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MAKE IT MONOCHROMATIC

BOB DYLAN A LIVING LEGEND TAKES THE STAGE

HOME FOR THE HARVEST

COMFORT FOOD, MEET CAST IRON

SAME SEX,

SAFE SEX

A LESSON ON LGBTQ+ SEXUAL HEALTH

BLEEDING OUTSIDE THE LINES TALKING ABOUT THAT TIME OF THE MONTH.


14 28 34 38

HOME FOR THE HARVEST

Cozy skillet recipes that are perfect for a night in.

SATURATED STYLE One color, one outfit, times five.

BLEEDING OUTSIDE THE LINES

One writer experiences the freedom of a period without products.

THE RISE OF MIDWESTERN CITIES

The Midwest is heating up— and it’s not just global warming.

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THE IMITATION GAIN

Shining a spotlight on the black market.


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CONTENTS

26

23 20

28 44

50


BITS & PIECES

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8 BIT OF LIT: PODCASTS Ditch music and download these series.

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8 BOOKSTORES AREN’T DEAD YET Rekindle your love of books.

9 ADULTING 101: CAR BUYING BASICS It doesn’t have to be a clunker.

9 CROSS STITCH COMEBACK Find your niche in the stitch.

10 MOTHER NATURE NEEDS SOME R&R Recycling? Here are the rules.

11 SANITY-SAVING APPS Don’t stress—there’s an app for that.

11 WEIRD SCIENCE

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Don’t be afraid, this is the future.

FOOD & DRINK 12 SQUASH GOALS Spice up the dinner table.

HEALTH & SEX

20 CURED EGG YOLKS

48 GMOS

These recipes won’t leave you scrambling.

20 THE UDDER SIDE OF DAIRY 5 alternatives to classic dairy.

21 SUPERIOR SPIRITS A guide to choosing the best booze.

FASHION & BEAUTY 22 COLOR ME PRETTY This makeup is made for you.

22 FACIAL SPRAYS

Maybe they’re not monstrous.

50 SAME SEX, SAFE SEX LGBTQ+ sex ed gets the attention it deserves.

52 POLAR PROCRASTINATION Don’t let your productivity grow cold.

54 HEAD SPACE Clear your room, clear your mind.

54 CAFFEINE CRASH NO MORE It’s time to break up with joe.

They’re not just expensive water.

MUSIC & ENTERTAINMENT

23 HEAVY METAL

55 DIZZY WRIGHT

Get glowing with metallic makeup.

A budding rapper spreads good vibes.

24 CAPSULE WARDROBES

56 ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: CHRIS VANCE

Minimal effort, maximum style.

A conversation with a high-profile local artist.

26 ALL-OUT FASHION

58 BOB DYLAN

Get inspired by these 4 LGBTQ+ icons.

An American icon makes a stop in Ames.

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DRAKE MAGAZINE EDITOR IN CHIEF

ART DIRECTOR

MANAGING EDITOR

PHOTO EDITOR

MEGAN MOWERY

EMILY LARSON ASSOCIATE EDITOR

MIA TIRADO

JOSIE CARRABINE MADISON KELLY ASSISTANT EDITOR

MADI KOETTING

CONTRIBUTORS

KATIE BANDURSKI ABBY BETHKE STACEY BERRY ASHLEY FLAWS HOPE FLETCHALL MADISON FREY MADDIE HIATT ELLIE HILSCHER ANNA JENSEN NATHAN MAUGHAN

DESIGN

NICK MCGLYNN WILL MUCKIAN CHEYANN NEADES KAYLA PARKER CYDNE RATLIFF ELIJAH ROCKHOLD MACKENZIE SMITH JULIE URAM HANNAH VAN ZEE

ART STAFF

ELLIE DETWEILER NICK ELLIS MADISON FREY MADDIE HIATT LINZI MURRAY JONDAVID OTTENBACHER LIZZIE PARKER

PHOTO

ALE DIAZ SAM FATHALLAH CHEYANN NEADES JAMES NGUGI JUSTIN NOLAN ELIJAH ROCKHOLD JULIE URAM

DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM EXECUTIVE EDITOR | WILL MUCKIAN ASSOCIATE EDITOR | ANNA JENSEN ASSISTANT EDITOR | CYDNE RATLIFF MULTIMEDIA + SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR | ELLIE HILSCHER PR + ADVERTISING DIRECTOR | ANNA MALLIN @2017 Drake Magazine is published with the support of the board of student communications. Opinions expressed in the magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Drake University. Letters to the editor are encouraged but will not be published.

Another autumn has come and gone. To quote Simon and Garfunkel, time hurries on and the leaves that are green turn to brown. Here at Drake Magazine, we’ve been working tirelessly all fall to bring you this issue. In these trying times, it can be all too easy to focus on the depressing politics of the day and want to crawl under a rock. That’s why our focus this issue is innovation. We’re looking forward and beyond. We created some inventive fashion and makeup looks (Heavy Metal, page 23, and Saturated Style, page 28). Our recipes using iron skillets (Home for the Harvest, page 14) are enough to warm even the coldest souls. And we detailed the reasons why the Midwest has become the place to be (The Rise of Midwestern Cities, page 38). Step aside, New York and L.A. None of this would be possible without our talented team behind the scenes. At Drake Mag, we’re truly blessed with the best, and that shines through in our art, design, and writing. As always, check out the creative content on drakemagazine.com. And if you don’t already, keep up with us on Facebook (Drake Magazine), Twitter (@DrakeMag), and Instagram (@drakemagazine). Share your feedback with drakemag@gmail.com—I’d love to hear it. Until next time,

Direct any questions, comments, or concerns to drakemag@gmail.com

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

CATHERINE STAUB, JEFF INMAN, KODEE WRIGHT, KATHLEEN RICHARDSON, ADAM GRAY, CHRISTIAN PRINTERS, MOM

Megan Mowery Editor-in-Chief


DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM EXPLORING ALTERNATIVE RAP

Hip-hop can be a polarizing genre, but it continues to grow. Now there’s something there for fans of almost any music.

WONDER WOMAN WITHOUT A RAZOR Beyond the traditional razor, there are tons of ways to get hair off your legs. Of course, some work better than others.

UNAWARDED AND UNDERAPPRECIATED MUSICALS While Hamilton and other Tony winners may grab headlines, there are many other modern musicals worthy of an hour or two of appreciation.


BITS & PIECES

QUICK QUIPS AND NEED-TO-KNOWS

BIT OF LIT: PODCASTS BUTTERED POP THESE DAYS, THERE’S AN ABUNDANCE OF After a long day of work, unwinding with some pop culture can be the PODCASTS TO CONSUME. SO WHICH DO YOU ideal move. Well, grab the snacks and turn on an episode of “Buttered DEVOTE YOUR TIME AND ENERGY TO? WE DOVE INTO THE DEEP POOL OF PODCASTS AND Pop,” a podcast that makes Keeping Up with the Kardashians feel a little CAME BACK WITH THREE YOU NEED TO KNOW. less guilty. Covering everything popular on TV, Netflix, and music, this

podcast spills the latest tea and more. With a rotating cast of hosts, the material always stays fresh. This weekly podcast is the new supermarket tabloid—no checkout necessary.

WORDS & PHOTO BY: ELIJAH ROCKHOLD

TELL THE BARTENDER Everyone knows bartenders are a cheap form of therapy. Patrons unload their darkest secrets onto bartenders—whether they mean to or not. This monthly podcast gives ex-bartender Katharine Heller an outlet to share the wild lives of her former patrons. More than just juicy gossip, Heller also shares the intricacies of the human experience. From stories about a kid with Asperger’s trapped in solitary confinement to a rock band of Gypsies, Heller serves up more than just drinks on this show.

VOX’S THE WEEDS Most people see major headlines on their phone’s push notifications, but what about the nitty gritty politics that doesn’t beg for our attention? Vox, a new-age news source, dedicates its weekly podcast to unpacking and debating less mainstream politics. They go beyond surface-level topics like health care and dig into subjects like budget reconciliation and how it affects the U.S. Senate. Don’t be afraid of getting lost in politics, the hosts of this podcast will guide you through “The Weeds.”

BOOKSTORES AREN’T DEAD YET WORDS: ABBY BETHKE

T

he chime of a doorbell, the turning of pages, and the welcoming scent of new books—you can’t get these experiences on a Kindle. Whether you’re stepping into a bookstore for the first time or the thousandth, there’s something comforting about spending hours among the shelves.

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Experiencing a personal connection with fellow bookworms is part of the charm. “Local bookstores are committed to advocacy and are safe spaces for discussion,” says Mary Roark-Watson, owner of Plot Twist Bookstore in Ankeny, Iowa. This discussion can lead to the discovery of new stories and genres beyond

just a recommendation from Amazon. Most importantly, bookstores help people of all ages and preferences explore the world of literature. After all, at independent bookstores—as Plot Twist employee Jessica Cox puts it—“You’re allowed to be you.”


ADULTING 101:

CAR BUYING BASICS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BUYING YOUR FIRST CAR. WORDS: MADI KOETTING Looking for a car sounds fun, but how do you avoid winding up with a clunker? Millennials, take note—here are four easy steps to make sure that new (or used) set of wheels will take you far.

STEP 1: PRICE First things first: Make a budget. When searching for a car it’s easy to get caught up on the price tag rather than the true value of the vehicle. Set a range of how much you’re willing to spend, then create a list of non-negotiable features. Basics like gas mileage play a primary role in the price of a vehicle, so you may have to ditch those leather seat dreams to fit within budget.

STEP 2: FEATURES When searching for a used vehicle, don’t get too distracted by a car’s external appearance—internal functions are much more important. “Mileage will give you a good overall look at the car, but brake safety, steering and suspension are all safety issues that need to be considered,” says Tom O’Brien, owner of O’Brien’s Auto Repair in West Des Moines. According to O’Brien, certain makes and models are significantly better for long term value. “Toyota, Honda and Volkswagen are

particularly good vehicles because they typically don’t have issues that are too costly and their safety features all work well even after multiple years,” O’Brien says. It’s worth looking past a few cosmetic blemishes if it means potentially saving hundreds of dollars on repairs in the future.

STEP 3: COMPARISON Once you’ve found a solid vehicle in your price range, it’s time to get a second opinion. “Always bring the car to a trustworthy, independent repair shop to check the vehicle out before purchasing,” O’Brien says. Don’t trust what the seller initially says about a car’s history—they may try to lead you astray.

STEP 4: BARGAINING When buying through any car dealership or private party, bargaining is the name of the game. Always do your research and compare the vehicle’s price on apps like True Car and Kelly Blue Book. They show your car’s market price and how much others in the area have paid for that particular make and model. After choosing a sweet set of wheels and haggling for a fair price, your car buying search is done—now hit the road.

cross stitch

COMEBACK

SOCIAL CHANGE, ONE STITCH AT A TIME. WORDS: NATHAN MAUGHAN | PHOTO: MADISON KELLY

P

ause the podcast and grab grandma’s sewing needles—young people are reclaiming cross stitching as an art form for the 21st century. Originally an activity associated with housewives, cross stitching has reversed its role and is being adopted to empower, inform, and enact change. New-wave stitchers may use the traditional styles and designs seen on oldschool throw pillows, but they aren’t creating elegies for the home and family. Instead, they stitch phrases like “A Woman’s Place is in the Revolution,” “Riots Not Diets,” and portraits of feminist icons like Ruth Bader Ginsburg. One of the trailblazers of this comeback is Chicago-based stitcher Shannon Downey. Downey runs the website Badass Cross Stitch. There, she’s created a community centered around “craftivism,” or activism through crafting. For Downey, cross stitching is both a form of personal therapy and a vessel for change. “[Cross stitching] adds a beautiful complementary layer to traditional activism,” Downey says. “I find that craftivism can establish a foundational level of confidence around the idea of taking a public stand on an issue, which hopefully translates into a progression of more significant actions.” Still, some stitchers use the art for both enjoyment and employment. Etsy entrepreneur Leo McGrath first learned to cross-stitch through a school-wide alternative to going out for recess in middle school. Now he uses it as a way to relax and make some extra cash. A little of what you’ll see on McGrath’s Etsy page, GameBreakingStitch, are stitches of pop culture imagery and his favorite video game characters. “It’s a thing that’s associated with girls, and I thought it would be funny to be a guy who knew how to do it,” McGrath says. “This is something that takes a lot of time and investment, so it’s not like throwing together a poster and going to a rally to promote feminism or something. It has a lot more impact than just a poster.” In a world filled with instant gratification, cross stitching allows millennials to create and engage with the world at a deliberate pace and with a deliberate message. Cross stitching is back, and it’s ready to smash the patriarchy. FALL + WINTER 2017

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BITS & PIECES

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QUICK QUIPS AND NEED-TO-KNOWS


SANITY-SAVING APPS THESE APPS ARE THE NEXT BEST THING TO A PERSONAL ASSISTANT. WORDS : CHEYANN NEADES

ANY.DO

PENNY

PACIFICA

Time to toss the sticky notes—Any.do, an electronic planner app, makes busy days more manageable with a little help from Siri. Planning future events and making to-do lists are made easy using your phone’s voice assistant technology. Available for free on the App Store, Google Play, and online.

The days of logging onto bank websites to dig through expenses and paychecks are gone. Penny makes managing financial affairs easy. It easily links to your bank account to create personalized budgets and advise financial decisions in just a few taps. Available for free on the App Store or Google Play.

A trusted friend in times of stress, Pacifica delivers mindfulness reminders and words of advice right when you need them. It caters to a variety of moods, with corresponding meditation exercises for each one. Pacifica also offers a peer support community and progress tracking to keep you on top of your mental health goals. Available for free on the App Store or Google Play.

WEIRD SCIENCE WITH EVERY PASSING DAY, THE WORLD BECOMES CLOSER TO A LIVING SCI-FI FILM. WORDS : CYDNE RATLIFF | PHOTO : ALE DIAZ & MADISON FREY Hear that? No, it’s not your outdated iPhone vibrating. Every time you turn around, new technology is being released, and each new gadget gets weirder than the last. Hoverboards, smartphones, and drones are no longer luxury items exclusive to the wealthy—they’re becoming everyday commodities. So what’s next?

KURI Watch out, Alexa—Mayfield Robotics is taking voice assistant technology to a new level. In December 2017, they released “Kuri,” a $699 personal robot. It monitors your house, greets you at the door, and even produces a highlight reel to showcase its favorite pictures and videos of you at the end of the day. While being continuously watched and followed by a robot sounds unsettling, look on the bright side—you might get some great Instagram candids out of it.

ANIMOJI As anticipated, the newly released iPhone X is equipped with a plethora of new features, including Animoji, which gives you the ability to see yourself as an emoji. It’s a part of the new TrueDepth camera, which can recognize 50 facial muscles to create a custom 3D emoji based on your expression. The real question is: Are you willing to spend $999 to bombard your friends with creepy emojis?

ARTIFICIAL MUSCLE Engineers at Columbia University have developed an artificial material that’s three times stronger than human muscle. These “muscles” look, feel, and perform like human tissue, only better. The 3D-printed material costs as little as three cents per gram. Scientists are now one step closer to constructing human-like robots that are, in the words of Daft Punk, “harder, better, faster, stronger.” FALL + WINTER 2017

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FOOD & DRINK

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

SQUASH GOALS STUFFED SWEET DUMPLING SQUASH SERVES 2 Squash isn’t a side dish anymore with the addition of hearty sausage and veggies.

2 sweet dumpling squash 1 lb. Italian sausage ½ cup mushrooms

¼ cup onions, diced 1 egg ½ cup sour cream ¾ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Halve and seed squash. Place cut-side down on a non-stick pan and bake for 30 minutes, or until tender. Brown sausage in large skillet. Add onions and mushroom. Cook for 5-10 minutes, or until onion and mushrooms are tender. In a separate bowl, beat egg and stir in sour cream and ½ cup mozzarella cheese. Add to sausage. Fill squash halves with meat and cheese mixture. Bake for 5 minutes. Garnish with remaining mozzarella cheese.

CURRIED RED KURI SOUP SERVES 4 See apples and squash in a new light with a kick of curry. This spicy soup will keep you warm all winter long.

2 red kuri squash 4 Tbsp. butter 2 cups yellow onion, finely chopped 5 tsp. curry powder

3 apples 3 cups chicken broth 1 cup apple juice ¼ tsp. salt and pepper to taste

Peel and chop squash into ½ inch cubes. Melt butter in a frying pan. Add onion and curry powder. Cover and simmer on low heat for 20 minutes or until onion is tender. Peer and core two apples. Cut the apples into ½ inch cubes. Combine squash, cubed apples, and chicken broth. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 30 minutes, or until squash is tender. Strain vegetables from liquid, saving broth. Set aside 1 cup of vegetables. Place remaining vegetables and ¼ cup of broth in a food processor and blend until a puree is formed. Combine puree with remaining broth, vegetables, apple juice, salt, and pepper. Cook over low heat for 20 minutes or until slightly thickened. Shred remaining apple, and use as garnish.

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OH MY GOURD—THESE FOUR SQUASH RECIPES WILL KEEP YOU WARM ALL WINTER WORDS: NATHAN MAUGHAN | PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

PEANUT SQUASH CUSTARD SERVES 4 Satisfy your sweet tooth with this unexpectedly delicious dessert.

1 peanut squash 2 Tbsp. butter, divided, room-temperature ½ tsp. baking powder 1 egg ½ tsp. salt

1 tsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. nutmeg 1 cup light brown sugar 1 Tbsp. flour 1 cup milk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Halve peanut squash. Place halves cut-side down on a cookie sheet and bake for 45 minutes, or until squash is tender. Remove from oven. Peel flesh from squash. Mash remaining squash in a bowl. In a separate bowl, combine 1 Tbsp. butter, baking powder, egg, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, brown sugar, flour, and milk. Add to mashed squash and blend. Grease custard cups with remaining butter. Pour squash mixture into the custard cups. Place cups in a baking pan of water. Bake for 45 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

SWEET ROASTED ACORN SQUASH SERVES 2 Traditional acorn squash: Been there, done that. Apricot preserves are an unexpected addition to this fall staple.

1 acorn squash 2 Tbsp. butter, divided 4 Tbsp. brown sugar, divided

¼ tsp. nutmeg, divided 2 Tbsp. apricot preserves

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Halve and seed squash. Place halves cut-side down in a shallow baking pan. Bake for 30 minutes, or until tender. Turn cut sides up. Rub 1 Tbsp. butter, 2 Tbsp. brown sugar, and 1/8 tsp. nutmeg in each halve squash. Broil squash for 5 minutes, or until butter is melted. In a separate bowl, melt leftover butter. Combine with leftover sugar and nutmeg, and pour into the squash. Garnish with preserves.

FALL + WINTER2017 2017 FALL + WINTER

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FOOD & DRINK

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

HOME FOR THE

HARVEST FEELING NOSTALGIC? THIS SEASONAL DINNER SPREAD RELIES ON CAST IRON SKILLETS TO MAKE WARM, COMFORTING CLASSICS. WORDS: KATIE BANDURSKI· PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

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FALL + WINTER 2017

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FOOD & DRINK

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

SALAD WITH HARVEST VEGETABLES SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR SALAD

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

1 lb. of desired fall vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts, tri-color carrots, squash, etc. 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt ½ tsp. pepper 1 tsp. rosemary 1 tsp. thyme 1 tsp. sage 12 oz. mixed greens ¼ cup red onion 2 oz. honey goat cheese, crumbled 2 Tbsp. pepitas 1 Tbsp. parmesan

Wash, peel, and clean vegetables as needed. Chop into bite-sized chunks. In a large bowl, combine vegetables, olive oil, salt, pepper, rosemary, and thyme. Spread mixture evenly into cast-iron skillet. Bake for 45 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir halfway through baking. While vegetables are cooking, prepare vinaigrette. Place all ingredients in a mason jar, and shake to mix. Remove vegetables from oven

FOR VINAIGRETTE

and let cool. Wash mixed greens

1/3 cup olive oil 3 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 1 Tbsp. honey 5 Tbsp. orange juice ¼ tsp. rosemary ¼ tsp. thyme

Slice red onion and crumble goat

and place in salad serving bowl. cheese. Set aside. Slice baguette into 1-inch pieces. Brush both sides with olive oil, thyme, and parmesan. Toast in oven for 5-7 minutes, or until crisp. Assemble salad by adding vegetables, red onion, goat cheese, and pepitas to the mixed greens. Drizzle vinaigrette over mixture. Toss, and serve with baguette.

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HOW TO CARE FOR CAST IRON

To maintain its shine, cast

Step 1: Preheat your oven to 350

Flip skillet over halfway through

iron requires upkeep through

degrees. Make sure your skillet is

baking.

seasoning—and no, we’re not

clean and completely dry.

Step 4: Let cool.

talking salt and pepper. Seasoning

Step 2: Using a pastry brush,

Step 5: Reseason your skillet

builds up a resistance on the skillet

spread a thin coat of oil across

every couple of months.

that, over time, makes it nonstick.

the entire skillet surface.

Follow these instructions to

Step 3: Place skillet upside down

season your skillets:

in the oven and bake for an hour.

FALL + WINTER 2017

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FOOD & DRINK

PUMPKIN MAC AND CHEESE SERVES 4-6

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 lb. macaroni noodles 2 Tbsp. butter 2 Tbsp. Flour 1 ½ cups milk ½ cup sweet cashew milk 2 cups canned pumpkin 2 cups Italian blend cheese 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper 1 ½ Tbsp. sage ½ tsp. nutmeg 1 cup bread crumbs 1 tsp. olive oil ¼ cup parmesan

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook pasta until al dente. Drain, and set aside. Make a roux in the saucepan by melting the butter, then adding the flour. Mix until a thick paste has formed. Gradually whisk in milk as sauce thickens. Then add cashew milk. Stir until thick. Add pumpkin and Italian cheese to the sauce. Season with salt, pepper, sage, and nutmeg. Combine pasta and sauce. Pour into greased cast iron skillet. Top mac and cheese with bread crumbs, olive oil, and parmesan. Bake 30-40 minutes or until bubbly and brown.

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SINGLE-SERVE APPLE CRUMBLE SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

3 apples 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 5 Tbsp. flour, divided 4 Tbsp. sugar, divided 4 Tbsp. brown sugar, divided 2 tsp. cinnamon, divided 2 Tbsp. butter ½ tsp. nutmeg ¼ tsp. ginger ¼ cup rolled oats Vanilla ice cream and caramel sauce, to garnish

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut apples into thin slices. Toss with lemon juice to prevent browning. Add 3 Tbsp. flour, 2 Tbsp. sugar, 2 Tbsp. brown sugar and 1 tsp. cinnamon to apples. Divide mixture between greased mini cast-iron skillets. Create crumb topping by mixing together oats and remaining flour, sugar brown sugar and spices. Spread spoonfuls of topping over each crumble. Bake 20-30 minutes, or until golden brown. While crumbles are still warm, scoop ice cream and drizzle caramel sauce over each skillet.

HOW TO PICK APPLES FOR A CRUMBLE OR PIE Not all apples are made alike. The apples you bake with are much different than the ones you choose for a mid-morning snack. The perfect baking apple is a little tart, and it won’t break down when you put it in the oven. For best results, consider a blend of apple types for your next pie or crisp. These are our recommendations for the best baking apples: Golden Delicious—sweet and shapely. Cortland—tart and juicy. Granny Smith—sour and crisp. Empire—perfect balance.

FALL + WINTER 2017

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FOOD & DRINK

SOMETHING TO FEAST ON

CURED EGG YOLKS THESE RECIPES WON’T LEAVE YOU SCRAMBLING. WORDS & PHOTO: JULIE URAM

E

gg yolks are controversial. One study says they’re a superfood, the next…not so much. So what’s the truth? We know for sure that there are key minerals in the yolk. Calcium and iron strengthen bones and assist in maintaining energy levels, and vitamins A, D, and K assist the immune system. Curing egg yolks concentrates both flavor and fat, so the body better absorbs the nutrients. And since they’re preserved in salt and sugar, cured eggs are perfectly safe to eat. Get the most out of your eggs with these methods for curing yolks.

FOR A BASIC CURED YOLK: Preserve yolks with salt and sugar for added moisture and a bolder taste experience. Whisk 1 ½ cups each of kosher salt and sugar. Spread half of the mixture in a shallow baking dish. Use a spoon to create small depressions in the saltsugar mixture, spacing evenly. Gently place an egg yolk in each depression. Sprinkle the remaining salt-sugar mixture over the yolks and cover the baking dish with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the yolks for about four days, or longer for a stronger tasting egg.

FOR A CREAMY YOLK: These yolks are smooth and spreadable over rice, pasta, or on toast. Add to a ramen bowl and sprinkle with chives, garlic, and Sriracha for added flavor.

the udder side of

THE DAYS OF DECIDING BETWEEN LOW-FAT AND WHOLE MILK ARE IN THE PAST. WORDS: HOPE FLETCHALL

Prepare the yolks in the same saltsugar mixture as the last recipe, but this time remove them from the fridge after two hours. Brush the mixture off each yolk, then rinse under cold water. Rinsing makes the yolks slippery, so handle with care. Then, they’re ready to serve.

FOR A CRUMBLED YOLK: For a colorful and versatile garnish, cured egg yolks can be grated like hard cheese and sprinkled over soups, pastas, or salads. To harden them, leave the yolks in the salt-sugar mixture for seven days. Then, preheat the oven to 150 degrees. Brush off the salt, then rinse under cold water. Gently pat dry with paper towels, then grease a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 1 1/2-2 hours. The eggs should come out opaque and firm.

DAIRY

SOY MILK

COCONUT MILK

RICE MILK

Soy milk is a plant-based milk that’s packed with protein. It’s high in fiber, fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals, making it a great source of energy. Check the milk’s sugar content before buying, as many are overly sweetened. Soy milk is a great substitute for dairy in baked goods.

Grab a glass of coconut milk for a sweet way to build your body’s immune defenses. Watch your portions, though— coconut milk contains more saturated fat than other nondairy milks. Due to its smooth and creamy texture, it adds a hint of tropical flavor to any smoothie or dessert.

PEA MILK

ALMOND MILK

Drop that disgusted face and give pea milk a chance. Despite its name, it doesn’t taste like peas at all. It contains the same protein content as 2 percent milk, with fewer calories. Pea milk also boasts low levels of saturated fat and sugar. Swap it for traditional coffee creamer in your morning cup of joe.

This low-calorie, nut-based milk has a creamy texture that makes it a great replacement for traditional cow’s milk. It’s enriched with vitamin D, calcium, and some—but not a lot—of protein. Almond milk is perfect in morning granola or late-night cereal.

Most rice milk doesn’t contain much protein, though some proteinfortified versions are now available, so check the label when buying. For vegans or those allergic to soy, rice milk is a great alternative milk. Since it’s low in fat and naturally sweeter than cow’s milk, rice milk is delicious alone or in baked goods.

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SUPERIOR SPIRITS

SHELF YOUR SUSPICIONS: LOW PRICE DOESN’T ALWAYS MEAN LOW QUALITY. WORDS: NICK MCGLYNN | PHOTO: JAMES NGUGI

I

t’s the classic liquor store dilemma: splurge on top-shelf booze, or settle for low-level, low-price spirits? Every day, Grey Goose is chosen over Phillips vodka because it’s thought to be superior, given the $30 price difference. But is there truly a distinction of quality? Bradie O’Neal, bar manager at Americana in Des Moines, dishes on what booze to splurge on and where to scrimp. According to O’Neal, the most important factor in almost all types of alcohol is how you plan on using it. “It really depends on your application,” she says. “For example, with vodka, are you going to make a martini? Is the booze going to shine on its own? Or are you going to mix it with something that’s going to mask it?” When making spiked punch for a party, cheap booze like Phillips or UV will do the trick. But for the alcohol to stand its own in a cocktail, choose one with a smoother taste.

VODKA The 2017 San Francisco World Spirits Competition rated $12 Wodka best in show, while the prominent $25 Grey Goose has never won the nearly 20-yearold competition. According to O’Neal, it’s all about the purity. “When you’re looking for the quality of vodka, you’re looking for something that’s smooth,” O’Neal says.

Pay attention to the smoothness and subtlety of a vodka instead of its taste.

RUM According to O’Neal, there’s no need to spend top dollar on rum because it rarely stands alone. “Most of the time it’s paired with other flavors,” O’Neal says. “I’ve never been asked to make a rum on the rocks.”

TEQUILA Whether it’s silver, white, or gold, each type of tequila has its own flavor profile. “One will taste smokier, one will taste more citrus-y, and they all have these subtle nuances,” O’Neal says. At the end of the day it’s all about the flavor you prefer over the pricetag. O’Neal recommends the smooth, midpriced Hornitos.

WHISKEY O’Neal says that there’s almost no reason to go over $30 when purchasing clear liquor. The price and flavor of whiskey, on the other hand, can vary depending on flavor, production, and time spent aging. “The more it’s aged, the more it costs,” O’Neal says. “There are so many variants with whiskeys.” It’s better to go high-shelf with this spirit.

THE MAFIA SUBTLE AND SAVORY Combine two shots of vodka and one shot of amaretto, then strain into a chilled glass with ice. Add 4 drops of bitters and garnish with an orange peel.

WHISKEY BUSINESS SMOOTH AND FLAVORFUL Combine five teaspoons of lemon juice and three teaspoons of triple sec. Add two shots of whiskey and one shot of simple syrup.

PUCKER UP STRONG AND BOLD Combine two shots of tequila and one shot of limoncello. Add 1/4 teaspoon of sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of tonic water.

GIN MEMBERSHIP FIZZY AND SWEET Mix two shots of gin with two shots of Fresca. Add one shot of simple syrup.

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FASHION & BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

COLOR ME LOOK PH-ANTASTIC WITH THESE COLORCHANGING COSMETICS. WORDS: MIA TIRADO

pretty

Kiss the frog, and its lips change from green to pink? Welcome to the pretty side of science, where beauty products use pH technology that transforms to complement the tone of your skin. An ingredient called red dye 27 turns bright pink and customizes based on your skin’s unique moisture and temperature levels. Experience the magic for yourself— there’s no telling what your perfect shade will be.

ERBORIAN CC CREAM This Korean complexion corrector instantly changes to the color of your skin—literally—at the tips of your fingers. While the CC cream provides a luminous, natural look, it also blurs blemishes and shields skin against the sun with SPF 25. Simply choose between two basic skin shades and let pH technology do the rest.

SEPHORA, $44

LIPSTICK QUEEN COLOR CHANGING LIPSTICKS FROG PRINCE LIPSTICK

SMASHBOX O-GLOW INTUITIVE CHEEK COLOR

Don’t worry, this green lipstick won’t leave a funky color on your kisser. Simply glide it on your lips and watch it transform into the perfect shade of rosy pink. The formula leaves a smooth and comfortable feel that even Prince (or Princess) Charming can’t resist.

Go from “oh no” to O-Glow with Smashbox’s glossy gel blush that wakes cheeks up with a natural pink flush. This product isn’t just beautiful, it also nourishes the skin naturally with Goji Berry-C Complex. The complex offers antioxidant protection and revitalizing skin benefits that brighten your complexion from the inside out.

ULTA, $25

SEPHORA, $29

FACIAL SPRAYS FIGHTING DULL SKIN IS NO LONGER A MIST-ERY. GET A WELL-RESTED, LIT-FROM-WITHIN GLOW—EVEN AT 4 P.M. ON A WEDNESDAY. WORDS: STACEY BERRY | PHOTO: MADISON KELLY

TATCHA LUMINOUS DEWY SKIN MIST

Perfect for a lustrous look, this spray’s abundance of botanical oils preserve the skin’s natural dewiness without leaving a sheen. This mist is your dullness-fighting best friend.

SEPHORA, $20

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MARIO BADESCU ROSE WATER SPRAY

JOSIE MARAN NIRVANA HYDRATING TREATMENT MIST

ULTA, $7

SEPHORA, $38

This soothing staple won’t break the bank. Rose water, aloe and herbs combine to work wonders on tired skin and—bonus—dry hair. Mist this spray over a cakey face for a soft, refreshed look.

A spray that eliminates dark spots, evens out skin tones, and is also organic? Just take our money. The combination of argan oil and coconut water in this mist leaves your face radiant all day.


HEAVY META L MOVE OVER HIGHLIGHTER—IT’S TIME FOR METALLICS TO SHINE. GLOWING LIPS AND EYELIDS ARE HERE TO SLAY. WORDS: EMILY LARSON | PHOTOS: ALE DIAZ

ON NYA:

Dark skin glows in jewel tones that are perfect for a night out. A touch of highlighter on the cheeks and collarbones completes the look.

TARTE GREATEST GLITZ PALETTE, $125, AMAZON

ON SARAH:

Eyes pop with shiny shadow that matches the irises. Wear this look with an all-black outfit for maximum wow-factor.

TARTE TARTEIST PRO AMAZONIAN CLAY PALETTE, $53, SEPHORA | STARLOOKS , $3, AMAZON

ON MICHAELA:

For a dreamy look, wear a light metallic on your lips. Metal shades leave lips looking plump without sticking a shot glass to your mouth.

MILANI, $8, WALGREENS

NYA

SARAH

23 MICHAELA

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FASHION & BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

CAPSULE WARDROBES LIMITLESS STYLE—NO WALK-IN CLOSET NECESSARY. CAPSULE WARDROBES PROVIDE ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES WITH ONLY A FEW STAPLE ITEMS. WORDS: MACKENZIE SMITH | PHOTOS: JAMES NGUGI

CAPSULE CLOTHES 1. Bomber Jacket, $90, American Eagle 2. Khakis, $50, American Eagle 3. Shirt, $13, Tilly’s 4. Black Jeans, $40, Kohl’s 5. Oxford Shirt, $30, Old Navy

6. Blazer, $35, H&M 7. Sweater, $68, Abercrombie and Fitch 8. Graphic Tee, Vintage 9. Ripped Jeans, $50, American Eagle 10. Denim Jacket, $30, Forever 21

CASUAL TIP:

Channel your inner Mac Demarco by cuffing your khakis and throwing on an indie hat. Accessory: Hat, $3, Forever 21

TIP:

Turn a denim jacket from basic to brilliant with details like patches, embroidery, or distressing. Accessory: Bandana, $4, Target

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WORK TIP: Tone down the

prep factor by adding pops of contrasting colors and patterns. Accessory: Necklace. $15, Charming Charlie’s

TIP: Buying a few high-

quality pieces over lots of low-quality ones is a worthwhile investment in the long run. Accessory: Clear Frame Glasses, $18, Urban Outfitters

GOING OUT TIP: Yes, a dressy blazer

can work for a night out— just pair it with ripped jeans for an edgier look. Accessory: Loafers, $55, DSW

TIP: Pair denim-on-

denim with a watch to perfectly time when to leave that lame party. Accessory: Watch, $47, Timex

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FASHION & BEAUTY

LIVE AND LOOK GOOD

ALL-OUT FASHION TAKE YOUR STYLE OUT OF THE CLOSET WITH HELP FROM THESE FASHION-FORWARD ICONS. WORDS: MADISON FREY | PHOTOS: SAM FATHALLAH

LGBTQ+ icons have always been out there (no pun intended), but only recently have they gained the recognition they deserve. These looks are styled after four members of the LGBTQ+ community known for their fiercely individual styles and their work to better the world around them. Forget what others have to say and get inspired by these icons in style and service.

ELTON JOHN Openly gay musician and entertainer Elton John reaches millions of people through his powerful voice and iconic fashion. He began turning heads in the ‘70s with his colorful, expressive outfits both on and off the stage. His style influences designers like Gucci, who presented the Elton John-inspired Spring 2018 collection at Milan Fashion Week. As an active philanthropist, he created the Elton John AIDS Foundation, which aims to de-stigmatize and find a cure for HIV.

ELLEN PAGE Actress Ellen Page openly celebrates her sexuality, giving young LGBTQ+ people a pop-culture figure they can identify with. Aside from her booming acting career, Page is known for her minimalist, androgynous style. On casual days, she often rocks button-downs with loose jeans and sneakers. She uses her platform to promote peace and equality while hosting a docuseries, “Gaycation,” about LGBTQ+ cultures around the world.

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MARSHA P. JOHNSON Marsha P. Johnson was a transgender African-American woman and self-titled drag queen who played a large role in the Stonewall uprising for gay rights in the ‘60s. An advocate for gay and transgender rights, Johnson often wore elaborate flower crowns and bright makeup in a time when such open expression was a dangerous political act. Although she passed away in 1992, her positive impact on the community lives on.

ALOK VAID-MENON Alok Vaid-Menon is a gender non-conforming, Indian-American speaker, writer, and entertainer. They got their big break with Darkmatter, a spoken word collaboration addressing trans and South Asian themes. After Darkmatter came to a close in 2017, Vaid-Menon began work on their own artistry in writing, education, and entertainment. They travel the world, promoting self-expression and speaking out about gender fluidity. Their style embraces both traditionally masculine and feminine touches with vibrant colors and strong patterns.


ELTON JOHN

ELLEN PAGE

ON RYAN BLAZER, $35, TARGET SHIRT, $35, OLD NAVY PANTS, $40, OLD NAVY GLASSES, $13, HOT TOPIC

MARSHA P. JOHNSON

ON MADELINE JUMPSUIT, $30, TARGET NECKLACE, $9, RUE 21 EARRINGS, $9, OLD NAVY FLOWER CROWN, $15, CLAIRE’S

ON HANNAH PANTS, $35, OLD NAVY BLAZER, MODEL’S OWN SHIRT, MODEL’S OWN

ALOK VAID-MENON

ON VIKRANT SHIRT, $22, RUE 21 PANTS, $22, RUE 21 FALL + WINTER 2017 27 HAT, MODEL’S OWN


TEXTURES, TONES, AND MONOCHROME: DRESSING IN THE SAME COLOR HEAD-TO-TOE ISN’T CRAZY, IT’S CONTEMPORARY. FASHION STYLING + WORDS: MADDIE HIATT MAKEUP + HAIR: JORDAN GERMAN PHOTOS: JAMES NGUGI

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PRETTY IN

PLUM A velvet plum jumpsuit is a must-have this season with its toasty texture and ability to suit all skin tones. Pair it with a fuzzy sweater for maximum style.

ON MAIYA

JUMPSUIT, $20, FOREVER 21 SWEATER, $25, FOREVER 21 FALL + WINTER 2017

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RADIANT

RED

Make a fierce statement in the color of the season: red. Put a casual twist on an evening look by adding a solid-colored sweatshirt to a fancier piece. The flowy sleeves and red booties complete the look.

ON JAZLIN

DRESS, $146, PRESERVATION SWEATER, $36, PRESERVATION HEELS, $35, FOREVER 21 30

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ON NOAH

SHIRT, $16, TARGET PANTS, $15, TARGET SOCKS, MODEL’S OWN SHOES, $60, J.C. PENNY ‘Tis the season for embracing the groutfit. Add a long tee to channel your inner Yeezy and sneakers that amp up the athletic look. FALL + WINTER 2017

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BLACK

OUT

All-black outfits are nothing new. Add a sequin mesh dress over top to amp up the look’s visual interest. Layer a fur vest or coat to add texture and stay warm.

ON CAROLINE

STAR DRESS, $52, MATILDA MUSE VEST, MODEL’S OWN MESH DRESS, $28, FOREVER 21 32

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ON TAY0:

SWEATER, $80, DALUTH

OLIVE YOU Strike a balance between casual and classy by pairing joggers with a chunky sweater and turtleneck.

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BLEEDING OUTSIDE THE LINES I FREE BLED THROUGH AN ENTIRE PERIOD. I LEARNED IT’S NOT NEARLY AS TERRIFYING AS THE SILENCE SURROUNDING WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES. WORDS & ILLUSTRATIONS : KAYLA PARKER

T

here’s carnage in the toilet bowl. It’s a strangely satisfying red sea, not only because it’s a primal sign of womanhood, but also because it’s literally part of us as women.* Like snakes, we’re shedding our skin. The inside of our bodies, this uterine lining, is rubbed away, and instead of disgust I’m filled with a sense of renewal. I rise like a phoenix from my bloody ashes. Even though by the end of the day I’m more than ready to rip the bloody underwear off and rinse out my good pair of jeans before they stain, I revel in the simplicity of not fretting over how many hours my tampon had been in. Not thinking if I had enough stuffed in my bag. Not wondering if anyone would see me sneak a tampon into my sleeve and discreetly race to the restroom. I’m proud that, thanks to free bleeding, I can let this natural process act out as it’s intended. I’m truly free.

Let’s Talk About Periods, Baby

For some reason, society has decided periods are strange, unhygienic, and taboo. Which is odd, given that nearly half the population has a period every month. It can be painful, awkward, and a nuisance, but women hardly ever talk about it—especially in mixed company. But free bleeding is looking to change that stigma. Free bleeding is the practice of going without pads, tampons, cups, or any other sort of hygiene products while menstruating. I tried it for myself one period last spring. Prior to free bleeding, I had no desire to

talk to men about my period. Why would I? I don’t want to be the subject of odd looks and the cause of awkward moments. Inevitably, whenever the subject accidently comes up in front of men, their reaction is usually the same. They clam up. I could talk to my girl friends, but even then, it’s more of an out-of-necessity conversation. ‘Do you have a tampon? Look but don’t make it obvious: Am I bleeding through my skirt?’ This is about as far as the conversation goes. And why would the topic go further? The media makes it clear that periods should be taken care of discreetly. Don’t dare show red liquid on pads or tampons: A mysterious blue liquid being absorbed is much more palatable, according to commercials. Don’t show pain— mimic those ladies dancing through fields of flowers instead. That’s what every woman does on her period, right? They avoid the real issue. Not to mention real life. I have college classes to go to and I work at a professional magazine. Dancing through fields of flowers doesn’t exactly fit into my agenda. Then I heard of Kiran Gandhi, a bad-ass drummer who’s played for bands like M.I.A. She ran the London Marathon while free bleeding. Her period came up unexpectedly, and when it came time for her race, she decided not to wear a pad, tampon, or any other product that could impede her run. She became a viral sensation for the blood soaking through her clothes. She broke every rule society silently instructs women to follow during their periods. And she kept going, using her voice to become an activist and advocate for women around the world. But let the record show: “My message when

running the London Marathon was less about advocating specifically for free bleeding and more about using radical activism to combat stigma,” Gandhi says. “The intention was to strategically use the visual imagery of free bleeding as a shock factor to combat menstrual taboo around the world. Each of us should have the psychological safety to prioritize our own comfort instead of feeling forced to adhere to a problematic social norm.” This is my mission, too. I don’t think free bleeding is the best option for everyone, or that there’s a “right” way to have a period. I believe it’s about letting women decide how they want to handle their periods, and helping them talk about this part of their lives without shame. I also think it’s important that just as women should be able to decide to free bleed, they should have access to whatever menstrual health products make them feel most comfortable. Right now, that’s not an option for a lot of women. Many states, including Iowa, tax feminine hygiene products. Iowa State Senator Janet Petersen explains that it’s not so easy to just take out this tax. As ridiculous as it is for things like tampons and pads to have a luxury tax, the budget is complicated. And it’s not just hundreds or thousands of tax dollars that feminine hygiene products bring in: In one fiscal year, Iowa makes between $1.9 million and $2.5 million off these products alone. “It’s important for people to see how we’re bringing in our revenue, and is it truly fair to those who have the least among us?” Petersen says. “Part of the deal is, if you eliminate the tax on these products, then you pull out revenues…so you have to make decisions,”

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she says. Iowa has already cut funding for victims of domestic violence by 26 percent simply because there wasn’t enough money in the budget. There have been cuts to public education as well, and many other programs benefitting women. “You have to look at the bigger picture. If you’re going to take the tax off of tampons, the revenue that comes through for that will be gone. That makes the budget smaller to work with,” Petersen says. Women tend to get the short end of the stick because when it comes to budgets and bills, “Decisions have been made for men by men.” I realize that cutting the tampon tax isn’t a quick and easy fix. But what about women who want access to these products but can’t afford them because some man decided basic feminine products were a “luxury” item that needed to be taxed? I’m free bleeding for these women, so that one day they can bleed however they bloody well want to.

And So My Bloody Adventure Begins

I’m officially free bleeding. And I’m fucking terrified I’m going to stain everything in sight with the torrent of blood that will soon gush from my vagina. I decided to ease into my free bleeding period by wearing burgundy pants. But Aunt Flow laughed in my face, and decided she wasn’t going to go all in if I wasn’t. It was actually a light period day. I felt a little sticky—I hate the word squishy, but that’s fairly accurate—and probably ran to the bathroom to check myself way too many times. But overall, it wasn’t bad. No bleeding through my pants, just the underwear—and not my cute underwear. I’m talking about the holey, only-on-period-days underwear. I was more worried about work than class. As a graphic design major, I’m surrounded by mostly women, so if I bled through, who cares? We’ve all been there. But work? That’s another story. I work for a major women’s magazine— it’s not totally Miranda Priestly style, but people still seem to have their shit together, or at least act like they do. When I had to go to a meeting, I conveniently nabbed one of the few red chairs in the room. I wasn’t about take any

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more chances than I needed to. So day one is done. I came, I bled, I conquered—or at least survived.

Day Two

I wore my dark jeans today. Another safe and smart decision. It’s day two—that’s when the blood runs heaviest. I was free to bleed. And that freedom made me talk. Most of my friends knew I was free bleeding for a story, but I felt more comfortable than ever talking about the situation. “How’s your thing going?” a friend asked pointedly. “You could say it’s a sticky situation,” I replied. But it was fine. Really. Even though my pants were bled through, nothing transferred to any chairs. I sat delicately, perched like a bird, but I felt oddly free.

Day Three

I felt a strange sense of pride about free bleeding on International Women’s Day. Like, hell yeah, I’m a woman. Hear me roar; watch me bleed. The next day I woke up in a pool of blood. It was expected. That’s how periods are. They’re not a constantly dripping faucet, but a rainstorm that sprinkles gently and then pours. It felt disgusting, but I’m a woman. It’s not the first time the downpour of blood has flowed. This was also the day I started using the “blotting method.” I don’t know if this is an official thing, but essentially throughout the day I would grab toilet paper when I went into the bathroom and blot at the blood pooling up. This was somewhat effective, and somewhat disgusting. I wore a cotton jumpsuit on the third day, which was risky, since it’s much thinner than denim. But it’s pretty loose around the crotch, so that helped. It’s interesting to consider the contrasting societal portrayals of women’s blood versus men’s. “I feel like it’s usually seen as a very masculine thing to bleed, like, ‘I’m bleeding, I’m so tough,’ but for some reason that doesn’t translate to periods,” says Lea Farho, writer of the zine Working Blood, which addresses her own menstrual experiences. “And I think that it’s definitely rooted in the lack to knowledge that even women have about their own bodies.”

Thankfully, because of Mother Nature’s mercy—or more likely, the hormones from my birth control—I was blessed with a short and not-too-heavy period. Days four and five were mainly spotting, so I wore leggings and worked out with ease. No blood on the yoga mat, thankfully. I safely transitioned out of my free bleeding experience.

Moving Forward

Each of us must be brave in our own ways, big or small. When Gandhi ran the marathon while free bleeding, she was aware of the privilege that allowed her to focus on her message and her run. “I knew that the symbolism of actually showing blood, which we never do in our society, was a very radical way to jumpstart and ignite the conversation about how we handle menstrual health.” However, she understands that smaller acts also need to add up to create change. “I need that radical, bad-ass girl in each small town, each city, each school, each classroom, whatever it is, to be the one who’s like, ‘Excuse me, I need to go to the bathroom because I have my period,’ or ‘Excuse me, can I go to the nurse’s office because I need some Midol because I’m on my period,’ instead of lying,” Gandhi says. Will I continue to free bleed? Maybe. There’s a freedom from not being tied down to tampons and pads that’s empowering. With that said, it’s not always practical. More than anything, what I’m taking away from this experience is that I don’t need to wear a tampon or a pad at all times when I’m on my period. I can and should feel free to talk about my experience throughout my period without having to hide it away. I can explore other methods, and find what fits my body’s needs the best. But women should still have the ability to afford feminine hygiene products if this is how they feel most comfortable bleeding. There need to be choices available for women, so that we can bleed however the hell we want to. *Editor’s Note: We feel it’s important to recognize that periods aren’t limited to just women. Other groups, such as people who are trans, non-binary, gender fluid, or intersex experience menstruation, too.


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HERE’S MORE TO THE MIDWEST THAN JUST CORNFIELDS AND CASSEROLES. EXPERIENCE THE BEST OF BIG CITY LIVING—WITHOUT THE TRAFFIC JAMS. WORDS: ELIJAH ROCKHOLD | PHOTOS: ELIJAH ROCKHOLD & SAM FATHALLAH

I

t’s as Midwestern as corn fields and passive-aggressive comments: the dream of the 20-something to graduate from college, move to a city far away, and make it big. Alas, many millennials are realizing that lots of people have that dream. Trying to survive professionally, socially, economically—let alone emotionally—amidst the millions of other people in a city is a feat. To avoid these problems, many are flocking to Midwestern metropolises like Des Moines, Omaha, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, or Kansas City, among others. They have all the attractive elements of their larger siblings—urban living, new-age amenities, stable jobs, and a poppin’ social atmosphere. But they also have low living costs, low crime rates, and a preference for families, areas where megacities can’t compete.

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D

es Moines is used to being really popular for about three months during the presidential campaign season, and then dropping off the map. While politics are important to the city, they aren’t everything. Des Moines has boomed in the last few years, becoming one of the fastestgrowing Midwestern cities.

JOBS As Des Moines expands, so do its

opportunities. Des Moines was—and still is—known as an insurance hub. Because of the strong economic foundation insurance companies have laid, a more diverse offering of jobs is now available. Healthcare, technology, and business firms are steadily forging a presence in the city.

HOUSING Unlike most cities, Des Moines’

suburbs were among the first to grow, before the downtown area. There are currently 610,000 people living in the metro area, a huge growth from 480,000 17 years ago. Now, downtown neighborhoods like the East Village are crowding with new housing developments aimed at attracting young professionals.

TRANSPORTATION Des Moines offers

a somewhat limited bus system, and not much else. The recent addition of bike lanes attempts to make the city more bike-friendly, but simply driving still tends to be the best way to get around.

SOCIAL The art scene in Des Moines is

better than you’d think. Colorful murals span downtown buildings, sculptures dot the central Pappajohn Sculpture Park, and artist showcases can be found in coffee shops across the city. With the massive influx of millennials in the past 10 years, Des Moines nightlife has grown to adapt. Dance halls, concert venues, and comedy clubs are widely attended, adding to a vibrant social scene. Advocacy groups are also active in Des Moines to facilitate discussions and better the community between elections.

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M

inneapolis is the embodiment of “Midwest nice.” It’s a city proud of its welcoming attitude towards refugees, immigrants, and emigrants. Its economic opportunities are as vast as its system of skywalks—11 miles from end to end—that link downtown buildings to protect Minnesotans from the harsh Mississippi River winter.

HOUSING One of Minneapolis’s main

SOCIAL Minneapolis is home to diverse

challenges is meeting demand for housing. Developments around the downtown area are currently being built to expand housing options, though they tend to be quite expensive. Neighborhoods within a 20-minute drive or bus ride of downtown are attractive alternatives.

JOBS Minneapolis, the largest city on

neighborhoods that offer options for all preferences and lifestyles. South Minneapolis, Lowry Hill, and Dinkytown all have distinct personalities and amenities, from collegetown energy to a thriving art scene to unique ethnic fusion restaurants. The Minneapolis art community is strong, with nationally-recognized operas, theaters, museums, and stadiums.

to place around the metro area is easy with Minneapolis’s expansive bus system. A train system is also limited to the downtown area, allowing for ease of travel there.

our list, boasts an impressive 17 Fortune 500 companies. These companies hold opportunities for young professionals in all realms of industry.

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TRANSPORTATION Traveling from place


A

mong the old brick buildings and cobblestone streets of Omaha’s Old Market lie modern coffeehouses, niche boutiques, and sleek skyscrapers. Pops of color—stained glass windows, brightly colored business facades, and public art—light up the blend of old and new. Omaha’s development is remarkable in its commitment to history, striving to preserve the city’s celebrated architecture while adjusting for the future. The mix of old and new vibes keep Omaha feeling fresh.

JOBS Omaha is home to five Fortune 500 companies, including Berkshire Hathaway, Union Pacific, and Mutual of Omaha. Unemployment is below 3.5 percent, and job growth is continually rising.

HOUSING The cost of living in Omaha is

SOCIAL Omaha might be best known for its

remarkably low. The newest residential and commercial housing investment is worth around $70 million, creating thousands of living options for young professionals. Much of the development downtown is aimed towards attracting millennials, adding to the vibrancy of the city.

zoo, but there’s so much more to explore. Check out its many museums, live music venues, and self-guided city tours. Dance clubs and contemporary bars have recently popped up, offering a more diverse nightlife than your typical Midwestern dive bar.

TRANSPORTATION The city government has worked to improve transportation in response to the flood of young people into Omaha. Now, city buses extend farther into the suburbs and have more convenient routes throughout the city center.

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K

ansas City: full of Midwestern charm and almost-Southern barbecue. The combined Kansas Cities, straddling Kansas and Missouri, sprawl across 15 counties. Each part of the city offers something unique, whether it’s the old City Market, the downtown business sector, or the rich, gentrified neighborhoods. Kansas City is a hub of activity on the edge of two states that otherwise have nothing going on.

JOBS Though Kansas City is home to just one Fortune 500 company, it boasts a large selection of businesses from every sector—one for every skill. This diversity, along with a strong start-up community, contributes to a thriving economy.

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HOUSING The city’s expansion authority

SOCIAL Kansas City loves to be outside.

recently approved an $18 million housing project on the Northeast Side, a historic neighborhood. This is just one of many projects, public and private, that contribute to both lowand high-density housing growth.

Outdoor markets and plazas contribute to its open-air feel. Public parks, playhouses, concert venues, and symphonies make the art scene social. Neighborhood edges blend together to form an awesome conglomerate, encompassing art, culture, and business. And you’re not a true Kansas Citian unless you cheer for the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals.

TRANSPORTATION We’re not going to lie— transportation in Kansas City is complicated. Though there’s a bus system in place and a free, continually-expanding light rail system, the city is still struggling to develop more robust and extensive transportation.


M

ilwaukee is an old city with a distinct past. Miller Brewing Company’s influence still looms large over Milwaukee, which is proud of its beer-making past and present. With a thriving art scene and the influence of the University of WisconsinMilwaukee and Marquette University, Milwaukee holds onto its historic roots while staying progressive.

HOUSING Housing shortages are a common

SOCIAL The arts in Milwaukee are on the

problem in rapidly expanding cities. Milwaukee is adding diverse types of housing, like public housing, low-rent, and private developments to meet the need. Milwaukee has added around 10,000 units of housing in the downtown area, but there’s still not a lot of pricing diversity in these new units.

rise. Small works mingle throughout the city with larger projects like the iconic Milwaukee Art Museum on the shore of Lake Michigan. Milwaukee’s heritage as Brew City, USA ensures that nightlife is always on point and a cold beer is never far away.

JOBS Unlike a lot of cities on this list, Milwaukee

Milwaukee is controversial. A new streetcar system has recently been approved, to the excitement of some and the agitation of others. Milwaukee’s also notorious for its headacheinducing construction patterns, as memorialized by a recent sculpture of traffic cones.

hasn’t left its blue-collar work force behind. Industry and manufacturing still play large parts in the city’s economy and identity. Milwaukee has expanded to a diverse economy that can support small, medium, and large businesses, including its five Fortune 500 companies.

TRANSPORTATION Transportation in

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The Imitation Gain REPLICA FASHION IS A SKETCHY INDUSTRY, BUT FOR THE PEOPLE INVOLVED, IT’S A BUSINESS LIKE ANY OTHER. WORDS : WILL MUCKIAN | PHOTOS: JUSTIN NOLAN

A

s Rob Kolet slips into the pair of “Pirate Black” Yeezy 350s sitting by his bed, it doesn’t even cross his mind that he might be stealing

from Adidas. How could he be? After all, there’s no way he could have found a pair of Yeezys at retail—they sell out far too fast for most interested buyers to ever hope to cop a pair— and buying them secondhand certainly doesn’t send any profits in Adidas’s direction. These shoes, the ones Kolet wears at least once a week, are fake, but Kolet doesn’t see that as such a bad thing. “Adidas basically started their whole replica market,” Kolet argues. “They’re responsible, at least in part, by creating this insane demand and having no supply. So that supply comes from the black market.”

THE FOUNDATION OF FAKING The world of replica fashion is defined by relationships, and the semi-parasitic one that Kolet describes is no different. As it stands, legitimate high-demand streetwear like Yeezy 350s isn’t just difficult to acquire—the highly anticipated Yeezy “Beluga” colorway sold out in less than 90 seconds at non-Adidas retailers—it’s hardly ever available at the retail price. There’s an awareness of everyone involved in the fashion market that high-end pieces will hardly ever be produced in enough supply to satisfy demand. Some companies consciously choose to limit lines to low numbers for exclusivity’s sake. This is nothing new. What’s changing, though, is that consumers now have

viable and affordable replacement options available in the replica market. Sellers talk to potential clients via a bevy of outlets, ranging from Skype to WhatsApp to WeChat, trying to foster relationships that result in good business.

sending the rest to Muks via Paypal. This way, Lemons says, it seems as though the two are just making ordinary transactions. There’s no evidence of any business going on between them.

HONOR AMONG SELLERS

BRICK AND MORTAR

This is where Honnie Lemons steps in. That’s not his real name, but it’s the title he’s known by online. Anonymity is often as important as good products, and the Singapore-based agent has enough of a brand to carry himself without divulging personal information. His role is to improve the relationship between buyer and seller. Lemons himself is not a creator or seller of shoes, but instead acts as the middleman between a seller named Muks and his customer base. Muks makes replicas of everything from Yeezys to Jordans to Balenciaga and more, then markets his shoes on Reddit. Because he operates out of China, he’d have to pay a stiff tariff in order to ship goods directly out of country and into popular foreign destinations like the U.S., Canada, and the United Kingdom. Lemons, meanwhile, uses his location just outside of China to skirt the high costs. “I started this business to help him source for a larger market,” Lemons says. “Muks hired me to make payment easier for the locals. I handle orders here…in the hopes that it’s cheaper for them and we would get more customers. I have a joint account [with Muks] to transfer money at a reduced fee.” Lemons handles transactions and collects a portion of the revenue as a commission fee,

Still, the business of fake fashion isn’t confined to just chat apps and tariff skirting. For a long time, China was a hub of activity for this market, selling to whatever curious Western businesspeople walked through the door. Kevin Brown, an engineering management executive from Saint Charles, Illinois, was one of those people. He stumbled upon a fake handbag shop during a business trip to China. “It was just another place to visit,” Brown says. “I found it [when] our local friends took us to the mall. It wasn’t hidden. We were with a large group and it was totally normal at the time.” These shops often cater to foreign visitors like Brown with pleasant storefronts in local malls. They conduct themselves like any other small business in China, which can mean a lot of haggling. “The sellers are very nice but very pushy; they’re used to getting a lot of money for garbage. They bargain quite ferociously,” Brown says. “If you know the system, you can usually get away with buying a handbag for less than $10.” The Chinese government has been cracking down on these businesses for years, and it’s starting to show. “It’s not as easy today. You can no longer

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Know the Lingo find these shops in Shanghai,” Brown says. “The days of the cheap designer purse are pretty much over.” As a cog in this suspect and fragile machine, Lemons has his own thoughts about the relationship between authentic companies and their fraudulent doppelgangers. “The way I see things, we’re helping Adidas and Nike boost their shoe sales and improve their publicity, bringing them more revenue,” he says. “There’s a risk of us getting sued by Adidas and Nike, but I wouldn’t think they’d want to sue us because by selling these replicas, we essentially generate more publicity and demand for their shoes.” What it boils down to is providing buyers with a tantalizing taste of the real thing. “When these super-demanded shoes come on sale, consumers will definitely try to get their own pairs and help Adidas and Nike sell out quick,” Lemons continues. “Without these replicas being sold, consumers would never even think of buying them, as they’ve never tried the shoe on or felt the thrill of wearing a shoe that everyone is dying to get.”

GROWTH AND GREY LEGALITY It must be working, because that same thrill is what hooked Rob Kolet six years ago. “I remember talking to my friend in high school about the Nike Red Octobers,” Kolet says. “I saw that they were worth $10,000, and said ‘Holy shit, that’s so cool.’ I’d been using Reddit extensively so I knew there would be a community there. I went over to the fashion subs and I’ve been involved ever since.” Kolet doesn’t just buy shoes. Since he bought his first fakes over a year ago, he’s been dabbling in all sorts of clothing: soccer jerseys, designer jeans, and even bags. He’s the perfect example of Lemons’ theory about fakes opening people up to buying the real thing. Kolet has purchased actual pieces from companies like Adidas and Palace in addition to his rep collection. “When I can afford stuff and it’s readily available [I’ll buy it],” Kolet says. “Like this Palace windbreaker I’m wearing right now—it’s a quality piece of clothing that will be a staple in my wardrobe for a long time.” For consumers, there’s no real reason to stop buying fakes if the quality is up to par. Laws prosecuting the sale of consumer goods don’t apply to the buyer. The only punishable offenders are people consciously engaging in the practice of trafficking, and to quote the Department of Justice directly, “It is not a crime under this act for an individual knowingly to purchase goods bearing counterfeit marks, if the purchase is for the individual’s personal use.” Kolet has said he doesn’t plan to stop buying replicas in the near future. Certainly, Honnie Lemons would love to keep providing them. But there’s a maturation process in the whole thing, a sense from both buyer and seller that perhaps this relationship is doomed to a certain brevity. “I don’t want to be buying fake stuff forever, you know?” Kolet says. “Eventually I want to be working and able to afford the real thing.” Perhaps this business is less parasitic than it seems.

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BATCH: The seller, as well as the generation, of a given replica. For example, David’s Yeezy 350s have 11 generations. “David’s 9th ” constitutes a batch. ON FOOT: How the shoe looks when worn around, as opposed to being carefully inspected. LC: Legit Check—how the replica holds up to scrutiny against an authentic shoe. QC: Quality Check—how does the shoe wear? Is it made from the right materials? Is it comfortable? B&S: Bait and switch—sellers send pictures of one product and sell a different, usually worse, product. W/L: Just like in the world of sports, wins (W) and losses (L) are reflected in how successful buyers are at grabbing authentic high-demand shoes when they drop. 1:1: An exact replica. Often used sarcastically at this point, because so many sellers promise a “1:1” product and fail to deliver. GP: Guinea Pig—someone who buys a batch first, with the intent of testing it out and reporting back to the community. GL/RL: Green Light/Red Light— advice given by the community to questioning buyers about whether to buy a certain product or not. Green is go, red is no.


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FOR THE BODY AND THE MIND

GMOS:

MIRACLES, MONSTERS, OR JUST MISUNDERSTOOD? WORDS: ABBY BETHKE | PHOTO: JAMES NGUGI

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G

MOs: If you’re conjuring up mental images of scientists cackling while constructing Frankenstein plants, you’re not alone. While foods made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs) now fill grocery store shelves, the general public still doesn’t know much about them. This lack of knowledge has led to a widespread—and likely unwarranted—fear of GMOs. Dustin Williams, agribusiness instructor at Blackhawk Technical College in Monroe, Wisconsin, explains that GMOs are created by “taking a gene from one plant or animal and inserting it into another organism.” This technique has been used since the ‘80s, and is typically used on crops like corn and soybeans. Despite the suspicion some have about GMOs, they’ve had concrete benefits for both farmers and consumers. According to Williams, insectresistant GMOs have led to increases in both the quality and quantity of harvests. Less loss due to insect damage means more food for consumers. Williams says that GMOs have also led to reduced use of potentially harmful pesticides. “If you go back 20 years, everyone was using insecticides,” he says. “[Farmers] don’t have to spray them now because we’ve developed resistance in the plant.” Many people believe that GMOs haven’t been studied for their long-term health effects, but this isn’t necessarily the case. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine conducted a study in 2016 addressing common concerns about the safety of GMOs. For one, they found no evidence that genetically engineered crops have influenced the number of diagnosed cancer cases over time. They also found no data that supports the belief that GMOs led to higher rates of obesity or type II diabetes. No evidence exists that GMOs are tied to rising rates of Celiac disease. And finally, there’s no data suggesting a link between genetically engineered crops and autism. While GMOs could still use more study on their long-term health effects, the data that’s currently available suggests that much of the hesitation the public has about GMOs is unfounded. GMOs likely aren’t the scary monster crops we make them out to be.

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FOR THE BODY AND THE MIND

SAME SEX,

SAFE SEX IT CAN BE HARD FOR LGBTQ+ PEOPLE TO GET THE INFORMATION THEY NEED ABOUT THEIR SEXUAL HEALTH. ONE WRITER DIVES INTO THE RESOURCES AVAILABLE FOR THE COMMUNITY IN DES MOINES. WORDS: HANNAH VAN ZEE | PHOTO: ALE DIAZ | ILLUSTRATIONS: CLIO CULLISON

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B

eing queer in a high school health class: It’s worse than you think. I have no recollection of my health teacher bringing up LGBTQ+ people once, much less how we could protect ourselves sexually. Alicia Ramirez, a 21-year- old bisexual student, had a similar experience. “I wasn’t aware people of the same sex could have intercourse safely until my second year of high school,” she says, “and that wasn’t thanks to the institution, but to the internet.” Ask most LGBTQ+ individuals about this lack of sex education, and you’ll notice some repetition. “If they did cover it, it was little more than just a footnote,” says Aaron Menick, a 22-year- old queer-identifying student. “Queer people in general weren’t brought up.” Having left high school sex ed without a positive understanding of safe queer sex, I was too uncomfortable to come out to my family doctor, so he advised under the assumption that I was straight. I rarely got tested because he’d ask probing questions about my fictional boyfriend and our relationship. At the time, I didn’t realize the risk I was putting myself in by not talking to a healthcare professional about my sexuality. Healthcare providers that aren’t inclusive or aware of their LGBTQ+ patients often don’t know their unique risks. This is especially dangerous when, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gay and bisexual men account for over half of all syphilis cases, and trans people receive a new HIV diagnosis at three times the national average. Coming out isn’t easy, though, as LGBTQ+ individuals commonly face stigma just trying to go to the doctor. In a recent survey, The Project found that 60% of LGBTQ+ patients were not out to their primary healthcare providers. The Project is a holistic, nonprofit health center in Des Moines that exists to serve the LGBTQ+ community. It provides free and comprehensive STI and HIV testing, which is comforting to Menick. “I know that the staff knows what they’re talking about,” Menick says. “I’m not going to have to work against stigmas while I’m in the doctor’s office.” When I visited The Project, I was asked my sexuality, gender, and gender pronouns—a rare and incredibly validating experience. I was also asked

whether I was having sex that put me at risk for STIs, like syphilis or HIV, for which LGTBQ+ people are at higher risk. The Project has been involved in the fight to eliminate HIV and its misconceptions for decades. It’s important to understand that HIV is the virus, while AIDS is the diagnosis that comes after individuals have had two or more opportunistic infections. “The groups in our society that are most heavily impacted by HIV are transgender women of color, and then black gay and bisexual men,” says Greg Gross, HIV Program Director at the Project. “It’s because of this perfect storm, so to speak, of racism, sexism, homophobia, discrimination, and transphobia.” The Project has started over 300 patients on PrEP, a daily pill that’s up to 99% effective at preventing HIV. “It’s one of the keys to ending HIV in our communities,” Gross says. “We’re getting to the point in our understanding and treatment of virus that a lot of people aren’t even getting to the AIDS diagnosis, so that’s becoming more of a thing of the past.” The Project isn’t the only affordable sexual healthcare organization that LGBTQ+ people can turn to. Planned Parenthood also strives to be inclusive in its care. “We’re the leading expert in compassionate, nonjudgmental sexual and reproductive healthcare, and that’s always included LGBTQ communities,” says Rachel Lopez, public relations manager of Planned Parenthood of the Heartland. “Our transgender care is very specific to transgender individuals in that there’s pre-counseling involved, and we can provide access to hormone therapy. We also can refer out for actual transitions.” Ramirez had a positive experience as a bisexual patient at Planned Parenthood. “Everyone was very helpful and welcoming and I felt safe, which I’ve never felt before in a doctor’s office,” she says. Eliminating stigma is the first step for medical establishments in providing comprehensive and inclusive care to LGBTQ+ individuals. In the meantime, queer-friendly organizations like The Project and Planned Parenthood are the only places I’ve felt safe and welcomed since coming out (pun intended) of my high school health classroom.

SAFETY FIRST Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) can be taken by those at high risk for HIV, and reduces the risk of sexually contracting HIV by more than 90%.

HOW TO MAKE

STEP 1:

INTERNAL CONDOM: EXTERNAL CONDOM: Placed on the erect penis, the external condom helps prevent most sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during oral, vaginal, or anal sex.

STEP 2:

This is inserted inside the vagina for vaginal sex and helps to prevent most STIs. It’s not recommended to use an internal condom for anal sex.

STEP 3:

YOUR OWN DENTAL DAM Dental dams can be purchased or created out of external condoms and prevent the spread of STIs during oral sex.

Many STIs show no signs or symptoms, so it’s important to get tested regularly at a healthcare clinic that’s aware of your risks.

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FOR THE BODY AND THE MIND

POLAR PRODUCTIVITY DON’T LET WINTER LAZINESS LEAVE YOU IN A HOLIDAZE. WORDS & PHOTOS: MADISON KELLY As the temperature drops and the days become shorter, so might your motivation. It’s not all in your head—there’s science to back you up. While we’re

NAMA-STAY ACTIVE

expected to perform at full capacity year-round, our brains are wired to slow down in the winter. Even though the daylight hours are slim, we still must keep up with day-to-day activities. Here are five easy ways to increase productivity and ease those winter blues.

outdoors, it’s important to stay active. Yoga is easy to do indoors, and helps relieve stress that causes headaches and lack of concentration.

GET SOME SUN Everyone knows that seasonal affective disorder is a huge problem in the winter. But its solutions can also extend to improving winter productivity. Winter’s funky sunlight hours make you want to stay in bed later and head to bed earlier. Investing in a light box will reduce your brain’s melatonin levels and help you feel ready to take on the day. For best results, bask in the light for 30 minutes while getting ready for work.

BUY A PLANT The New University of Technology in Australia finds that keeping plants in the workplace can decrease stress and negativity. Adding some greenery to your work space at home or in the office can improve your mood and therefore lead to higher productivity. Choose a spider plant or peace lily for the additional benefit of cleaner air. Added bonus for brown thumbs—these plants are tricky to kill.

Turn warrior from a pose to a state of mind. Even when snowy weather prevents you from spending time

STAY SOCIAL A study by MIT finds that socializing in the workplace actually leads to increased productivity. So don’t feel bad about chatting with coworkers or friends over lunch—you’ll get back to your desk feeling refreshed and ready to work. Mid-day coffee breaks help, too. We’ll drink (a latte) to that.

EAT HEALTHY Yes, we’ve heard this over and over again. But we still don’t listen. We eat poorly because we choose what we want to eat when our energy is at its lowest. The solution? Plan your meals before you get hungry. Doing so will give your body the nutrients it needs, leaving you feeling better and more productive. And fill your diet with fish, eggs, and nuts, which give your body the vitamin D it usually gets from the sun.

Sources: American Osteopathic Association, WebMd, Forbes, Gallup, Greatist, Harvard Business Review, Mgbmovement, Nursery and Garden Industry Australia

YOGA FOR BEGINNERS: THE CHAIR POSE

Find a flat, open space. You won’t need a mat for this pose, but you can use one if you prefer. Inhale and squat down slightly as if you’re about to sit down in a chair. Keeping your arms straight, raise your hands over your ears and above your head. Relax your shoulders. Focus your weight on your heels, relieving stress from your knees. Take a few breaths and feel the power of productivity flow through you.

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DITCH THE COFFEE DEPENDENCY WITH THESE ALTERNATIVES THAT’LL GET YOU THROUGH THE DAILY GRIND. WORDS: ASHLEY FLAWS It’s 3:00 p.m. and the midday slump is hitting hard. Gulping down a latte is be tempting, but a caffeine crash will inevitably come back to drag you down. Swap that shot of espresso for these quick alternatives for an energy boost that’ll leave you feeling refreshed for the rest of the day.

MINIMALISM HELPS PURGE MORE THAN JUST STUFF—IT ALSO BENEFITS YOUR MIND. WORDS: ANNA JENSEN | PHOTO: CHEYANN NEADES

H

umans love buying new things. In this materialistic society, we’re encouraged to collect items and yearn for what we don’t need. But some millennials are finding themselves drawn to minimalism, a decluttering phenomenon. More than just the desire to get rid of unnecessary items, minimalism also satisfies something more internal. John Bisenius, a counselor at New Beginnings Counseling Services in Urbandale, Iowa, finds minimalism intriguing because just as hoarding stems from the anxiety of letting go, minimalism can also provoke anxiety at first. “The beginning stages can be stressful, as people find security and attachment in most things they own,” Bisenius says. “[Minimalism] ends up benefiting people because of the clinical approach of mindfulness. Essentially, you’re making a conscious decision to not align with your material things.” Twenty-one-year-old Kennedy Japenga began minimizing last January. After she and her boyfriend watched the film “Minimalism: A Documentary on the Important Things,” they were determined to try it. Soon enough, they were identifying the necessities and purging anything determined “extra.” She found that clutter can mean more than just the stuff around us—it’s also the media we consume,

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the people in our lives, our thoughts, and more. “We got rid of everything—Netflix, Hulu—so after work we would come home and actually talk to each other because we weren’t just staring at a screen,” Japenga said. “It made a positive change in our relationship.” Minimalism has ultimately strengthened the relationships important to her and helped her let go of the ones that aren’t. In a minimalisminduced technology purge, Japenga went from around 1,000 Facebook friends to only 60. Minimalism can also influence the brain’s cognitive ability. “As society has shown us, we can very easily get tied up in our things and it takes up a lot of space in our psyche,” Bisenius says. “Sometimes through [minimalism] people have an improved ability to problemsolve or get through stressors better.” Japenga finds this to be true. Before she began practicing minimalism, she says she was a relatively anxious person. Now, she handles bumps in the road better than before. “Those who follow this lifestyle are much more flexible,” Bisenuis says. “They can get through stress—they have more resilience. Not everything in their life is ‘I need to work harder, so I can get more money so I can buy more things.’”

PROTEIN + CARBS = SUCCESS Jennifer DeWall, certified sports dietitian, nutritionist, and owner of Nutrition in Motion in Des Moines says that a common mistake is drinking a protein shake with only water. “Although it’s quick, you’re not getting the carbs you need for immediate energy,” she says. DeWall suggests spiking the shake with fruit to ensure your body gets enough carbs to sustain energy.

STRIKE THE RAGDOLL POSE Abby Miesner, studio manager at Power Life Yoga in West Glen, Iowa, recommends performing the ragdoll pose. It increases blood flow to the brain and releases tension throughout the body. To begin, stand with feet hip-width apart and knees aligned with your toes. Bend forward so that your head and neck hang close to your knees, and bind your arms together by grabbing the opposite elbows. Relax, then slowly sway side to side to elongate your spine.

EASY PEASY, LEMON SQUEEZY When life gives you lemons, get energized. Taking a whiff of lemons increases alertness and wakes up your mind and body. The tangy scent stimulates the mind and rejuvenates you when your body start to get worn down. Lemon scents are conveniently found in hand sanitizers, lotions, perfumes, essential oils, air fresheners, and candles.


DIZZY WRIGHT

THIS UP-AND-COMING RAPPER BRINGS CHILL VIBES TO THE STAGE AT HIS DES MOINES SHOW. WORDS: NICK MCGLYNN | PHOTO: JUSTIN NOLAN

I

t’s hard to attend a Dizzy Wright concert and not smile. He comes on stage, kills his tracks, and does it all with an infectious grin on his face. Dizzy hit Wooly’s in Des Moines one night this past October. Though Wooly’s 700-person capacity was about a third full, that didn’t seem to matter to the fans who stood through two and a half hours of local openers before getting to the main event. The crowd waved their hands to the music and responded to all of the artists’ calls to the crowd—“When I say Dizzy, you say Wright!” When Dizzy finally came out, he started strong with “Do The Most,” a song off his most recent album, “The Golden Age 2.” Between songs you can catch him urging fans to spread

positive vibes and have a good time. Soothing beats and fast-paced lyrical style have been a staple for Wright’s career. This shows in his most popular songs, “Kill ‘Em With Kindness” and “Coolin’.” In a hip-hop world where the focus has turned primarily towards catchy beats, Dizzy stays true to his influences, like Jay-Z, A Tribe Called Quest, and Bone Thugs-N-Harmony. Despite his upbeat personality, Wright hasn’t always had it easy. He grew up with an absent, incarcerated father, lived in a homeless shelter for five months as a child, and moved frequently during his high school years. Just this past year, he dealt with the collapse of his longtime record label,

Funk Volume. Despite his difficult past, he’s learned to keep his wordplay positive, and to focus on his “J-O-B.” Dizzy’s Des Moines show felt disorganized, like he messed around with some beats and decided to put on a random show with his friends in the middle of Iowa. But this only contributed to Dizzy’s openness and freespirited vibe. It’s clear, through his lyrics and stage presence that no matter who rocks with him at his shows, he keeps his energy high and the atmosphere chill. Bottom line: Dizzy Wright’s a performer and lyricist to watch, because no matter where he goes, he brings the party with him.

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IDEAS FOR PLAY + PLAYLISTS


ARTIST PROFILE:

CHRIS VANCE A VETERAN OF THE DES MOINES ART SCENE SPILLS MORE THAN JUST HIS PAINT. WORDS: ASHLEY FLAWS | PHOTO: SAM FATHALLAH

E

very Des Moines resident not living under a rock knows the quirky, colorful characters that grace the mural near Scenic Route Bakery in East Village. Chris Vance is the man behind it and many other murals that shape the personality of downtown Des Moines. After 20 years on the scene, Vance opens up about how he got where he is today. So listen up— Vance knows what he’s talking about. DM: How did your career as an artist take off? V: I got together with two of my friends from college, and we rented a lodge hall. Basically we invited anybody that we would invite to our wedding— friends, family, whatever—and had an opening where we sold work and made money and that kind of spurred the next chapter. DM: You’ve said your art is like a diary. How are experiences from your life reflected in your work? V: Last year, my opening at Moberg Gallery was totally about growing up in 1980. I was looking back and listening to music from the ‘80s, like Duran Duran. I did a piece when I got back from Denver—there’s people just floating around in the Rocky Mountains. Everybody’s high out there now, it’s really bizarre. I felt like it was time to make a painting about it. DM: What have you learned about dealing with mistakes over the years? V: When you’re first getting started as an artist, you’re working on stuff and you’re like, ‘Shit, that’s screwed up, how do I fix it?’ I’ve been painting for so long that I’ve made, I don’t even know how many thousands of paintings, so now I have this confidence that no matter what, there’s a way to fix it. DM: What have you learned about yourself as an artist while traveling and showing your work? V: I like a good mix; I like having the festivals and galleries, but I don’t want to do one or two exclusively. That’s just not my personality. I like meeting people. One thing I’ve learned over the years is you can be a big fish in this market, but to be a big fish in other markets, you have to expose yourself in those markets. DM: What’s your advice to younger artists? V: I’m one of the younger people that’s doing art festivals, and that makes me nervous because people under 30 aren’t trying them because they’re such hard work. You can have a lot of success doing festivals; you just gotta be willing to get kicked in the teeth now and then.

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IDEAS FOR PLAY + PLAYLISTS

BOB DYLAN

THE LEGENDARY SINGER-SONGWRITER TOOK THE STAGE IN AMES FOR A BITTERSWEET PERFORMANCE. WORDS: MEGAN MOWERY | PHOTO: COURTESY OF COLUMBIA RECORDS

I

’ll admit it: I have an extra-large poster of a young, harmonicaplaying Bob Dylan hanging in my apartment. It’s one of the first things I see when I wake up. So when I heard that The Bard was heading to Ames, Iowa for a show in late October, I wasn’t going to miss it. There are a few things to expect when you show up to a Bob Dylan concert: One, his iconic raspy voice carries about as well as you’d figure in a large venue. That is, it doesn’t carry well at all. Two, imagine singing songs you wrote today when you’re 76. Cringe. That’s how Dylan feels, too—so don’t expect him to croon “Blowin’ in the Wind” like it’s 1963. Three, you will be the youngest adult person in the crowd. You’ll feel uncomfortable, but you’ll love it.

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Dylan filled Iowa State University’s Stephens Auditorium for his first show there since 1994. For the past 29 years, he’s been traveling the world on his Never Ending Tour. The crowd, though not the most energetic, buzzed with anticipation. Mere weeks after the sudden death of longtime Dylan contributor Tom Petty, the show’s vibe was very, ‘we don’t know how long Dylan’ll be around, so we’ve got to take this opportunity to see him now.’ In a surprising twist, given the general demographic of the audience, the air smelled slightly of marijuana. It was easy to imagine the crowd of Baby Boomers toking up one last time in homage of their Dylan awakening as teenagers. Following an electric set from legendary opener Mavis Staples, Bob Dylan took the stage.

The roughly 90-minute set was a solid mix of Dylan classics and tracks from his latest album, 2017’s “Triplicate.” A lifetime of rocking and rolling has clearly taken its toll on Dylan. He hobbled across the stage between sets, alternating between sitting at his piano and grasping at his mic stand as he swayed awkwardly to the music. It was a bittersweet view of the old man. He didn’t play his classics quite like you’d expect him to—he switched up the arrangements, so it was tough to know exactly what song he was playing until you recognized the lyrics about halfway through. Throughout the entire show, he never spoke a word to the audience. Despite everything, it was humbling to be in the same room as a man who was the voice and

soul of a generation. We mourn our lack of political songwriters and cultural leaders today like Dylan was to the ‘60s. His impact on the Vietnam War, Boomer-era cannot be understated—even today, he’s being recognized for his singular songwriting through awards like his Nobel Prize for Literature. Dylan is one of the last in a dying breed of American folk and pop music. By the time Dylan took the stage for his encore of “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “Ballad of a Thin Man,” it was clear it was time to go. His tired body resisted each move he made, like a spring desperate to snap back into position. At the end, with a smirk and nod to the audience, he was gone.


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Drake Magazine Fall 2017  
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