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Show Me the Money Entrepreneur’s Forum pg. 6

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Forensics Fanatics Forensics & Debate Team pg. 14

A Night at the Races Track & Field pg. 18

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Meet The Staff Callie White

Hometown: Nickerson Major: Speech Pathology Plans: K-State

Courtney Carlton

Hometown: Hutchinson Major: General Studies/ Sports Broadcasting Plans: K-State

Carolyn Durbin Hannah Wallace

Hometown: Clute, Texas Major: Journalism Plans: Working for a magazine or newspaper

Nate Weaver

Hometown: Emporia Major: Visual CommunicationsGraphic Design / Web Technology Plans: Toss up between graphic designer or real life superhero

Hometown: Whitewater Major: Translator for Hebrew and Italian Plans: Live in Milan

Derrick Stiles

Hometown: South Hutchinson Major: Visual CommunicationsGraphic Design / Web Technology Plans: Open a restaurant someday and be Nate’s sidekick

The Dragon’s Tale is published three times a year by the Magazine class of Hutchinson Community College, 1300 North Plum, Hutchinson, KS 67501. When compiled, the three issues serve as an overview of the activities and the people of HCC during the school year. Staff

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Show Me the Money Derrick Stiles Dragons by the Numbers Nate Weaver Tale of Two Plays Derrick Stiles Forensics Fanatics Hannah Wallace & Callie White Women’s Nationals Courtney Carlton

Table of Contents

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Leaving a Legacy Callie White

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A Night at the Races Nate Weaver & Carolyn Durbin How’s My Driving Nate Weaver & Derrick Stiles Postponed Play Callie White & Derrick Stiles A Family Bond Courtney Carlton & Carolyn Durbin Good Game Nate Weaver Ads Staff

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Big Shoes Left To Fill Boxes full of equipment and supplies made their way through the parking lot toward a destination, carried by the president of Hutchinson Community College, Dr. Edward Berger himself. LeAnn Bravi, Public Health/ Safety instructor and coordinator, and Phi Theta Kappa advisor gratefully worked alongside with her own arms full. “He demonstrates what a servant leader does,” Bravi said. “He didn’t have to (help her carry boxes) and wouldn’t have been expected to, which I think is what always impressed me about the action. In my opinion, it is the little things that speak of a person’s character.” Individuals readily recalled instances of Berger’s servitude that impacted them significantly. Jamie O’Dell, Hutchinson, a student in his leadership class who had recently had knee surgery, experienced Dr. Berger kneeling on the floor to clean a pool of water created by a leaking ice pack. “Dr. Berger is an individual who is totally dedicated to the success of the college,” Randy Myers, Vice President of Student Services, said. “Sometimes leaders have personal agendas where they want to make themselves look good. Dr. Berger isn’t like that at all. What drives him is that HCC is a premier institution. He is willing to do his part, work hard, and be dedicated. He is not

During the Kick Butts Campaign, Dr. Berger grilled hot dogs with members of SGA which were distrubted for free to students. The Kick Butts Campaign helped raise awareness of the dangers of tabacco use. Photo by Callie White

an individual who stands back and lets others do the bulk of the activity.” Faculty and students alike agreed that Dr. Berger was a devoted leader and his modest demeanor was of distinct humility. “Dr. Berger is an outstanding leader, visionary, and leads HCC as if it were his very own even though he’s quite humble. I don’t know of anyone who doesn’t value him as a person,” Dr. Cindy Hoss, Vice President of Academic Affairs, said. Uniquely, Berger was not only the president, but was also a teacher in a leadership class. He interacted with students Dr. Berger

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one-on-one to build leaders that would positively impact their current and future environments. “I have always enjoyed dealing with students, being able to interact with students and hear what kinds of exciting things are happening in their lives,” Berger said. College education piqued Berger’s interest while he worked on his master’s degree at Wichita State University. He was a teacher’s assistant in History, then moved on to become Dean of Community Service at Seward Community College. When the position of Dean of Continuing Education at

HCC opened up he returned to Hutchinson to fill the position with the goal of becoming president. Since achieving that goal in 1981, he has been acutely involved with the success and credibility of the college. “He is a developer. If you look at individuals who have come through HCC and gone on to administrative roles in other organizations or here, he is responsible for a lot of that development,” Myers said. Because of Dr. Berger’s expert leadership, HCC has thrived and become a place of high renown. Hoss said HCC holds a great reputation for academics, athletics, extra-

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story

photos&story

Callie White

curricular activities, service learning, and also PTK and the Honors Program. “I think he’s one of the leaders in the state at the legislature, and they ask for HCC to test things and new endeavors. There are things that are happening because of his presence there. They look to him for answers with education,” Jillene Cunningham, Dept. 2

Callie White

Co-Chair, said. HCC was the first institution to merge with a vocational school and, therefore, served as a model for other community colleges, who in turn, improved their technical education programs as well. “He helps more than people know, with the Kansas legislature and the Kansas Board of Regents. He answered the In the Introduction to Leadership class, Randy Myers, Vice President of Student Services, and Dr. Berger, have a discussion before class. They later passed out assignment packets to students. Photo by Callie White Dr. Berger stands before the leadership class as he prepares to teach. He was actively involved with students, having taught the leadership class each semester. Photo by Callie White

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governor’s call about Senate Bill 155 about supporting technical education and that bill alone has put courses into high schools that are paid for. So many more people can access technical education and Hutchinson is a leader in that because of all the partnerships he has developed,” Hoss said. In addition, Dr. Berger was also a huge supporter of extracurricular activities at the college and was actively involved in participating with students and attending events. At the theatre’s flash mob, Dr. Berger was the first to wear makeup and don a costume, and demonstrated he was a good sport with many other similar events. SkillsUSA, a technical-based program focused on leadership skills, which competes with other colleges in the state and nationally, has also experienced a tremendous boost due to Dr. Berger’s support. He was able to bring several of the state contests to the HCC campus and expand the number of contests. “I really appreciate his level of energy and dedication to the college. He goes to every athletic event, every fine arts event. He has a missionary kind of approach to his role with this college. This is not a 40-hour-a-week job for Dr. Berger. This is a job where he is going all the time,” Myers said. If any organization wanted Dr. Berger to attend, he did his

best to make an appearance. He even used his lunch time to meet with school superintendents, potential donors, community members, and people from business and industry areas to cultivate support for HCC. “I appreciate Dr. Berger’s continued enthusiasm for PTK and his involvement with the officer team. He is our administrative sponsor for Kappa Gamma. I’m sure he could have delegated someone else to work with the organization but to my knowledge, he’s always taken that responsibility. He listens to their ideas and goals and provides encouragement and support but lets them develop their own leadership skills and styles. He provides them with an excellent example of quality leadership,” Bravi said. Berger also met with the Student Government Association once a month, where the students shared accomplishments, future activities and goals. He, in turn, updated them on the college’s progress. “As a student under the

This is a cutline that should be two sentences long. First, highlight Steve Student and replace with your name, then highlight the words of the cutline and not the directional arrow and start typing. Photo by Steve Student

Dr. Berger addresses the new PTK members, their parents, and current officers at the PTK Induction. He congratulated them on their outstanding accomplishments and encouraged them to keep up the good work. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

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In his office, Dr. Berger stands beside a computer-generated design for the new Fire Science building. He spent many hours in the office dedicated to the success of the college. Photo by Callie White

leadership of Dr. Berger, I appreciate that he has a vision to always improve the college for students and become a model leader for surrounding community colleges in the state,” Adam Pohl, President of SGA, from Hutchinson, said. Myers said that students probably took for granted the open door, easy access structure of HCC that larger institutions lack. Students who wished to talk with Dr. Berger could go directly to his office and if he was available, he would welcome them in.

“I think responsiveness to student concern is the most important quality for a president to have. Dr. Berger will listen to any campus concerns if you talk to or email him. He will then do his best to answer your question or resolve the issue,” Pohl said. Vividly noticeable accomplishments of Berger’s guidance at HCC, are the renovated Bob and Lou Peel Allied Health Center which house all of the allied health programs along with a new foundation well under way for a fire science building which would allow those vital programs to grow and develop. “His leadership in renewing our campus facilities and buildings is so important. I know we shouldn’t ‘judge a book by its cover,’ but if the buildings and facilities look worn out and unkempt, I think it is difficult to continue to attract students,” Bravi said. Though many improvements have already been made and arranged, Berger looked toward the future of HCC after he was gone. He sees expanding the curriculum, serving new geographic areas in the state and opening opportunities for more students as key goals for the institution to strive for. “Every year, my highlight is graduation and seeing the students across the stage with a diploma or certificate. They have accomplished a goal. This college has provided a vehicle

Dr. Berger

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for them to work for and achieve their goals. Some of them have achieved heights that they never did think possible,” Berger said. “This is a wonderful institution. It has been a great opportunity for me and I have truly enjoyed every bit of it.” The college looked to the challenge of finding a new president with some foreboding. Many felt his leaving as a great loss, but approached the new step with confidence. “In my mind, he is a legendary President. You know, there are people who are in various roles and when they leave, it is kind of like how are you going to

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replace the legend,” Myers said. “I think as you talk to people across campus, you are going to get that Dr. Berger has been a great leader, tough to replace, it’s going to be like following the legend for whoever comes in here next.” With the mutual feeling of colossal admiration for the work and devotion of Dr. Berger, the institution’s faculty, staff, and students expressed their appreciation for his 33 years of service. Many passionately believed he deserved all the recognition he received and more.

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Show me th Local Banker shares his story and insight photos&story

Derrick Stiles

It’s an opportunity for students and community members to connect with successful business leaders in an open, welcoming, and comfortable environment. At Hutchinson Community College it’s referred to as the Entrepreneurs Forum. The forums are held every fall and spring and provide a chance to learn about successfully launching and operating

Darrel Miller, Vice President of Central Bank and Trust, talks during different stages of the forum. The bottom photo featured Miller and Roy Broxterman, instructor, shaking hands.

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a business. The college enlists local business leaders to share experiences, observations, insights and suggestions about all aspects of business including marketing, operations, human resource, technology, and finance. The speakers are chosen from a variety of methods. Dan Naccarato, instructor and facilitator of the Entrepreneur Forum, said, “We listen to suggestions from students and faculty. Our Business Management & Entrepreneurship Advisory Board meets every August and January and we discuss possible featured speakers. Also, we partner with local financial institutions and seek their input about selecting featured speakers. We are very open-minded in our discussions about potential featured speakers. We seek experienced business managers and entrepreneurs whom are willing to candidly speak about their life experiences and openly respond to questions.” On February 27, the 21st Entrepreneur Forum was held in the Justice Theatre in Shears Technology Center. Approximately 122 students, faculty, and local business leaders filled the theater to listen to Darrel Miller, Vice President of Central Bank and Trust in Hutchinson. He estimated that

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“He did not have a highschool diploma and was very apprehensive about going to college. However, he overcame those fears, got his GED, Associate of Arts and Bachelor’s degrees, and has a very successful career. He did not expect to be given anything but was willing to work for what he got. Current students should expect the same,” Broxterman said. “Success comes from hard work and dedication. Darrel started at the bottom and worked his way up.” Brandi Gore, Bonner Springs, said, “I appreciated that he came from nothing made a name for himself. It gives me hope that someday I can accomplish my own goals.” Throughout the forum, Miller highlighted each of the five components with a real life story. One example included a client that used an extensive stamp collection as collateral for a business loan. The idea of entrepreneurship is a new concept for many students but achievable. Miller said, “I have had student’s start lawn mowing businesses, IT support businesses, video game writing businesses, cattle businesses, farming, etc. I would encourage students to thoroughly plan their business model and then be ready to adapt and make changes if the Entrepreneur Forum

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THE Character city a p a C

al t i p Ca

Con dit ion s

he has helped entrepreneurs start between 150 to 175 businesses. Miller’s presentation covered the five components that lenders look at when considering the credit worthiness of an applicant. He started with a condensed version of how he achieved his status. Miller originally comes from an Amish heritage. In the Amish community, higher education is not an option for full-fledged members of the church and Miller had aspirations of attending college. “When I left home at an early age, I knew I was not leaving for a rumspringa experience. I knew I wanted to attain a higher education, which was not optional in the Amish culture. So when I left the church, I never looked back. While Amish youth in their rumspringa period have the option of always going home at night to a warm bed and home-cooked meals, I was out on my own. My life was filled with work, often two jobs, in order to save money for college with no intention of returning to my previous way of life,” Miller said. Miller attended HCC where he connected with Advisor Roy Broxterman. Broxterman guided Miller through the process and helped him along his path of success.

c’s Collat eral

e the Money

The 5 factors determining credit worthiness business model needs altering in order to be successful. Surround yourself with professionals that can provide counsel and support.” “The life of an entrepreneur can be very difficult, but rewarding. To be a successful entrepreneur, you need a lot of determination and drive,” Broxterman said. “I would recommend that students who are interested in entrepreneurship to take classes to see if this is the field that they want to pursue.”

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Miller left the audience with a final piece of advice. “Please maintain a checkbook register,” Miller said. “So many individuals and young business owners manage their personal and business finances based on the bank balance and not their checkbook balance and these are two very different balances in most cases.”

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Dragons by the photos&story

A look at the Industrial Research Department of Hutchinson Community College.

Numb3rs

N a t e We ave r

In order for a school to receive the appropriate amount of funding, they are required to submit reports to both the federal and state governments containing data on their students and programs. All institutions of higher education must maintain a certain level of performance. According to Dr. Edward Berger, President of Hutchinson Community College, if these standards are not met, the school risks having their funding reduced by the government.

In order to quickly and efficiently collect, compile, and utilize all of the data required for those reports, HCC relies heavily on the Institutional Research Department. Heading up this department is Mr. Rex Cheever. Cheever worked in the Information Technologies Department at HCC for 12 years before changing positions to the head of the department. “I felt that my knowledge of HCC’s data environment would be valuable in providing accurate and timely reports, and that my I.T. background

would help improve data gathering and reporting process for HCC,” said Cheever. During his time in the I.T. Department, he worked along side many of the offices that were in charge of collecting student data. Many of the students at HCC are completely unaware of the existence or the purpose of the Institutional Research Department. Most of the data used by this department is gathered from other offices at HCC such as the admissions, records, and the financial aid offices. Specific academic departments

also collect their own data about the students. “Institutional research allows us to demonstrate the success of our students and the effectiveness of our programs,” said Dr. Berger. In addition to filing federal and state mandated reports, they also provide information about the school to other departments and offices at HCC; however, not all of the information gathered stays in house. Many web sites that publish information about HCC for prospective students get their data directly from the Institutional Research Department. Thanks to the continued work of Rex Cheever and the rest of the Institutional Research Department, Hutchinson Community College continues to receive proper funding.

Research Coordinator Rex Cheever works to compile information gathered by the Institutional Research Department. Cheever worked in the IT Department at HCC for 12 years before moving to Institutional Research. Photo by Nate Weaver

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3

1. Allied Health

TOP 2. BusinessPROGRAMS

3

3. Fire Science

OUT OF STATE 7%

Where are we from? OTHER KANSAS

36%

RICE

McPHERSON

2%

RENO

32%

11%

HARVEY

12%

1/3

55% 45%

Graduate Transfer to different school Stop Attending

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Tale of Two Plays HCC’s Theater Department displayed versatility in producing two different styles of plays photos&story

Derrick Stiles

The Hutchinson Community College Theatre Department produced two plays in the spring semester of 2014. While it sounds like an overly simplistic summary statement, it would grossly understate the amount of effort, intelligence, and versatility displayed by the department as it executed two entirely different styles of theatre. The theatre department took on the task of producing a five-act improv play in which the entire production from conception to the final curtain was completed within a 24 hour

time frame. The other production was a full-blown traditional musical, “Fiddler on the Roof.” Charlene Widener, Department Head of the Fine Arts Department, succinctly summarized the differences. “The 24 hour play is an opportunity to do ‘boiler pot’ theatre. The plays are usually topical, comedic, and are more plot driven rather character driven. The characters are often character types instead of fully-developed characters,” Widener said. “Costumes, props, and set pieces are limited to what we have on hand. We

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allow limited sound and lighting support because of the number of plays produced and the time we have. “In a traditional production, after the production is selected the first step is the development of a production concept. The concept is the goal of the play and includes how we are going to attain that goal visually and in character development. Then every step of the process relates back to that concept using a specific style.” Widener said that to produce the traditional production they usually start the conversation nine months to a year before the play which includes weekly meetings for the production staff to make sure that the concept is being met. “Many traditional produc-

tions are character and concept driven within the framework of the play. The sets and costumes are built to meet the concept and lights and sound are developed as well,” Widener said. Each of the different types of productions presented a different set of challenges. Deidre Ensz-Mattox, Director of Theatre, said, “The greatest challenge for the 24 hour improv is putting together all the people who are involved in the event. I enjoy the unpredictably of the event. The greatest challenge for ‘Fiddler on the Roof ’ is maintaining stamina and focus through several weeks of rehearsals and very intense work. I enjoy watching the actors as they take possession of the characters for themselves and make their own

choices.” Mattox explained the normal pattern of events that takes place during each of the productions. The 24 improv began when the entire group met on a Friday evening for introductions. Everyone went home for the night except for the playwrights. Playwrights first drew actor names and began writing their plays. By early morning, after the plays had been written, the directors showed up to read the plays and decided who would direct the different pieces. Following that, the actors and technicians began the rehearsals. Rehearsals went on throughout the day and included technical rehearsals. Continued on page 27

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Scenes from

24 Hour Plays

Cast Andrew Davis Sean Eaves Eva Planthold Tanner Webster Justin Cabral Dalin Hinds Amanda Moore Alicia Monceaux Chaz Thurman

Jocelyn Reed Colin Tighe Skye Colaw Kristen Cruz Josh Fredrick Eduardo F. Ibarra Issac Glover Bethany Manny

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Theatre

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Scenes from

Fiddler on the Roof

Cast Tanner Webster Amanda Moore Bailey Lamer Bethany Manny Alexis Johnson Dalin Hinds Andrew Shermoen Josh Fredrick Kristen Cruz

Ben Jones Andrew Davis Sean Eaves Conner Eaves Blake Zwickl Eva Planthold Alex Ponce Austin Scott Ryan Fulcher

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Jahman Hill, Larned, presents an impromptu speach at the Forensics Showcase. With impromptu the speaker had seven minutes to prepare and give their speech, with the speeches based on quotations. Photo By Callie White

At the Forensics Showcase, Sarah Wagler, Yoder, delivers her Informative Speech on brain memory implants. This speech type allowed ten minutes and must be original, created by the student and include multiple sources. Photo by Callie White

FORENSICS

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anatics

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Dedicated students who reaped many rewards Hands gripped seats, breathing was unconsciously held, and hearts pulsed louder as audience members were enraptured by a speaker who made reality seem like a vague fog when compared to the speech. At Hutchinson Community College, Debate and Forensics Coach Travis Roberts helped to cultivate this sort of skill in the members of his team. In order to accomplish this level of proficiency, team members devoted a majority of their time to forensics.

“It’s not so much that my time is taken up by forensics, but rather that my time away from it is measured out in teaspoonfuls, to borrow Eliot’s metaphor. It’s my life. We perform basically every weekend, and rewrite and practice (and practice, and practice) all week long,” Sarah Wagler, Yoder, said. She suggested that if a student was contemplating forensics in college, they needed to be ready to give up everything else since it was a life-consuming commitment. Though the input was huge, the product was worth the cost, which was reiterated by the 315 trophies the team won this year. “That’s huge,” Roberts said, “This has been the best year ever, as far as events qualified for nationals. We had 28 qualify. We are having a very good year competitively and the students’ work ethic this year has been really good.” Students became part of the forensics team at HCC different ways. Jahman Hill, Lar ned, aspired to play college basketball, but due to a lack of height he decided to use his debating abilities, cultivated in high school, in college. This decision rewarded him fully and he qualified in six events this year which Roberts said has never been done before by a student during his time as coach. Caitlyn Ross and Madison

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Tucker, both from Meriden, were duo partners since freshmen year of high school and they came to HCC for a visit and were awarded a scholarship. Not only were students gratified by trophies at tournaments but they also benefitted from their forensics experience in many other ways. “It helps me a lot with academic. I use things a lot that I learn within my different speech topics for academics and projects that I do with my honors classes. We always have extra projects to do and I always tie that back to something I’ve done in forensics. So it really helps my knowledge base in all areas not only with economics but also with psychology, sociology, and history. I get to use all of those aspects between forensics and academics,” Hill said. Students’ communication abilities and thought processes were also improved through forensics. “I am able to understand communication now, on so many more levels and much deeper than I could one year ago. It has opened my eyes and ears to more possibilities in terms of the human capacity for learning and growth than I ever dreamed possible,” Wagler said, “Travis and Kenny make a point of engaging the team on every level of intellectual stimulation. The environment here is bursting with ideas, and potentiality, and analysis, and rational thought. I adore the way the community is messagefocused in every way. Ideas matter, and here they are given not only a voice, but a hearing. Continued on page 27

In his After Dinner Speech, Dyllan Hodson, Anthony, describes how geography isn’t emphasized in the education system and the resulting problems. In this type of speech, an important topic was chosen and its finer points and deeper meaning were highlighted through humor. Photo By Hannah Wallace Jessica Wood, Lyons, and Tagan Trahoon, Emporia, perform a Dramatic Duo. Dramatic Duos were the only event to feature two people and they were not allowed to look at each other or touch during the course of the presentation. Photo Illustration by Hannah Wallace

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Competing at NATIONALS

The National Tournament was an exciting time for the Lady Dragons. The girls went into the National Tournament undefeated. The all-time scoring record was broken by Jamie Patrick, Hutchinson, on Mar. 20 during the quarterfinals

against Tyler. The girls met up with 35-1 Trinity Valley looking to take home the title. After a hard fought game, the team lost 46-65. They brought home the trophy for second place in the nation.

Jamie Patrick

Alyx Bloom & Sydney Benoit

Hutchinson

Clay Center

Smith Center

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Women’s NJCAA Basketball

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2013-2014 Lady Dragons pose with their second place trophy

Jen’Von’Ta Hill

Kalani Purcell

St. Paul, Minn.

Hamilton, New Zealand

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Women’s NJCAA Basketball

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A NIGHT

AT THE RACES

Ashlynn Lambert, Concordia, runs the 3,000 meter steeplechase on April 6. With five competitors, Lambert ended with a winning time of 12:46 minutes. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

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Night Relays

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Leaping through the air, Jorgeo Spears, Kansas City, Mo. , participates in the men’s long jump. Spears longest attempt was 19 feet 10.25 inches. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

S

MEN

Nicole Kinser, Hugoton, lands in the sand after completing an attempt in the long jump. Her best jump measured 16 feet 11.25 inches. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

Kinser jumps during her attempt in the women’s long jump. She placed fourth in the event during the Hutch Night Relays. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

Hutch Night Relays Results

Event Place 1500m Run 2 110m Hurdles 3 400m Hurdles 2 3000m Steeplechase 3 4x100m Relay 1 4x100m Weight Relay 2 4x200m Relay 1 4x400m Relay 1 4x800m Relay 1 1600 Sprint Medley 1 Distance Medley 1 High Jump 3 Pole Vault 1 2 Long Jump 2 Triple Jump 2 3 Hammer Throw 3 Javelin Throw 1 3

Athlete Oberlin Rojas Blake Wilkey Austin Vaden Edgar Guiterrez

Lakin Liebst Andrew Pope Clay Kear Blake Wilkey Lakin Liebst Jorgeo Spears Jake Brinkman Jake Brinkman Brenner Wells

WOMEN

Event Place 400m Hurdles 2 3000m Steeplechase 1 2 4x100m Relay 1 4x100m Weight Relay 1 4x400m Relay 1 800 Sprint Medley 1 Distance Medley 3 High Jump 2 Long Jump 1 Triple Jump 2 Shot Put 2 Discuss Throw 1 Hammer Throw 2 Javelin Throw 3

Athlete Kristin Harris Ashlyn Lambert Ashley Claxton

Madison Shrock Kanedra Lee Kanedra Lee Alec Melvin Alec Melvin Alex Griffin Janelle Hoheisel

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Frasier Dawson, Bournemouth, England, watches his shot from the fairway. The shot landed six feet from the hole. Photo by Derrick Stiles

ng? Driv my page design

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Tayler Smith, Arkansas City, eyes his next shot. The drive landed in the sand trap approximately 80 yards from the pin. Photo by Derrick Stiles

2013-14 GOLF RESULTS Jayhawk Conference No. 1 Team 4th Place

Winfield

Jayhawk Conference No. 2 Team 2nd Place Individual 3rd Place

Mcpherson

Jayhawk Conference No. 3 Team 3rd Place Individual 1st Place

Jordan Hecker & Dominic Lara Lawrence Jordan Hecker

NJCAA National Preview Team 4th Place

Ottumwa, Iowa

MCC/Coca-Cola Classic Team 2nd Place

Waco, Texas

Results as of April 3, 2014

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Jason Cain, Mulvane, tees off from the 4th hole at Prairie Dunes Country Club. Cain commented that he loved playing at Prairie Dunes. Photo by Derrick Stiles

Eliiot Leonard, London, England, putts while Dominic Lara, El Dorado, observes. Leonard sank the putt from 12 feet out. Photo by Derrick Stiles

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Golf

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PLAY

Assistant Coach Benjamin Whitsitt, talks to Lacey Hudson, Enid, Okla., after she reached first base safely. Hudson, the team’s leading hitter, batted .467 through 16 games. Photo by Derrick Stiles

POSTPONED

story

From snow, to rain, to poor field conditions, the Lady Dragon’s softball team faced many post-poned games which put them at a disadvantage for having a good season. The coaching staff was comprised of Jamie Rose, head coach; Ben Whitsitt, assistant coach; and Michelle Nuss as the pitching coach. They worked hard to prepare the team to pull ahead once nice weather arrived. When play became regular, the team was able to begin the average season with several, memorable, record games for the Lady Dragons.

Callie White

The women’s softball team breaks huddle after their pregame ritual. Their ritual included dance moves performed by Asaria Usher, Wichita, while the rest of the team chanted. Photo by Derrick Stiles

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Softball

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PLAY

2013-2014 Women’s Softball Scoreboard

DATE

OPPONENT

RESULT

Feb. 11 NOC-Enid

PPD

Feb. 14 Barton

PPD

Feb. 15 NOC-Enid

L, 1-16; L, 11-12

Feb. 19 Garden City

W, 10-8; L, 4-14

Feb. 22 Barton

L, 6-7; L, 6-14

Feb. 25 Brown Mackie

PPD

Feb. 27 Sterling College JV

PPD

Mar. 4

Pratt

PPD

Mar. 7

Pratt

PPD

Mar. 9

Brown Mackie L, 10-11; W, 27-16

Mar. 11 Cloud County

L, 0-8; W, 4-3

Mar. 14 Highland

L, 5-18; L, 0-8

Mar. 15 Kansas City KS

W, 2-0; L, 3

Mar. 18 Hesston College

W, 10-0; L, 6-7

Mar. 21 Allen

W, 12-2; W, 14-3

Mar. 22 Neosho Mar. 25 Dodge City

L, 5-6; W, 5-1 L, 9-10; L, 8-9

Mar. 27 Tabor College JV W, 9-6; W, 10-1 Apr. 1

Cowley College

L, 2-5; L, 3-11

Results as of April 3, 2014

Head Coach Jaime Rose, strides back to the dugout after making a pitching change. Rose is in her 10th year of coaching the Lady Dragons. Photo by Derrick Stiles Rylee Nave, Enid, Okla., connects with a pitch. Nave played through injuries throughout the majority of the season. Photo by Derrick Stiles

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Cour tney Carlton

Cheering each other on from the dugout enourage the players through out the game and up to bat. The bond between players s strenghtened during every practice and game. Photo by Carolyn Durbin

Baseball

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It’s a team that combines 32 players, 9 states and 2 countries that come together to form a bond that cannot be broken, both on and off the field. “Our bond as a team I don’t think can be related to any other teams on campus. We are a family,” Zach Wilson, Denton, Texas, said. The strong bond between the players and coaches make a huge difference on the field and during a game. “They (the coaches) keep it light on the field. A lot of guys will go into the coaches’ office and just hang out. Plus, we’re together all the time,” Jacob Schleppenbaugh, Lincoln, Neb., said. During a game, the bond makes a big difference in the

way they click with each other and play. “It’s a level of trust and confidence. Everyone believes in everyone, no one ever doubts our ability as a team,” Chris Pinne, Prairie Village, said. Describing their team as a family is something the players take pride in. “Having the guys as a family is something special, knowing in that we all are chasing the same thing, we all want to win the region, and have a change to go to Grand Junction, but to do that we have to become closer as a family and play it one game at a time,” Matt Jones, Gretna, Neb., said. A key to any sport is communication, but in baseball it is especially important. “It makes a big difference

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Making a pitch, Austin Harms, Overland Park, performs during the home game against Hesston College. The Blue Dragons won 4-2.

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Keeping his eye on the ball, Bennett Oliver, Topeka, swings the bat. The teams record is 24-9.

because a team will play closer together as one when everyone is on the same page with everything and has one main goal,” Schleppenbaugh said. “As a catcher I have to be on the same page with all my pitchers. And knowing their personality helps me when I have to talk to them and calm them down to focus on the situation,” Dakota Shadoan, Norman, Okla., said. The family aspect of the team meant a lot to both the players and the coach and spoke volumes with the performance on the field. “I make a point to say family as much as I can when we are around each other. It should mean something to you when you say you belong to a family. You have responsibilities to that

family. You are responsible for yourself and how you represent that family. We focus on bringing our baseball family closer together every day. I tell the guys all the time, the most talented teams don’t go to Grand Junction, it is the closest family,” Ryan Schmidt, head coach, said. Whether the team is in class, eating dinner, or just hanging out, they are always spending time together and strengthening their bond. “There are contributions that come from up and down our line up which allows us to work as one. We don’t depend on one or two guys to stand out to win games. We do it together. This is a family,” Owen Renwick, Alberta, Canada, said.

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Jake Schleppenbach, Lincoln, Neb., swings at a pitch. Schleppenbach has six home runs this season.

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Congratulating each other after a run, Tucker Chadd, Overland Park, and Oliver celebrate. The team kept a strong bond with one another on and off the field.

2013-2014 BLUE DRAGON SCOREBOARD DATE 2-14 2-15 2-16 2-21 2-22 2-23 2-26 2-27 2-28 3-4 3-9 3-10 3-11 3-14 3-15 3-16 3-19 3-22 3-23 3-25 3-26 3-29 3-30 4-1

OPPONENT Rose State College Rose State College Rose State College Northeast Texas Northeast Texas Northeast Texas NOC-Tonkawa Garden City Garden City Cowley College Longview Longview NOC-Tonkawa Pratt Pratt Pratt Hesston College Seward County Seward County Cowley County Coffeyville Colby Colby Seminole State

RESULT W, 8-0 W, 14-6 W, 24-10 W, 9-6 W, 4-3; L, 4-5 W, 8-7 PPD W, 5-4 (8 innings); W, 5-3 L, 2-5; W, 7-3 PPD W, 7-1; W, 11-1 (8 innings) L, 3-9; L, 6-7 W, 11-4; L, 12-2 W, 10-6 L, 0-4; W, 12-6 W, 15-11 W, 4-2 W, 5-0; W, 5-4 W, 4-2; W, 18-13 L. 6-9 PPD W, 15-4; W, 14-5 L, 2-3; W, 4-2 L, 3-6; W, 9-8

(results as of 4-1-14)

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ing eav me l s e a etir nd g ar r ation a he e y e Pu ram anim Vinc d the t prog o n i n s ag beh lopme ear e dev ted s y a cre

We a ry s&sto N a t e photo

What drew you to HCC? Growing up, my family made quite a few trips to Hutchinson for shopping, and I went to the State Fair often. I have always liked Hutchison, and Hutchinson Community College has a great reputation. What was the driving force behind moving from a drafting instructor to developing the animation and game development program? I have taught animation for many years but not game development. The last five years or so I had a lot of students asking about game design. I was not able to do both drafting and animation/game development so I decided to give up computer drafting technology and move into developing a curriculum for animation and gaming. What will you miss most about HCC? Everything. I have really enjoyed working with the faculty, staff, administration, and of course the students. We have a great campus with excellent facilities, and it feels like a family environment. How do you plan to continue your involvement in the gaming industry? At this time I don’t have any plans of being involved with the gaming industry, but it is such an interesting field that, who knows? What retirement plans do you have in mind? I plan on getting a lot of odd jobs done around the house that I have put off for a few years. My wife and I will do some traveling in the United States, and I’m sure I will do quite a bit of golfing.

1974-1987

1987-1992

1992-1993

1993-2009

2009-2014

Lacross High School Industrial Ed. Teacher

Great Bend Industries Drafting Supervisor

Cloud County Community College Drafting Instructor

Hutchinson Community College Drafting Instructor

Hutchinson Community College Animation & Game Development Instructor

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Puyear Retires

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Continued from page 11 The plays were presented Saturday evening with the entire production process finishing up before or at the 24-hour mark. “For ‘Fiddler on the Roof ’, initial production meetings begin usually several months in advance of the production. These meetings continue for several weeks prior to even the first auditions such that major decisions about each production (concept, designs, etc.)

are made before each show is auditioned for,” Mattox said. “The show is rehearsed for six to eight weeks, five nights a week for three hours a night, during which production meetings continue and our Theatre Practicum class works on building set, costumes, props, etc. The final week of rehearsals involves lengthy technical rehearsals and dress rehearsals where we incorporate and rehearse all the technical aspects of the production

(costumes, props, lights, sound, special effects, etc.) along with the acting leading up to the opening of each show.” The set design component also faced these same challenges. Fine Arts Technical and Facilities Coordinator Patrick Reading explained his time frames. “Set design for ‘Fiddler on the Roof ’ was finalized in Dec. and we worked on it for around six weeks, with the last two weeks being really intensive.

For the 24 hour Improv there is no design. There are five 15-20 minute plays that I don’t read until around 5:30 am. I have 13 hours to figure everything out before they are performed in front of an audience.” With all of the different obstacles faced and the long hours worked, the theatre department and students reflected on both plays that were produced and looked forward to the next production with a new set of challenges.

Continued from page 15 This is what was intended by the shapers of the university in the first place.” In addition to academic furtherance the team became a close group of friends and also had the opportunity to meet other students at tournaments and meets. “I’ve made a lot of good friends. We’ve met a lot of people who are not just from Kansas and our school,” Ross said.

Tucker said they were able to meet and interact with other forensics students who shared the same goals, interests, and personalities which was not always easy to do in the typical group of college students. “We’re like a very, very, quirky family. Everyone knows everyone else’s faults a little too well. But we’re also a family in terms of shared victories. No one’s achievements are left uncelebrated,” Wagler said. Roberts said that the stu-

dents underwent a weekend of criticism at each tournament and most people would have become depressed and dejected. He taught the students to view it positively and use for their benefit. This is a skill that students used to their advantage in all areas of life. Another main reward for participation in forensics was the availability of large scholarships to four-year institutions following HCC. “They are heavily recruited

to move on to the four-year colleges. They all get to go to their top choices of four-year programs when they are done here,” Roberts said. After thoroughly preparing team members to succeed in their future educations and careers, HCC sent the forensics team to colleges around the nation to make a difference for their communities and their world.

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Dragon's Tale - Spring 2014 Issue