by Julio Grinblatt


per numbered image, but in some instances three or four drawings occupy a single page. It is not uncommon moreover for the same image to figure in more than one notebook—a rendering after a famous photograph of Rimbaud appears in the Rimbaud, Smith, and Salvador Pániker books, and a striking motif of a child’s dress that JASL found in a Colombian marketplace features alone on at least two occasions and is also integrated into larger compositions [PL. 12]. JASL’s project is straightforward: take a text, find a passage of interest, and make a drawing each day. And yet the actual application of this mandate is far from simple. It requires diligence and patience, and a willingness to forgo perfection. It involves strategizing—the source book, for example, generally must be long enough to last the course of a year, and the drawings must conform to the size of the selected notebook and employ the materials JASL has on hand. Indeed, the approach represents a peculiar variant on systems-oriented aesthetics, in which the application of a limiting principle typically accompanies a concomitant reduction in artistic creativity in the traditional sense. For JASL, by contrast, creativity (and virtuosity) is paramount, even as his model of creativity is one that builds upon the creativity of others. Indeed the very choice of the notebook as a medium necessitates a certain loss of authorial control, something that the artist exploits in the drawing materials that he chooses and in the way he manipulates his marks from page to page. As puncture holes on one page are incorporated into the next, and stains register through semi-transparent pages, the notebooks propel the viewer forward. Consider a particularly impressive four-page sequence from the third Ovid notebook in which a pink watercolor stain is given multiple lives, first as a mandorla encasing the doomed Byblis as she confesses her love for her twin brother Caunus; then as a cloud (of imploring words or tears?) emanating from her lips; next as the shared breath of the lovers Iphis and Ianthe; and finally as a wispy trail of breath emerging from an anonymous male figure, perhaps Iphis, once woman, now made man [PLS. 39–42]. It is important to point out that the relationship between image and text is often tangential and in some cases positively inscrutable.

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PL. 39

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003


PL. 40

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003


P L . 41

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003


P L . 42

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003


Moreover, JASL discourages such links. As he puts it, to look for the “key to the images” is to mistake his intention. The point is not that JASL’s images are complete in themselves; quite the opposite in fact: they court a fundamental uncertainty. They do not so much clarify the texts as accompany and respond to them, just as they respond to earlier images, and just as the source books respond to other texts. It is even often unclear in whose voice JASL is speaking, his own or those of the authors he quotes. Recalling Traba’s emphasis on drawing’s quiet humanity and lack of pretension, there is a humility to JASL’s entire project, an abandonment of ego and a willingness to become part of something else. If the yearbooks are diaries, they are diaries that are open to other people’s stories and other artists’ visions. They present a model of artmaking that, in keeping with Traba’s definition, is personal but not egocentric, diligent but not ostentatious. Partial, indeterminate, and outward-looking, JASL’s yearbooks present a portrait of the artist in and through the collective imagination.

Author’s note: Special thanks are owed to José Antonio Suárez Londoño for his generosity, good humor, and dedication to this project every step of the way.

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Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complétes January 1 – March 31, 2010


L I S T O F P L AT E S

PL. 5

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998 PL. 1

Mixed media

A Year With Swollen Appendices:

6 x 4 inches

Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997

Image no. 329

Mixed media

Book 15 of 16

5 x 3 inches

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Image no. 340 Book 4 of 4

PL. 6

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998

Carolina Villegas

Mixed media 6 x 4 inches

PL. 2

Image no. 106

A Year With Swollen Appendices:

Book 5 of 16

Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Mixed media

Carolina Villegas

5 x 3 inches Image no. 196

PL. 7

Book 2 of 4

The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, January 1999

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Mixed media 3 7/8 x 4 3/4 inches

PL. 3

Image no. 5

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Mixed media 6 x 4 inches

PL. 8

Image no. 197

The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, January 1999

Book 9 of 16

Mixed media

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

5 3/4 x 4 1/4 inches

Carolina Villegas

Image no. 7 Photograph by Cathy Carver

PL. 4

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998

PL. 9

Mixed media

Evan S. Connell, The Diary of a Rapist, 2000

6 x 4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 246

6 x 4 inches

Book 11 of 16

Image nos. 159–165

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and Carolina Villegas

120


P L . 10

P L . 14

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria, 2001

Mixed media

Mixed media

4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

3 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

Image no. 125

Image nos. 132–133

Book 2 of 6

Book 2 of 5

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Carolina Villegas P L . 15 P L . 11

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria, 2001

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000

Mixed media

Mixed media

3 1/4 x 7 1/8 inches

4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

Image nos. 51–52

Image no. 265

Book 1 of 5

Book 4 of 6

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and Carolina Villegas

P L . 16

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria, 2001 P L . 12

Mixed media

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000

3 1/4 x 7 1/8 inches

Mixed media

Image nos. 327–328

4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

Book 5 of 5

Image no. 295

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Book 5 of 6 Photograph by Cathy Carver

P L . 17

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a P L . 13

Young Poet, 2002

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000

Mixed media

Mixed media

6 1/8 x 4 5/8 inches

4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

Image no. 161

Image no. 246

Book 2 of 3

Book 4 of 6

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Carolina Villegas

Carolina Villegas

121


P L . 18

PL. 22

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen

Young Poet, 2002

of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004

Mixed media

Mixed media

6 1/8 x 4 5/8 inches

8 3/4 x 5 inches

Image no. 301

Image nos. 227–228

Book 3 of 3

Book 2 of 2

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Carolina Villegas

Carolina Villegas

P L . 19

PL. 23

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen

Young Poet, 2002

of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004

Mixed media

Mixed media

6 1/8 x 4 5/8 inches

8 3/4 x 5 inches

Image no. 329

Image nos. 65–66

Book 3 of 3

Book 1 of 2

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Carolina Villegas

Carolina Villegas

PL. 20

P L . 24

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a

Popol Vuh, 2005

Young Poet, 2002

Mixed media

Mixed media

6 1/8 x 4 3/8 inches

6 1/8 x 4 5/8 inches

Image no. 159

Image no. 70

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Book 1 of 3

Carolina Villegas

Photograph by Cathy Carver PL . 25 P L . 21

Sam Shepard, Motel Chronicles, 2005

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen

Mixed media

of Sheba: A Memoir, 2004

6 1/8 x 4 3/8 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 229

8 3/4 x 10 inches

Photograph by Cathy Carver

Image no. 1 Book 1 of 2 Photograph by Cathy Carver

122


PL. 26

PL. 30

Sam Shepard, Motel Chronicles, 2005

Jorge Luis Borges, Artificios; Margarita Rodríguez,

Mixed media

Los Mejores Relatos de Derviches; John Berger, The

6 1/8 x 8 3/4 inches

Shape of a Pocket; W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants;

Image no. 188

Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red, 2008

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Mixed media

Carolina Villegas

9 x 12 inches Image nos. 46–49

PL. 27

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art,

W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn, 2006

New York

Mixed media

Latin American and Caribbean Fund, 2009

7 x 8 3/8 inches

Photograph by Thomas Griesel

Image no. 1 Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

P L . 31

Carolina Villegas

Jorge Luis Borges, Artificios; Margarita Rodríguez, Los Mejores Relatos de Derviches; John Berger, The

PL. 28

Shape of a Pocket; W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants;

W.G. Sebald, Vertigo, 2006

Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red, 2008

Mixed media

Mixed media

7 x 8 3/8 inches

9 x 12 inches

Image nos. 212–213

Image nos. 58–61

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art,

Carolina Villegas

New York Latin American and Caribbean Fund, 2009

PL. 29

Photograph by Thomas Griesel

Michael Kimmelman, The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa; Jonathan

PL. 32

Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly

Patti Smith, Early Work: 1970–1979, 2009

Close; John Berger, Keeping a Rendezvous; Robin

Mixed media

Brooks, Mystery of the Portland Vase, 2007

8 1/4 x 5 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 20

5 1/8 x 16 1/4 inches

Book 1 of 9

Image no. 26

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Book 1 of 3

Carolina Villegas

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and Carolina Villegas

123


PL. 33

PL. 37

Patti Smith, Babel; Patti Smith,

John Berger, King: A Street Story; Craig

The Coral Sea, 2009

Highberger, Superstar in a Housedress: The Life

Mixed media

and Legend of Jackie Curtis; Maxence Fermine,

8 1/4 x 5 inches

Neige; Henri Michaux, Ecuador, 2011

Image no. 259

Mixed media

Book 7 of 9

4 1/2 x 12 inches

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Image nos. 30–31

Carolina Villegas

Book 1 of 4 Photograph by Cathy Carver

PL. 34

Patti Smith, Babel; Patti Smith,

PL. 38

The Coral Sea, 2009

Henri Michaux, Ecuador; Sam Shepard,

Mixed media

Day out of Days: Stories, 2011

8 1/4 x 10 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 175

4 1/2 x 12 inches

Book 5 of 9

Image nos. 102–103

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Book 2 of 4

Carolina Villegas

Photograph by Cathy Carver

PL. 35

PL. 39

Arthur Rimbaud, Poésies Complètes, 2010

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003

Mixed media

Mixed media

16 x 6 inches

5 x 7 3/4 inches

Image nos. 200–203

Image nos. 240–241

Book 3 of 4

Book 2 of 3

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Carolina Villegas

Photograph by Julio Grinblatt

PL. 36

PL. 40

Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complètes, 2010

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003

Mixed media

Mixed media

16 x 6 inches

5 x 7 3/4 inches

Image nos. 97–100

Image nos. 250–251

Book 2 of 4

Book 2 of 3

Photograph by Miguel Suarez and

Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Carolina Villegas

Photograph by Julio Grinblatt

124


P L . 41

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003 Mixed media 5 x 7 3/4 inches Image nos. 252–253 Book 2 of 3 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Photograph by Julio Grinblatt P L . 42

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003 Mixed media 10 x 7 3/4 inches Image nos. 254–255 Book 3 of 3 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Photograph by Julio Grinblatt W h ole b oo k

Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complètes, January 1–March 31, 2010 Mixed media 8 x 6 inches Book 1 of 4 Photograph by Cathy Carver

All works courtesy of the artist, unless noted otherwise.

125


LIST OF E XHIBITED WORKS

Jorge Luis Borges, Artificios; Margarita Rodríguez, Los Mejores Relatos de Derviches. Antología; John

The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, January 1999

Berger, The Shape of a Pocket; W. G. Sebald, The

Mixed media

Emigrants; Orhan Pamuk, My Name is Red, 2008

31 pages

Mixed media

Dimensions variable

9 x 12 inches Image nos. 46–49

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914-1923,

Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art,

October 5–November 26, 2000

New York

Mixed media

Latin American and Caribbean Fund, 2009

53 pages: 5 1/2 x 4 1/8 inches each Book 5 of 6

A Year With Swollen Appendices: Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997

Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complètes,

Mixed media

January 1–March 31, 2010

10 x 3 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 340

24 pages: 8 x 6 inches each

Book 4 of 4

Book 1 of 4 A Year With Swollen Appendices: Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003

Brian Eno’s Diary, 1997

Mixed media

Mixed media

10 x 7 3/4 inches

10 x 3 inches

Image nos. 58–59

Image no. 196

Book 1 of 3

Book 2 of 4

Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998 Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003

Mixed media

Mixed media

6 x 4 inches

10 x 7 3/4 inches

Image no. 246

Image nos. 187–188

Book 11 of 16

Book 2 of 3 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998 Mixed media

Ovid, Metamorphosis, 2003

6 x 4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 329

10 x 7 3/4 inches

Book 15 of 16

Image nos. 254–255 Book 3 of 3 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

126


The Diaries of Paul Klee, 1898–1918, 1998

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria

Mixed media

(second memory), 2001

6 x 4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 106

3 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

Book 5 of 16

Image nos. 327–328 Book 5 of 5

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000 Mixed media

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria

4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

(second memory), 2001

Image no. 125

Mixed media

Book 2 of 6

3 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches (open) Image nos. 197–198

Franz Kafka, Diarios II 1914–1923, 2000

Book 3 of 5

Mixed media 4 1/8 x 5 1/2 inches

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a

Image no. 265

Young Poet, 2002

Book 4 of 6

Mixed media 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 inches

Evan S. Connell, The Diary of a Rapist, 2000

Image no. 70

Mixed media

Book 1 of 3

6 x 4 inches Image nos. 159–165

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria

Mixed media

(second memory), 2001

6 1/8 x 9 1/4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 260

3 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

Book 3 of 3

Image nos. 51–52 Book 1 of 5

Rainer Maria Rilke, Diaries of a Young Poet, 2002

Salvador Pániker, Segunda memoria

Mixed media

(second memory), 2001

6 1/8 x 9 1/4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 173

3 1/4 x 14 1/4 inches

Book 2 of 3

Image nos. 132–133 Book 2 of 5

127


Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen of

Michael Kimmelman, The Accidental Masterpiece:

Sheba: A Memoir, 2004

On the Art of Life and Vise Versa; Jonathan Safran

Mixed media

Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close;

8 3/4 x 10 inches

John Berger, Keeping a Rendezvous; Robin Brooks,

Image nos. 227–228

Mystery of the Portland Vase, 2007

Book 2 of 2

Mixed media 5 1/8 x 16 1/4 inches

Jacki Lyden, Daughter of the Queen of

Image no. 26

Sheba: A Memoir, 2004

Book 1 of 3

Mixed media 8 3/4 x 10 inches

Robin J. Brooks, Mystery of the Portland Vase;

Image no. 1

John Berger, Here is Where We Meet; Anna

Book 1 of 2

Pavord, The Tulip; W.G. Sebald, Campo Santo, 2007

Sam Shepard, Motel Chronicles, 2005

Mixed media

Mixed media

5 1/8 x 16 1/4 inches

6 1/8 x 8 3/4 inches

Image no. 158

Image no. 223

Book 2 of 3

Popol Vuh, 2005

W.G. Sebald, Campo Santo; Jonathan Safran Foer,

Mixed media

Everything is Illuminated, 2007

6 1/8 x 8 3/4 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 159

5 1/8 x 16 1/4 inches Image no. 281

W.G. Sebald, Vertigo, 2006

Book 3 of 3

Mixed media 7 x 8 3/8 inches

Patti Smith, Early Work: 1970–1979, 2009

Image nos. 212–213

Mixed media 8 1/4 x 10 inches

W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz, 2006

Image no. 20

Mixed media

Book 1 of 9

7 x 8 3/8 inches Images nos. 305–306

Patti Smith, Babel; Patti Smith, The Coral Sea, 2009 Mixed media

W.G. Sebald, The Rings of Saturn, 2006

8 1/4 x 10 inches

Mixed media

Image no. 259

7 x 8 3/8 inches

Book 7 of 9

Image no. 1

128


Patti Smith, Early Work: 1970–1979, 2009 Mixed media 8 1/4 x 10 inches Image no. 77 Book 2 of 9 Blaise Cendrars, Poésies Complètes, 2010 Mixed media 16 x 6 inches Image no. 97-100 Book 2 of 4 Arthur Rimbaud, Poésies Complètes, 2010 Mixed media 16 x 6 inches Image nos. 200–203 Book 3 of 4 John Berger, King: A Street Story; Craig Highberger, Superstar in a Housedress: The Life and Legend of Jackie Curtis; Maxence Fermine, Neige; Henri Michaux, Ecuador, 2011 Mixed media 4 1/2 x 12 inches Image nos. 30–31 Book 1 of 4 Henri Michaux, Ecuador; Sam Shepard, Day out of Days: Stories, 2011 Mixed media 4 1/2 x 12 inches Image nos. 102–103 Book 2 of 4 All works courtesy of the artist, unless noted otherwise.

129


CONTRIBUTOR

Claire Gilman is Curator at The Drawing Center.


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Co-Chairs Frances Beatty Adler Eric Rudin Jane Dresner Sadaka

José Antonio Suárez Londoño: The Yearbooks is made possible in part by Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro and Regine Basha, with additional support provided by the Embassy of Colombia.

Treasurer Stacey Goergen Secretary Dita Amory Brad Cloepfil Anita F. Contini Steven Holl Rhiannon Kubicka David Lang Merrill Mahan Iris Z. Marden Nancy Poses Kenneth E. Silver Pat Steir Barbara Toll Isabel Stainow Wilcox Candace Worth Emeritus Melva Bucksbaum Frances Dittmer Bruce W. Ferguson Michael Lynne George Negroponte Elizabeth Rohatyn Jeanne C. Thayer Executive Director Brett Littman

The Mario Gradowczyk Public Program Series supports programming related to the institution’s Latin American exhibitions and is funded by Felisa Gradowczyk, Diego Gradowczyk and Isabella Hutchinson.


E D WA R D H A L L A M T U C K P U B L I C AT I O N P R O G R A M

This is number 101 of the Drawing Papers, a series of publications documenting The Drawing Center’s exhibitions and public programs and providing a forum for the study of drawing. Jonathan T.D. Neil Executive Editor Joanna Ahlberg Managing Editor Designed by Peter J. Ahlberg / AHL&CO This book is set in Adobe Garamond Pro and Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk. It was printed by Shapco in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

L I B R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S C O N T R O L N U M B E R : 2 012 9 512 70 I S B N 9 7 8 - 0 - 9 4 2 3 24 -70 - 9 Š 2 012 T h e D rawing C enter


T H E D R AW I N G PA P E R S S E R I E S A L S O I N C L U D E S

Drawing Papers 100 Guillermo Kuitca: Diarios Drawing Papers 99 Sean Scully: Change and Horizontals Drawing Papers 98 Drawing and its Double: Selections from the Istituto Nazionale per la Grafica Drawing Papers 97 Dr. Lakra Drawing Papers 96 Drawn from Photography Drawing Papers 95 Day Job Drawing Papers 94 Paul Rudolph: Lower Manhattan Expressway Drawing Papers 93 Claudia Wieser: Poems of the Right Angle Drawing Papers 92 Gerhard Richter: “Lines which do not exist� Drawing Papers 91 Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage Drawing Papers 90 Leon Golub: Live & Die Like a Lion? Drawing Papers 89 Selections Spring 2010: Sea Marks Drawing Papers 88 Iannis Xenakis: Composer, Architect, Visionary Drawing Papers 87 Ree Morton: At the Still Point of the Turning World Drawing Papers 86 Unica Zurn: Dark Spring Drawing Papers 85 Sun Xun: Shock of Time Drawing Papers 84 Selections Spring 2009: Apparently Invisible Drawing Papers 83 M/M: Just Like an Ant Walking on the Edge of the Visible Drawing Papers 82 Matt Mullican: A Drawing Translates the Way of Thinking Drawing Papers 81 Greta Magnusson Grossman: Furniture and Lighting Drawing Papers 80 Kathleen Henderson: What if I Could Draw a Bird that Could Change the World? Drawing Papers 79 Rirkrit Tiravanija: Demonstration Drawings

T O O R D E R , A N D F O R A C O M P L E T E C ATA L O G O F PA S T E D I T I O N S , V I S I T D R AW I N G C E N T E R . O R G


THE D R AWI N G CENTER

3 5 W O O S T E R S T R E E T | N E W YO R K , N Y 10 013 T 212 219 216 6 | F 8 8 8 3 8 0 3 3 6 2 | D R AW I N G C E N T E R . O R G


D R AW I N G PA P E R S 1 0 1

$XX.00 US

IS BN 9780X X X X X X 5XX00

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Profile for The Drawing Center

José Antonio Suárez Londoño: The Yearbooks  

The Drawing Center's Drawing Papers Volume 101 featuring an essay by curator Claire Gilman.

José Antonio Suárez Londoño: The Yearbooks  

The Drawing Center's Drawing Papers Volume 101 featuring an essay by curator Claire Gilman.

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