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Familiar Faces of HCC Student Ambassadors

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Greenshoots Renewable Energy Technology

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Pulling Their Weight Blue Dragon Football

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LONDON COMES TO

KANSAS

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Meet The Staff

The Dragon’s Tale is published three times a year by the Magazine class of Hutchinson Community College, 1300 North Plum, Hutchinson, KS 67501. When compiled, the three issues serve as an overview of the activities and the people of HCC during the school year.

Front Row: Carolyn Durbin, Mayra Ramirez, Taylor Thimesch, Courtney Carlton Back Row:  Rhiannon Taylor, Cristie Likins, Wade Burlew, Derrick Stiles, Hannah Wallace, Callie White

Staff

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Table of Contents

2 4 6 10 12 16

Familiar Faces of HCC Mayra Ramirez

Greenshoots Derrick Stiles

Karen Baehler’s Trail to HCC Callie White

Reset 837 Courtney Carlton

3rd Thursday Taylor Thimesch

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Everything Is Real But The Blood Carolyn Durbin

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Government Changes Aid Cristie Likins

Bump! Set! Spike! Wade Burlew

Pulling Their Weight Rhiannon Taylor

London Comes to Kansas Hannah Wallace

Cross Country Staff

Ads Staff

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EVERYTHING Is Real But The Field Operation Day Presents Scenario-Based Training Like No Other photos&story

Carolyn Durbin

It was a hot summer day on June 18 when the first call came in to Reno Country 911 dispatcher. “Reno country 911,” said the dispatcher. “What is your location? What is the emer-

gency? May I get your name and phone number?” Mr. Jones, the caller, said, “My address is 1809 E Essex Rd, Hutchinson, KS, my emergency is my daughter fall from the top of a tree I think she broke something, I see her bones. My name is John Jones and my phone number is 620-

254-3452.” That was the conversation the Hutchinson Community College Emergency Medical Sciences students heard as they participated in the EMS field operation. The purpose of the field ops day was to provide the paramedic students with an

opportunity to practice their skills in real time and life-like scenarios. Students were required to evaluate and address a multitude of complaints, injuries and illnesses while also functioning as a cooperative EMS team member. James LeBaron, EMS continuing education instructor, said, “Paramedic students should experience the pace and intensity of medical and trauma emergency scenes, run calls, and interact with fellow students as part of a response team, and apply their classroom training by demonstrating critical thinking skills in each scenario.” The students’ experience began when the HCC Emergency Dispatch Center requested one of the 25 responding ambulance crews manned by 2-3 students and a mentor. The crew arrived at one of the 14 simulated-scenario scenes. Example scenarios included a car accident, chemical spill, heart attack, domestic disturbance, diabetes, childbirth and other types of situations. EMS student Christopher Boivin, Rose Hill, gives aid to a victim during the two-day field operation at south campus, near Yoder in mid-June. A total of 175 volunteers played the victim role.

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Luke Edward, Newton; Julie Romereim, Andover; and Bobby Johnson,Newton, wheeled a victim into the emergency room or treatment. Simulated emergency rooms played a big part in the training and provided a place to transport the victims.

In Honor Of Chy Joseph Miller • President of Kansas Services Association • Worked at Pratt

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County EMS, Arkansas City Fire/EMS, and McPherson EMS • At the time of his death, held the position of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians.

Community colleges that participated in the EMS field ops day

Barton County Cowley County Johnson County EMS student Macus Maust, Hesston, ripes the shirt off the victim so he can treat her injuries. Students from three other colleges attended the lage-scale disaster event.

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The crews provided patient care, transported patients to one of two emergency departments or handed off the patient to real-life flight medical crews. This vision was cast by Chy Miller, former coordinator of EMS and chairman of the public safety, fire science and criminal justice department, and implemented in 2006. Miller and his staff carried out his vision with the purpose of giving the EMS students a big classroom to work in. “The experience of running calls with different participants from other programs on unique runs that they might not see right away when they go to the field,” Lesta L. Stonecipher, EMS instructional program assistant, said. “Be able to have a preceptor there to address concerns with the calls.” The purpose for the event is to expose and engage the students to care for the sick and injured in a real life situation, in real-time with all the bells and whistles. Top priority is given to realism, safety, education and integrity. “I am sure what I took from field ops is different then with others. I took a sense of awe in how all the different agencies came together to provide real life scenarios for students who may not have any field experience at all,” Jimi Kristek, Pretty Prairie, said. “That every paramedic, nurse, doctor, teacher, and volunteers were willing to take time out of their busy schedules to help students utilize this amazing teaching tool that not everyone gets to have.” The instructors organized and ran the event that gave the students a training opportunity Continued on page 28

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Familiar Faces of

HCC

Student Ambassadors provide information to prospective students.

Ambassador’s Top 10 Must Know Things

1. Must be friendly. 2. Must be outgoing. 3. Learn to be flexible. 4. Tour will occur no matter what the weather is outside. 5. Must learn to make conversation with complete strangers 6. Must have the skills to talk with anyone and everyone 7. Be a team player. 8. Maintain a positive attitude 9. Stay out of trouble (outside of school and in) 10. Must be a good folk.

photos&story

M AY R A R A M I R E Z

The ambassador clocked in and thumbed through a notebook to find the name of who a complete stranger. That person would become the ambassador’s main focus as they planned out the campus route according to the prospective student’s interests. The campus visitor arrived and the tour began. An ambassador was a person who acted as a representative or promoter of a specified activity. The Hutchinson Community College ambassadors have an important job on campus. They are often the ones that are involved with helping many students make one of their biggest decisions when

Apryl Manzi, Wichita, and Bryce Young, Hutchinson, give tours to some of the 200 students on Blue Dragon Senior Day. Both talked about the newlyremodeled Science Hall and what it offered.

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choosing what college to attend. Their primary duty was giving campus tours to prospective students. They were also involved in recruitment activities, as well as working inside the admissions office helping with sending out materials. “We do not try to convince people, we give people the proper tools so they can make the best decision possible,” Efrain Lopez, Macksville, said. The HCC ambassador program came about 20 years ago. Every year, a team of 20 to 25 make up the team. To become an ambassador, the student must apply for the scholarship, and let the admissions staff know that they are interested. If the student was chosen, the process began with another application and interview. “I think that it allows the student the opportunity to know too, that we think highly of them, that we are putting them out as the face of the college,” Corbin Strobel, admissions director, said.

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Favorite Thing About Being an Ambassador 1. Scholarships available.

Writing letters, Brandon Day, Wichita, finishes his shift for the day. One of the ambassador responsibilities included doing other work assigned by the Admissions Office.

2. Meet new people. 3. Admissions staff. 4. Opportunities to get involved at the college (campus activities, etc.).

Looking at a notebook, Tyson Kuhn, Hutchinson, and Tyler Terrel, Haysville, prepare for the list of tours scheduled for the day. Terrel showed a prospective student around campus and introduced the student to other staff members.

5. Being a part of the process to help future students choose the right college for them.

On average, the admissions office gives about 5 tours a day, up to 25 a week. There are about 600-700 tours per year. When giving a tour, an ambassador showed the student the things HCC had to offer that were important to that person. Factors that most looked for were things such as cost, distance, major, activities, and size of the campus. “Bring our perspective from their eyes and not ours,” Strobel said. When looking for the ideal ambassador, the staff looked at personality traits, someone who is caring, had personal skills as far as interaction, and someone that is welcoming. A good ambassador didn’t necessarily need to have the background information about the college. They were trained on the ins and outs of the college. Most of all what makes a good ambassador is someone who had people skills. The ambassadors had to be able to know what each depart-

ment had to offer in order to help students on tour with questions asked or showed the student the particular building. “My favorite part about being an ambassador is meeting the new people I take on tours and working with some pretty amazing people,” Alexis Johnson, Macksville, said. Not only did they show them the academic buildings on campus, they also took them to the dormitories. This allowed students to see what campus housing offered. During the visit the student could also meet with their potential advisor to talk about their chosen program. When being an ambassador it helped students build a relationship with faculty, as well as getting to meet other people around the campus.

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Hutchinson Community College’s Renewable Energy Technology Program looks to grow

Alec Gaug, Wichita; Mitchell Burkes, Great Bend; Marie Moses, Hutchinson; listen to Dennis Luebbers, program coordinator and instructor, explain how to connect the battery charger to the battery. In a matter of minutes, the solar panels charged the battery from 12V to 12.08V. The Endurance 5kW wind turbine, located at the Hutchinson High School football practice field, provides power for the Hutchinson Career and Technical Education Academy. The blades measured 10.ft long and the tower was 90ft tall.

photos&story

Derrick Stiles

Energy production is undergoing a major paradigm shift. As America moved from the traditional methods of natural gas and coal to more ecofriendly means, Hutchinson Community College trained students for these fast growing industries. According to the Institute

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for Energy Research website, 9 percent of all energy consumed in the United States in 2012 was from renewable sources and they accounted for about 12 percent of the nation’s total electricity production. In 2012, wind energy became the number one source of new U.S. electricity generation capacity for the first time – representing 43 percent of all new electric additions and accounting for $25 billion in U.S. investment. The country’s cumulative installed wind energy capacity increased more than 22-fold since 2000. HCC’s Renewable Energy Technology program introduced students to wind, solar, and geothermal forms of energy. Courses offered the advantage of hands-on learning in the industrial laboratories, including electronics, hydraulics and pneumat-

ics. Hands-on applications included a functional 5kW wind turbine, 2.5kW solar units and geothermal heat pump. A certificate of renewable energy technology was awarded to students who successfully completed the program. The credit earned in the certificate applied directly towards the Associate in Applied Science in Manufacturing Engineering Technology. The program was still in its infancy as it was only its third year of being offered at HCC. Only five students have graduated in the renewable energy technology program and those students are working in the adjacent fields of HVAC and electronics. Currently, the program has five students enrolled and is looking to grow. Dennis Luebbers, program coordinator and instructor, was optimistic on the program’s growth and

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growth in the industry. “I believe that renewable energy is just going to grow and grow,” Luebbers said. “The government mandated a law that states that 20% of all electricity will be generated by renewable energy means such as wind and solar.” Government backing provided the program additional support. One of the least favorite things that students learned in the program was the amount of government regulation involved in the industry. Cory Richards, Inman, said, “Be ready to deal with a lot of government. There is a lot more than you might think.” According to Alec Gaug, Wichita, the politics involved with renewable energy was the most interesting or surprising thing he learned. Gaug said, “Probably the politics involved with renew-

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able energy. Wherever there is big money involved, politics are involved.” Politics aside, the jobs that involved green technology were expanding. The program was geared towards students gaining employment as Renewable Energy Technicians (RETs). RETs worked in a variety of industries, from manufacturers that produce component parts for renewable technologies to utilities that captured and transferred power. RETs were responsible for installing, monitoring and maintaining renewable energy systems, and operating the bio refineries of the future.

Gaug holds the voltmeter as Burkes and Moses take a reading on the solar panels. The panels generated a reading of 18.2V DC.

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Another growing job field was renewable energy audit specialists. In the spring, a course called Renewable Energy Technology Analysis will focus on teaching students these job skills. “It’s a brand new course that we developed last year. Students go in and learn everything they need to know about geothermal, solar, and wind units so they can size them and go out and sell them to a customer. They do an energy audit and ask them how much of this do you want to be produced by renewable energy? The students will have to go sit down and figure up the size of system that it would take. For solar they figure up how many square feet of solar panel

that it would take to generate the amount of electricity they want,” Luebbers said. Current students prepared for life after college. Gaug planned on moving to the southwest region of the country and to become a technician for electronic billboard companies that run off of solar energy. Richards planned to continue his education in automotive technology and then pair the two together to get a job in the auto industry. “The company I would like to get on with is BMW or Audi. BMW is on the leading edge of green technology and application into their cars. I want to take what I learn here and make better cars for the future,” Richards said.

These careers and this field of study did required students to have certain characteristics. Many qualities led to success in this course of study. “Well number one, I would say the ability to learn something new. Also a sense of adventure, because if you are going to work on one of the big wind farms, some of those wind towers are 300 feet in the air and you have to have a sense of adventure to climb to the top of that thing and actually work on it. They also will need a mechanical aptitude. We want them to be interested in electricity. Know AC and DC,” Luebbers said. The ability to learn new things was good but students also had to be able to apply this

Kansas Wind Farms

new knowledge. “Come in with a willingness to learn, to try. They will be getting dirty and greasy. One of the things that we want to develop is the ability to think critically. You have to be able to troubleshoot,” Luebbers said. “Be ready to learn stuff. You will have your eyes opened into a lot of different ways of doing things. There are lots of different opportunities in this new frontier of technology. Even for me it has got my mind thinking, how can we make that one better,” Richards said. “It’s a good think tank. You have the teacher inputting, the students inputting, and it gives you a lot of material to work with and to think through.”

Top energy producing wind farms in Kansas

Merdian Way Wind Farm

Smoky Hills Wind Project Spearville

Central Plains Wind Farm

Cimarron Wind Project

Ensign Wind Farm

Post Rock Wind Project

Elk River Wind Farm

Shooting Star Wind Project

Caney River Wind Project Flat Ridge

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Q: What are your favorite parts of the job? A: My favorite parts of the job are the climbing, I know that most of the guys that I work with would probably not agree with me; but I really never get tired of having a perspective that most Midwesterners will never know. The other part of the job that I love is that I am challenged almost every day, to learn something new and be pushed out of my comfort zone. I also enjoy getting things fixed and fixed right. Finally I love being outside no matter the weather and dealing with as few people as possible and making things work for the greater good. Q: What are your least favorite aspects of the job? A: My least favorite parts of the job are the paperwork that this particular company has as a requirement of the job. That is really the only thing that I don’t like about the job. Q: What qualities are employers looking for in students coming out of college? A: The qualities that our company looks for are self-motivated individuals that have a strong background/education in mechanical and technical equipment. It would also be a benefit to have

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photo courtesy of Paul Baird

From the Field

Q: What is your typical day like? A: Typical day involves addressing any turbines that are faulted; if there are none then we have various projects that would be considered preventative maintenance. In addition to these tasks we are asked to try and find improvements in any processes that we see are lacking. Those improvements could be to make things safer, faster or increase availability. We have a rotating on call schedule which requires us to be the first point of contact in the event of a turbine faulting outside of our normal eight hour work day. We are also asked to travel to other sites for training and/or assistance.

Paul Baird Wind Technician, Nextra Energy some knowledge of business and I think that it would go without saying, but some computer skills. Q: What classes prepared you the most for your career? A: Technology, computer and business classes will be the best classes that prepare you for the industry. Q: How much can students expect to earn coming out of college? A: You could expect to earn upper teens to low twenties per hour starting out.

Q: What was the biggest surprise when you started your job? A: How many people are scared of heights that work in the industry.

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Practical life lessons were a strong point in the classroom of Dr. Karen Baehler, economics instructor, who led students down the trail to success through strong academic learning. Baehler spent most of her time defining topics such as scarcity, incentive, and other related terms. In addition to the economics classes, she also taught horsemanship, a non-credit class where students learned how to interact, ride, and take care of horses. Though originally from Minnesota, she spent much of her early years in Belleville, KS, where she worked in her father’s western store. She attended Belleville High School, a small 3A school with a strong theatre and forensics program, and she attributed her involvement in that to her achieved ability to communicate to a large group of people. She thought it was an activity that helped prepare people for many different careers and occupations. “It takes a lot of confidence to walk into a large group and think you can hold their attention for an hour,” Baehler said. Upon graduation from Belleville High, she attended one

year at Colby Community College, which she believed was a wise choice since she stated that probably not very many 18-year-old graduates are truly ready for a big college when they come from a smaller school. “I’m a real big believer in community colleges, I think it’s a great place to start. Obviously, financially it is, but I do think they are a teaching institution, and we have really strong teachers here,” Baehler said. Baehler was a strong promoter of education and acknowledged that it had opened many doors for her; therefore she enjoyed her job of preparing students for their future. “One thing I really hope is that I’ve tried to always make learning fun, so I really like to change it up a lot,” Baehler said. What teachers in economics education call chalk talk, she tried to eliminate by incorporating group activities and discussion. Eric Ernst, Colwich, was Baehler’s student assistant. He said he appreciated Baehler’s position against redundancy. She always tried to get new material and double-checked

Dr. Karen Baehler, econonmics instructer, speaks to students in one of her Macroeconomics classes. She often took time to explain economics concepts further through real life examples.

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photos&story

Callie White

Preparing to saddle the horse, Baehler visits with students at the horsemanship class. The horse was one of her older horses that she used for the class due to its well-broke behavior. Baehler stands with her horse at her home. She personally trained the four-year-old horse that came from a special bloodine she favored.

with him to prevent back tracking. “She’s very good at using lots of helpful examples and explains in depth if you don’t understand something. She also represents her lessons through PowerPoints, which makes studying easier,” Sara Balkenbush, Kingman, said. Balkenbush took macroeconomics from Baehler and also enrolled in microeconomics. “She is very good at praising me when I go above & beyond what she has asked for me to do,” Ernst said. Baehler traveled through a series of learning experiences and places of education to be able to help students. She spent two years at Kansas State University where she was the

university’s Rodeo Queen for one year. She competed at nationals in Bozeman, MT, in the National College Finals. She also served as a judge at various events, rode in parades, and helped with a rodeo at Hays for children with disabilities. “It was a great experience. It came with a lot of responsibilities. It was a little bit of a juggling act keeping up with schoolwork and traveling. My hauling buddy would drive while I did homework, then I would drive and she would do homework,” Baehler said. After graduation from KSU, Baehler taught at Winona, Berean Academy, and Hillsboro. She received her Masters from Wichita State University and accepted a full time job at HCC in 1999. Recently, after she encountered various obstacles and side paths, she earned her Doctorate from the Continued on page 30

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Karen Baehler

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E S RE

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Cour tney Carlton

Ever wanted to hit the ‘reset’ button on life before the week started? Tired, frustrated and stressed out over things that happened last week that can’t be controlled? Reset 837, a newly organized club on campus was designed to help student do just that. The group meets in the basement of Parker Student Union every Sunday night at 8:37 PM. Reset 837 is a non-denominational worship service for college students, with live music and speakers. There are six churches that come together to make this possible: Crossroads Christian Church, CrossPoint, The Fathers House, The Journey, Our Redeemer Lutheran, and First Church of the Nazarene. The name comes from a verse in Romans, chapter 8 verse 37 “No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.”

Rion Rhoades, head football coach, leads students in prayer after the message. Each night of Reset ended with worship songs and prayer, which allowed students to reflect, prepare and apply that weeks lesson.

“I feel like our campus needs the activity,” Tyler Anderson, Hutchinson, said. Between the fellowship, worship band, and speakers, students can find a part that speaks to them and allows them to worship freely. “We don’t want students to feel judged. We want it to be a safe environment,” Anderson said. College students have busy schedules and individuals get overwhelmed and stressed. “[Reset], that’s what a lot of us need to do. Our lives are crazy, we need to reflect back and start over,” Rion Rhoades, head football coach, said. The reason for attending or being involved in the club was different for all members. “I wanted to be involved in Reset because I know how hard it is to be a young adult but I also know how encouraging it is to be surrounded by a body of believers. I wanted there to

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Reset

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be a place where students could have the opportunity to be with other believers and worship, so once my dad proposed the idea to me I was in 100%,” Sydney Rhoades, Hutchinson, said. Worship music is one way for students to express themselves. “Our band is awesome. I think it creates a really cool and fun environment and gives students a chance to worship with other people their age,” S. Rhoades said. Being in the band, things are viewed from a different aspect. “It truly is wonderful to be able to guide the students in a time of worship. I am just on stage to glorify God – there is no other reason,” Emily Davis, Hutchinson, said. The future hopes for the club are big! According to Sam Maldonado, Hutchinson, the club hopes to grow throughout the school.

Emily Davis and Zach Busick, both of Hutchinson, lead worship during Reset. Each Sunday night started and ended with worship music. The worship band was student lead and anyone was welcome to participate.

Having a comfortable atmosphere during worship is important to allow students to worship in their own way. Students were welcome to worship in any way they felt lead too. Students would pray with each other and encourage one another throughout the week.

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Reset

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The worship team leads students in a worship night at Westbrook Baptist Church. Reset gathered off campus in addition to the usual meeting time to spend a night in prayer and song.

Most clubs want a lot of students to be involved and that is their focus, for Reset 837 things are viewed in a different perspective. “I ultimately hope that Reset can reach as many people as it can, teaching them about what Jesus has done for us. However, I realize that numbers aren’t everything. If RESET continues to consistently be 50 or 60 people, but every week is deep, spiritual, and completely sur-

rendered, numbers no longer become an issue,” Davis said. Not only do they want more people to be involved, but also build connections with each other, both students and sponsors. “Reset is a meaningful time, the most important is getting to know more students and building connections,” R. Rhoades said. With more than 80 clubs and organizations on campus,

Reset 837 planned to set themselves apart and provide an atmosphere where students can worship freely with their classmates. “When a college student can have a meanigful relationship with God, how much they can accomplish, how much smoother, more meaningful life can be for them” R. Rhoades said.

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Prayer

Worship

Fellowship

Music

What to Expect at Reset Four Things the Club Focused On

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3rd

Thursday

Students share their side of working Third Thursday instead of going to the event for entertainment. photos&story

Ta y l o r T h i m e s c h

Food, live entertainment, and shopping galore! One day a month downtown Hutchinson showcases these three things during an event called Third Thursday. It offers Hutchinson Community College students and other residents of Hutchinson not only something to do, but an escape from everyday life. “I’m not from Hutch so I never knew about it till I started working. It looks like fun and it’s different. And it doesn’t happen every night. It’s once a month. And it’s different to other people who are not from here. Gives them something to explore,” Kimberly Zoglman, Garden Plain, said. Zoglman worked two Third Thursdays at the kitchen accessory store, Apron Strings. Before the monthly event started in 2008, the downtown businesses closed at their regular times. Jennifer Randall and Lacey Schechter are the ladies to contact if a person wants to become involved in the event. After contacting those in charge of the event, vendors and businesses set up their displays for the public and

Instructor, Daniel Spees, stands in front of his art piece that he entered into the downtown business, Gallery 11. The theme of the exhibit showcased art for Dia de los muertos. Kimberly Zoglman, Garden Plain, learns how to use a kitchen utensil for slicing, peeling and coring apples. The workers demonstrated how to make churro cheesecake with fried apple topping during the Third Thursday event.

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Morgan Shore, Hutchinson, straightens up a mannequin at Anima Bella before the crowds arrive on Third Thursday. The store offered 20% off to students with their student IDs on Saturdays.

Why Attend Third Thursday? 120 students shared the main reason they attended the event.

9 work at local business

prepared for the extra people downtown. “To prepare for Third Thursday traffic of people we have to make sure everything is ready to go, such as having dressing rooms ready and staff prepared. Some Third Thursdays get pretty hectic, but others aren’t so bad,” Morgan Shore, Hutchinson, said.

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people watching

food

The event allowed the public to be more aware of the different businesses. Visitors were likely to check out stores they might not otherwise frequent. “[My favorite part is] the different people that come in. It is a variety of ages and tastes. Many people come in to just see our elaborate decor in our store,” Shore said.

The extra flow of people however has its downside for employees of these businesses. “Its very tiring being on my feet all day,” Zoglman said. Unfortunately, not everyone that went into each shop came to make purchases. “People come in our boutique on Third Thursday to talk instead of shop. It crowds up the store and takes up

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shopping

room for the people who actually want to come in and shop,” Shore said. The overall point of this night of festivities was to have fun and get people more involved in the community and to promote local shopping. “It is a great chance for volunteering at things. Many great causes to be involved in,” Shore said.

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AID

GOVERNMENT CHANGES

STUDENTS AFFECTED BY FINANCIAL AID CHANGES photos&story

Cristie Likins

College cost money. Most students need some kind of financial aid to be able to go to school. The government recently changed how much and how students received aid. These changes affected pell grants, subsidized and unsubsidized loans. Pell grants do not need to be repaid and were awarded to undergraduate students who had not earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. Pell grants were need-based federal grants available to both full-time and part-time undergraduate students. The first change affected students who received pell grants. They were only eligible for a twelve semesters rather than the previous eighteen semesters. This meant that student who received a pell grant for six years or twelve semesters would be cut off from further funding. It also limited how much a student could get in subsidized student loans. “We have had to adjust our process to account for previous college attendance,” Dianna Bunker, financial aid advisor, said. Federal student loans were a form of federal aid that must

be repaid. One of the two main types included subsidized loans for which the student did not pay interest. Interest would normally be charged periodically according to the annual percentage rate (APR) . However, with a subsidized loan another party pays the interest. “We are beginning the evaluation process on how we will be able to best help students with upcoming changes in subsidized loans,” Bunker said. Interest rates increased from 3.4% to 6.8%. Interest would begin to accrue during the sixmonth grace period of the loan, previously it did not. The other main federal loan was the unsubsidized loans. Students chose to make interest payments while still in school or capitalize the interest and made payments after they had finished their education. As a rule, interest on an unsubsidized loan begins to accrue as soon as the loan amount is disbursed. This type of loan does not provide some of the advantages of a subsidized loan. With subsidized loans, the federal government prior to the commencement of repaying the balance covers the interest. This arrangement meant that the student does not have to be concerned about the interest payments while still in school or deal with capitalized

interest after graduation. The Hutchinson Community College Financial Aid Office encouraged students to better understand these changes. “I want students to be aware of the changes that are gong on. Don’t what a student to be going to school for three years than come to them and not

know that they are running out of subsidized loan and then not know how they are going to finish,“Nathan Buche, director of financial aid and scholarships, said. I would rather a student come and sit and talk to them for ten minutes and let them know their options ahead of time so they know what’s

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Aware of The Federal Financial Aid Changes Yes

No

going on than be surprised at the end.” According to Buche, it’s going to be based on a 150% completion of the chosen program. If a student came to college for a two-year degree, they would only be able to get subsidized student loans for three total years. If it took longer then they could choose

What Kinds Of Financial Aid Received

to take out an unsubsidized student loan. If a prospective student wanted to go to college they need to explore all of the financial aid options. They are encouraged to talk with the college’s financial aid office to make sure they get all they need to be able to get your degree.

Pell Grants Government Student Loans Bank Loans Loans From Parents Didn't Receive financial aid 0

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Janae Zimmerman, Valley Center, asks Robyn Kelly, financial aid secretary, questions regarding her financial aid. Kelly helped direct students to go online to find information they needed for financial aid.

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120

150

Working on an application, Braden Burleson, Wichita, has Dianna Bunker, financial aid advisor, help him with questions about work study. Work study allowed students with a financial need to earn money to help pay for education expenses.

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Wa d e B u r l e w

Athletes adjust to the transition of high school to collegiate play and the challenges that come with it. Being no stranger to the game of volleyball, Coach Patrick Hall was accustomed to adaptation and change. “The large number of freshmen really affects the dynamics of the team,” Hall said. The volleyball team played the season with nine freshman and five returning sophomores, with the majority of the team being new players. Hall said, “Our team chemistry is a very strong asset. It really sets us apart from the other teams in our league.” With over thirty years of coaching, Hall had experienced the recruiting process. “The whole team is looking good, especially our starters,” Hall said. “For as few as there are, our sophomores are excellent role models both on and

off the court.” Sophomores and returning players included Teresa Wade, St. John; Megan Heier, Grainfeild; Mariah Dickson, Lawrence; Samantha Lackey, San Antonio, Texas; and new sophomore Dragana Micic, Ivanjica, Serbia. As a team, Hall said that his athletes really cut down on error potential and worked on turning it into a more rhythmic game. Paige Weidner, Ottawa, played both server and right side, and had noticed quite a bit of a change when moving out of high school and moving into collegiate volleyball. “It’s a way faster pace and it’s always kill for kill,” Weidner said. As with any other sport, the transition to collegiate play

proved to be the biggest step when it comes to school play. Weidner said, “You really get to know your role as a player. With the sophomores, they all serve as leaders in their own different ways,” Weidner said. “Megan is the team mom which every team needs.” When it comes to teammates, at this level, it’s not all hugs of encouragement. There are also concerns as a player. “Everyone is good, that’s why they’re here. Everyone is an athlete. You have to keep your game face on because there will always be someone willing to take your spot,” Weidner said. “Everyone is always progressively getting better. Everyone is getting to know their roles on the team and are getting good at filling their positions. They all seem to know what’s best for the team.” As a player, they must know

Mariah Dickson, Lawrence, and teammates cheer on their team from the sidelines. The players created a chemistry which was credited toward their success as a team.

their strengths. Weidner consistently started for the team and played two wide-ranged positions: server and right side. “Ever since high school I’ve played all over the court when it came to different positions. So, naturally, I’ve gotten good at adjusting,” Weidner said. When all was said, what was brought to the table seemed to be what marked an athlete as a player. It’s not just going out for a team, it about proving themselves. Knowing what they were able to do and being able to bring that particular skill on game day and presenting it at 100% every time possible made the best athletes.

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2013 Volleyball Results Aug.23

Eastern Arizona

L

Sept. 27

Seward County

W

Aug. 23

Yavapai

W

Sept. 28

Cloud County

W

Aug. 24

Frank Phillips College

W

Oct. 2

Barton

W

Aug. 24

Pima

W

Oct. 5

Colby

W

Aug. 28

Barton

W

Oct. 7

Cloud County

L

Sept. 4

Colby

L

Oct. 9

Seward County

W

Sept.6

College of Southern Idaho

L

Oct. 11

Jefferson College

W

Sept. 6

North Idaho

L

Oct. 11

Colby

W

Sept. 7

Snow College

L

Oct. 12

MSU West Plains

L

Sept. 7

Salt Lake

L

Oct. 15

Garden City

W

Sept. 11

Garden City

W

Oct. 17

Dodge City

W

Sept. 18

Dodge City

W

Oct. 22

Pratt

W

Sept. 20

Redlands

W

Oct.25

MSU-West Plains

L

Sept. 20

Jefferson College

W

Oct. 25

D2-No. 6 Illinois Central

W

Sept. 21

Seminole State

W

Oct. 26

Indian Hills

W

Sept. 21

Frank Phillips College

W

Oct. 26

Jefferson College

W

Sept. 25

Pratt

W

Results as of Oct. 31, 2013

Paige Weidner, Ottawa, lines up for a serve. Weidner also played the right side position.

Nicole Kinser, Hugoton, goes in for a kill against Garden City. The Lady Dragons went on to beat Garden City 3-0.

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The Hutchinson football coaches and team stand on the sideline and watch as the ball is snapped for a new play. The team lost their first home game against Navarro.

W Coffeyville 44-14

W Fort Scott 63-39

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R h i a n n o n Ta y l o r

L Navarro 16-41

H Dragons

W

New Expectations Drive Players to Succeed

Garden City 34-24

A new season for any football team brings new beginnings, new excitement, new experiences, and of course new players. The Hutchinson freshman players got their first experience being a Blue Dragon when the team started preparation early with camp in June and later moved into the dorms to begin official practices. The difference from high school to collegiate football were on the minds of many freshman players. “It’s a lot faster paced than high school football, but you get

L Dodge City 40-34 (OT)

Overall Record : 6-3

W

Independence 58-0

W

Bethany College JV 50-0

W

Highland 36-20

L

Butler 19-16 (6 OT) Results as of Oct. 31, 2013

used to it pretty quick,” John Gilbertson, Wichita, said. Getting adapted to the tempo of the game wouldn’t be the only thing they would need to get used to, for many of the starting freshman a lot of pressure was felt. Ryan Weese, Olathe, had become familiar with this sort of pressure. Being the starting kicker there would times when the extra point would be the difference between a win and a loss. “I thrive for those pressured situations,” Weese said. Once August 24 rolled

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Orange Moony, Olathe, cuts around the defense in open field to gain more yards. Hutchinson and Dodge City fought hard as the game ran into overtime. Ryan Weese, Olathe, launches the ball down the field 60 yards to Navarro. Navarro returned the ball for a 7-yard return.

around, the Blue Dragons began the new season in a battle for their first win against Coffeyville. The stands filled up and the sun fell behind the horizon. The stadium light shined bright on the field as the first kick off of the season began the game. Knowing how much faster everything was, nothing settled the nerves of those who stepped on college turf for the first time. “I was pretty nervous before the game, but pretty excited once game time got closer,” Clay Wilcox, Anthony, said. With the first game under their belt, and a first game won at that, starting freshman began to feel a little more at home. “I’m a lot calmer when it comes to game time now that I know what to expect,” Wilcox said. It wasn’t until the next Saturday that the Blue Dragons took their first loss, but it didn’t deflate the hopes of the team’s goal to get to the playoffs. “I feel like the loss to Navarro only humbled us, we still have a bright season ahead,” Gilbertson said. A hope of a bright season illuminated once news spread that Butler, the most anticipated

game of the year for the Blue Dragons, had lost to Highland. Highland was the next game on the team’s schedule. The beginning of the game against Highland almost seemed too easy, the Blue Dragons scored twice within the first quarter without much effort. Questions were asked around the stadium if this really was the team that beat Butler. Before the half, the Scotties had only scored with a field goal, but came back to answer with two touchdowns and extra points in the third quarter making the score 36-17. Despite their effort it wasn’t enough to pull ahead of the Dragons with only one more field goal from Highland in the fourth quarter, HCC claimed the win, 36-20. “It felt awesome beating them, we played great and we knew we could handle them, and it just reminded us that much more that we can beat anyone if we play as hard as we did that game,” Gilbertson said. Taking that win against Highland only increased the anticipation for both freshman and the team veterans, for the day the Dragons and Butler Grizzlies came head to head.

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Madison Holmes, Wichita, trys to get the ball while her teammates set up the play. She came to HCC as a freshman and was the sister of former Lady Dragon all-conference midfielder Miranda Holmes.

photos&story

H a n n a h Wa l l a ce

London comes to Kansas

Four players from England become Blue Dragons International players joined the Hutchinson Community College soccer team and experienced more of the different game. Many soccer players came from outside of Kansas as well as outside of the country. Out

of the 20 players on the roster, 4 traveled from England. Phebie Eshen, London, England, played the game of soccer since she was nine. She was determined to play through the memory of her best friend Leo, whom passed away in a car crash. Eshen said the biggest difference beween playing in London and playing here in America was, “Coach Sammy is more intense with the game.” Melissa Zapata, Giddings, Texas, played midfield for the team. “It has been a different experience than playing in club soccer,” Zapata said. “Soccer at Hutch is fun, but it sucked when we lost to Butler.” Zapata experienced the game of soccer in Mexico. She also said that playing soccer here in America versus play-

ing out of country is different, America is more organized with the sport. Zapata said she had a moment in soccer she will never forget that occured in a Hutchinson game. “I am 5 foot and I scored a header” Zapata said. Madison Holmes, Wichita, played soccer since she was five years old. She played the forward position for the team and agreed that soccer is different in college than it was in high school. She said that Coach Lane is very intense but she would not change anything. She dosen’t like 5:30 a.m. practices, but said the team has improved over the season. Whether watching international soccer or on the field in Hutchinson, players enjoyed the sport.

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Siobhon Wilson, London, England, receives the ball after playing strong defense. Wilson practiced with the Lady Dragons in 2012 as a redshirt player.

2013 Soccer Scoreboard Date Opponent

Aug. 25 Aug. 28 Sept. 5 Sept. 9 Sept. 13 Sept. 17 Sept. 19 Sept. 25 Sept. 28 Oct. 4 Oct. 11 Oct. 13 Oct. 19 Oct. 23 Oct 30

Kansas City Garden City Independence Hesston College Neosho County Cowley Coffeyville Barton Allen Johnson County Butler No. Oklahoma College Cloud County Dodge City Pratt

Result

W, 7-1 W, 11-1 W, 6-0 W, 8-0 W, 5-0 W, 5-2 L, 4-1 L, 1-0 W, 10-0 L, 3-0 L, 3-0 W, 2-1 W, 8-0 W, 2-0 W, 10-0

Results as of Oct. 31, 2013

Melissa Vega, Topeka, receives the ball from a teammate. Vega played midfield as a freshman for the Lady Dragons.

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Edgar Gutierrez, Hutchinson, prepares for the race while a student athletic trainer tapes his foot. Guiterrez finished 74th in the Region VI Championships at Hutchinson’s/Prairie Ridge Park. Photo by Staff

Cross

Country story

D r a g o n ’s Ta l e S t a f f

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Continuing down the hill, Jordan Hall, Kansas City, stays ahead of the pack of runners. As a freshman, Hall completed the Region VI Cross Country Championships in 56th place on Oct. 28. Photo by Mike Durbin

Ashley Claxton, Derby, holds her place at the Romp at the Ridge held in Hutchinson on Sept.14. Claxton completed with a 49th place finish at the Region VI Cross Country Championships. Photo by Mike Durbin

Ashlynn Lambert, Concordia, . Lambert placed 13th at the Region VI Cross Country Championships on Oct. 28 and earned 12th place in the Jayhawk West standings. Photo by Mike Durbin Skylar Hayes, Buhler; Gutierrez; Drew Haggeman, Hesston; Helam Hernandez, Newton; and Orbelin Rojas, Phoenix, A.Z., sprint after the races starts. Rojas placed 10th in the Jayhawk Conference standings. Photo by Staff

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Continued from page 3 to get accustomed to their chosen career field. “Field ops is a valuable training opportunity that I wish I had experienced before I entered my paramedic field internship,” Lebaron said. “Words can’t describe the unique experience of field ops and being able to construct scenes and calls with moulage for an optimum experience for students. It is what sets us apart,” Stonecipher said. Exposure to different sce-

narios allowed students to assess the situation and practice their training. “My favorite part was getting to meet different people and see all the great acting skills! Some volunteer patients played the part very well,” Kristek said. There were 140 plus calls that went out on the first day and 90 calls went out on day two. Tina Peevyhouse, EMS lab assistant and coordinator, said, “Sixty-five plus different scenarios were available at

14 locations. Fifty percent were trauma and fifty percent were medical.” Trauma is a physical wound to the body caused by an external source such as, a leg laceration, burn to hands, or joint injury. Bringing a day like this to life involves a lot of volunteers. “Watching everyone show up! Big relief when all the email, phone calls and text messaging was effectively communicated. To see 25 ambulances, 6 fire trucks, 5 law enforcement

agencies, 4 colleges and about 175 other people in one parking lot,” Peevyhouse said. “Very exciting knowing that the end product of this two-day event is focused on the common goal of communities receiving great patient care from emergency services.” When summer rolls around remember the HCC EMS students while they brave the heat to practice and perfect their skills.

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Continued from page 11 University of Kansas. “When I said that day about being persistent and persevering, I meant it. I think the big deal is to not give up, you never know what’s around the corner,” Baehler said. She used her story to encourage students to reach for their dreams and goals and to never give up. Baehler, who said she had been around horses, also enjoyed sharing her interest in these animals with students. “When you’re passionate about something, you want to share it with other people and help them learn what you do,” Baehler said. The horsemanship class is divided into beginners and advanced. Jim Keever, Hutchinson, assisted Baehler by teaching the advanced while she devoted her time to students who were less experienced with horses.

“I always tell people that at the beginning of every class, Karen tells them about how much experience I have and how much I know and each time the story gets better but I don’t bother to correct her. She and I have a good working relationship,” Keever said. Together, Baehler and Keever educated individuals about horses and worked to improve their riding ability as well as interaction and knowledge of the animals. In addition to learning how to work with horses, students also took away lessons that were applicable to every day life. Baehler explained that horses are similar to children in that they need to be disciplined the instant they misbehave or else behavioral problems will progress and worsen as time goes on. “Teaching individuals that when their horse starts to make mistakes, do it in a firm way, not

a mean way I think is a good skill that young adults can have so that they can transfer it over to children,” Baehler said. Baehler regarded perseverance as key in a successful life and working with horses cultivated this attribute. “Another life lesson with horses is that sometimes, you know, I’ve had a horse that I’ve thought there’s no way this horse is going to turn around and come to the level that I competed at, but you just keep working with them and working with them,” Baehler said. Ernst said Baehler had a very enjoyable sense of humor as well as a vast knowledge of horses from which he was in the process of trying to learn from. She and her daughters have won many awards in the world of rodeo and showing. Since her daughters were very special and important to Baehler, she used their talents and accom-

plishments as examples and topics of interests during her lectures. “I appreciate the fact that she is always supportive and stresses that family is most important and uses examples of her daughters,” Balkenbush said. “At the very last class I always share a PowerPoint and I talk about having a real life, and it’s not always about tons of money,” Baehler said. I think that I’ve been blessed in many ways, with a lot of opportunities that have come my way, I hope I’ve always taken advantage of them in ways that were honoring to the Lord, I’ve tried to do that.” From knowledge of opportunity cost and scarcity, to reining and sliding stops dealing with horsemanship, Baehler shared life stories and high academic knowledge that students learned from.

Come see what’s going on in South Hutch. Catch us online at:

www.southhutch.com @SouthHutch www.facebook.com/southhutch

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Congrats to the Skills USA members who competed at the state contest in spring 2013

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Dragon's Tale - Fall 2013 Issue