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DRAKE MAGAZINE FALL + WINTER 2016

INKED

ART

TATTOOING IS AN ART FORM— IT SHOULD BE TREATED AS SUCH

+

GIRL GANGS STAY-ATHOME DADS

BREAKING DOWN GENDER STEREOTYPES

OUTSPOKEN

GIVING LGBTQ+ ARTISTS A VOICE

DESSERT SUSHI

CHOPSTICKS, MEET CHOCOLATE

LYRICAL LOOKBOOK OUTFITS INSPIRED BY YOUR FAVORITE SONGS


Dogtown’s locally owned coffee shop for over 10 years


Fall 2016 28

Lyrical Lookbook Music, meet fashion. Five looks inspired by your favorite songs.

15

Anytime Tacos Tacos aren’t just for Tuesday anymore.

34

Girl Gangs and Stay-at-Home Dads: The Fight for Gender Equality Women (and men) can be whatever they want to be—as long as we fix a few things first.

42

Inked Art

Today, almost everyone knows someone with a tattoo—but ink hasn’t always been an art form.

48

THE RISE OF EDM There’s more to dance music than bass drops.


IN THIS ISSUE FALL 2016 bits + pieces

6 | BIT OF LIT Get ready for a Netflix binge. 7 | MIDWEST CLUBS Time to find your niche. 7 | ALCOHOL TATTOO This tat tells when tipsy’s gone too far. 8 | HANDMADE IN THE HEARTLAND Our favorite Midwest e-shops. 9 | VEND A HAND What can’t you buy in a vending machine? 9 | NOT-TO-MISS NEWSLETTERS Emails you actually want to read. 10 | TURNING TABLETOPS Board games are back. 11 | A HIT OF HISTORY There’s more to Mary Jane.

say what

fashion + Beauty

12 | DEATH OF THE SALESMAN Exploring the technology takeover.

24 | FAST FASHION Athletic wear you can rock at work.

13 | DISEASE OF BEING BUSY When your schedule is too much to handle.

26 | LAYERED ACCESSORIES Yes, you can wear more than two chains.

food + drink

27 | SAVING FACE Our guide to the latest makeup trends.

14 | AT-HOME HAPPY HOUR The best home bar for under $100. 20| FLITEBRITE Your beer flight just got smarter. 20 | BETTER THAN BAREFOOT Our picks for the best of the bottom shelf. 21 | BRUNCH ON THIS Three Midwest spots to satisfy any brunch craving. 22 | DESSERT SUSHI Sweet sushi is how we roll.

health + sex 52 | NATURAL BEAUTY Makeup to look and feel good. 52 | BULLET JOURNALS Time to organize your thoughts. 53 | SUBTLE TEAS Brew your way to better health. 53 | UNDERGROUND HEALTH FOODS Snacks with sneaky health benefits.

music + Entertainment 54 | OUTSPOKEN Highlighting artists in the LGBTQ+ community. 56 | THE WOMBATS Indie-pop band gears up for their fourth release. 57 | ON TOUR WITH JACK GARRATT One-man-band makes a stop in Des Moines. 58 | THE EDGE OF THE SPOTLIGHT Meet Peter Hughes, bassist for The Mountain Goats.


DRAKE MAGAZINE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

KATIE BANDURSKI ART DIRECTOR:

MANAGING EDITOR:

MADDIE HIATT

MEGAN MOWERY

PHOTO EDITOR:

ASSOCIATE EDITOR:

SAM FATHALLAH

JORDAN GERMAN

ASSISTANT EDITOR: JON KLINGENBERG

WRITING COACH:

EMMA MUTH

CONTRIBUTORS JESSICA BANKS EMILY BAUER ANDIE CONTRERAS-MURALLES JENNA CORNICK MARISSA DEPINO MELODY DEROGATIS TAYLOR EISENHAUER ASHLEY FLAWS ELLIE HILSCHER ELLEN JUDGE MADISON KELLY EMILY LARSON

MOLLY LONGMAN LINZI MURRAY KATIE O'KEEFE BROOKE OTTERSON JENNA PFINGSTEN ADAM ROGAN MELISSA STUDACH MIA TIRADO ANGELA UFHEIL JULIE URAM LAUREN VELASCO JORDIN WILSON

ART STAFF DESIGN

PHOTO

JOSIE CARRABINE ELLIE DETWEILER ADAM GRAY ZOE EKONOMOU KAYLA PARKER

WILL FOLLETT MADISON KELLY JAMES “BUGIE” NGUGI MORGAN NOLL PRANEETH RAJSINGH

DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM EXECUTIVE EDITOR | JENNA PFINGSTEN MULTIMEDIA + SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR | TAYLOR EISENHAUER ASSISTANT SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR | JESSICA BANKS ASSISTANT EDITOR | LAUREN SELFRIDGE PR + ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: JORDAN MCENTAFFER

2016 Drake Magazine is published with the support of the Board of Student Communications. Opinions expressed in the magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Drake University. Letters to the editor are encouraged, but they will not be published. Direct any questions, comments, or concerns to drakemag@gmail.com.

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

CATHERINE STAUB, JEFF INMAN, MEGHAN BAEZA, KATHLEEN RICHARDSON, CHRIS SNIDER, JILL VANWYKE, MATT STRELECKI, CHRISTIAN PRINTERS

4 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

The times they are a-changin’ in 2016. The Chicago Cubs won the World Series, America elected its 45th president, and recreational marijuana use is now legal in eight states (learn more about the drug’s history, pg. 11). Here at Drake Magazine, we’re changing things up, too. For starters, we took the tortilla out of the taco and replaced it with four unusual shells (Anytime Tacos, pg. 15). Then, we figured out a way to wear athletic wear to work— yes, you read that right—and still look stylish (Fast Fashion, pg. 24). Now that you’re well-fed and looking fab, join us as we take a look at the changing landscape of women in the workplace (Girl Gangs and Stay-at-Home Dads: The Fight for Gender Equality, pg. 34). One writer investigates just how difficult it is for women to break into male-dominated industries, like craft brewing and agriculture. Plus, she’s breaking down the stigma associated with stay-at-home dads. Our staff has changed this semester, too. We’ve been fortunate to welcome many new editors, writers, designers, and photographers to our team. I hope you enjoy the talent they bring to our pages. Keep up with us at drakemagazine.com, or follow us on Facebook (Drake Magazine), Twitter (@DrakeMag), and Instagram (@drakemagazine). Share your own thoughts and send any questions or comments to drakemag@gmail.com. Let’s go change the world. Best,

Katie Bandurski Editor-in-Chief

Behind the scenes of our taco photoshoot­—find your favorite on pg. 15

Get closer to the music with our lyrical lookbook, pg. 28


Building a “Chopped” Champion Chef Cory Morris knows what it takes to conquer the competition and take home the title on Food Network’s popular cooking showdown.

Update Your Playlist

Check out these upand-coming artists to refresh your music library—and give your skip button a break.

Not So Plain White Tee White tees may be basic, but they don’t have to be boring. Transform this closet staple from everyday to every way with these three looks.

ASMR: Explained and Experienced

Find out the latest on this relaxation craze that induces head orgasms and sends tingles down your spine. Plus, watch others experience the sensation and hear their uncensored reactions. FALL 2016 • 5


BITS + PIECES QUICK QUIPS AND NEED-TO-KNOWS

BIT OF LIT:

DOCUMENTARY EDITION NOT ALL DOCUMENTARIES WILL PUT YOU TO SLEEP. CHECK OUT OUR TOP PICKS FOR WHEN READING IS TOO MUCH WORK. WORDS: ADAM ROGAN | PHOTO: SAM FATHALLAH

Indie Game: The Movie (2012) Directed by: Lisanne Pajot, James Swirsky

As ubiquitous as video games are amongst American teens, it’s easy to forget about the months—and oftentimes years—of work that go into making a single game. When it comes to independent successes like “Braid,” “Fez,” and “Super Meat Boy,” the burden of developing games can fall on small teams, or sometimes just one person. The workload, risk, and stress of making a game are immeasurably heightened when developers don’t have AAA companies, like Nintendo or Sony, funding every pixel. Not to mention, there’s the anxiety brought on by seemingly endless workloads, negative reviews, and unsolicited hate mail. “Indie Game: The Movie” follows the creative minds behind three games as they pray to avoid GAME OVER.

6 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

Rich Hill (2014)

Directed by: Andrew Droz Palermo, Tracy Droz Tragos

Centered in the ironically-named town of Rich Hill, Missouri, this film chronicles a year in the life of three poverty-stricken, adolescent boys—Andrew, Appachey, and Harley. It’s an intimate look into the lives of the poorest Americans. Not only are they struggling to get by and fit in at school, but each boy faces a quickly approaching future that doesn’t appear to offer an escape from their deadend town or absent-minded parents. In spite of their hardships, each boy professes to putting their family first; they love because there’s no room in the budget for rebellion against the ones who have their back. The film highlights moments of childhood foolishness, like when Appachey accidentally loses a skateboard down a storm drain, and startling teenage maturity, when Andrew has to tuck his prescription-medicationdependent mother into bed. A true-to-life American epic, “Rich Hill” is an abrasive look into the survival of those who are all too easily dubbed “white trash.”

Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight For Freedom (2015) Directed by: Evgeny Afineevsky

For three months between 2013 and 2014, the city square of Kiev, Ukraine, became a modern day “Les Miserables” as citizens rose up against a non-democratic government.“Winter on Fire” becomes a case study of humanity, love, family, and brotherhood. The first seconds of the film show a 16-year-old boy taking cover from his own government on a city street that was calm just three months before. The film then flashes back 92 days to when protests began. It shows the escalation of peaceful demonstration to governmental retaliation to bloody resolution in Ukraine’s storied capital city. Viewers meet lawyers and doctors who give up their secure professions to stand up for what they believe is right. There’s also Roma, the lovable preteen who joins in the three-months-long protest and helps in whatever way his fragile frame can. “Winter on Fire” may be full of heartbreak, but it’s a story of hope, power in unity, and the good that’s still left in the world.


MIDWEST CLUBS THESE QUIRKY GROUPS UNITE UNUSUAL INTERESTS IN AMERICA’S HEARTLAND. WORDS: MEGAN MOWERY | ILLUSTRATIONS: ADAM GRAY

Role Players Guild of Kansas City

Windy City Naked Yoga

Social Introverts Club

The Role Players Guild of Kansas City is one of the largest gaming clubs in the Midwest and aims to serve and enhance the gaming community. The cosplayer group hosts roleplaying, card, and board games as well as monthly meetups and an annual convention. “It doesn’t matter what your background is, come and play games,” Role Players Guildmaster, Beth Perrin, says. “We’re a very inclusive community.” Memberships are free, or $15 per year for access to exclusive events and game store discounts.

For some, baring it all during a downward dog sounds like a scene straight out of a recurring nightmare. For others, it’s a relaxing form of exercise and stress relief. This nudist group offers both individual and couples classes in Vin Yasa yoga, as well as yoga retreats. Lance Hoagland, Windy City’s founder and teacher, stresses its acceptant, judgment-free environment. “A number of people come to class hoping to overcome body issues,” he says. “We basically shed our ego. We’re all on the same playing field. As long as you don’t discriminate or judge people, you’re welcome to come to class.” Classes are $20 each and are open to all skill levels.

Who says introverts should stay home on a Friday night while extroverts go out and have all of the fun? Des Moines’ Social Introverts Club aims to provide social interaction in a way that’s comfortable for those of a gentler nature. Meetups include restaurant outings, board game tournaments, and trivia nights. The group boasts over 2,000 members, and joining is as simple as signing up for an event on meetup.com.

Kansas City, Missouri

Chicago

Des Moines

ALCOHOL TATTOO

DURING A NIGHT OUT ON THE TOWN, THIS TATTOO’S GOT YOUR BAC. WORDS: ELLEN JUDGE There’s nothing wrong with going out and having a little fun, but how do you know when it’s time to quit? Researchers at the University of San Diego have designed a way to measure a person’s blood alcohol content with a temporary tattoo. All drinkers have to do is stick the device on their arm and it tells just how much fun has been had. The tattoo measures ethanol content in sweat and transmits the data to a smartphone via a small, flexible circuit board. Researchers are tweaking the device to allow for long-term use. Unfortunately, there’s no word on when the tattoo will hit the market.

FALL 2016 • 7


BITS + PIECES QUICK QUIPS AND NEED-TO-KNOWS

HANDMADE IN THE HEARTLAND WORDS: EMILY BAUER PHOTOS: MORGAN NOLL As Pinterest DIY fails can attest, not everyone’s born a crafter. Thankfully, virtual shops make it easier than ever to find unique, homemade goods. We scoured Etsy to find the best Midwest e-shops—Here are our picks. Acanthus Apparel: A Des Moines-area couple birthed the idea for Acanthus when they were in college. Today, they sell rustic screenprinted apparel. See their collection of T-shirts, pullovers, dog hoodies, and more at etsy.com/shop/acanthusapparel TeesAndTankYouShop: This eclectic shop from Columbus, Ohio, sells a variety of quirky apparel and pins with pop culture phrases and sarcastic sayings. Picture a crewneck with a stylized print of a candle and a banner that reads, “It’s lit.” Plus, all of their clothes are printed with water-based, eco-friendly ink. Take a look at etsy.com/shop/TeesAndTankYouShop Frostbeard Studio: This Minneapolis couple creates soy candles inspired by literary stories and their characters. With scents like “Cliffs of Insanity,” “Gatsby’s Mansion,” and “Trashy Romance Novel,” Book Lovers’ candles bring stories to life. Find a favorite scent at etsy.com/shop/Frostbeard TheBusyBeeCreations: Based in Milwaukee, this crafter sells apparel, stationary, and home goods. Her shop is stocked with sentiments from many different states, so you can always show off a piece of home. Find her at etsy.com/shop/TheBusyBeeCreations midwestmoderngirl: Snail mail can still be stylish. This Kansas-based crafter specializes in all kinds of paper goods: greeting cards, stationary, custom-made stamps, and more. Check out her offerings at etsy. com/shop/midwestmoderngirl MidwestFinds: The mason jar trend isn’t over, thanks to this husband-and-wife team from Charleston, Illinois. They turn the canning staple into lanterns, spoon rests, and even jewelry. See their shop at etsy.com/shop/MidwestFinds

8 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

Acanthus Apparel in Des Moines


NOT-TO-MISS NEWSLETTERS STAY UP-TO-DATE WITH THE LATEST IN NEWS, CULTURE, AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN. WORDS: TAYLOR EISENHAUER | PHOTOS: MORGAN NOLL Daunting, cluttered inboxes and glaring red notifications have overtaken email. Personalize your inbox with messages you actually want to read. Newsletters are the best way to get the latest and greatest news without having to comb the internet— or take time away from binging on Netflix. For the news junkie: theSkimm ICYMI—It’s the hottest newsletter around. Wake up every weekday morning with all the need-to-know current events condensed into bite-sized chunks. It’s a little bit of news and a whole lot of sass. Subscribe and get your Daily Skimm at theskimm.com For the socially conscious: MicCheck Daily Mic.com’s newsletter sends you five stories—you guessed it— daily that “challenge you to rethink the world.” But don’t be fooled by the name. Mic covers today’s hotbed issues, including police brutality, gun control, wage gaps, and more. Sign up at mic.com/miccheckdaily

For the cat lover: BuzzFeed’s This Week in Cats The internet hasn’t grown out of its cat phase—and neither have we. Get a dose of cuddly kittens right in your inbox once a week. Not a cat fan? We won’t judge you—much. Try BuzzFeed’s Animals newsletter, delivered three times a week. Sign up for one or both at buzzfeed.com/tools/email For the wino: Garagiste A wine store you can visit daily without being judged? Sign us up. The only way to purchase, or even browse, the must-beworth-it wine is to add your email to the list. It features daily deals and editorials on wine from around the world. Pinkies up at garagiste.com/signup For the “Girls” superfan: Lenny Letter Lena Dunham co-created this newsletter, but don’t fret if you haven’t seen the hit HBO show. You can still enjoy a collection of longform writing from various female writers every Tuesday, plus an interview with a powerful woman each Friday. Get the latest in feminism and friendship at lennyletter.com

SAY NO TO STALE CHIPS—THESE THREE VENDING MACHINES ARE CHANGING THE GAME WORDS: KATIE O’KEEFE The Farmer’s Fridge Chicago No stale chips here. The Farmer’s Fridge is stocked with fresh salads, juices, protein snacks, and more. A team of chefs prepare fresh food every day to be dispensed from the vending machines. After 24 hours, all leftover food is donated to a local Chicago food pantry. Expect to pay around $8 per meal.

Art Vending Machine Des Moines Catch a show or class at the Des Moines Social Club, then head to its art vending machine for an affordable souvenir. “It was created to be a sustainable gift shop so customers can buy products from local artists,” says Katie Ortman, Volunteering and Fundraising Coordinator for the Social Club. Products range from birthday cards to key chains, and most cost less than $5. Proceeds from the machine go towards a summer camp scholarship for a young Des Moines artist.

BurritoBox Madison, Wisconsin Skip the line at Chipotle, because this vending machine makes a burrito in 90 seconds flat. Besides dispensing four types of burrito, the BurritoBox also offers chips, salsa, guacamole, and hot sauce. The company originally began in California, but has since made the move nationwide. Prices vary by item.

FALL 2016 • 9


BITS + PIECES QUICK QUIPS AND NEED-TO-KNOWS

TURNING TABLETOPS YOU WON’T BE BORED WITH THESE GAMES. WORDS: MELODY DEROGATIS | PHOTO: SAM FATHALLAH

W

hether it’s part of a pregame, party, or casual night with friends, board games are a great way to break the ice. We’re not talking the classics from your childhood, though. These new games are snarky, sexy, and smart. Kyle Engen, co-founder of the Interactive Museum of Gaming and Puzzlery in Beaverton, Oregon, says over 5,000 games were released last year. Engen attributes the rise of board game popularity to creators striving to stay culturally relevant. “Start a Kickstarter with a classic game, but with kittens or zombies incorporated, and people will fund it and buy it,” he says. We’ve picked five fresh games to try on your next night in. Bucket of Doom Perhaps the most underrated on our list, this storytelling game tests a player’s survival skills. Players read a “doom” card, pick an “object” card, and then come up with an escape. Whoever has the most creative scenario wins. This game is ideal for fans of Would You Rather? and F#@K, Marry, Kill. amazon.com, $28

10 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

NEED A LITTLE LIQUID LUCK? TURN ANY OF THESE GAMES INTO A DRINKING GAME BY TAKING A SIP EVERY TIME A PLAYER LOSES A TURN OR GAINS A CARD/POINT.

Utter Nonsense Utter Nonsense is the lovechild of charades and Apples to Apples. The judge draws an “accent” card—like Valley Girl, pirate, or stoner—and each player has to say one of their seven phrase cards in that accent. After all players have tried the accent, the judge picks which they thought was funniest. utternonsensegame.com, $25 Settlers of Catan This game is like a shorter version of Monopoly. Each player is a settler in a new land, trying to build a village. Settlers receive resource cards instead of money, and each time they grow their settlement they earn points. The first player to 10 points wins. Catan is perfect for creating friendly competition between friends since it requires strategy, but it isn’t overly complicated. catanshop.com, $49

The Game of Things This game gets real shady, real fast. The “reader” draws a “things” card and reads the prompt—such as “things you shouldn’t do at work”—then players respond to the prompt by writing an anonymous answer. Next, each player guesses who said what. For every correct guess, that player gets a point. Whoever has the most points at the end of the game wins. The anonymity is what makes it so much fun. For a dirtier version, try The Game of Nasty Things. thegameofthings.com, $40 5 Second Rule The object of the game is simple: draw a card that prompts you to name three things in a particular category. You have five seconds to do so, and if you can’t, the next player gets a chance. Whoever is able to name the items first gets the point. Though seemingly simple, the game is surprisingly challenging and can cause players to blurt out nonsensical things. amazon.com, $12


A HIT OF HISTORY

WE’RE GOING TO BE BLUNT—MARIJUANA HAS HAD AN INTERESTING PAST. WORDS: MEGAN MOWERY | DESIGN: KATIE BANDURSKI

1906

The Pure Food and Drug act is passed. Consumer items that contain marijuana are now banned.

1937

The Marijuana Tax Act regulates the drug and imposes heavy taxes on those who possess it.

1944

The New York Academy of Medicine finds that marijuana does not encourage violence or lead to the use of heavier drugs.

1956

A first marijuana offense now carries a minimum of two years in prison and a $20,000 fine.

1970

The Controlled Substances Act makes marijuana a Schedule 1 drug—the category for the most dangerous drugs.

1974

High Times Magazine is founded, giving voice to the youth counterculture.

1975

The Alaskan Supreme Court says that adults have the right to possess a small amount of marijuana in their homes. The decision was later challenged.

1996

Medical use of marijuana is legalized in California with Proposition 215. Federal law, though, still prohibits the possession of marijuana of any kind.

1986

Under the Anti-Drug Abuse Act, possession of 100 marijuana plants receives the same penalty as possession of 100 grams of heroin.

2012

Colorado and Washington legalize the recreational use of marijuana.

2014

Alaska, Oregon, and Washington D.C. legalize recreational use of marijuana.

2016

Voters in California, Massachusetts, and Nevada legalize recreational marijuana use. Four other states loosen their medical marijuana laws, or legalize it entirely.

SOURCES

pbs.org, time.com, washingtonpost.com FALL 2016 • 11


SAY WHAT OPINIONS AND CULTURAL COMMENTARY

MILLENNIALS HAVE SO MUCH TO DO, AND SO LITTLE TIME—BUT IS IT BY NATURE OR DESIGN? ONE WRITER INVESTIGATES. WORDS: JESSICA BANKS | PHOTO: MORGAN NOLL “I’ve only slept six hours in the last two days,” a friend said at a recent get-together. “With three jobs, I barely have time to think,” said another. I joined in, eager to explain how I was just as unbearably busy as they were, and proud that I was still functioning with the many tasks I’d taken on. As I chatted with my friends, a part of me was disappointed. Why did I care so much about filling every second of my day, and why was I so proud of it? There’s a sense of accomplishment millennials seem to feel when their schedules get too chaotic to handle. The busier, the better. If every inch of your calendar isn’t covered with color-coded commitments, you aren’t doing life right. There’s a competition of sorts, to be the person who’s the most sleep deprived and taking on the most responsibilities. Being busy is a disease—maybe even an addiction. We thrive on it. We crave it. And it’s contagious. So, why do we do it? According to a survey measuring wellbeing by mindful.org, 69 percent of employees report that work is a significant source of stress. That doesn’t even take into consideration all of the other things workers have going on. We readily admit we’re stressed and much too busy, but refuse to do anything about it. A social phenomenon called groupthink might be to blame. Groupthink is a concept that focuses on conformity. It causes people to strive for consensus among the group—even if that means changing their own beliefs or behaviors. It doesn’t come as much of a shock, then, that as you hang out by the coffee machine at the office and join in on a conversation about how many projects Adam and Jane are taking on, you feel compelled to do more, too. It doesn’t matter if Adam and Jane are part of that 69 percent of employees who consider work a major stressor. They are part of the successful and busy majority, and you want to be, too. 12 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

Perhaps the need to be busy starts in childhood, when our parents enroll us in every activity possible. As our education progresses, the feeling is only amplified by the idea that only the person with the highest grades, longest list of extracurriculars, and most impressive accomplishments will be successful. Finally, we’re full-fledged adults, living in a culture that equates busyness with hard work and values it as such. Before we know it, our own children are enrolled in three sports camps and two art classes. They’re rushing out the door with sandwiches stuffed between their teeth and a load of responsibilities weighing on their shoulders. Our too-busy lifestyles also carry many side effects. Too much stress can lead to anxiety, depression, headaches, insomnia, and heart attacks. Dr. Vipan Gupta, an Illinoisbased neurologist, says that the stress that comes from overscheduling often sends his patients further and further down the rabbit hole of health problems. “I see a lot of young women who have migraines,” he says. “Every time I ask them what’s causing the pain they say it’s work, which stresses them out so much they can’t get their job done, which stresses them out even more. It’s a vicious cycle.” Some part of all frantic, progress-driven millennials will always crave the high of busyness—the feeling of knowing we’re doing as much as we physically can. But it’s time to stop coveting the person who stands on the podium, busiest of all. If you look closely, her hands are shaking. There are dark circles under her eyes, and she’s aching to find a way back onto solid ground. While we as individuals have the ability to take back our lives and put an end to our own personal brand of busyness, society still has far to go. It’ll be hard to break the hustling mindset that has been ingrained in us since childhood, but millennials are often referred to as change-makers. We are the generation that will shape the future. We can start the movement to eradicate schedule-based stress and self-inflicted exhaustion for future generations.


DEATH OF THE SALESMAN ONE WRITER’S TAKE ON THE INCREASING USE OF TECHNOLOGY TO REPLACE HUMAN JOBS. WORDS: JON KLINGENBERG

A

s technology integrates itself more into human life—from leisure to the workplace—many have raised concerns that robots are up to no good. More specifically, many are wondering if their income will be usurped by the same technology that was last seen gift-wrapped as an RC helicopter. Although it may appear grim, this looming tech takeover may actually benefit workers—and the economy—in the long run. Robots and other machines are already used in a number of fields: including medicine, food service, agriculture, and big business. In many cases, machines are merely assisting humans with their jobs, but in others, they have replaced traditional employees. Self-service kiosks in fast food restaurants, for example, are speeding up the ordering process and reducing human error. With the ongoing battle over minimum wage, these kiosks could also help cut costs. Think of it this way: If one fast food franchise is forced out of business because it can’t afford to pay its workers the new wage, then everyone at the store loses their jobs. But if kiosks are introduced instead, it’s likely only a few people will be laid off, if any. With this in mind, self-service kiosks seem like a sensible addition to fast food restaurants. Not only can they improve accuracy and efficiency in the ordering process, but they could alleviate some of the pressures of rising labor costs. Kiosks replacing front counter workers would also allow more employees to move back to the kitchen. Former Janney Capital Markets restaurant analyst, Mark Kalinowski, has surveyed McDonald’s franchises for 11 years. He found that kitchen workplaces are often considered understaffed by the franchise owners. Kiosks out front could allow for more workers in the back.

While kiosks may be the more recognizable face of the robot takeover, drones, too, are becoming commonplace in our local airspace. According to business firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), over $127 billion of business services could be replaced by drones. Out of that $127 billion, PwC predicts that over $32 billion of it will be in agriculture. For example, crop dusting, a surprisingly dangerous occupation for which pilots fly up to 150 mph, and at only 12 feet above the ground, could be executed entirely by drone. With drones, not only will pilot safety cease to be a concern, but the process could be completed with more consistent, pre-programmed accuracy. Other occupations, like delivery services, will also be changed with drones. Be it cross-country shipments or cross-town pizzas, miles of deliveries could be completed in the air, and PwC reports that this field could save up to $13 billion by doing so. Experts point out that more drones in the delivery business means less traffic congestion. Plus, fewer vehicles on the road lead to less emissions in our atmosphere. And to accommodate for more drones buzzing around, NASA has started working on an air traffic control system for low-flying, unmanned aircrafts. Yes, some jobs will likely be lost as businesses introduce more robots into the workplace. But the benefits to business, customer satisfaction, and even the environment all arguably outweigh the costs. Furthermore, not all jobs can be replaced by robots. Creative occupations will need ideas from a bonafide human, and tasks requiring opinions can’t just be programmed into a machine. Have no fear of a robo-economic uprising, and instead look at the benefits we will get by hiring some finelywired friends.

FALL 2016 2016 •• 13 13


FOOD + DRINK

SOMETHING SOMETHINGTO TOFEAST FEASTON ON

AT-HOME HAPPY HOUR THE BEST HOME BAR FOR UNDER $100.

WORDS: MELISSA STUDACH | PHOTO: MADISON KELLY

R

ed cup concoctions may not come with an expiration date, but we can assure you they’re no good after four years. Graduate to a grown-up bar with the help of Beau Williams, co-owner of Kansas City, Missouri’s Julep Cocktail Club. “It’s easy to romanticize the fun aspects of bartending,” he says. “But there’s a lot of moving parts to make it look easy.” Williams chatted with Drake Magazine to share his tips for creating an affordable, at-home bar.

Step One: Build Your Tool Kit The Jigger Too little (or too much) alcohol can make or break a crafted cocktail. Use a jigger to measure the correct amount. With oneand two-ounce measurement options, the stainless steel piece makes following a recipe easy. Double Jigger, $5. bedbathandbeyond.com The Shaker Set A solid shaker is essential for properly mixed drinks—not to mention a bartender’s smooth, over-the-shoulder shake. Williams recommends the two-piece Boston shaker for its easy release. “There’s nothing more frustrating than shaking a drink well and not being able to take the cap off to strain it,” he says. A bartender’s cool is defined by his or her pour. Assure a smooth one every time with a strainer. This shaker set comes with a julep strainer, perfect for stirred cocktails out of the glass, and a coiled Hawthorne strainer to catch ice or other chunky ingredients. The Shaker Set, $20. thebostonshaker.com The Juicer Turn party punches to craft cocktails with one modification: fresh ingredients. “If you’re going to do a drink justice, fresh 14 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

ingredients are a good way to start,” says Williams. A juicer extracts flavor while catching seeds and pulp. Lemon Press, $13. williams-sonoma.com Bar Spoon + Muddler Mixing a cocktail with a regular spoon can lead to a cloudy drink. This long, spiraled stirrer provides a clear alternative. Flip the spoon for a grooved muddler that presses flavors out of herbs, sugar cubes, and other ingredients. Bar Spoon with Muddler, $7. crateandbarrel.com

Step Two: Stock the Bar Whether the party is planned or impromptu, you’ll want to have a few key spirits on-hand. Vodka | Crowd favorites like the cosmopolitan, Moscow mule, and screwdriver call for vodka. Texas-made Tito’s Vodka is distilled six times, creating a silky finish at a reasonable price. Gin | Easily impress guests with a hand-crafted classic martini, gin and tonic, or gin fizz. We recommend the best-selling and award-winning Beefeater Gin. Whiskey | The smooth, sweet profile of this dark spirit shines in an old fashioned, Manhattan, mint julep, or whiskey sour. Try Crown Royal’s affordable Canadian Whiskey options.

Step Three: Top It Off A crafted cocktail is all about the details. Many classic drinks call for aromatic fixings like vermouth and bitters. You’ll also want to be stocked with fresh garnishes, including olives, lemons, limes, and mint.


ANYTIME TACOS CAN YOU REALLY HAVE A TACO WITHOUT A TORTILLA? WE THINK SO. THESE UNCONVENTIONAL SHELLS BRING TACO TUESDAY TO EVERY MEAL. WORDS: ELLIE HILSCHER PHOTOS: PRANEETH RAJSINGH

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FOOD + DRINK

SOMETHING SOMETHINGTO TOFEAST FEASTON ON

NOT A FAN OF SCRAMBLED? ANY WAY YOU LIKE YOUR EGGS WORKS IN THIS TACO.

the taco of champions MAKES 2 TACOS

Tacos, welcome to the breakfast club. A hash brown shell filled with eggs and bacon is a surefire way to start your day.

instructions

Ingredients

Drizzle olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add one cup of hash browns to the pan and form a patty shape. Sprinkle ¼ cup cheese over hash browns. Once stabilized, flip three or four times until both sides of the patty are golden—about 10 minutes. When the patty is brown, remove from pan and place inside a pint glass to create a curved taco shell shape. Repeat with remaining hash browns and cheese. Next, whisk together eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Pour in a medium skillet and scramble with a spatula over low heat for four to five minutes, or until light and fluffy. Remove eggs from pan, then fry bacon strips over medium-high heat until crisp,— or about five minutes. Remove the hash brown shells from the glasses and fill them with eggs. Crumble up the bacon slices and sprinkle over taco. Top with pico de gallo.

1 tsp. olive oil 2 cups shredded hash browns ½ cup colby jack cheese 4 eggs 2 Tbsp. milk ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. pepper 2 slices bacon 2 Tbsp. pico de gallo

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the pig out MAKES 2 TACOS

Feed your inner carnivore with a taco shell made from 12 strips of bacon. Warning: Eat at your own risk.

instructions

Ingredients

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Take six pieces of bacon and lay them horizontally on a baking sheet. Vertically weave six more pieces through each slice, creating a lattice. Repeat with the remaining 12 slices. Place the bacon in the oven and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until crisp. When done, let the shells cool for a few minutes around a pint glass. Fill with tomato slices, lettuce, and mayonnaise. Garnish with basil ribbons.

24 slices bacon 1 large tomato, diced 4 lettuce leaves 2 tbsp. mayonnaise 4 basil leaves, cut into ribbons

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FOOD + DRINK

SOMETHING SOMETHINGTO TOFEAST FEASTON ON

the grown-up grilled cheese MAKES 2 TACOS

Honey goat cheese forms the base of this taco shell, which blankets around roasted vegetables. Mom would be so proud.

instructions

Ingredients

Use a rolling pin to flatten bread. Then, spread butter on one side of each slice. Place one slice of bread, butter side down, in a pan over medium heat. Crumble ½ oz. of goat cheese on each slice, and sprinkle with ¼ cup mozzarella. Top with another slice of buttered bread. Grill each side for two to three minutes, flattening with a spatula. Remove from pan and place inside a pint glass. Repeat to make second shell. Saute veggies, olive oil, salt, and pepper over medium heat, about 10 minutes. When the veggies are tender, remove from heat. Fill each grilled cheese shell with half of the veggie mixture.

4 slices white bread ¼ stick of butter, softened 1 oz. honey goat cheese ½ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded ½ zucchini, diced 3 portobello mushrooms, diced 3 small mixed peppers, cut into ½-inch pieces 8 stalks of asparagus, chopped in thirds 2 Tbsp. olive oil ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper

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THE APPLE OF MY PIE

MAKES 2 TACOS

Take the pain out of making a pie. These taco shells use pre-made dough, so no rolling pin required.

instructions

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Cut pie crust in half to create two pieces. Press dough into circular shape. Ball up pieces of tin foil to form an oval the size of a baking potato. Place on a baking sheet. Drape dough over rolled-up pieces of foil and bake for 10 minutes or until golden. For the filling, cut apples into ¼-inch slices. Mix with cinnamon, lemon juice, sugar, and flour in a large bowl. Cook in a saucepan on medium heat for eight minutes, or until apples are tender. Add water as needed. Divide the filling between the shells. Scoop ice cream on top of the taco, and drizzle with caramel.

Ingredients ½ of a refrigerated pie crust 2 medium apples, peeled and cored ½ tsp. cinnamon 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 6 tsp. sugar 4 tsp. flour ¼ cup water 2 cups vanilla ice cream 1 Tbsp. caramel sauce

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FOOD + DRINK

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

BETTER THAN FLITE BAREFOOT BRITE

THE BEST (OF THE BOTTOM SHELF) FOR YOUR BUCK WORDS: MOLLY LONGMAN | PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

There comes a time in every blossoming wino’s life when they realize they don’t have the dollars to feed their high-class habits. But these thrifty—and tasty—bottom shelf wines will let you drink like James Bond on a “Bob’s Burgers” budget. FlipFlop Pink Moscato $5.99

Redwood Creek Merlot $5.99

Guenoc Sauvignon Blanc $7.39

For a sweeter palate, this whimsical white is just right. The sugary notes are on par with a Pixie Stick, making it perfect to pair with berries, chicken, or soft cheeses.

A sip of this velvety red opens with a hint of plum and brown sugar but slowly fades with a spicy kick. If it wasn’t wine, this choice combination could be straight off of a Bath and Body Works shelf.

This grassy vino may surprise you with lingering hints of grapefruit. Much like the real fruit, you’ll be left trying to squeeze out every last drop.

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WORDS: ANDIE CONTRERASMURALLES Three Midwesterners walk into a bar. The punch line? A new way to experience beer. FliteBrite is a smart paddle that serves as an interactive beer flight. Each paddle allows beer drinkers to keep track of what’s being sampled, learn interesting details about the flight, and share to social media via an app. In a typical flight experience, samples of beers are served with little to no background information and it’s easy to forget which beer is which, says Jake Wilson, FliteBrite sales manager. “FliteBrite is that middleman with whom you can learn and interact with but ultimately helps you develop a better understanding of your beer palate.”


BRUNCH ON THIS

MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR MORNING WITH THESE MIDWEST BRUNCH SPOTS. WHETHER YOU’RE CURING A HANGOVER OR IMPRESSING A DATE, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED. WORDS: ASHLEY FLAWS PHOTO: MORGAN NOLL Tried-and-true brunch spots are great, but let’s break out of the rut. No matter the occasion, we’ve found the Midwest’s top spots to try something new. The Hangover Brunch Sobelmans Pub and Grill, Milwaukee Sobelmans doesn’t serve a traditional brunch menu, but that doesn’t stop customers from crowding the restaurant on Sunday mornings. Dishing out delicious burgers and outrageous bloody marys, it’s the place to go to cure last night’s stubborn hangover. The $50 Bloody Beast bloody mary is served with an entire fried chicken on top, making it perfect to share with friends. sobelmanspubandgrill.com The Girls’ Day Out Brunch Kit Kat Lounge and Supper Club, Chicago Kit Kat Lounge and Supper Club is known for its “divalicious” brunch. Along with tasty food and free-flowing cocktails, Kit Kat’s Sunday-morning brunch features a drag show performance by Madame X. The star performer is famous for her quick changes and celebrity impersonations of Miley Cyrus and Cher. So whether one’s looking to extend a wild girls’ night out or just catch up with friends, Kit Kat is the perfect stop. kitkatchicago.com The Date Brunch Aposto, Des Moines On the first Sunday of every month, Aposto offers a ticketed brunch that includes an elite dining experience and a diverse prix fixe menu. Treat a date to the Scala Egg Casserole with roasted potatoes, creamed leeks, and caramelized onions, or the Breakfast of Champions with braised pork and chive creme fraiche. This brunch only comes around once a month, so book tickets well in advance. apostodm.com 21 2016•• 21 FALL 2016


FOOD + DRINK

SOMETHING SOMETHINGTO TOFEAST FEASTON ON

DESSERT SUSHI

NOTHING FISHY HERE. GRAB A MAT AND EXPLORE THE SWEET SIDE OF SUSHI. WORDS: MIA TIRADO | PHOTOS: PRANEETH RAJSINGH

DARK CHOCOLATE COCONUT SUSHI MAKES 8-10 PIECES

Chocolate and coconut are a classic pair. Nestle the dynamic duo atop a bed of sweetened sushi rice for a candied take on nigiri. INGREDIENTS 1 ½ cups sushi rice 1 cup milk 1 cup coconut milk 1 3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder ¼ cup sugar 7 oz. dark chocolate Coconut flakes, to garnish 22 •• DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM 22 DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

DIRECTIONS Combine rice, milk, and coconut milk in a medium saucepan. Stir in cocoa powder and sugar. Bring to a soft boil. Reduce to low heat. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes, or until liquid is absorbed and rice is soft. Remove from heat. Let stand, covered, for 10 minutes. Once rice has cooled, shape into 3-inch ovals. Melt dark chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl or double boiler. Toast coconut flakes in saute pan over medium heat until golden. Take rice ovals and dip the flat tops into the melted chocolate. Sprinkle coconut on top to garnish. Chill for 15 minutes before serving.


MOCHI ICE CREAM SUSHI MAKES 6-8 PIECES

DIRECTIONS

This dish is like a romantic comedy—sweet and mushy. Inspired by traditional Japanese mochi, this ice-cream-filled sushi roll is chewy on the outside and soft on the inside.

Stir together rice flour, water, and salt in a microwave-safe bowl. Add sugar and stir until smooth. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and microwave for two minutes. Remove bowl. Stir mixture, re-cover, and microwave until the dough is thick and sticky—about one to two minutes. Lightly dust a work surface with cornstarch and flatten dough until it’s roughly the size of a sushi mat. Transfer dough to a sushi mat covered with a sheet of wax paper. Spread a ½-inch layer of ice cream on the dough and add fruit if desired. Starting at one end of the mat, roll the mixture into a log shape. Freeze for two hours. Cut into 1½-inch pieces. Serve immediately.

INGREDIENTS 1 cup rice flour 1 cup cold water ¼ tsp. salt 4 Tbsp. sugar Cornstarch, to dust workspace Pint of ice cream, any flavor Fruit, optional

COOKIE BROWNIE SUSHI MAKES 6-8 PIECES The name says it all. This soft and chewy blend of brownie and cookie dough forms the base of the sushi roll—the rest is up to you. INGREDIENTS 2 ½ cups prepared brownie batter 2 cups chocolate chip cookie dough Chocolate sandwich cookies, candies, sprinkles or frosting, to garnish DIRECTIONS Bake brownie batter according to package instructions. Let cool for 30-45 minutes. Bake dough as one giant cookie, about 12-15 minutes. Let cool for 20-30 minutes. Remove brownies from pan. Cut one inch off each edge, leaving only the soft center. Flatten onto a sheet of cling wrap over a sushi mat. It should cover most of the mat’s surface. Remove the cookie’s hard edges and cut into horizontal strips. Place across the mat on top of the brownie. Roll the sushi, and cut into 1-inch pieces. Garnish with toppings of choice.

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FAST FASHION + BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

FASHION

NO NEED TO CHANGE OUTFITS. TAKE A LOOK FROM SPIN CLASS TO HAPPY HOUR— AND EVERYWHERE IN BETWEEN— WITH ATHLEISURE APPAREL.

STYLING + WORDS: JORDAN GERMAN + MADDIE HIATT PHOTOS: JAMES NGUGI MAKEUP + HAIR: JORDAN GERMAN 24 •• DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM 24 DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM


WORK IT Say goodbye to stuffy button-downs and boring trousers. A knit tank and black pumps make these heather-gray joggers work appropriate. For an extra edge, toss on an always-in-style black leather jacket and a statement necklace. ON AMY JACKET, $108, MACY’S. SHIRT, $25, GAP. JOGGERS, $79, LUCY ACTIVEWEAR. SHOES, $40, MOD. HAT, $16, DRY GOODS. NECKLACE, MODEL’S OWN.

KEEPING IT NEUTRAL With the professionalism of khakis and the comfort of sweatpants, these joggers are a closet must-have. Add an olive bomber jacket and rugged combat boots for an edgy ensemble. ON LARRY BOMBER, $100, AMERICAN EAGLE. SHIRT, $30, URBAN OUTFITTERS. JOGGERS, $60, GAP. SHOES, $190, TIMBERLAND.

A DRESS TO IMPRESS A neutral knit dress is a staple in any wardrobe, but can be boring by itself. Amp it up with a distressed jean jacket. Throw on high-top sneakers for a practical outfit that’s easy to wear all day long. ON GRACE JACKET, $60, AMERICAN EAGLE. DRESS, $98, ATHLETA. SHOES, $55, CONVERSE.

FALL 2016 • 25


FASHION + BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

A suede choker offers balance to differing necklace lengths.

Mix silver and gold metals to provide contrast, and choose jewelry with beads and crystals for added flair.

LAYERED ACCESSORIES WORDS: MARISSA DEPINO PHOTO: MADISON KELLY Defy basic and boring staples this season with eyecatching layered necklaces. The key is to stack strands that complement one another, not compete with each other. Each chain should maintain an individuality that helps complete the ensemble.

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SAVING FACE BAFFLED BY BEAUTY TERMS? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED. WORDS: JORDAN GERMAN | ILLUSTRATIONS: KAYLA PARKER With beauty magazines, bloggers, and YouTube gurus proclaiming the latest and greatest tips to fake a flawless face, it can be overwhelming to sift through the noise and find practical techniques. And with new methods constantly arising, it’s hard to keep up to speed. Here are the best tried-and-true methods to craft perfect features and smooth skin.

CONTOURING/ HIGHLIGHTING

STROBING

BAKING

Contouring involves strategically shading various parts of the face—or body if one’s feeling bold—to create shadows and faux definition. Highlighting works in conjunction with contouring by bringing light and dimension to the face. First, apply contour shade below cheekbones, along the hairline, down the sides of the nose, and under the jawline. Be sure to blend for a seamless finish. To avoid streaks or blotches, use a light hand and build product up as you go. After makeup has set, use a fan brush to dust on highlighting powder. Apply to tops of cheekbones, the bridge of the nose, and on the Cupid’s bow, slightly above the upper lip.

Strobing works much like the contouring and highlighting combination, but with a subtler, dewy finish. Many strobing products are cream or liquid based, making them an easy option for everyday wear. Apply product anywhere you’d put highlighter. Use over foundation or on bare skin for a more natural look.

Baking was once reserved only for the kitchen. The term has since been adopted by the beauty industry as a way to set makeup and further perfect features. It involves strategically packing on translucent powder, allowing it to sit for five to 10 minutes, and letting the warmth of one’s skin “bake” the product. Pack powder under the eyes, in the center of the forehead, and just under contour lines to lock in makeup, clean up mistakes, and enhance shading. After allowing it to sit, sweep off excess with a fluffy brush.

FALL 2016 • 27


FASHION + BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

LYRICAL LOOKBOOK 28 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

KEEP STYLE IN PERFECT HARMONY BY DRAWING INSPIRATION FROM A MORNING PLAYLIST. EACH LOOK IS BASED OFF OF A DIFFERENT SONG, SO NOW YOUR OUTFIT CAN MATCH YOUR FAVORITE TRACKS. STYLING + WORDS: JENNA CORNICK ASSISTANT STYLIST: WILL MUCKIAN MAKEUP + HAIR: JORDAN GERMAN PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH


Just like the “I miss my ex” anthem, this cozy look never gets old. Drape an oversized knit cardigan over a simple tank and let a romantic lace bralette peek through the straps. A pair of distressed jeans keeps the ensemble casual yet chic.

ON GABI SWEATER, $70, EXPRESS. TANK, $25, PACSUN. BRALETTE, $23, PACSUN. JEANS, $55, AMERICAN EAGLE OUTFITTERS. NECKLACE, MODEL’S OWN.

CLOSER THE CHAINSMOKERS

FALL 2016 • 29


FASHION + BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

OPHELIA

THE LUMINEERS

Don’t be a fool. Fall in love with this look’s vibrant, mustard yellow cropped sweater and lace-up flats. Like The Lumineers’ music, the jeans feature intricate details. Look closely to note frayed hemlines and a laceup closure.

ON LAUREN SWEATER, $60, EXPRESS. JEANS, $70, MATILDA MUSE. SHOES, $50, EXPRESS. NECKLACE, MODEL’S OWN.

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22 (OVER S∞∞N)

BON IVER

Throw on a striped sweater and denim jacket to combat the chills, whether from the wind or Justin Vernon’s haunting vocals. Pair with suede boots and olive green chinos. Not a fan of the winter? No worries, it’ll be over soon.

ON JACOB PANTS, $70, GAP. SHOES, $130, CLARKS. SHIRT, $50, JCREW. JACKET, MODEL’S OWN.

FALL 2016 • 31


FASHION + BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

Lana Del Rey radiates old-school aesthetic. Bring her glamorous, vintage vibe to life with an offthe-shoulder sweater and sleek leather skirt. Gold statement necklaces add elegance, while chunky heeled booties give the look an edge.

ON STACEY SWEATER, $49, AERIE. SKIRT, $40, ASOS. TIGHTS, MODEL’S OWN. SHOES, $52, ASOS. JEWELRY, MODEL’S OWN.

WEST COAST LANA DEL REY

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NO MORE PARTIES IN LA KANYE WEST

This stripped-down look brings Kanye’s barebones production style to life. You won’t be spending everything on Louis Vuitton though–because a vintage, light-wash denim jacket, beige knit sweater, simple black jeans, and boots are classic closet staples you can rock all season long.

ON BRANDON SWEATER, $65, GAP. JEANS, MODEL’S OWN. JACKET, $83, ASOS. SHOES, $60, URBAN OUTFITTERS.

FALL 2016 • 33


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GIRL GANGS AND STAY-AT-HOME DADS: THE FIGHT FOR GENDER EQUALITY ENCOURAGING WOMEN TO FOLLOW THEIR DREAMS ISN’T ALWAYS ENOUGH. LUCKILY, WE CAN DO MORE TO BRIDGE THE GENDER GAP. WORDS: ANGELA UFHEIL | PHOTOS: JAMES NGUGI There’s a mistake some craft beer enthusiasts make when they come across the Thirsty Pagan beer tent at brew festivals. “Customers will start talking to my assistant brewers about beer details,” Allyson Rolph says. “If they’re asking specifics about the beer, they’ll ask the guys. Then people are like, ‘Oh wait, you’re the brewer?’” I jump on her statement. “Is there ever any frustration or annoyance when people assume the dude next to you is brewing the beer?” “I don’t get offended by it because it doesn’t happen as much as I expect it to,” Rolph says. “I get this question more often than I actually run into the experience.” Cue the guilt. I’m writing a story about the challenges women face when they enter maledominated industries. I called Allyson Rolph because she’s the head brewer at Thirsty Pagan Brewing in Superior, Wisconsin. Women make up only four percent of head brewers in the U.S., according to a study done at Stanford, so I assumed that Rolph

was probably facing some serious workplace discrimination. I believe women and men deserve equal opportunities, and I believe women and men shouldn’t be treated differently. Yet here I am, asking a woman a question I would never ask a man. On one hand, I feel justified. In a recent Pew Research study, 63 percent of women say they face significant obstacles in their quest to get ahead. So it makes sense to ask those women about their experiences, to learn more about challenges they face. But on the other hand, maybe journalists like me are inadvertently contributing to the problem. I wonder if a reporter has ever asked Rolph about her job outside the context of her sex. Talking about women in the workplace can get complicated, and it can be easy to lose sight of the ultimate goal—gender equality. Encouraging women to follow their dreams isn’t always enough. We need to help them build supportive networks, do away with limiting stereotypes, and get men in on the fight.

35 2016•• 35 FALL 2016


Building a Network

Even as a little girl, Kate Cloudsparks dreamed of owning a farm and living off the land. But instead, Cloudsparks tucked away her dreams and became a nurse. She worked in a hospital for years until a series of health problems transformed her from nurse to patient. “I had to have extensive surgery and a lot of rehab,” Cloudsparks tells me. “I recovered pretty darn well, but I could no longer go back to nursing. I was like, ‘OK, time to get on the land, time to work at my own pace.’” Fulfilling her childhood dream meant stepping into a male-dominated field— no pun intended. According to the 2012 Census of Agriculture performed by the USDA, women make up 30 percent of all farmers. Only 14 percent are principal

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operators—the person in charge of making day-to-day management decisions on the farm. These low numbers mean female farmers might struggle to find other women with whom to network—and it doesn’t help that farms are so spread out. But Cloudsparks wasn’t worried about networks and numbers. She decided to start a goat farm and rented 40 acres from a family who no longer lived on the land. Then she reached out to her neighbors for guidance. They were less than helpful. Some made fun of her for putting an off switch on the giant amber light most farmers had on their land. “I wanted to be able to see the stars,” Cloudsparks says. “And they laughed about that in town, they


said ‘Oh, this city girl doesn’t know what she’s doing,’ and ‘It gets really dark out there, you might get scared.’” Cloudsparks felt alone and stuck. Then she found out about The Women’s Food and Agriculture Network (WFAN). WFAN helps women pursue sustainable farming. The group’s based in the Midwest, and they offer learning circles, mentorship programs, and conferences. Turns out, they also make house calls. The executive director at the time visited Cloudsparks’ land. “We talked about what I was interested in doing and what some of the obstacles were,” Cloudsparks says. “There still wasn’t funding and grants, but there was at least encouragement

that something could happen.” Encouragement is central to WFAN. I gave Bridget Holcomb, WFAN’s current executive director, a call. She says helping women realize their goals are possible is often the first step. “There are women who have a dream of being a farmer, but when they tell people they get a lot of negative responses,” Holcomb says. “We work hard to be a place that celebrates women farmers.” I ask why women get those negative responses and Holcomb quips: “Basic sexism.” She once told a cab driver what she did for a living, and he asked if getting women into agriculture was such a good idea because “they couldn’t even pick up a watermelon.”

Other women have told her that male farmers in the area don’t include them in social events, which can feel isolating. Holcomb says there are plenty of supportive men, but women still appreciate a safe space to share their aspirations. WFAN hosts womenonly learning circles, where women interested in farming can ask questions and get educated. “By the end of the day, not only do women feel passionate and not afraid to say it, they have a list of things they are going to do and people they can talk to in order to make it happen.” Cloudsparks attended WFAN’s national conference four years ago, and she says it changed everything. “I met all these other women who were farming, and I saw that I wasn’t the only one out here in the middle of nowhere trying to do what I was doing,” she says. “It really gave me a boost.” She also participated in WFAN’s mentoring program, which pairs a new farmer with a more established woman in agriculture. There, she learned animal husbandry (or as she calls it, “wifery”), and she says it’s helped her deal with her own pregnant animals. These days, Cloudsparks is running a successful goat farm. She’s gotten friendly with her neighbors, but blames their initial chilly reception on custom. “There’s half a dozen families who have been here for many generations. Family is extremely important to them,” she says. “I moved here as a single person, no spouse, no kids in the school. I’m living on land by myself. I’m obviously a dyke. So they didn’t know how to relate to me. It took time for people to understand I’m serious about what I’m doing.” But in the beginning, before Cloudsparks built those bonds, it was the women at WFAN who helped her get started. “Women helping women, that’s one of the powerful things. You can make connections like that through WFAN,” she says. “Women cooperating with one another can make stuff happen.”

FALL 2016 • 37


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you know what they say about assumming... Remember Rolph, the brewer who called me out for my stereotypical questions? Well, she admits she hasn’t always been perfect, either. Before she was the head brewer at Thirsty Pagan, she was serving beer at festivals. While at a festival in the Wisconsin Dells, the team didn’t have all the equipment they needed. So she walked into another tent and asked the woman there for help: “So, I don’t have all the things I need to serve this beer. When your brewer gets back, can you have him come over and give us a hand?” The other woman swore at Rolph and asked her why she was even there if she couldn’t serve her beer. “I was like ‘Well, I’m not even a brewer’” Rolph says. “And she was like ‘I am the head brewer.’ And I was like ‘Oh, I’m a complete asshole.’ Because there’s no reason that a woman can’t be a brewer. That’s the dumbest thing I ever said.” The dumbest thing she ever said ended up changing her career. Before the encounter, Rolph was working in an art gallery and brewing her own beer at home. She’d never thought about turning her hobby into a profession. But after talking to the other woman (spoiler alert: they’re friends now), she starting interning at the Thirsty Pagan—and got involved with the Pink Boots Society (PBS). The Pink Boots Society has chapters across the U.S. and uses education and networking to encourage women to get involved in the beer industry. Laura Ulrich, the president of PBS, tells me they want to eliminate the bearded-guy-in-aflannel stereotype that pervades the craft brewing industry. “All the commercials that you see, it’s only guys brewing beer, and then you see the women in their scantily clad clothes serving the beer,” Ulrich says. “It’s never the other way around.” Ulrich thinks media images strengthen our assumptions that a man is the brewer. Like Rolph, she’s had people ignore her expertise, even though she’s a skilled small-batch brewer at Stone Brewery in San Diego. The best way to end this stereotyping? Transform women into incredible brew masters. PBS offers scholarships for brewing classes, and members teach mini lessons at meetings. “The more knowledge you have, the better chance you have of standing your ground and being able to fight for a better position,” Ulrich says. Ulrich wants to make it clear that the men in the industry have been welcoming. “When we started Pink Boots Society, there was nobody saying ‘Oh my god, these guys are all assholes, we hate them, they haven’t helped us,” Ulrich says. “We were more like ‘The guys have been super helpful, but it’s kind of nice that there are other women out there that I can commiserate with and ask questions to without that slight feeling of ‘Oh, he’s not going to think I know what I’m talking about.’” For both Ulrich and Rolph, the goal is to erase the malebrewer stereotype completely, and in the process erase the need for PBS. “Everyone at Pink Boots would love it if there was never a gender issue, if there was never a need to have a separate Pink Boots Society,” Ulrich says. “That’s absolutely what we’re aiming for. But right now, because we’re not there… anything that we can do to help women get there, I am beyond grateful to do.”

THE BUZZ ON QUEEN BEES

The Queen Bee Syndrome describes women in positions of power who view other women, especially subordinates, more critically than they do men. Some even subtly undermine other women in the workplace. Remember the way Emily treats Andy in “The Devil Wears Prada,” giving her menial tasks and trash-talking her behind her back? Classic Queen Bee. There is some evidence that the syndrome exists. A recent study from an organizational behavior specialist at Washington University shows that women in high-prestige groups often want to maintain their status as the token female. “I can understand why some women would say, yeah, I like having this unique perspective that only I can bring,” Sheppard says. “But I think men would be exactly the same.” Unfortunately, it’s hard to know for sure—the same study has never been performed with men. And Sheppard says that reveals a bigger problem. “Sometimes criticisms hold women to a level of scrutiny that men are not held to,” she says. She points out that we don’t expect men to support one another. We view it as part of the problem. “We can’t really have hugely contradictory views on people helping members of their own gender,” Sheppard says. “It’s wonderful if there are other women that are going to look out for you, but don’t expect that.” The fact is, men aren’t criticized for being competitive—so women shouldn’t be either. “We have too many expectations.” Sheppard says. “I think we need to give women a bit of a break.”

FALL 2016 • 39


Let Men Lean Out

Josh Carter is a burly dude with a big beard, and he’s in a dance studio. He’s surrounded almost entirely by women, and he tries to exchange contact information with one of them. She gives him a weird look. Josh suspects he knows the reason. “I think some of the women think I’m hitting on them,” he says. He’s not, though. Josh is a stay-at-home dad. He’s been watching his daughter’s dance lesson, and he noticed she seemed friendly with another girl in the class. He just wanted to set up a play date for them. “I want my kids to play with these other kids, but it’s difficult, even a little weird, to be making playdates with other moms,” Josh says. “I sometimes feel like an outsider because it’s still a woman’s world.” He’s not wrong. A Pew Research study from 2012 shows that only seven percent of dads stay at home full time, even though 48 percent of men interviewed wanted to spend more time with their kids. Josh is part of that seven percent. He and his wife, Courtney, wanted to be the ones raising their daughters, so daycare wasn’t an appealing option. Courtney made more money as a pharmacist than her husband did as a chef, so it made the most sense for him to take a few years off. He did just that until their first daughter went to preschool, then he went back to work. He took more time off a few years later when their second daughter was born. Josh misses being in charge of a kitchen, but he enjoys taking care of his daughters. “I definitely love cooking, but family is more important to me,” Josh says. “Being at home and being with my kids is more rewarding right now.” But not everyone has embraced Josh’s role as much as he has. Josh says older folks give him weird looks, and moms sometimes seem standoffish or unwilling to chat. He’s even had a few people judge him for the way he’s raising his kids. He’s not the type to hover—he says kids won’t learn if he never lets them fall. “So I let my baby run around a little bit, and I get some women being like ‘oh, I’ll pick her up and hold her and watch her.’” Josh doesn’t think people would step in if he was a woman. “At first, it was frustrating. Just because I’m a man doesn’t mean I can’t take care of kids,” he says. “I feel that some women definitely think I don’t know what I’m doing or that I need help.” Again, he’s not wrong. A Pew Research Center survey from 2013 shows that many still aren’t comfortable with the notion of a stay-at-home dad. Fifty-one percent of responders say children are better off with a stay-at-home mom. Only eight

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percent say the same about stay-at-home dads. That prevailing attitude sucks for guys who would love to spend more time taking care of their children. But it also impacts women who want to advance their careers. “There’s only so much room at the top, so if we’re going to give some of those positions to women, it’s just mathematics that men are going to have to take a step back,” Sheppard says. Plus, men aren’t expected to choose between work and family as often as women. “Powerful women are typically in dual-earner couples and they have women’s double-day— where they work all day, and then usually they end up doing most of the domestic activities and childcare,” Sheppard says. “I really believe if we’re going to encourage women to lean in, we also have to make it acceptable for men to lean out.” But right now, Sheppard thinks we’re missing the mark. “We never really talk about fatherhood. Everything is directed at moms,” Sheppard says. “And we completely exclude men from that. And the message we’re basically sending with that is men have no responsibility in childcare.” Even men who want more time with their kids have gotten that message. Dads spend on average seven hours with their kids per week—moms spend 14 hours. But that does show some improvement since the 60s, when dads were hitting under three hours. If we want to see those numbers improve, Sheppard says feminists need to support stay-at-home dads as much as we do career-driven women. “We hear a young woman who wants to go into engineering, and we’re like, ‘You go, girl. That’s great. Get in there,’ Sheppard says. “But we don’t really do the same thing for men.” Stay-at-home dads also need a network. Josh says that’s easier said than done. “It definitely would be cool to know some other stay-at-home dads so you can get the kids together and chit-chat with some other adults,” Josh says. He just doesn’t know where to find them: “I know they’re out there. I’ve read articles about stay-at-home-dad groups, but that’s in California.” Josh is making it work. He takes his daughters to Mommy and Me programs, and he’s getting better at chatting with moms. He says most men he knows would benefit from staying home with the kids for a few years. But if society wants more men like Josh, Sheppard says we can’t lose sight of the ultimate goal: gender equality. “It’s not just women holding the top position,” Sheppard says. “It’s also making men comfortable with pursuing lower positions as well. That would be true equality.”


MAKING PROGRESS We may not have achieved total gender equality, but we’ve still come a long way. According to Pew Research Center and American Time Use surveys, women have been steadily increasing their workplace presence since the sixties—and men are spending more time with their kids. Hooray for progress! PERCENTAGE OF WORKPLACE POSITIONS HELD BY WOMEN:

37

65

1968

2011

NUMBER OF COUPLES WITH CHILDREN WHO HAVE TWO INCOMES:

1960: 1 in 4

2011: 6 in 10

TIME DADS SPEND DOING HOUSEWORK PER WEEK:

1965 2011 4 hours

10 Hours

FALL 2016 • 41


inked art GETTING A QUALITY TATTOO ISN’T LIKE PICKING UP FAST FOOD. YOU CAN’T JUST DRIVE UP, PLACE AN ORDER, AND LEAVE WITH A FINISHED PRODUCT. THREE ARTISTS SHARE THEIR STORIES OF EARNING RESPECT AND REFINING THEIR ART IN AN EVOLVING INDUSTRY. WORDS: JENNA PFINGSTEN | PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

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Joshua Bowers tattoos a client at Iron Heart Tattoo in Des Moines. He’s been practicing his craft for 13 years.

I

n the mid-2000s, the tattoo industry was changing. Getting inked was becoming less about rebellion and more about fitting in. Josh Grable, artist at Speakeasy Custom Tattoo in Chicago, started his career in 2007. He entered the tattoo world right as it was shifting from an underground taboo to a mainstream trend. “It was cool. I was doing something different, doing something off the grid,” Grable says. Although they were first associated with sailors and bikers, tattoos skyrocketed in popularity when “Miami Ink” premiered on TLC in 2005. It wasn’t the first reality show about tattoos, but it was the first one to gain prominence by adding drama and recurring storylines. A lot of tattoo artists are vocal about the show’s inaccurate and exaggerated portrayal of the trade, but most agree that it had a significant impact on perception and growth of the industry. In 2016, 45 million Americans have at least one tattoo. And nearly $1.7

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billion is spent within the industry each year. “When I started tattooing it was something you had to earn,” Megan Hoogland, who’s been tattooing in Minnesota for over 20 years, says. “And now it’s something people think they’re entitled to.” This increase in demand puts a strain on some artists when they’re expected to deliver high-quality work as quickly as possible. “I think there’s definitely a dilemma in the fact that tattooing has become so mainstream, where it’s become a customer service industry,” Grable says. “The problem is, we aren’t salesmen.” Instead, tattooists spend years practicing and refining their trade to gain success. It takes dedication and pure artistic talent. Joshua Bowers has been tattooing for 13 years. He currently works at Iron Heart Tattoo in Des Moines. When he’s not in the shop, he’s pursuing his two other side businesses and making time to improve his craft.

“I’ve always been an artist outside of tattooing. And I get to do a lot of my art on clients because that’s what people ask for now,” Bowers says. There’s a big difference between custom studios and street shops—which handle mostly walk-in customers and ink generic designs. Someone can enter a street shop with a basic idea and walk out a few hours later with a finished piece. Custom shops take a different approach. Artist and customer collaborate to create a one-of-a-kind tattoo. “We’re making them how they’re going to look the rest of their lives,” Hoogland says. “And none of us take that lightly.”

Finding a Specialty

The most common way to enter the tattoo industry is through an apprenticeship. Before getting the job, an aspiring artist has to show up with a portfolio of work that shows they’re capable of creating original designs.


tattoo etiquette Treat your artist with respect: They’re creating something permanent on your body, so have some consideration for what they’re doing. Listen to the artist: They’ve been in the business and know what’s going to work and what’s going to look like garbage in a year. Trust their opinion and be open to new ideas. Don’t ask for an exact replica: Most shops won’t duplicate a picture you found online, so gather a few examples and explain what you want. Tip your artist: Just do it. About 15-20 percent is fair. Don’t bring your whole crew: Excess people can be distracting to the artist. And especially don’t bring rowdy children with you. Don’t micromanage: Trust the tattoo artist. Don’t be a backseat driver. Don’t come in drunk: Besides possibly making a disastrous decision, coming in with alcohol in your system thins your blood and you’ll bleed more during the process. Don’t try to haggle: Most tattoo prices aren’t negotiable, and it’s rude to the artist. A quality tattoo isn’t cheap, so come in expecting to spend some cash.

Apprenticeships can last anywhere from a few months to a few years— it’s up to the artist to decide when an apprentice is ready to start tattooing on their own. Until then, the apprentice does the grunt work—anything from talking to customers to answering emails and running errands. Along the way, they’ll learn important tools of the trade, like how to run a shop and how to operate a tattoo machine. “Having an apprentice is like having another child,” Hoogland says. “It’s a huge responsibility. You have to trust the person you’re apprenticing because you have to be responsible for every single thing they do and say. That’s a reflection on you.” After the mentor thinks the apprentice is ready to leave the nest, then the real work begins. After his own six-month apprenticeship, Grable worked in Indiana, Michigan, and Seattle before ending up at Speakeasy. Grable’s career didn’t kick off until

he started working with color portraits. Not all tattoo artists have a specialty, but Grable found his by trying out a little bit of everything. “Since I was a kid I’ve been fascinated with recreating the world around me more than I was in creating my own world on paper,” Grable says. “I always tried to draw things I saw or replicate people’s faces. It’s always kind of been there for me.” Now, nine years after entering the industry, Grable’s in a position where he’s able to choose the projects he wants to take on—depending on whether or not they inspire him. If not, he’ll usually recommend them to another artist he thinks would be good for the job. If he decides to take on a project, Grable works with the client to find out what they’re looking for and then spends time creating a piece they’re both happy with. On any given day, Grable receives five to 20 emails from potential clients.

Most get an automated response asking for more information about the tattoo, as well as a warning that they might not hear back for up to four weeks. “Any reputable, good artist—anyone who has a specialty—you’re probably going to wait at least a few months to a year before you can get in,” Grable says.

A Collector’s Item

A tattoo from Grable isn’t something you get on a whim. The clients he takes on are the ones that value what Grable does and are willing to wait for it. Some even travel hundreds of miles to collect a piece from him. These clients are commonly called tattoo collectors. They see tattoos as art, and their body a gallery—curating pieces from specific tattoists to grow their collection. “I think a lot of tattoo collectors do it because they love the industry—they love tattoos—but also because they get FALL 2016 • 45


a certain bit of notoriety,” Bowers says. Like owning a Warhol, getting a tattoo from a certain artist is held in high regard in tattoo circles. It’s also an honor for the artists themselves. “These are pieces that represent the particular artist and they’re asking for it on their bodies,” Bowers says. “That’s something that they had a voice in outside of tattooing.”

A FORM OF ART

If you have a bad tattoo experience, you’re going to remember it every time you look in the mirror. Bad tattoos are more than just a misspelled word, and the artist’s job is to make sure there are no 46 • DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM

regrets down the line. “When the artist recommends something or tells you something won’t work, we’re not trying to attack you,” Grable says. “We want to make sure this tattoo’s good because it’s forever.” The artist also has skin in the game. Most artwork is stuck in a museum, but tattoos are like walking billboards for an artist. “People come in thinking they want this and you should do it for them rather than respecting you,” Hoogland says. “Artists don’t always do what someone else wants them to do. They want to put their own spin on it.” It takes collaboration and some giveand-take to strike a balance between

the client wanting to preserve their idea and the artist wanting to take creative license. “This is a team effort,” Grable says. “The clients give the idea, trust the artist, the artist provides a good quality piece.” Tattooists carefully pick out the projects that will showcase their best work, and spend hours tediously tending to every detail so they can be proud of every tattoo that leaves the shop. “Art isn’t just something that we draw or that just comes out of our brains. There’s some channeling to some higher power involved,” Hoogland says. “That’s what art is. That’s why it speaks to people.”


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THE RISE OF

EDM

ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC WAS ONCE UNDERGROUND. THERE WERE A FEW MOMENTS OF BREAKTHROUGH, BUT ONLY RECENTLY HAS IT TAKEN CENTER STAGE AS A MULTIBILLION DOLLAR INDUSTRY. THE GENRE’S FANBASE ISN’T MAINSTREAM, THOUGH. IT’S A SUBCULTURE FOUNDED ON PEACE, LOVE, UNITY, AND RESPECT. WORDS: THE DRAKE MAGAZINE STAFF ADDITIONAL REPORTING: LAUREN VELASCO PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

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T

he night before Halloween, hundreds of concertgoers pack inside a warehouse in Clive, Iowa. Fruity clouds of vape smoke fill the air. There’s a hint of marijuana, too. Despite the brisk, late October weather, many people are dressed in shorts, tank tops, and sneakers. Others have donned costumes in celebration of the holiday weekend. Colorful stacks of beaded kandi bracelets and glow sticks line people’s arms. Everyone has gathered in the Seven Flags Event Center to wait for Diplo—an internationally recognized EDM artist—to take the stage. As the overhead lights dim, the crowd erupts—screaming, clapping, and pushing towards the front of the stage. Everyone’s packed tightly together. There’s no room for personal space here. There’s a feeling of anticipation and collectivism as the room waits for the show to start. Almost like disciples preparing to worship their god. When Diplo finally takes the stage, only his silhouette is illuminated. The noise of his fans is deafening. Flashes of electric lights pierce through the darkness as a sea of hands pulse with the beat. This single show is just a tiny slice of EDM culture in 2016. EDM—which is shorthand for electronic dance music—hasn’t always looked this way. Before the mid2000s, electronic music was underground, reserved for jet-setter clubs and secret raves. But today, EDM is used as an umbrella term for bone-rattling, heart-pounding, digital music. Over the past few years, the genre—and its devoted fanbase—have emerged in the mainstream.

Mike Prevatt has been covering nightlife—and as a result, dance culture—in Las Vegas for 18 years.

He explains there’s often a misconception that EDM is the entirety of electronic dance music. But the term only became popular after the genre started gaining traction around 2010. “I call it commercial EDM to make it even more clear, because usually when people talk about EDM, they’re talking about Kaskade and Calvin Harris,” Prevatt says. “EDM is almost more of a cultural reference for a time period when electronic music got big, and the culture kind of flared out.” Original dance music dates back decades. Tammy Anderson, a sociology professor at the University of Delaware, has done extensive research on the electronic music and rave scene. She explains that in the U.S., house music and techno were the first electronic styles to appear. House music, which is a soulful version of 70s

disco, started in Chicago, while techno finds its roots in Detroit. “It makes sense because Detroit was this great factory town and these were the sounds of the assembly line,” she says. Prevatt remembers electronica appearing on the radio when he was in college in the 90s—musicians like Daft Punk, The Chemical Brothers, and Prodigy cracking the airwaves. But they never quite made it to the mainstream. It wasn’t until 2006 that EDM really took a turn. Daft Punk played Coachella and exposed dance music to the mainstream. “I think it inspired a lot of artists to start looking at pop music with more of a European dance music flair,” Prevatt says. “It changed the impression of electronic music to people who were in the music industry, and it also made electronic music a little more cool for people who go to festivals.” Anderson attributes this shift to opportunity. “The first wave of electronic dance music was an outgrowth of disco,” she says. “People believed back then that words got in the way of the music being able to mean anything. Ravers used to tell me they didn’t want their attention to be directed to misogynistic or sexist tones, they didn’t want to hear about romance.” She explains that over time, the culture had to evolve in order to expand. And it did so by incorporating components of mainstream music into its underground format—which is how you get the Calvin Harris’s of the genre. “These guys are superstars,” she says. “And people saw that there was a lot of money to be made from dance music, and they started to commercialize festivals.” Commercialize is a key word here. Because the EDM scene has become a little less about music and more about the money for organizers. “I think you have to understand raves and EDM— not as just a cultural—but as an economic business phenomenon,” Anderson says. A 2016 International Music Summit Business Report states that the global electronic music industry is worth $7.1 billion—which is 60 percent more than three years ago. The salaries of EDM artists have substantially grown, too. In 2012, Forbes first released its “Electronic Cash Kings” list that ranks top-earning EDM artists each year. Tiesto was at the top, making $22 million, followed by Skrillex, earning $15 million, and Swedish House Mafia making an estimated $14 million. Fast forward to 2016, and Forbes features Calvin Harris, Tiesto, and David Guetta in the top three spots. They earn $63 million, $38 million, and $28 million respectively.

FALL 2016 • 49


As important as these DJs are to the scene, they would be nothing without their fans. Christian Conway is a 22-year-old from San Diego who’s been going to EDM shows since he was 16. He’s gone to over 30 shows in 2016 alone, and the atmosphere keeps bringing him back. “I love the sense of community. I love the openness, the acceptance. There’s a certain energy at a proper show that no other genre can come close to.” 20-year-old Lindsay Lopardo is another avid EDM fan. She’s a “hooper”—meaning that for the past three years she’s been traveling to EDM shows throughout the U.S. and performing with a hula hoop. She isn’t a fan of raves but instead thrives on the exhilarating high of performing for an audience. “It’s an emotional outlet for me to express myself in my own way—just like an artist or someone who plays an instrument,” she says. “Happy, sad, angry—you can express anything you want with dancing.” Lindsay explains that as she travels from show to show, she is constantly meeting new people. Over time, her EDM friends start to feel like a second family. “I travel the states and meet up with old friends and make new friends. I just really enjoy this life,” she says. “The music scene has brought me so much joy and friendship. I’m so grateful for where I am now and all the beautiful souls I’ve met on this journey so far.” The community Christian and Lindsay describe has a name: PLUR. The acronym—which stands for peace, love, unity, respect—is used to bond fans together. It’s one of the reasons people feel so in tune with the culture and feel a sense of belonging to it. Its message connects strangers from every walk of life. “It can be kind of cliche,” Prevatt says of PLUR. “But I think the initial intent of it is something that dance culture can be proud of.” He shares a story of attending Las Vegas’s Electric Daisy Carnival in 2012. It’s a windy night and security is telling fans to get in the stands. “Now usually when you’re at a festival and there’s a big eruption of action, people start to wig out, like ‘What’s going on?’” he says. “There’s always uncertainty as to what’s gonna happen. But these kids just walk right into those stands, they sit down with their friends. They just wait.” This moment sticks with Prevatt because it shows just how unified EDM fans can be. “It was this very pure, very charming outcome of what could have been a real bad time,” he says. “It could have been a disaster, could have been a bummer—you could look at it a bunch of different ways...It really says something about the culture and the people that populate it.” Conway’s had similar experiences. “There’s a sense of community, there’s a sense of caring. I have shitty knees and a bad back. So at a lot of shows I’ll sometimes sit off to the side and just enjoy the music while resting. And people will come up to me and genuinely care when they ask if I’m okay...That’s kind of special.” 50 •• DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM 50 DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM


So where does EDM go from here?

It depends on who you ask. Commentators have been predicting the death of EDM for years. “When I was collecting data, people had declared raves dead,” Anderson says. “People were saying that the RAVE Act of 2003 [a bill that made it legal to punish venues for the drug use of their patrons] killed the rave scene, and look what happened. I really think the story is much more about a gradual, silent alteration into popularity than an outright obituary.” Prevatt agrees that EDM isn’t dead. He thinks it just needs to shift in a different direction. “You definitely hear a lot more pop stuff. A lot more vocals. That stuff is kind of getting played out. It has to go in another direction,” he says. “You see some of these artists trying to play with different genres. I think it’s in this period where it’s not sure where it’s going to go.” Music is often cyclical. A genre, artist, or style is only cool until the next big thing is discovered. Music starts underground, the soundtrack for purists. But as it moves up to the mainstream, that sound becomes standardized. “People then begin to demand a more unique sound with the rebirth of the underground,” Anderson explains. “I think a lot of people in underground houses or techno circles have always hoped that the kids would get tired of the pop-dance-music thing that EDM kind of represents. And they would dig a little deeper,” Prevatt says. “They would become a little older, a little more mature. And they’re like ‘Where’s the roots to this music? Where’s the cool version of this music now?’”

The Other Side of EDM The EDM scene is not without its growing pains. In 2013, Electric Zoo—an EDM festival in New York—canceled its final day because of two drug-related deaths. Such drug incidents are not limited to the U.S. Asia’s largest EDM festival in Malaysia was forced to shut down on its final day after six people died from drug overdoses, and 29 others were arrested in drug-related charges. Drug safety is also a concern. The Teen Rehab Center estimates that only about five to 10 percent of ecstasy pills—one of the most popular dance drugs—are pure MDMA. This means that a lot of concert-goers don’t know what they’re actually taking. Organizations such as DanceSafe—a Denver-based nonprofit—offers unbiased information and drug-testing services at some shows and festivals. Prevatt acknowledges the problem, but thinks it has less to do with the specific genre and more to do with music in general. “Wherever cool music is there’s a drug for it,” he says. “And it’s definitely not a thing where the music is kind of propelling the drug culture. It’s just one of those things that’s a part of it. I don’t think it should define it.”

FALL 2016 • 51


HEALTH + SEX

FOR THE BODY AND MIND

BULLET JOURNALS A CREATIVE WAY TO KEEP YOUR LIFE ON TRACK. WORDS: MEGAN MOWERY | PHOTO: SAM FATHALLAH

F

or the organization freaks among us, there’s a new style of journal on the rise. Bullet journals keep users organized while providing a creative outlet—think day planner meets Instagram-worthy sketchbook. There’s a complex system of bullet points (hence the name) and simple scribbles behind them that can be followed as closely or loosely as desired. Bullet journal originator, Ryder Carroll, created the system as a way to deal with a learning disability that prevented him from focusing on note-taking. After years of experimenting, he discovered bullet journals to help him keep track of tasks, events, and notes. Eventually, he took his holy grail and shared it with

the world. “I did this for myself,” Carroll says. “Eventually it proved so useful that I showed it to a couple friends, and then something unexpected happened, which is that they also found it useful.” Today, the bullet journal is used by many types of people. “I never imagined that it would work as much for a middle schooler who has A.D.D as it would work for a lawyer who’s working on some of the most intense lawsuits in the country,” says Carroll. “It’s the same tool, just applied differently.” Bullet journal basics comprise of a blank journal, preferably with a dot or grid pattern on the pages, and some colorful pens. Anything else—from washi tape to stencils, stickers, and magazine

cutouts—is completely up to the user. A typical bullet journal will include yearly, monthly, and daily calendars, as well as “trackers”—simple charts that are filled in if the activity in question was performed that day—for health, fitness, habits, or just about anything else. At the end of the week or month, it’s plainly visible if the user has stuck to their goal, thus “tracking” the activity. Part of their appeal is that bullet journals are completely customizable, giving users the power to take creativity and organization into their own hands— literally. “The beauty of the bullet journal,” says Carroll, “is that it can be anything you want it to be.”

Makeup to look + Feel Good WORDS: JORDIN WILSON | PHOTOS: PRANEETH RAJSINGH It’s the best of both worlds: makeup that’s good for skin and the environment. Gone are the days of splurging on eco-friendly cosmetics that aren’t effective, or powerful products full of unnatural chemicals. Strike a balance with the following brands—but don’t let your glowing skin and eco-warrior status give you too much of a superiority complex. Jane Iredale While on the pricier end of the cosmetic spectrum, Jane Iredale products are dermatologist recommended. Sue Schooler, PhysicianS Assistant and owner of Skin Iowa, says Jane Iredale foundations are made with micronized minerals and no oil, so it’s nearly impossible to clog pores. These products also lack talc, chemicals, and dyes that can irritate skin and harm the environment. janeiredale.com, $40-50

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Ecco Bella Ecco Bella is a cosmetic line that’s also fairly affordable. This beauty brand fiercely advocates against animal testing, by-products, and chemicals. Plus, Ecco Bella products use only natural, plantbased ingredients such as flower wax. eccobella.com, $20-30

Physicians Formula If specialty store items are beyond your budget, try a drugstore steal such as Physicians Formula. This brand’s makeup is 100 percent preservativeand paraben-free. Instead, Physicians Formula uses natural ingredients, such as safflower seed and jojoba oils, which moisturize skin. Drugstores and physiciansformula.com, $10-20


Subtle Teas WORDS: EMILY LARSON Tea culture is a lot like wine culture— confusing, complicated, but worth it when one gets to the bottom of the cup. We combed through the many varieties of tea and found their specific health benefits.

Black Tea Caffeine content:

UNDERGROUND HEALTH FOODS

EAT YOUR WAY TO A HEALTHIER LIFE. THESE FIVE SNACKS ARE PACKED WITH ANTIOXIDANTS, VITAMINS, AND ALL THE GOOD STUFF YOUR BODY NEEDS. WORDS: JULIE URAM | PHOTO: JAMES NGUGI We’re tired of kombucha, too. So we found the next food trends worth trying. Below are some unexpected snacks to add to any diet for a banquet of benefits. Find the following health foods in the nutrition aisle at local grocery stores or at specialty health markets. Dandelion Consumable through tea, wine, or straight-up blossoms, this flower improves digestion, helps to clear skin, and aids the immune system. Looking to spruce up your morning joe? Pick a few dandelions, rinse the flowers, and let dry. Then grind the yellow petals with coffee beans for a powerful morning kick, thanks to vitamins A and K, which can help prevent cancer. Coconut Oil Pulling You might not want to swallow this one, but the healthy results of coconut oil pulling are obvious—whiter teeth, fewer cavities, and fewer headaches. Take a spoonful of coconut oil, warm in the microwave to liquify, and swish in your mouth for 15 minutes. Bacteria is absorbed in the lipids of the oil, which is then spit out, clearing your mouth of stubborn bacteria.

Bee Pollen These little yellow pellets are filled with all the good stuff. The bright pollen is filled with amino acids, antioxidants, and vitamins. It packs a powerful punch atop soups and salads, or stirred into a glass of warm water. Local pollen can also aid some seasonal allergies. Sorghum A member of the grass family, sorghum is similar to the puffy, chewiness of barley, and can be used in anything from porridge to bread. The nutty, ancient grain is even safe for gluten-free friends. Native to Australia and Africa, sorghum contains proteins low in digestibility, which aid the body’s processing of food. This grain is also a tasty source of vitamins and minerals. Nutritional Yeast This flaky yellow seasoning can be sprinkled on salads and smoothies or used as a fresh topping for popcorn. Originally created as a supplement for vegetarian and vegan eaters, its nutritional value is similar to that found in meat, with essential B vitamins and minerals.

Helps block fat absorption. Example: Earl Grey

White Tea Caffeine content: Lots of antioxidants reduce the risk of cancer. Example: Silver Needle

Green tea Caffeine content: Increases blood flow to the brain, which can help delay the onset of dementia. Example: Matcha Green

Oolong Tea

Caffeine content: Boosts metabolism so fat burns faster. Broken heart? Add some whiskey to your cup of oolong and let time take care of the rest. Example: Iron Buddha

Herbal Tea

There are thousands of herbal teas helpful in targeting specific health concerns. Examples: Peppermint teas can soothe pain. Can’t get it up? Gingko biloba tea can increase blood flow to the penis. A combination of mint, chamomile, catnip, and lemon can help one fall asleep. Ginger teas can calm a turning tummy.

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MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT FOR PLAY + PLAYLISTS

THESE ARTISTS USE THEIR TALENTS TO INCREASE VISIBILITY IN THE LGBTQ+ COMMUNITY. WORDS + PHOTO: MADISON KELLY

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E

ven today, in a society that’s become increasingly accepting of the LGBTQ+ community, pop culture still centers around heterosexuality and rigid gender binaries. Singers on the radio almost always express feelings towards people of the opposite sex. Heterosexual romances make an appearance in almost every major motion picture, no matter the genre. Even the most progressive media outlets fall back on old-fashioned stereotypes of gender. With straight and cisgender (identifying as the gender one was born with) identities continually looming over them, LGBTQ+ artists often fall into the shadows. However, just because queer and trans artists are hidden from mainstream media, it doesn’t mean they don’t exist. Steph Knipe, who identifies as they/ them, is the lead singer of the selfdescribed “bittersweet romantic indie pop” band, Adult Mom. The group’s first full-length album, “Momentary Lapse of Happily,” features melancholy but melodic lyrics on the highs and lows of life. They address issues affecting the LGBTQ+ community, like acceptance and self-doubt. “Queer folks and trans folks need to be represented in the media because we are real people whose experiences are valid and lived,” says Knipe. “Speaking for myself, I have a desire to see them sometimes solely for my own identification process and understanding.” Finding LGBTQ+ artists to connect with can be a crucial part of the “identification process” Knipe describes, especially for those questioning their gender or sexuality. Without representation—or rather accurate representation—of orientations and identities other than cisgender or straight, self-identification and selfacceptance can become difficult. Kansas-based singer-songwriter Taryn Miller, who uses she/her pronouns, says, “Growing up, I wish there would have been more people that felt that they could be themselves and speak out.” Miller, who performs under the project name Your Friend, describes her folk sound as “experimental, textured, and cinematic.” And while her queer identity may not play into her lyrics as directly

as Knipe’s, her music still focuses on bringing people together. “It’s rooted in connecting people,” she says. The connections LGBTQ+ artists make with their audiences are key. Ollie Schminkey, who uses they/them pronouns, is a spoken word poet and activist from St. Paul, Minnesota. They point out that many people contact them, explaining the importance of their poetry in their identification and coming out process. Not only can visibility of LGBTQ+ artists inspire people within the community to come out, it can also inspire other queer and trans artists to speak out. “When I first started doing slam five years ago I was often the only trans person on the stage for an entire tournament,” Schminkey says. “And now, I go to a big tournament and there’s tons of trans people. And by tons of trans people I mean like 20 out of 500 people, but that seems like a lot. And I think that’s really cool. I think visibility begets more visibility.” While much of Schminkey’s betterknown poetry centers on gender, self-acceptance, and other LGBTQ+ prominent topics, they say a majority of their poetry actually focuses on things like family, mental illness, and life in general. “I wrote a lot of poems for a long time about being trans,” Schminkey says. “But for the most part, a lot of my poetry is about other stuff.” While representation of LGBTQ+ artists is vital, it’s important that artists are not categorized solely by their sexualities or genders. “One of the most important things is creating spaces for trans and queer people and poets to write about things other than being trans,” Schminkey says. “It’s really important to give people space to not have to tokenize themselves and not only have to be the ‘trans poet’—they can just be poets.” The identities and orientations of LGBTQ+ artists are important to their personal stories, but aren’t labels that should be tagged onto artists like genres. Miller explains that she doesn’t want her queer identity to be what she’s known for. “I don’t want to just be a queer musician,” she says, “I just want to be a person.”

ASHLEY MARDELL Ashley Mardell, 24, is a nonbinary, pansexual YouTuber from Minneapolis. With her videos feeling more like late-night conversations than information guides, Mardell uses her channel to inform viewers on the LGBTQ+ community. Mardell is also author of the recent book “The ABC’s of LGBT+: Understanding and Embracing Your Identity.”

AGAINST ME! Against Me! is a punk rock band from Gainesville, Florida. Laura Jane Grace, lead singer of the band, came out as transgender in 2012 with the full support of her bandmates and fans behind her. Pulling from her experiences as a trans woman, she produced the album “Transgender Dysphoria Blues,” which the band released in early 2014.

HAYLEY KIYOKO Hayley Kiyoko is a singer-songwriter, actress, and artist. Gaining popularity in the LGBTQ+community after the release of her single “Girls Like Girls” in 2015, Kiyoko has since come out with queer and trans inclusive music videos as well as women love women tracks on her new EP, “Citrine.”

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( M U S+ IENTERTAINMENT C & E N T E R T FOR A I PLAY N M+EPLAYLISTS NT ) MUSIC

THE WOMBATS

BRITISH POP-ROCKERS TOE THE LINE BETWEEN ADULTHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE AS THEY PREP FOR THEIR FOURTH RECORD WORDS: ADAM ROGAN | PHOTO: THE WOMBATS

T

he Wombats rolled into Des Moines to play Wooly’s in September on one of the Brit-pop trio’s first headlining tours since relocating from Liverpool to Los Angeles. It’s been nearly a decade since The Wombats first album dropped in 2007, and their lineup hasn’t changed at all, though their boyish charm is fading. A casual listener may not be able to differentiate between The Wombats’ earliest record and their newest, but the growth the band has experienced over the past nine years is explored in the music they create. Much of The Wombats’ music can be dually affecting. You can dance to a song one day and cry to it the next. Their single, “Let’s Dance to Joy Division,” for example, pairs the pangs of heartbreak with the backbeat of a dance track. Think early Arctic Monkeys meets Two Door Cinema Club. With their dynamic, poignant, and positive sound, The Wombats are unmistakably fun. Their vibrancy is unlike most everything else in modern

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pop, regardless of whether lead singer Matthew Murphy’s lyrics are centered on depression, drugs, or British soap operas. The Wombats are pushing one million cumulative album sales. Their distinctive sound—featuring upbeat keyboard, highpitched guitar, powerful basslines, and dynamic drumming—has evolved as well. “It feels like stuff is definitely building,” Murphy says, “and that in itself is probably the most exciting feeling you get in a band. You see more people coming, you see more stuff happening, and more buzz around the band.” The group played nearly a dozen music festivals in 2016—including the Reading and Leeds Festivals, Austin City Limits, and Summerfest—and toured extensively throughout the rest of the U.S. So before returning to the studio in January to start recording their fourth album, the band plans to take some well-deserved time off. For now, Murphy focuses on unfocusing. He’s enjoying a lighter schedule while finally being off the road. He hinted at a potential sonic shift in

their upcoming album. Despite The Wombats’ appreciation for pop music, they grew up on heavier bands. They closed their Des Moines performance with two minutes of pure, hard rock noise redolent of moshing. Concert-goers were left baffled by the stark deviation from their usual poppy tone. “It’s just a way to let loose and get the crowd going at the very end of the show,” Murphy says. “Seventy percent of the time we do it, depending on if we enjoyed the show or not. But most of the time we crank it out to give the crowd a bit of a Rage Against the Machine or Smashing Pumpkins vibe; just a way of having fun and not taking it too seriously.” The Wombats are no longer angsty teens singing about youthful parties and trying to impress the older kids. They’re more refined, less anxious, and firmly established. “I feel like we’ve already been successful in many ways,” Murphy says. “If it’s to stay like it is now, I think we’d be fairly happy. We have big ideas and we want to do what we feel we can to be bigger and better.”


ON TOUR WITH

JACK GARRATT ON THE TAILS OF HIS FIRST STUDIO ALBUM, BRITISH SINGERSONGWRITER JACK GARRATT STARTS TO MAKE IT BIG. WORDS: BROOKE OTTERSON | PHOTO: MADISON KELLY As the lights at Wooly’s in Des Moines dim, a hush falls over the crowd. Then, in a flash of light, color, and sound, a man with the intensity of Kendrick Lamar and the electric energy of The Chainsmokers begins his first song. A one-man-band, he stands on stage surrounded by his laptop, a drum set, two guitars, and a keyboard. This is Jack Garratt. He’s a young Brit who has stolen the hearts of many overseas and who is beginning to take hold of some in America, too. A small group of dedicated fans crowd the stage. They scream every word to his soulful electro-pop songs. Garratt manages to exude energy despite his position behind the drum kit. A short, 11song set list doesn’t hinder his electricity from invigorating the crowd, especially during a throwback rendition of the “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” theme song. Nearly three years of touring have sent Garratt around the world. But his roots lie in Buckinghamshire, England, where his mother, a music teacher, encouraged a love for all kinds of music. He wrote his first song at age 12. Since then, inspiration strikes spontaneously, and he follows it wherever it takes him. “I don’t think I’ve ever been consciously aware of inspiration,” Garratt says. “It just unknowingly comes from something. I don’t know what it is until the music happens. Something, somewhere, has impacted me and fermented in my brain, and the song is the direct correlation of that.” No matter the influence, Garratt’s surroundings are constantly impacting his never-ending musical work.

“I’m always creating,” he says. “I don’t know whether I’m writing specifically for albums. I don’t know what it’s for yet, but I’m always outputting something. It’s up to me whether it’s going to turn into something fulfilling or not.” The steady stream of creation led to the release of Garratt’s first EP, “Remnants,” in 2014, followed shortly by an EP of remixes under the title “Remnix.” He then caught the attention of Mumford & Sons and opened for their 2015 tour. “Phase,” Garratt’s first studio album, was released in February 2016. Many singles from the album steadily climbed the U.K. charts. Although he hasn’t charted in the U.S. yet, tracks such as “Weathered,” “Worry,” and “Surprise Yourself” are gaining popularity stateside. Garratt loves the intimacy of small venues such as Wooly’s. He carefully crafts playlists to enjoy with the preshow crowd as he preps backstage. “The great thing about being in venues like this is you’re close enough to the stage where you can hear what’s happening out there,” he says. “It’s important to me that I walk out on stage in the same mindset of the crowd. It’s like we’re going on the same battlefield together.” Garratt’s looking forward to taking some time off and working on a new album. As much as he enjoys small venues, cramming arenas as a headlining act might still be in Garratt’s future. But he’s not thinking about that too hard yet—“I’m taking things one step at a time.”

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MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT FOR PLAY + PLAYLISTS

THE EDGE OF THE SPOTLIGHT WITH A LEAD SINGER THAT GARNERS MOST OF HIS BAND’S ATTENTION, BASSIST PETER HUGHES OF THE MOUNTAIN GOATS FEELS AT HOME IN HIS ROLE AT THE SIDE OF THE STAGE WORDS: ADAM ROGAN | PHOTO: THE MOUNTAIN GOATS

T

he Mountain Goats’ bassist Peter Hughes is wandering the streets of Bloomington, Indiana. His band is on the last leg of their latest tour before heading back into the studio to record album number 16. Considering their 22-year musical backlog, The Mountain Goats have found a formula that breeds creation. Lead singer John Darnielle, an icon of indie-folk rock, tackles issues stretching from divorce and addiction to religion, loneliness, even the state of Texas. He’s joined by Hughes and drummer Jon Wurster. Darnielle isn’t too keen on giving interviews when he’s out on tour, though—he needs to “rest his voice,” according to the band’s manager. This restriction, however, opened up the opportunity to talk with Hughes, who oftentimes comes off as more of a background character in the shadow of Darnielle’s writing prowess. With a domineering emphasis on storytelling, album crafting, and lyricism, the group’s instrumentalism is easy to overlook.Musicality is oftentimes forgone to give Darnielle’s lyrics more attention; his bandmates are obliged to exercise restraint rather than experimentalism. “It’s generally understood, I think, both by people inside and outside of the band, that the point of The Mountain Goats is the lyrics more than anything else,” Hughes says.

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The band uses its sound as a bed that Darnielle’s powerful stories lie. Soft guitars and talk-singing vocals, with the occasional instrumental flourish, let the lyrics speak for themselves. “Folk” would probably be their genre classification, but it can be hard to pin down when a band has more than 500 songs. Each time Hughes hears demos of Darnielle’s newly written songs, he asks himself the same questions: “What’s the best way to serve this song? And what’s the best setting we can create to support the story—whether it’s narratively, atmospherically, or whatever?” Even if he doesn’t take center stage, Hughes admits that he relishes his role in the background. “I love what the bass does. It’s the thing that ties together the rhythm and the melody. It’s super important, but if it’s drawing too much attention it risks subverting the whole thing,” he says. “I want to add something. I want to add some flavor.” Hughes believes that sometimes you need to switch it up to keep things fresh. That change is good—but not always. He hinted that the upcoming album might reflect this thinking. It may be a slight departure from what fans are used to, but in a good way. Still, he refuses to reveal what’s in store. “I don’t want to give away the game.”


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