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The Campus Through the Years S U M M E R

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News of the University Class of 2010 celebrates n Two 2010 graduates receive Fulbright Awards n DePauw’s Greek communities in top 5 percent for academic performance n 11 percent of DePauw’s 2010 seniors apply for Teach for America n Rector tradition reestablished through gift of Lewis Gulick ’44 n Grew Bancroft Foundation helps bring students from Tokyo to Greencastle n DePauw will move to the North Coast Athletic Conference in 2011 n Three students to teach and translate in Japan n DePauw wins SCAC President’s Trophy for fifth consecutive year n Two alumni, one senior named Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows n Faculty Briefs n Faculty members recognized for excellence

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Feature: The Campus Through the Years 14 The distinctive style of DePauw’s campus through the years A history lesson by Professor Emeritus John Baughman 14 Historical time line

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Recent Words Anne Derrickson Burnside ’92 n Scott H. Decker ’72 n Wendy B. Gifford ’71 n John W. Guy ’63 n Toby Jones ’83 n Amie Klempnauer Miller ’88 n Alan R. Millett ’59 n Dr. Jack Runninger ’45 n Jeffrey D. Shively ’95

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S (Photo: Marilyn E. Culler)

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(Photo: Larry Ligget)

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Alumni Reunion Weekend Highlights from the weekend

Also in this issue Alumni Programs

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Class Notes

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DePauw profile

(Cover image: Courtesy of Duke Energy)

DePauw Magazine Summer 2010 • Volume 74 • No. 1

www.depauw.edu/pa/magazine Staff Larry G. Anderson, editor 765-658-4628 landersn@depauw.edu Richard Fields, University photographer photographicservices@ depauw.edu Kelly A. Graves, designer, director of publications kgraves@depauw.edu Donna Grooms, class notes editor dgrooms@depauw.edu Larry G. Ligget, editorial assistant, photographer larryligget@depauw.edu

Jennifer Clarkson Soster ’88, executive director of alumni relations 765-658-4208 jsoster@depauw.edu DePauw Alumni Association Officers Janet L. Johns ’85, president Marcus R. Veatch ’75, vice president Sarah Roberts Houghland ’65, secretary

Printed by Mignone Communications Inc., Huntington, Ind.

Spring 2010 I DePauw Magazine 1


News of the University

‘There’s no greater gift than to find your passion’ Class of 2010 celebrates “As a class, we have made our mark on DePauw history, and we have contributed great things to this place,” Walker Cup recipient Nicole “Nikki” C. Craker told her 484 fellow graduates during 2010 commencement on Sunday, May 23. “Some of our accomplishments are large and public, others are small and personal.” A biology major and Honor Scholar, Craker served as DePauw’s student body

(Photo: Marilyn E. Culler)

“We have done a lot for DePauw, but DePauw has done a lot for us.” – Nicole “Nikki” C. Craker ’10

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president, mentor to first-year students, and member of the Student Life and Academic Atmosphere Committee as well as the Campus Planning Committee. As Walker Cup recipient, she was recognized as the senior student judged to have contributed the most to DePauw in the past four years. “While it is clear that our class is made up of very talented individuals, we have all contributed to this experience,” she said at DePauw’s 171st commencement, held in Holton Memorial Quadrangle. “We have done a lot for DePauw, but DePauw has done a lot for us. Here we have learned not only skills but also how to think, how to examine and how to question. We have been given the tools necessary not only to succeed in our own pursuits, but also to inspire others to do so as well.” She called the University “our home – a home that will continue to support us as new alumni.” Wallace “J.” Nichols III ’89, a leading conservationist who has particularly worked to protect the oceans and endangered sea turtles, delivered the

(Photo: Marilyn E. Culler)

principal address, titled “Lovers and Fighters,” to the Class of 2010. “You are making the changes that inspired me,” he said. He commended the graduates for their generation’s commitment to improving the environment and challenged them to continue working to make the world a better place. Nichols noted that members of the Class of 2010 have demonstrated great love for their parents, college and planet. “But you’re also fighters,” he said. “You’ve fought hard to reach this day, to graduate from college after almost two decades of schooling. You’ve fought to make your campus cleaner and greener, and your world more just. … You fight for the things you love. That’s why you are lovers AND fighters.” Living his environmental principles, Nichols traveled to Indiana by riding a train for 62 hours – instead of flying – from California in order to speak at commencement. He gave each member of the audience a blue marble as a symbol of the great blue, ocean planet on which we live.


News of the University

Wallace J. Nichols ’89 delivered the commencement address, “You Are Lovers and Fighters,” to the Class of 2010 on May 23, 2010. cable industry start it more than three decades ago. C-SPAN launched with the first televised House of Representatives debate on March 19, 1979. Today, C-SPAN employs approximately 270 people and delivers public affairs programming on three television channels, globally to Internet users via C-SPAN.org and 15 other websites, and to listeners through C-SPAN radio. Lamb has been a regular on-air presence at C-SPAN since

Tortuguero, an international grassroots movement dedicated to restoring Pacific sea turtles and to sustaining management of ocean fisheries. In 1999 Nichols co-founded and for five years directed WiLDCOAST, an international conservation team dedicated to the protection of coastal wilderness. Lamb, chairman and CEO of C-SPAN Networks, has been at the helm of the public affairs channel since he helped the

(Photo: Marilyn E. Culler)

Nichols recalled his experience at DePauw and how it prepared him for his life’s work. “I left [the University] knowing that I had squeezed every experience and every opportunity from DePauw. I had sucked the marrow out of this place, as Thoreau might say. And at that moment, I had discovered my passion. I wanted to fix what was being destroyed, plain and simple. I’ll tell you, there’s no greater gift than to find your passion.” DePauw awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree to Nichols. Brian Lamb, chairman and CEO of C-SPAN Networks, received an honorary Doctor of Letters. Nichols is a senior research scientist at the Ocean Conservancy, research associate at California Academy of Sciences, conservation science director for ProPeninsula and a board member of Animal Alliance, Coastwalk, Drylands Institute, Oceana, Reef Protection International and Save Our Shores. He is founder and co-director of Ocean Revolution, a program that inspires, involves and mentors the next generation of ocean conservation leaders, as well as co-founder and director of seeTURTLES.org Conservation Tourism Expeditions. In 1998 he founded Grupo

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News of the University

(Photos: Marilyn E. Culler)

Nicole “Nikki” C. Craker 2010 Walker Cup recipient

Brian Lamb (left), chairman and CEO of C-SPAN Networks, received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree. At right is President Brian W. Casey.

Major: Biology Marthe A. Chandler (left), professor of philosophy, was recognized for her retirement from the DePauw faculty. At right is President Brian W. Casey.

the network’s earliest days. Beginning in 1989, he interviewed 800 nonfiction authors for a weekly program called Booknotes. Currently, he hosts Q and A, an hour-long interview program with people who are making things happen in politics, media, education and technology. Lamb previously served as a member of DePauw’s Center for Contemporary Media Board of Advisors. He received DePauw’s Bernard C. Kilgore Medal for distinguished lifetime achievement in journalism. DePauw also recognized Marthe A. Chandler, professor of philosophy, who retired at the end of the 2009-10 academic year. She joined the DePauw faculty in 1981.

Extracurricular activities: • Student body president • Peer Mentor • President of Independent Council • Leadership Intern Favorite professors: • Harry J. Brown, associate professor of English – “He is very committed to his students.” • Sharon M. Crary, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry – “I learned the most in her class. It was extremely tough, but I loved every minute.” • Henning Schneider, associate professor of biology – “He cares about his students deeply and is always willing to help.”

(Photo: Larry Ligget)

DePauw experiences I value most: • Winter Term in Service trip to the Philippines • Serving as student body president • Completing my Honor Scholar senior thesis

Read more about DePauw’s commencement and access video and audio clips of the addresses at

www.depauw.edu/news.

View photo galleries of commencement at

www.depauw.edu/photos.

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Future plans: Work at National Institutes of Health in Phoenix this summer, then attend medical school Parting message to fellow graduates: “We must remember that while we are leaving Greencastle, DePauw will stay with us.” Special comment: “Thank you, Mom, for all you have done for me.”


News of the University

Two 2010 graduates receive Fulbright Awards DePauw University continued its Fulbright tradition as two graduating seniors received prestigious Fulbright Awards to teach and study abroad during the next year. For the fourth consecutive year, DePauw is listed among the Top Producers of Fulbright Awards for U.S. Students by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Mary A. Howard will teach English at a public school in South Korea during the upcoming academic year after receiving an English Teaching Assistantship grant through the 2010-11 Fulbright U.S. Student Program competition. Fulbright student grants aim to increase mutual understanding among nations through educational and cultural exchange while serving as a catalyst for long-term leadership development. During the summer of 2007, she worked as teaching assistant for the reading and writing summer program at the International School of Bangkok. In DePauw’s Academic Resource Center, she was a writing tutor and a speaking/ listening consultant. Last year, Howard received a Critical Language Scholarship from the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and

Cultural Affairs, and spent the summer in South Korea studying the Korean language at Kyung Hee University and immersing herself in the local culture. Danielle M. Shover has been awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarship. The grant will allow Shover to travel to Spain to teach English to high school students in Madrid during the 2010-11 academic year through an English Teaching Assistantship. Shover will also lead a creative writing group, which will focus on food literature and culture. Shover was a double major in English (writing) and Spanish and a Media Fellow who spent the Spring 2009 semester in Spain, studying and interning with Barcelona Metropolitan magazine. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program is the largest American international exchange program offering opportunities for students and young professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools worldwide.

DePauw’s Greek communities in top 5 percent for academic performance The academic performance of DePauw’s fraternity and sorority members has been recognized as being among the top 5 percent of Greek communities in North America. Gamma Sigma Alpha National Academic Greek Honor Society named DePauw’s fraternities and sororities to its Honor Roll for the 2009 calendar year for achieving at or above the campus grade point average. Gamma Sigma Alpha National Academic Greek Honor Society, headquartered in Indianapolis, is the premier organization committed to the academic success of its members and aligning with the academic missions of the institutions that house its more than 200 member chapters.

11 percent of DePauw’s 2010 seniors apply for Teach for America Seven of DePauw’s 2010 graduates will begin teaching this fall as Teach for America members in urban and rural public schools across the country. They are among 4,500 recent college graduates selected from a record 46,000 applicants. Because of the record-breaking number of applicants this year, admission to Teach for America was more selective than ever before. At more than 120 colleges and universities nationwide, more than 5 percent of the senior class applied, including 12 percent of all seniors at Ivy League universities and 11 percent of DePauw seniors. The 2010 corps earned an average GPA of 3.6, and 89 percent held leadership positions as undergraduates. May 2010 graduates of DePauw who are joining Teach for America this fall are Rebecca A. Dray, Danielle A. Johnson, Colton M. Krueger, Erica L. Martin, Michelle C. Parsons, Laura A. Pearce and Anajah L. Roberts. Teach for America is the national corps of outstanding recent college graduates of all academic majors who commit two years to teach in urban and rural public schools and become lifelong leaders in ensuring educational equity and excellence for all children. The organization’s mission is to build the movement to eliminate educational inequity by enlisting the nation’s most promising future leaders in the effort. n

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News of the University

Rector tradition reestablished through gift from Lewis Gulick ’44 Jack Morrill ’57 named Rector Scholarship Program director DePauw University is reestablishing a Rector Scholarship tradition with the help of a gift from an alumnus who was able to attend DePauw as recipient of the prestigious scholarship. A gift from M. Lewis Gulick ’44 will allow DePauw once again to provide a director to maintain the “Rector spirit” of DePauw’s preeminent academic merit award program. Gulick is author of the book An Investment in Humanity: Edward Rector and His Historic Scholarship Program for DePauw, published in 2009. “A group of five undergraduate Rector Scholars from the Classes of 2009 and 2010 who worked on the book commended the academic excellence of their campus peers but regretted the absence of group and bonding activities that they said had historically characterized the program,” Gulick said. “I agree with their observations and favor creation of a permanent position or entity to support and enhance the program indefinitely through the years ahead. Thus, I am pleased to have an opportunity to help in the reinstitution of Rector Scholarship Program Director position.” Lawyer and philanthropist Edward Rector made one of the largest gifts ever to a liberal arts college in 1919 to fund full-tuition scholarships. His generosity made it possible for many talented students to pursue a DePauw education, which they might not have been able to afford otherwise. During the next nine decades, Rector Scholars went on to achieve uncommon success in their careers, personal lives and communities. “The Rector scholarship program had an enormous impact on DePauw, particularly in its earlier years when scholarships were being awarded at well upward of 100 a year. As might be expected from such a large influx of gifted he story of Edward Rector and his Gulick historic scholarship program it is that of a young students, raised the brilliant and farsighted philanthropist. Rector saw education as a key to improving the whole school academically to an lives of youths and their ability to contribute to society as adults. Denied a college education himself because of poverty in his early years, entirely new level,” Gulick said. he resolved to help gifted youth in similar circumstances were he able to do so in later years. And so he could, did, when Depression as a “During theandGreat Chicago patent lawyer he accumulated a large fortune for his time. years, Rector endowment DePauwthe University, a small liberal arts school in Greencastle, Ind., was the fortunate recipient ofhelped Rector’s visionto and generosity. His also keep the most notable donation came in 1919 with an endowment for 100, full-tuition four-year University financially. Still scholarships annually forafloat academically bright young men from Indiana high schools. It was one of the largest gifts in history to a small today, it is the largest DePauw college, and when he died in 1925 his will bequeathed a second, even larger amount. And importantly, Rector not only provided money to merit endowment dedicated but also devoted his personal time and effort to the utmost in nurturing the scholarship academic scholarships. More program and its student recipients as their numbers grew. This volume tells of Rector’s remarkable than 4,000 Rector scholars philanthropy during his lifetime – what he termed as his “investments in humanity” – and also importantly, follows through with anthe years, have graduated over account of how the program fared through the balance of the 20th century. many of whom could not have Cover portrait: There is only one known portrait of Edward Rector at DePauw attended DePauw without the University. Housed in a 23- x 27-inch frame, the oil painting is titled “Edward Rector” scholarship. Inaftermy case also, I (1863-1925). It was painted his death from a photograph, by the well-known Indiana Edward Rector and his artist Marie Goth (1887-1927) and presented lacked the financial means, and to the University in 1928 by the Men’s Hall Historic Scholarship Program for DePauw University DePauw Association. The pictureDePauw on this cover is because the first University I chose I could photograph of the portrait to be taken and Lewis Gulick published. get a Rector Scholarship.”

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An Investment in Humanity

Edward Rector and his Historic Scholardhip Program for DePauw University

Top image: historic photograph of the first class of Rector Scholars enrolled at DePauw University in 1919. Bottom image: five 21st Century Rector Scholars who assisted with this book, pictured with DePauw President Robert G. Bottoms.

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An Investment in Humanity


News of the University

John “Jack” E. Morrill ’57, Rector Scholarship Program director To administer the program, Rector established the Edward Rector Scholarship Foundation to oversee all scholarship program activities. The first Rector Foundation director was the revered Henry B. Longden, who spent 73 years as a student, teacher and administrator at DePauw and served as acting president from 1924-25. Eventually, University offices expanded and other financial aid sources became available, and the foundation ceased to exist in the 1980s. In subsequent years, the admission, financial aid and other offices handled matters previously addressed by the foundation and its director. “Longden’s Foundation directorship was as important as any of his appointments from the standpoint of DePauw’s development because the Rector program in its earlier years was such a large part of the school. Undergraduate Rector Scholars peaked at 700 in the 1932-33 school year, comprising nearly half the entire student body and 70 percent of the men,” Gulick said. “The director and his aides engaged in a wide range of activities, from recruiting scholarship applicants

to conducting gatherings of the scholars on campus, issuing publications and promoting associations of graduates.” With Gulick’s gift, DePauw named its first new Rector Scholarship Program director in decades. John “Jack” E. Morrill ’57, professor emeritus of mathematics and economics and a Rector Scholar himself, has been named director and is beginning work to revive the office. Morrill’s number-one goal is to restore communication with Rector Scholars. “I plan to develop more public visibility for the Rector Scholarship Program, and especially to connect with Rector alumni as well as communicate with current Rector Scholar students to make them more aware of the tradition of the Rector Scholarship,” Morrill said. “There also was a newsletter called Rector Record that I plan to start again.” Morrill also will begin building relationships with incoming Rector Scholars. He will organize a welcoming event for new Rector Scholars and plan events for all Rector Scholars on campus. “Edward Rector followed his scholarship students closely and had a habit of visiting the homes of the Rector students. He even got copies of their grades to check on them,” Morrill said. “I don’t intend to monitor their grades, however.” Rector Scholarships were initially intended for men only, and men from Indiana in particular, Morrill noted. However, an additional rule allowed any student – male or female – who received higher grades than a Rector Scholar in their class to earn a Rector Scholarship. As a result, many women did. Eventually, Rector Scholarships were awarded regularly to men and women. Morrill received a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics from DePauw and master’s and doctoral degrees in mathematics from the University of Michigan. Following graduate school, he returned to DePauw to teach

mathematics and became a full professor in 1976. He retired in 2001and still lives in Greencastle. Very little was published about Edward Rector and his historic scholarship program until Gulick undertook a project to recognize his great contributions to DePauw. In his book, Gulick provides insights into Rector the man as well as how he set up and maintained a scholarship program that attracted to DePauw some of the best and brightest high school graduates from across the nation. The book also examines the tremendous impact the scholarship program and the Rector Scholars themselves have had on DePauw. A copy of the book is now given to all entering Rector Scholar students. An Investment in Humanity is available by going to the DePauw Bookstore website or calling 765-658-4926. The price is $15 plus shipping and handling. Contact Rector Scholarship Program Director Jack Morrill at johnmorrill@ depauw.edu. You can read more about the Rector Scholarship on the Financial Aid Office website at www.depauw.edu/admin/ financial-aid/scholarship/rector.asp.

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News of the University

Tamana Ogawa ’11, left, in Nepal during spring semsester.

Grew Bancroft Foundation helps bring students from Tokyo to Greencastle By Linda Li ’10 Tamana Ogawa, a junior majoring in conflict studies, heard about the Grew Bancroft Foundation scholarship from teachers at her high school in Japan. The foundation is an organization that honors the U.S.-Japan partnership as one of the most important bilateral relationships by providing scholarships for graduates of Japanese high schools to study for four years at well-recognized liberal arts colleges in the United States. With her teachers’ encouragement and mentorship, Ogawa went through the application process to attend DePauw University. Ogawa was attracted to DePauw in large part because of the opportunity to explore the interdisciplinary conflict studies program. She believes that the Grew Bancroft Foundation scholarship and others like it have helped to improve U.S.-Japan relations. She said, “I think [the scholarship] definitely contributes to a good relationship between the two countries in the long run. My experience in the States has tremendously expanded 8 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

my understanding of what America is like. Also, I had an opportunity to introduce what Japan was like to the DePauw community. “The time that I spent with my friends and professors at DePauw has been incredibly rich and joyful. I will share my experience with my friends in Japan. Thus, in the long run, mutual cultural understanding will contribute to minimizing misunderstandings between the two when students work in the real world.” Ogawa is also a Rector scholar at DePauw and serves on the Multicultural and Community Life Advisory Board, International Student Association and Model United Nations. On a global level, she worked with abused children in the Philippines through PREDA (People’s Recovery, Empowerment Development Assistance Foundation), built houses for victims of Hurricane Katrina through Habitat for Humanity, and spent spring semester 2010 studying at SIT World Learning program in

Kathmandu, Nepal, where she examined the diversity of Himalayan societies across the South Asian sub-continent, with special emphasis on the Tibetan experience and identity. DePauw is one of 18 U.S. liberal arts colleges with which the Grew Bancroft Foundation collaborates. Currently, DePauw has three students associated with the Grew Bancroft scholarship on campus: Tamana Ogawa ’11, Megumi Horiguchi ’12 and Shota Ebata ’13. Applicants for the Grew Bancroft Foundation scholarship undergo a one-day, three-round interview process in the International House in Tokyo. They submit their applications and recommendation letters in the first round, take a series of tests on essay writing, mathematics and translating from English to Japanese in the second round, and interview with a group of alumni from the program in the third round. Only two finalists receive a scholarship from the foundation. The remaining finalists are given recommendation letters to submit to liberal arts colleges in collaboration with the foundation. Horiguchi, although not a Bancroft Foundation scholarship recipient, was one of the finalists and received a recommendation letter at the end of the application process to accompany her

The first Japanese students to attend DePauw arrived in 1877. From left: Sutemi Chinda 1881, Keizo Kawamura 1881, Izumy Nasu 1883 and Aimaro Sato 1881.


News of the University application to DePauw. The University offered her a full-tuition scholarship, which she accepted. At DePauw, she is involved in a range of extracurricular activities, including being a member of the University Symphony Orchestra and ASIA club. She says she enjoys the tight-knit community that the University and the surrounding Greencastle community offer. A psychology major, Horiguchi hopes to attend graduate school in the States and earn a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology. She appreciates the opportunity to attend DePauw through the Bancroft Foundation’s help and says she has learned a great deal about both the United States and Japan through her experiences at the University. “You gain new perspectives by being immersed in new cultures, and you start seeing your own country more objectively and what your country really needs,” Horiguchi said. “For me, that was psychology and that Japan really needs professionals in the field of psychology.

A student from Japan performs during the International Bazaar held on campus in November 2009. I think that is one benefit from this program. I hope that other people learn something from being around me and hearing my opinions [as well].” The Grew Bancroft Foundation was established in 1950 and currently has more than 100 graduates, 24 of whom have earned doctorates and 41 of whom

have master’s degrees, including M.B.A. Recipients of the scholarship have worked or are working at some of the most prominent businesses and organizations in the world, such as Goldman Sachs Japan, International Monetary Fund, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, United Nations and World Trade Organization.

2010

Peril or Promise? Journalism in the New Media Age Mika Brzezinski

Sept. 23-24

Joe Scarborough

For more information, go to www.depauw.edu/discourse. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 9


News of the University

DePauw will move to the North Coast Athletic Conference in 2011 DePauw University will join the North Coast Athletic Conference (NCAC), effective July 1, 2011. NCAC officials invited DePauw, a member of the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) since 1998, to join the conference, which includes Allegheny College (Meadville, Pa.), Denison University (Granville, Ohio), Hiram College (Hiram, Ohio), Kenyon College (Gambier, Ohio), Oberlin College (Oberlin, Ohio), Ohio Wesleyan University (Delaware, Ohio), Wabash College (Crawfordsville, Ind.), Wittenberg University (Springfield, Ohio) and the College of Wooster (Wooster, Ohio). “After careful consideration of the advantages of membership in this conference and of the adjustments that would be required in leaving our current conference, we have decided to accept this invitation,” President Brian W. Casey said. Twenty of DePauw’s 21 intercollegiate athletic programs will move to the NCAC effective July 1, 2011. Football, which already has a schedule in place for the next two seasons, will enter the NCAC effective July 1, 2012. According to President Casey, “Many

factors played a part in this decision. Chief among them was a desire for a less strenuous and more environmentally friendly travel regimen for our teams,” noting that the NCAC membership stretches across Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, while the SCAC includes institutions in Texas, Mississippi and Colorado. The move to the NCAC, the president adds, aligns DePauw with “strong institutions with a similar focus on academic excellence and the overall

development of the student with fewer strains on both schedules and budgets.” “Like the SCAC, the NCAC is committed to broad-based athletic programs, gender equity and the campus integration of student-athletes,” said S. Page Cotton, The Theodore S. Katula Director of Athletics at DePauw. “We are very excited about this new partnership, which is a great fit for DePauw.”

(Photo: © Richard Orr Photography, LLC)

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President Casey asked Cotton to coordinate the transition to the new conference. “The North Coast Athletic Conference is home to many of the most outstanding undergraduate liberal arts colleges in the lower Great Lakes states,” said Dale T. Knobel, president of Denison University and president of the NCAC. “We are as proud that all members host chapters of Phi Beta Kappa as we are of the high level of athletic competition that makes the NCAC one of the leading conferences in NCAA Division III. DePauw University already partners with other NCAC colleges in a variety of academic activities. It just seems natural that DePauw’s student-athletes should now join their peers and friends of the NCAC on the playing field.” More than one out of five DePauw students is a member of an intercollegiate athletic team. The University’s intercollegiate athletic history dates back to 1866. Currently, the Tigers compete in 21 sports and have won five consecutive Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference all-sports trophies and six in their 12 years of competition, including the 2009-10 award.


News of the University Three students to teach and translate in Japan Three seniors – Ingrid C. Elias, Charles W. Jewett and Samantha B. Levy – were accepted to participate in the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Program. Administered by the Japanese government, JET brings native English speakers into public schools and government offices to teach and translate, and the program promotes grass-roots international exchange between Japan and other nations. n

DePauw wins SCAC President’s Trophy for fifth consecutive year With spring championships in women’s tennis and women’s golf and secondplace finishes in men’s and women’s track and field, baseball and men’s tennis, DePauw captured the 2009-10 Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference President’s Trophy by a 127.5-point margin. DePauw finished with 925 points, followed by Trinity University with 797.5, Centre College with 777.5 and Rhodes College with 722.5. DePauw has won the last five SCAC all-sports trophies and six in its 12 years of SCAC competition. The127.5-point margin is DePauw’s largest ever and equals the total margin from the last four all-sports races combined. DePauw is only the third school in the history of the conference (CAC or SCAC) to put together a President’s Trophy win streak of five or more years. In addition to DePauw’s two spring sports titles, the Tigers won titles last year in women’s cross country, women’s basketball and men’s swimming and diving, and shared the championship in football. Prior to the four second-place finishes in the spring, DePauw also placed second in men’s cross country, field hockey, men’s basketball, and women’s swimming and diving.

Two alumni, one senior named Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows Two DePauw alumni and a senior were among the 80 new Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows – the “Rhodes Scholars of teaching” – selected by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, N.J. Each Fellow receives a $30,000 stipend to complete a special intensive master’s program in teacher preparation at one of the four partner universities in Indiana (Ball State, Purdue, University of Indianapolis and Indiana UniversityPurdue University at Indianapolis). Fellows then make a commitment to teach for at least three years in a high-need urban or rural school in the state of Indiana that has committed, along with the partner university, to provide ongoing professional support and opportunities for continued study. Andrew M. Bever ’08, who majored in physics as an undergraduate and was a Science Research Fellow and president of the Physics Club at DePauw, is pursuing a master’s degree in education at Purdue. Amanda N. Hendricks ’09, who majored in biology and is a naturalist intern with Indiana Dunes Environmental Learning Center, is enrolled in a master’s program at the University of Indianapolis. Kaley E. Robbins ’10, who was a mathematics and Spanish double major with a minor in education studies and is the creator and coordinator of DePauw’s Special Student Friend program, also is enrolled at University of Indianapolis. The new Fellows will be ready to enter their own classrooms in fall 2011. The Woodrow Wilson Foundation selected Indiana in December 2007 as the first site for its new national fellowship for high school teachers. The program is intended to help overhaul teacher education and encourage exceptionally able teacher candidates to seek long-term careers teaching science, technology and math in high-need classrooms. n

Faculty Briefs Dana A. Dudle, associate professor and chair of biology, was co-author of a research article, “Why some stems are red: cauline anthocyanins shield photosystem II against high light stress,” with Kevin S. Gould of the School of Biological Sciences at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand and Howard S. Neufeld of Appalachian State University – published in the June 2010 issue of Journal of Experimental Botany. The article was also the subject of the illustration on the journal’s cover.

Vanessa L. Fox, associate professor of biology and program coordinator of the DePauw Nature Park, and three recent graduates – Charlotte P. Buehler ’08, Chad M. Byers ’08 and Summer E. Drake ’09 – collaborated on an article, “Forest composition, leaf litter, and songbird communities in oak- vs. mapledominated forests in the eastern United States,” that was published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. The research was conducted at DePauw. n

n Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 11


News of the University Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr., University Professor and professor of English, was one of three leaders of the Science Fiction Foundation’s SF Criticism Masterclass conducted at Middlesex University in London from June 11-13. n Pauline A. Ota, assistant professor of art, was awarded a summer research grant by the Japan Foundation, which she used to spend 43 days in Japan during June and July conducting research at archives and museums in Tokyo and Kyoto. n Caroline B. Smith, Cassel Grubb University Professor of Music, was invited to give a master class at the National Classical Singer Convention in New York City on May 29. Smith also served as one of three national judges in the semifinal round of the national high school competition during the convention. n Paul B. Watt, Walter E. Bundy Professor of Religious Studies and professor of Asian Studies, received a Distinguished Service Award from ASIANetwork. Watt, a member of the organization’s board, is only the fourth recipient of the award in ASIANetwork’s 20-year history.

Faculty members recognized for excellence Three faculty members – Mary P. Dixon, professor and chair of economics and management; Carl A. Huffman, Robert Stockwell Professor of Greek Languages and Literature and professor of classical studies; and Paul B. Watt, Walter E. Bundy Professor of Religious Studies and professor of Asian studies and chair of the religious studies department – are this year’s recipients of the Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Tucker Jr. Distinguished Career Award. Presented annually by the president of the University to one or more senior members of the faculty since 1988, the Tucker Award is designed to recognize the achievements of those faculty members who have made notable contributions to DePauw by their commitments to students, teaching excellence, their chosen disciplines and service to the University. Two other faculty members – Tamara M. Beauboeuf, associate professor of education studies and sociology and chair of the education studies department, and Wade N. Hazel, Winona H. Welch Professor of Biology – are the 2010 winners of the Edwin L. Minar Jr. Scholarship Award. Established in 1981, the Minar Award is presented in recognition of exceptional scholarly achievement and is named in honor of its first recipient, a former professor in the department of classical studies. Marcia A. McKelligan, Blair Anderson and Martha Caroline Rieth Professor of Applied Ethics and professor of philosophy, was honored with the G. Bromley Oxnam Award for Service. Named after DePauw’s13th president (1928-36), the award was created last year.

Mary P. Dixon

Carl A. Huffman

Paul B. Watt

Save the date

You Gonna Eat That? Feb. 23-24, 2011

The Ethics and Economics of Food Choices

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics For more information, contact Carol S. Steele, associate dean of academic affairs, at carolsteele@depauw.edu. Support for the symposium is provided by DePauw’s grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in support of environmental education, and by The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics.

12 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Through the Years

The distinctive style of DePauw’s campus through the years A history lesson by Professor Emeritus John Baughman

Speaking with alumni who come back to Greencastle for Alumni Reunion Weekend, it quickly becomes clear that different generations remember different campuses, though everyone seems to find parts of campus that remind them of their experiences here. As Professor Emeritus of History John J. Baughman ’48 suggests in the following pages, DePauw’s campus has changed and developed through the generations for many reasons. Fires, economic pressures, and the need to renovate and renew existing structures have all contributed to the changing face of the campus since 1837. The campuses of healthy schools grow and change, and the best schools channel this change in support of their missions. Nowhere is this process more important than at schools like DePauw. What makes residential liberal arts colleges such as DePauw an important part of the tapestry of American higher education is the extent to which we are able to provide an overall environment designed to support the education we bring to our students. DePauw is vitally connected to the world outside Greencastle, through our study abroad programs and internships and through our alumni, who have prospered all over the world. But DePauw is also a world unto itself, a world aimed at helping our students launch the best lives that they can for themselves. Our campus, then, is especially important to our educational work. When DePauw Magazine sat down with Professor Baughman to talk about how the DePauw campus has evolved since the University’s founding in 1837, he joked that he should title this lecture “Baughman’s Reflections in His Old Age About the DePauw Campus and the Buildings Internally, Externally, and Other Aspects of Buildings Here.” The fact is, after 66 years of involvement with DePauw as a student, beloved teacher and even University historian for a time, hardly anyone is more qualified to discuss the history of the campus. Baughman also was co-author with Clifton J. Phillips, professor emeritus of history, of DePauw: A Pictorial History in 1987. So, as the University heads toward its 175th anniversary in 2012, we offer you a DePauw history lesson, courtesy of Professor Baughman. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 13


The Campus Through the Years

A

s I ponder the nearly 175 years of the University’s history, several themes come to mind that I think made a difference about how the campus evolved. The most obvious is growth in size of student body and faculty, with an accompanying increase in curricular opportunities and social interests. This naturally has meant physical growth of our campus. Only 50 years ago, one could move about the campus comfortably in the 10 minutes allotted between classes and easily find most University locations. Today there are University buildings that some graduates never enter in their four years at DePauw. Another thought is how frequently

our buildings were constructed, perhaps unintentionally, to impress students. In the 19th century, most students were in their late teens when they arrived on campus from Hoosier farms and small towns; our buildings must have seemed huge to them. Significant, too, is that when DePauw was founded in 1837 as Indiana Asbury University, no one considered the college responsible for housing students, who had to locate room and board in the small town of Greencastle, then with a population of about 600. Other colleges provided rudimentary dormitories, but not us. By the time Indiana Asbury University became DePauw in 1884 and first provided some student housing, fraternities and sororities had already begun to offer their own residences.

The first building In June 1837, the trustees laid the cornerstone for the first real structure on the Indiana Asbury campus, on the present site of Roy O. West Library. The Edifice, which faced north, would serve as the single major building for the next 35 years. Built in the Federal architectural style with three floors, it had a small, belfry-like tower with a melodious bell that could be heard all over town; later there was a large clock. Because the University was a Methodist Episcopal institution, the first floor had a large chapel plus three recitation halls. The second floor had smaller classrooms to accommodate the primary teaching method of recitation, and the third floor housed a small library and two large halls for the student literary societies. Here, the all-male students could gather weekly

1876 1837

Locust Street Methodist Episcopal Church Constructed in 1876 at the corner of Anderson and Locust streets. Merged with College Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church in 1924. Used by department of public speaking 1927-29.

Edifice / West College Cornerstone laid for the Edifice on June 20, 1837. Completed in 1842. Edifice destroyed by fire in 1879 and rebuilt as West College.

Wesley W. Wilson, coordinator of archives and special collections, and the DePauw Archives staff compiled the archival photos and accompanying historical information for the timeline. 14 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

1870

East College Cornerstone laid in 1870 and dedicated at commencement in 1877. The Columbian Boulder was placed near the main entrance in 1892.

Left: Meharry Hall


The Campus Through the Years to present their own scholarly lectures and enjoy a bit of social life. The original 40 or so students, aged 13 to 28, studied in a preparatory department housed in a small county seminary building on the corner of Seminary Street and College Avenue, near the present Emison Museum of Art. The only object related to Indiana Asbury before the Civil War, and the only one remaining today, is the 1859 gravestone – located in the Academic Quad – of Methodist Episcopal Bishop and Mrs. Roberts, who were instrumental in the University’s founding.

Teaching moves to East College By the 1870s, Indiana Asbury’s leaders decided to construct a larger building to the east of the Edifice. It has always been called East College, and it remains a

The need for student housing led to the establishment of fraternities and sororities. The founding members of America’s first sorority, Kappa Alpha Theta, in 1870 were, from left, Laura Beswick, Mary Simmons, Alice Allen and Bettie Locke.

College Avenue Methodist Church Constructed in 1879 on the southeast corner of College Avenue and Seminary Street. Became known as Speech Hall in 1929 and was demolished in 1978.

1879 1884 McKim Observatory Construction completed in 1884 at the end of University Park.

1885

Gentlemen’s Hall/ Middle College Gentlemen’s Hall constructed in 1885 on the northwest corner of Larabee Street and College Avenue. Converted in 1892 into a classroom building and renamed Middle College.

Music Hall Constructed in 1884 on the northeast corner of Locust and Hanna streets (faced Locust Street). In 1927 the building was moved to the southwest corner. Served as headquarters for Music School for 92 years and was torn down in 1976.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 15


The Campus Through the Years dominant campus site and historical hub. The cornerstone was laid in 1870, but financial delays prevented classes from meeting there until 1875. All college teaching was to be in East College, while the preparatory department moved into the Edifice. East College’s unique Victorian style included Gothic arches, French mansard roof and Italianate columns. The first floor had classrooms and two large, wellfurnished rooms for the two remaining literary societies. The second floor had a chapel, Meharry Hall; the president’s office; and the classics department. A chapel balcony and extra classrooms were on the third floor. The building had two towers – one for the bell and clock, and the other for a campus telescope and observatory. The basement housed chemistry classes. To great consternation, the Edifice, except its outer walls, burned in 1879.

military department; the second, an assembly hall and classrooms for the preparatory department; and the third, the University library, museum and alumni hall.

The influence of Washington C. DePauw

Washington C. DePauw Within two weeks, University trustees decided to rebuild it as a renamed West College, facing the east rather than the north. The first floor housed a small gymnasium and an armory for the

Florence Hall Constructed in 1891 on South College Avenue as a rooming and boarding dormitory for theological students. After 65 years of use as both a men’s and women’s dormitory, it was demolished to make room for Bishop Roberts Hall.

1891 Simpson House Home of the School of Art from 1887-1913. Demolished to make way for Rector Hall.

1885

1895

Women’s Hall Completed in 1885 on the site of the current Mason Hall, facing Locust Street. Remodeled and renamed Mansfield Hall in honor of Belle Mansfield in 1918. Destroyed by fire in 1933. 16 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

In 1884 Washington C. DePauw, an influential Methodist businessman and philanthropist, provided enough money to rescue the struggling Indiana Asbury, which was renamed in his honor. With support from the administration and trustees, DePauw developed a plan for separate specialized schools housed in separate buildings. The idea was to create five separate parks: • West Park encompassed the old West College, the Roberts tomb, and a new building called Gentlemen’s

McKeen Athletic Park Land was purchased on West Hanna Street in 1895 for McKeen Field and formally dedicated in October of that year.


(Photo: Larry Ligget)

The Campus Through the Years

The design for Walker Circle, right, using the Minshall columns was the idea of Jim Katterjohn, DePauw landscaper, who presented the idea for consideration to Mrs. Walker. Their idea was that the circle would serve as a visual bridge between the new addition to the Memorial Union Building and historic East College.

Minshall Laboratory Opened in 1902 and served the chemistry and physics departments. Razed in 1973.

1891 1908

Carnegie Library Constructed in1908. After nearly 50 years as the main library, it was renamed Emison Art Center in 1986.

Hall, a male dormitory, on the site of today’s Harrison Hall. • Center Park included East College and the College Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, which had replaced the county seminary and later became known as Speech Hall. • East Park was made up of Locust Street Methodist Episcopal Church on the corner of Locust and Anderson streets; a new Women’s Hall dormitory to be built to its south on the site of the current Mason Hall; and a new building on the corner of Locust and Hanna streets to be used for the schools of law and theology, which later became Music Hall. • South Park was then empty, except for private residences, and ready for expansion. It had only a former

Rector Hall First occupied in 1917 as a women’s dormitory. Initiated the Quad on Locust Street. Destroyed by fire on April 7, 2002.

1917 Bowman Gymnasium Dedicated in 1916.

1916

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 17


faculty home called Rosabower, where Roberts Hall now stands, and which the University used for a variety of activities. • DePauw purchased University Park in northeast Greencastle for eventual expansion. McKim Observatory was built on a knoll there in 1884. All the new buildings were much alike. Red brick, limestone edging and simple geometric lines unified the campus architecturally. But the sudden death of W. C. DePauw in 1887 and economic panic of the 1890s halted campus expansion plans. The exception came in 1891, when DePauw’s widow and daughter gave a building located in the South Park, originally for the school of theology. Instead, it became a dormitory and dining room named

(Photo: Larry Ligget)

The Campus Through the Years

The Gateway Arch was a gift from the Class of 1890 at its 20th reunion in 1910.

Blackstock Stadium Dedicated on Old Gold Day 1923.

1923

1928

Lucy Rowland Hall Dedicated in 1928.

Lucy Rowland Rector

1918

Studebaker Memorial Administration Building Completed and dedicated in 1918.

18 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

1927

Longden Hall Completed on South College Avenue in 1927.

Henry B. Longden


The Campus Through the Years Florence Hall. Some alumni remember living there during their student days. Male students rejected Gentlemen’s Hall to remain in rooming houses or the mansions that some fraternities rented. Renamed Middle College, the proposed male dormitory instead housed biology and the life sciences. The law and theology building was turned over to the music program.

After the turn of the century Declining enrollment compounded the difficulties brought on by W. C. DePauw’s death and the financial crisis of the 1890s. In place of multiple professional schools, DePauw reestablished itself as a liberal arts college with an attached music school. Electives and lectures replaced traditional recitation in a revised curriculum.

Growing enrollment and an increasingly specialized faculty sparked the need for new buildings. No longer would fund drives among local citizens and generous Hoosier Methodists suffice; financing would come primarily as gifts from new and prosperous Methodist entrepreneurs. First on the scene was D.W. Minshall, a Terre Haute industrialist who, with his family, in 1901-02 provided a home for chemistry, physics and mathematics in Minshall Laboratory on the southwest corner of Center Park. The three-story building used DePauw’s traditional red brick and limestone, but it was U-shaped with an ornate entrance flanked by classical columns. The columns eventually were restored in Walker Circle on the north side of the present Memorial Student Union. In 1908 Andrew Carnegie gave

Gobin Memorial United Methodist Church Constructed in 1929 as Greencastle Methodist Episcopal Church. Renamed for former DePauw president Hillary A. Gobin in 1933.

1929

$50,000 to build a Carnegie Library. An Indianapolis architect took a new approach, designing a two-story NeoGreek structure entirely of Bedford limestone with four huge Ionic columns on the west entrance. The first floor featured the book stacks, spacious reading rooms, high ceilings and massive columns. The second floor housed seminar rooms and departmental libraries. Many people thought it was the most beautiful building on campus – and it challenged our tradition of red brick rectangles. In 1916 Bowman Gymnasium, named after a former president, became the first major building in old South Park. It, too, was built in the style of the early buildings, but with more ornamentation. It was an imposing structure, with indoor athletic facilities

Rosabower Home of William C. Larrabee; later used as a dormitory and infirmary. Purchased by DePauw in the 1930s.

Hillary A. Gobin

1930

1940

Harrison Hall Constructed in 1940, included classrooms and faculty offices.

Asbury Hall Dedicated in 1930, included classrooms and faculty offices. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 19


The Campus Through the Years for both men and women – a basketball court, swimming pool, bowling alley, lockers, showers and office space for the athletics faculty and coaches. Its classrooms and two large meeting rooms on the lower floor introduced a place for students to gather. Chicago lawyer and philanthropist Edward Rector gave money in 1917 to build a large new women’s dormitory in East Park. Named after his father, Rector Hall had elements of the Classical Revival and Italian Renaissance architectural styles. Majestic and highly functional, Rector Hall had three stories in an H-shape. It featured a spacious reception hall, great dining facilities, and single and double sleeping rooms for women. For 1917, it was a gem. Studebaker Memorial Administration Building was completed in 1918, a gift

of the Studebaker family of South Bend, Ind., and named for Clem Studebaker of the automobile and carriage company, a former DePauw trustee. Classical columns marked the entrance, and inside its brick and limestone exterior was an ornate marble stairway with statuary. It still houses administrative offices, although only the president’s office remains in its original location. With new buildings ever more sophisticated and lavish, University trustees in 1917 engaged DePauw’s first landscape architect to draw up a comprehensive campus plan. It included planting 2,500 new shrubs around the campus.

Colonial revival comes into vogue Before the Depression, fraternities and sororities began building their own large

houses on the fringes of the campus. In the late 1920s, funds from Edward Rector’s estate (he died in 1925) allowed DePauw to follow suit with two new dormitories. Next to Rector Hall, and in a similar style, was Lucy Rowland Hall for freshman women (1928), named for Rector’s wife. To locate Lucy Rowland Hall, the music hall was physically moved across the street next to Bowman Gymnasium – still remembered by a few Greencastle senior citizens as a majestic event. The second new dormitory was Longden Hall (1927), named for revered professor Henry B. Longden, first director of the Rector Scholarship Fund Foundation. Longden Hall, along with Florence Hall, was intended for independent men, now organized into Men’s Hall Association. In 1929 the two crowded Methodist Episcopal churches

1940 Mason Hall Student residence constructed in 1940.

1952

Memorial Student Union Building Constructed in 1952 in memory of DePauw students who died in World War II.

1956 1943

20 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

Locust Manor Navy V-5 headquarters in 1943. Women’s dormitory in 1944. Association of AfricanAmerican Students house in 1960s.

Roy O. West Library Completed and dedicated in 1956. Renovated in 1987. New façade in 2001.

Roy O. West


(Photo: Larry Ligget)

The Campus Through the Years

The East College bell was a gift from the Class of 1879.

1961

on the fringes of campus were replaced – College Avenue Church became Speech Hall, and its sanctuary a theater – by one new church named for former DePauw president Hillary Gobin. Gobin Memorial United Methodist Church was built in a Gothic renewal style of yellow brick. Small and cathedral-like, it was unlike any other building on campus. But the church was so centrally located and filled with students and townspeople on Sundays and weekdays that it became an integral part of the campus. Thanks to organist Van Denman Thompson and Josiah K. Lilly of Indianapolis, it had the only pipe organ on campus, a real asset for the School of Music. Also in 1929, the trustees adopted Georgian, or Colonial Revival, as the official architectural style for future DePauw buildings. With the Rockefellers

1972

Bishop Roberts Hall Student residence constructed in1961.

Hogate Hall Student residence constructed in 1968.

rebuilding Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia, many colleges east of the Mississippi adopted this style, which would dominate our campus for decades. Asbury Hall for the humanities and social sciences came first in 1930, a wide building with decorative chimneys at either end of a central section, dormer windows, reversible gabled roof and red brick walls. Next to it on the west, in 1935, was the Publications Building in a similar style. In 1940 Mason Hall, a dormitory for independent junior and senior women, completed the new quadrangle in old East Park. It occupied the site of Women’s (Mansfield) Hall, a dormitory that burned in 1933. Mason’s north front was similar to other Colonial Revivalstyle buildings on campus but with a beautiful semicircular portico on the

Percy L. Julian ’20

Percy L. Julian Science and Mathematics Center Science and mathematics building was constructed in 1972 and rededicated in 1982 in honor of internationally known chemist Percy L. Julian ’20.

1968 1976 Performing Arts Center Constructed in 1976 to house Music School, communication and theater departments. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 21


The Campus Through the Years north side; the south side matched Lucy Rowland Hall and Rector Hall. On the site of W. C. DePauw’s Gentlemen’s (Middle College) Hall, torn down along with West College in the 1930s, came Harrison Hall in 1940, named after Danville, Ill., alumnus John Harrison. It was similar to and faced Asbury Hall – three stories, red brick, wide chimneys and dormer windows – but the roof gables ran in a different direction. It was to house the botany, zoology, geology and psychology departments. Harrison Hall had the first elevator on campus. Blackstock Stadium, built in 1941, was unique in its use but still maintained the brick-and-limestone, Colonial Revival look. The World War II era brought us some oddities with temporary barracks,

Quonset huts and prefabricated houses to accommodate increased enrollment of married veterans and, later, junior faculty members. The Memorial Student Union in 1952 memorialized those lost to the Second World War. It continued DePauw’s use of Colonial Revival architecture; impressive and L-shaped, its broad front portico and six famous columns faced the Rector Quad, and an outside patio faced East College. The Union introduced a ballroomauditorium, cafeteria, dining room, large central reception hall, alumni office, faculty lounge, WGRE radio station and more. In 1956 Roy O. West Library, designed by library architectural specialists Wheeler and Bailey, departed radically from Colonial Revival. The reason was cost; it was a large, flat-roofed cube of reinforced concrete and brick.

The library has since been renovated and enlarged, with columns added to the front of the building and a decorative belfry on top for a more Colonial Revival look. The old Carnegie library was remodeled into the Emison Art Center. The last of the Colonial Revival structures, Roberts Hall, a men’s dormitory, was built in 1961. A new bookstore added to the Union building didn’t stray too far, but Roberts Hall marked the end of Colonial Revival architectural style on campus.

A shift in perspective A new student residence, Hogate Hall, was added in 1968. This unusual, accordion-style building was constructed with brick, stone and glass walls. The first floor featured a large reception room, kitchen and dining room. The University

1982 Lilly Physical Education and Recreation Center Constructed in1982.

1993

F.W. Olin Biological Sciences Building Dedicated in 1993.

2001

Center for Contemporary Media Constructed in 1991. Named the Eugene S. Pulliam Center for Contemporary Media in 2000. 22 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

1991

Indoor Tennis and Track Center Site of the 2003 and 2010 NCAA Division III Men’s and Women’s Indoor Track and Field Championships.


The Campus Through the Years moved away from dormitories with rooms on either side of long halls and toward suite living; Hogate Hall included 24 sixperson suites. It was also the first building on campus to be air-conditioned. A major addition to campus occurred in 1972 with construction of the Percy L. Julian Science and Mathematics Center. Designed in a modern style, the Julian Center reflected the emerging use of technology. It featured an auditorium, classrooms, library, computer center, offices, seminar rooms and large laboratories on two large floors. The building had a limited number of windows. The music, communication and theater departments were strengthened with construction of the Performing Arts Center in 1976. Built in a modern style with lavish glass and plain red-brick facing on exterior and interior walls,

Rector Village Construction of suite-style student residences began in 2003 on the former site of Rector Hall, which was destroyed by fire in 2002.

The only pre-Civil War object surviving on the campus today is the 1859 gravestone for Methodist Episcopal Bishop and Mrs. Roberts.

Percy Lavon Julian Science & Mathematics Center Renovated and expanded science and mathematics building was rededicated in 2003.

2003 2005

Richard E. Peeler Art Center Dedicated in honor of a beloved former professor of art in 2002.

2002

William Weston Clarke Emison Museum of Art Renovated and expanded art museum dedicated in 2005.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 23


The Campus Through the Years it was a unique, three-story academic building. The Performing Arts Center also featured the 1,400-seat Kresge Auditorium, which changed campus life. Meharry Hall in East College and Gobin Church sanctuary were too small to accommodate large audiences of students, faculty members, alumni and people from the community. Kresge Auditorium enabled DePauw to gather most of the campus community in one place at the same time.

Ongoing change In the last three decades, new, more contemporary buildings and the renovation of others have changed the campus considerably. The Lilly Physical Education and Recreation Center, completed in 1982, was a thenspacious field house with gymnasium

and natatorium. Subsequently, it was expanded to provide a fitness center with exercise equipment for students. The old Bowman Gym was demolished, and a park was landscaped in its place. Academic programs were supported with construction of the Eugene S. Pulliam Center for Contemporary Media in 1991; F.W. Olin Biological Sciences Building in 1993; and the Richard E. Peeler Art Center, designed by worldrenowned architect Carlos Jimenez, in 2002. The Julian Center also was renovated and greatly expanded, and the William Weston Clarke Emison Museum of Art (formerly Emison Art Center) was renovated, as was Roy O. West Library. The center of campus became much more impressive with the redesigned and expanded Judson and Joyce Green Center for the Performing Arts. The

Indoor Tennis and Track Center, which opened in 2001, provides a state-of-theart competition and practice venue. A new dimension was added to the University with the acquisition of the 520-acre DePauw Nature Park to the west of campus. The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics and The Bartlett Reflection Center were built there on the cliffs overlooking an old limestone quarry. In this period, the University also completed a major restoration of the landmark East College. While many colleges use their oldest building as administrative headquarters, DePauw maintained classrooms in East College. That decision means that students have an opportunity to attend classes and study in the heart of the old campus, where they gain a real sense of the historical DePauw.

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics Located in DePauw Nature Park and dedicated in 2007.

Judson and Joyce Green Center for the Performing Arts Renovated and expanded performing arts center dedicated in 2007.

2007

2009 The DePauw Nature Park The 520-acre nature park was dedicated in 2004. 24 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

The Bartlett Reflection Center Located in DePauw Nature Park and dedicated in 2009.


The Write Stuff

T

he process of teaching and learning at DePauw in its early days involved mostly recitations by students and faculty members in small classrooms. As enrollment grew, the University moved to more lecture classrooms, beginning about 1900. Asbury Hall, Harrison Hall and the other buildings on campus were built for lecturing, which impacted the technique of college teaching. In more recent years, DePauw has increased the size of its faculty and moved toward using more seminars and technology in teaching and learning. As a result, buildings have been constructed and renovated with smaller classrooms that incorporate technology and accommodate a different style of teaching and learning. A 50-year graduate of DePauw recently stopped by and told me about visiting his old haunts on campus. In a letter I received later, the alumnus said he went to Asbury Hall to see where he took some of his courses. He reported that the larger classrooms he knew are now smaller seminar rooms. So, yes, things have changed over the years, but DePauw has maintained its distinctive style.

What are your stories about campus? Many places on campus had a personal impact on alumni during their student days at DePauw, or they bring back particularly strong memories or continue to have special meaning years later. Do certain places represent DePauw experiences you’ll never forget? DePauw Magazine would like to hear these stories from alumni and will print as many as possible in future issues of the magazine. Please send your campus stories and reminiscences to Larry G. Anderson, editor, by e-mail at landersn@depauw.edu or by letter to DePauw Magazine, 300 E. Seminary St. P.O. Box 37, Greencastle, IN 46135-0037.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 25


Recent Words

RECENT WORDS ANNIE DERRICKSON BURNSIDE ’92, Soul to Soul Parenting: A Guide to Raising a Spiritually Conscious Family (Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing, Inc. – ISBN: 978-1-936214-14-3). Parents yearning for ways to include spirituality in their family’s busy lives will find a wealth of insight and user-friendly suggestions in Soul to Soul Parenting. It is both a guidebook filled with a wide-ranging “toolbox” of ideas and activities and a remarkable chronicle of one family’s spiritual journey. Soul to Soul Parenting gives readers the tools to lead an authentic, conscious, divinely inspired life so that they can provide the same for their children, assisting parents in becoming active participants in their children’s awakening as conscious global citizens. With the lessons taught in this book, Burnside empowers parents to live soul to soul with their children, not just side by side. n SCOTT H. DECKER ’72 and Hugh D. Barlow, eds., Criminology and Public Policy: Putting Theory to Work (Temple University Press – ISBN: 978-1-43990007-9). In Criminology and Public Policy, Decker and Barlow examine the major criminological theories and how they inform policy. Individual, group and macro level theories of crime and criminality are examined in chapters written by leading theorists. They examine strain, conflict, feminist, social learning and routine activities theories. Each 26 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

theory is then applied to public policy and crime control practice. Criminology and Public Policy also includes chapters that link theory and practice regarding specific forms of crime – including drug, gang and violent offenses. Decker is Foundation Professor and director of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. n WENDY B. GIFFORD ’71, His Border Bride (Harlequin Historical – ISBN: 978-0-373-29594-4). Writing as Blythe Gifford, this is her fifth historical romance. However, this time the story takes place in 14th century Scotland. Gifford again tells the story of a hero born on the wrong side of the royalty blanket. Wendy Gifford has recently signed a contract with Harlequin for thee additional books. The Chicago Tribune calls her work “the perfect balance between history and romance.” Her other books are Innocence Unveiled, The Harlot’s Daughter, and The Knave and the Maiden. Gifford welcomes visitors at www.facebook.com/BlytheGifford and on her Web site, www.blythegifford.com. n JOHN W. GUY ’63, Middle Man, A Broker’s Tale (IBJ Book Publishing – ISBN: 978-1-4515498-1-2). This is the first novel by John Guy, president of Wealth Planning & Management, LLC

and a securities industry arbitrator. In this fiction story, Jack Chap is a middle man extraordinaire, by both trade and temperament. A financial professional who strives for an ordered life personally and professionally, Chap lives in the middle. No matter the circumstances, he will try to find the middle ground. He is not a boat-rocker. Everybody says Chap is a nice guy. He couldn’t have committed brutal murder in his office, could he? You’d think unraveling begins at the edges, but in this case, it just may have started in the middle. Guy is also the author of an investment policy guide, How to Invest Someone Else’s Money. n TOBY JONES ’83, The Way of Jesus: Reforming Spiritual Communities in a PostChurch Age (Resource Publications – ISBN: 978-1-60899-152-5). Countless books have been written about the impending death of the institutional church, but this one both celebrates the resurrection that will follow and lights the way toward a new kind of spiritual community. In The Way of Jesus, Jones draws both from the scriptures and from such fresh thinkers as Brian McLaren, Dallas Willard, Doug Pagitt and Shane Clairborne, offering genuine hope and historical direction to the millions of spiritually homeless. Just as importantly, The Way of Jesus offers a clear path to struggling, shrinking congregations who desire to re-form themselves in a way that is both more faithful to the Gospel and


Recent Words

compelling to post-modern generations, who have long since abandoned the institutional church. n AMIE KLEMPNAUER MILLER ’88, She Looks Just Like You: A Memoir of (Nonbiological Lesbian) Motherhood (Beacon Press – ISBN: 978-0-8070-04692). At the age of 37, Amie Klempnauer Miller was about to become a mother for the first time, except she wasn’t pregnant. After a year and a half of trying to conceive through in vitro fertilization, Miller’s treatments were unsuccessful. When her partner, Jane, decided to undergo the procedure and became pregnant on the first try, Miller was thrilled, but suddenly found she was in uncharted waters. In She Looks Just Like You, Miller shares the intimate details of pregnancy, childbirth, and stay-at-home parenting from the perspective of someone who both defies and defines the norms of motherhood. She explores the love, humor and terror that come with motherhood, and though she does not shy away from sharing the most challenging parts of her experience, Miller’s ability to find the humor in things always shines through. n ALAN R. MILLETT ’59, The War for Korea, 1950-1951: They Came from the North (University of Kansas Press – ISBN: 978-0-7006-1709-89). In this second

volume of a monumental trilogy, Millett shifts his focus to the 12-month period from North Korea’s invasion of South Korea on June 25, 1950, through the end of June 1951 – the most active phase of the internationalized “Korean War.” Moving deftly between the battlefield and the halls of power, Millett weaves together military operations and tactics without losing sight of Cold War geopolitics, strategy and civil-military relations. Filled with new insights about the conflict, The War for Korea, 1950-1951 is the first book to give combined arms its due, looking at the contributions and challenges of integrating naval and air power with the ground forces of United Nations Command and showing the importance of Korean support services. Millett is Ambrose Professor of History and director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies at the University of New Orleans. n DR. JACK RUNNINGER ’45 and Judge Dan Winn, Fixing Stupid, Two Curmudgeons Pet Peeves (ISBN: 9781451553710). The authors adhere to the philosophy that one of the few advantages of old age is the privilege of becoming crotchety and cantankerous. This book is a discussion by two curmudgeons of their resultant pet peeves. The book’s first section is written by retired judge Dan Winn. According to an editor’s note, Winn uses his keen and perceptive legal mind and experience to

analyze the things that irk him, and what should be done about them. The second part of the book is written by retired optometrist Jack Runninger, a humorist who has received many Ohio and national awards for his newspaper and magazine humor columns. Runninger focuses on the humor and satire in the crazy and aggravating things that people do. n JEFFREY D. SHIVELY ’95, It Came Out Fighting!: Cadillac Motor Car Division’s Rise to Dominance of the Luxury Car Market After World War II (AuthorHouse –ISBN: 978-1-4343-4834-0). It Came Out Fighting! is an analysis of the factors that contributed to Cadillac Motor Car Division’s ascension to sales leadership in the fine car field in the years following World War II. Factors at play during the pre-war years, such as mechanical and styling innovations, advertising concepts and the redefinition of the luxury car genre are considered. Cadillac’s wartime production of aircraft engine parts and tanks hold the real key to post-war dominance. The War Department paid the company to upgrade its facilities and its drive train, allowing Cadillac to avoid many of the financial burdens endured by its primary rival, Packard, during reconversion. That also permitted Cadillac to sell an improved product for less cost to the customer than its competitors and to rule the luxury car market until the close of the 20th century. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 27


Alumni Programs Interested in helping your alma mater? Alumni can do so in the following ways: n Refer a prospective student or represent DePauw at a college fair in your area (www.depauw.edu/admission/ resources/alumni.asp) n Host a current student for a Winter Term internship (e-mail alumnioffice@depauw.edu) n Serve as a Regional Council or Club member (www. depauw.edu/alumni/regional/ volunteeropps.asp) n Support the DePauw Annual Fund (www.depauw.edu/ development/index.asp) n Assist with Career Services (www.depauw.edu/ admin/career/alumni/ helpcareerservices.asp)

DePauw Alumni Association and Office of Alumni Relations announcement Please mark your calendars for these special upcoming alumni events and visit www.depauw.edu/alumni for complete information: DePauw Discourse................................................................Sept. 23-25, 2010 Old Gold Weekend....................................................................Oct. 8-9, 2010 Monon Bell game and telecast parties ....................... Saturday, Nov. 13, 2010 Legal and Healthcare Professionals Program......................... March 4-5, 2011 Celebration of DePauw Athletics...................................Saturday, May 7, 2011 Alumni Reunion Weekend.......................................................June 8-12, 2011 Your regional alumni volunteer leaders are planning events around the country. To find out about upcoming events in your area, please visit the Alumni Relations homepage at www.depauw.edu/alumni.

Want to contact fellow alumni or find who is living in your region? Log in to the DePauw Alumni Gateway at www.depauw.edu/e/alu/login.asp. If you need additional information about upcoming alumni events or how you can assist DePauw, please contact the Bartlett Alumni House staff at alumnioffice@depauw. edu or toll-free at 877-658-2586.

Wide age range of alumni riders compete in fourth annual Little 5 Alumni Bike Race The 54th running of Little 5 was held on Saturday, April 17, at Blackstock Stadium, and for the fourth time in the history of the race, an alumni race was held in conjunction with the student races. The alumni race is comprised of four races within one, as the race is scored in four age categories: Masters 30 field for all those racers under the age of 39, Masters 40 field for all racers in their 40s, and Master’s 50 and 60 field. This year the race field consisted of 26 avid cyclists, the largest race field to date for the alumni race. For some 28 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Alumni Programs

DEPAUW U N I V E R S I T Y

Old DEGold PAUW Weekend October 8-9, 2010 alumni, their interest in cycling began when they participated in the Little 5 race because it was their first exposure to the sport of competitive cycling. Alumni traveled from both coasts of the country and represented graduating classes from 1970-2009. The 50-minute race was a spirited competition that was witnessed by family, friends and students. The alumni race festivities started on Friday when a number of riders who arrived on campus early went on an afternoon group social ride. The casual ride allowed alumni to catch up with some old friends and to make new ones as they cycled through the back roads of Putnam County. Alumni Race director A. Kent Billingsley ’80 said, “The level of interest and support from the alumni this year was outstanding. The Alumni Relations Office,

Mark your calendars for Old Gold Weekend

Visit campus for Old Gold Weekend from Oct. 8-9 and help recognize the 2010 Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award recipients: Old Gold Goblet: Don R. Daseke ’61 Young Alumni Award: James A. Rechtin ’93 Citizenship and Voluntary Service: Ruth Ritz Rusie ’40 Creative and Performing Arts: Barbara Zaring ’69 Management and Entrepreneurship: Kathy Patterson Vrabeck ’85 Professional Achievement: Carolyn Hostetter Smith ’59 and Dr. L. Penfield Faber ’52 In addition to the annual Distinguished Alumni Achievement and Awards dinner, Old Gold Weekend highlights include The Washington C. DePauw Society Benefactor and Scholarship recipient breakfast, a career-networking program for students and alumni, and a community-wide fall festival.   More information can be found at www.depauw.edu/alumni.

Student Steering Committee and Professor Kent Menzel were invaluable in helping this year’s event be so successful. We had the largest showing of alumni racers this year as this event continues to gain more and more interest and popularity. Although most of the racers were recreational riders, this year’s race field held an average speed of 21 mph with surges that hit 27 mph. Not too shabby when you consider the largest race group in the field was the Master’s 50 with 13 racers. “The alumni race is open to any alumnus; there is no prerequisite that you must be a former Little 5 rider. If you (both men and women) have taken up the sport of cycling since leaving DePauw, consider joining us next year for the race.” If you have any questions or inquiries about the race, contact Billingsley at alumnilittle5@comcast.net.

Overall winner of the 2010 Alumni Race was 48-year-old Scott Kuiper ’83. The category winners were: Masters 30 1st – C. Neil Broshears ’09 2nd – John R. Stallings ’09 3rd – James J. Griffin ’96 Masters 40 1st – Scott D. Kuiper ’83 2nd – Alexander G. Godfrey ’84 3rd – Timothy F. Meyer ’83 Masters 50 1st – James W. Vidmich ’82 2nd – Thomas H. Gee ’73 3rd – Michael L. Hopwood ’83 Masters 60 1st – Peter M. Donahower ’70 2nd – David C. Westerholm ’70

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 29


Alumni Programs

Alumni and friends represent DePauw at 88 college fairs During the 2009-10 academic year, 87 alumni and friends assisted the Admission Office by representing the University at 88 college fairs in 21 states and two foreign countries. Without the assistance of these loyal alumni and friends, it would not be possible to attract students to DePauw from all regions of the country. The admission staff expresses its sincere thanks to the following persons who helped to enroll this fall’s incoming freshman class: Christy A. Agness ’01 Austin, Texas

Jonathan V. Cuevas ’97 Charlotte, N.C.

Mark E. Hungate ’73 St. Petersburg, Fla.

Marcia Pritchard Alig ’63 Princeton Junction, N.J.

Erin Linville Curley ’96 Phoenix

Kathryn Rohlf Johnson ’93 Moline, Ill.

Sherri Ashby-Modrak ’87 Valparaiso, Ind.

Luis R. and Deborah (White ’82) Davila ’81 Beijing, China

Susanne C. Kerekes ’07 New York City

Jennifer Pace Baker ’97 Plano, Texas

Susan Melberg Davis ’79 St. Louis

Brooke Barbee ’03 Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif. Santa Ana, Calif.

Meghan E. DeFreeuw ’06 Dallas

Rajb R. Bhattacharjee ’06 Plano, Texas

Scott R. Eberle ’96 Pittsburgh

Carol Euken Bledsoe ’90 Fort Myers, Fla.

Barrett T. Ellsworth ’08 Tulsa, Okla.

Barrett L. Boehm ’08 Kansas City, Mo. Liberty, Mo.

Jonathan D. Enenbach ’05 Omaha, Neb. Mark E. English ’64 Naples, Fla.

Carter W. Boehm ’08 Cottleville, Mo.

Allison E. Frost ’69 Hong Kong, China

Jeffrey G. and Shelly (Mazeau ’96) Bogda ’96 Memphis, Tenn. Adam D. Brackemyre ’00 Fairfax, Va. Katherine E. Brambl ’01 Tulsa, Okla.

Kyle A. Gamble ’92 Des Moines, Iowa Anita Mendoza Garibovic ’98 Houston (2) Daniel S. Garrison ’01 Dallas

Tobias J. Butler ’04 Atlanta

Gregory A. Gelzinnis ’84 Granite City, Ill.

Caryn O’Brien Callanan ’89 Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

David W. Gilbert ’65 Maplewood, N.J.

James M. Callane ’64 Kokomo, Ind. Helen T. Carlson ’06 Houston, Texas Henry and Nancy (Hilliger ’69) Coan Champaign, Ill.

Allison L. Grogan ’06 Lexington, Ky. Michelle Silkowski Hackett ’88 Redondo Beach, Calif. Torrance, Calif.

Pamela A. Collins ’75 Sherman Oaks, Calif. Moorpark, Calif. Marc E. Cooper ’76 Palo Alto, Calif. John J. Costello ’08 Chesterfield, Mo. Kerry A. Cragin ’08 Romeoville, Ill. Lake Forest, Ill. 30 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

Collette Engert Harlow ’85 Grand Rapids, Mich. Jodi L. Harris ’90 Wooster, Ohio David W. Hasenbalg ’87 Seal Beach, Calif. Linda Berkey Herrick ’75 Tucson, Ariz. Tyler S. Hollett ’05 Honolulu

Allyson Wylie Klak ’89 Mt. Pleasant, Mich. Rachel S. Kovac ’04 Knoxville, Tenn. Jonathan D. Lau ’04 Bloomfield Hills, Mich. Edward E. Lehman ’82 Beijing, China Cynthia Jones Lippincott ’84 Tampa, Fla. Tamara Lewis Lynch ’86 Merrillville, Ind. Kathleen Gorman Maltarich ’92 Davenport, Iowa Jennifer King Molyneaux ’99 Moline, Ill. Scott Morrow ’01 Richardson, Texas Charles J. Nelson ’85 Sherman Oaks, Calif. Kerry E. Notestine ’79 Bellaire, Texas Jessica L. Oesch ’06 Hazelwood, Mo. Daniel P. Peabody ’89 Wooster, Ohio Jacqueline K. Pence ’08 Chicago Nicole R. Pence ’06 Lexington, Ky. M. Scott Ramey ’70 Sylvania, Ohio Natasha Ranjan ’05 Austin, Texas Darlene Kane Reinhard ’85 San Antonio, Texas Stephanie Rivera ’05 Houston (2) William J. and Rebecca (Hawk ’77) Roess ’79 Beavercreek, Ohio

James W. Rowlett ’54 Scottsville, Mich. Traverse City, Mich. Timothy L. Scott ’66 Ft. Worth, Texas Brenton A. Shultz ’06 Houston Glenn R. Silcott ’65 LaCanada, Calif. Pravir Singh ’05 New York City Dale Gossard Stevenson ’89 Quincy, Ill. Susan Leis Thiele ’79 Centerville, Ohio James M. Tomsic ’69 Parma, Ohio Andrea L. Travelstead ’09 Des Plaines, Ill. Tuan P. Vuong ’03 Hanoi, Vietnam David C. and Ann (Triplett ’02) Warner ’00 Crestview Hills, Ky. Evan B. Webeler ’07 Cincinnati Darin E. Williams ’93 Franklin, Tenn. Laura Bond Williams ’92 Austin, Texas James W. Wright ’64 Anaheim, Calif.; Burbank, Calif.; Costa Mesa, Calif.; Cypress, Calif.; Fullerton, Calif.; Irvine, Calif.; Laguna Beach, Calif.; LaHabra, Calif.; Long Beach, Calif.; Orange, Calif.; Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.; Santa Ana, Calif.; Santa Monica, Calif.; Torrance, Calif.; Tustin, Calif. Elizabeth Weidman Zuercher ’66 Costa Mesa, Calif. Irvine, Calif.; Laguna Beach, Calif.; Tustin, Calif.


Alumni Programs

Atlanta and Cincinnati Clubs, Mike Bogers ’01 receive Regional Council and Club Awards The Alumni Board of Directors Programming Committee selected the Atlanta Regional Club, Cincinnati Regional Council and Michael E. Bogers ’01 as recipients of this year’s Regional Council and Club Awards. They were recognized during a dinner on June 10 at The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics as part of the Alumni Reunion Weekend events. The Atlanta Regional Club and Cincinnati Regional Council were recognized for their efforts to significantly improve their regional programming and events. The Atlanta Club increased its number of events to nine and offered a variety of alumni engagement opportunities. Instrumental in their success were Julie A. Trowbridge ’88, club president, and Tobias J. Butler ’04, Alumni Board member. Likewise, the Council in Cincinnati significantly increased its number of events compared to the previous year as well as the variety of event offerings. Cincinnati alumni hosted 11 events,

including two service projects, a career networking event and several downtown networking lunches. David C. Warner ’00 was the lead coordinator of this effort. Bogers received the Individual Council Member Award for encouraging DePauw connections by developing the downtown networking lunch concept, facilitating the lunches in Indianapolis for more than two years, and helping to coordinate them. He has hosted downtown lunches since July 2008 that have featured speakers such as: Gary D. Lemon, director of The Robert C McDermond Center for Management & Entrepreneurship; Brad A. Kelsheimer, vice president for finance and administration; and Carol S. Steele, associate dean of academic affairs and University sustainability coordinator. To read more about the purpose of the awards and to review past winners, go to www.depauw.edu/alumni/regional/ recognition_award_details.asp.

Jason A. Asbury ’95, left, chair of the Alumni Board’s Programming Committee, presents the Individual Council Member Award to Michael E. Bogers ’01.

Tobias J. Butler ’04, right, accepted the Regional Club Award on behalf of the Atlanta Regional Club. At left is Jason A. Asbury ’95, chair of the Alumni Board’s Programming Committee.

Save the date

CHICAGO-AREA ALUMNI 1st Annual Regional GOLD Gala Oct. 29, 2010

A night for GOLD alumni to reconnect and celebrate. Look for additional information at www.depauw.edu/alumni. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 31


Alumni Programs

Don’t miss this fascinating alumni tour Experience Tunisia from May 23-June 7, 2011 Plunge into the past: meet stubborn Roman ruins, storied Punic harbors, soaring mosques, Berber houses, sparkling mosaics, the timeless desert and savory flavors of an African crossroads. Tunisia offers remarkable diversity in its history, people, climate and geography. If you ever went on a Winter Term trip that opened up a world of learning and experience (or wish you had), join Pedar W. Foss, DePauw’s dean of academic life and Edwin L. Minar Professor of Classical Studies, to learn how to decipher Roman tombstones and ancient gameboards, discover the construction and workings of amphitheaters, temples and baths, untangle the strands of old and recent religious syncretism, and appreciate the lifeways of this unique country between the Mediterranean and the Sahara. Let us unlock the ancient world for you. For more information about the tour, cost and how to make a reservation, contact: Linda Feinstone, president • Archaeological Tours, 271 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016 Phone: 212-986-3054 • Toll-free: 866-740-5130 • www.archaeologicaltrs.com

Are you ready for a Monon Bell telecast party?

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32 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

area! DePauw’s Office of Alumni Relations will create and e-mail telecast party invitations for you. The office also will

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Nearly 2,000 alumni attended a record 66 Monon Bell telecast parties around the country in 2009. You can be a telecast party host in your area this year and add even more excitement to the game. The 117th battle between the DePauw Tigers and Wabash Little Giants is scheduled on Saturday, Nov. 13, at Byron P. Hollett Little Giant Stadium in Crawfordsville. Wabash, which defeated DePauw 32-19 last year, leads the legendary series 54-53-9. If you like to hang out with DePauw friends (and friendly Wabash alums, too), love Tiger football and would like to get some free stuff from your alma mater, then you should host a Monon Bell telecast party on Nov. 13, or attend the party in your

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mail each party site a game-day goodie box. Each host will receive a special token of our thanks for your efforts. Volunteer today! If you are interested in hosting a telecast party in your area, contact Dana Coffin Moell ’95, assistant director of alumni relations, at 877-658-2586 or danamoell@depauw.edu. Check for further telecast and party details on the DePauw Alumni Relations website at www.depauw.edu/alumni. View photo galleries from 2009 Monon Bell telecast parties at www.depauw.edu/alumni/monon/index.asp. To read more about the Monon Bell, its history, interesting facts and game stories, go to the Monon Bell website at www.depauw.edu/ath/football/monon.


Alumni Programs

Regional Councils and Clubs make a difference with service projects Continuing the tradition of DePauw’s strong connection with community service, nine regional events focusing on service were held during 2009-10. A Regional Council in Cincinnati did not feel that one service event was enough, so members planned two. Four Regional Councils (Chicago, Cincinnati, Putnam County and the Twin Cities) added a social aspect to their service events. The Chicago Regional Council held an event at Corcoran’s Pub in Old Town where alumni supported the Chicago-based, nonprofit organization Alumni for Public Schools. Gathering food for the less fortunate was the focus for the Putnam County Hot Spot. The Cincinnati Regional Council supported the Brighton Center, while the Twin Cities Regional Club held an event for the benefit of Simpson Housing Services. The Greater Washington, D.C., Regional Council assisted with Servathon 2010, which has an 18-year history of bringing together thousands of area volunteers for two extraordinary days of service. Volunteers made a lasting impact at nonprofits and schools in their region by painting, cleaning, landscaping and revitalizing. In April DePauw alumni in the Indianapolis area helped Rebuilding the Wall, Inc. This organization stabilizes and empowers low-income families by renovating vacant inner-city properties and giving families the opportunity for

New York City Regional Council members and area alumni in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. homeownership. They combat social injustice by building relationships across racial and socio-economic barriers and stabilize the community by recycling assets within the neighborhood. DePauw alumni volunteers specifically assisted with the construction of a home. Abigail A. Parsons ’04 organized a service event benefiting Reading to Kids in the Los Angeles area. Reading to Kids is dedicated to inspiring underserved children with a love of reading. Volunteers coordinate reading clubs at elementary schools in downtown Los Angeles where they read aloud to children and create arts and crafts projects about the stories. Each child receives a book to take home, and the books read aloud are donated to the school’s library. New York Regional Council members and area alumni gathered in Prospect

Park, Brooklyn, for It’s My Park Day on May 15, 2010. They assisted with cleaning up litter, raking, mulching, planting bulbs, caring for tree pits, painting and more. Alumni then gathered at a local eatery to network and reconnect. On March 6, 2010, Cincinnati alumni and Regional Council members stocked and arranged products in a new Habitat ReStore facility, which opened to the public in mid-March. Habitat ReStores are outlets that accept donated home improvement goods for resale – furniture, home accessories, building materials and appliances. Fifteen volunteers participated in this event organized by Rick Carlin ’68. If you are interested in planning or assisting with a service event in your region, send an e-mail to Dana Coffin Moell ’95, assistant director of alumni relations, at danamoell@depauw.edu.

The second

Legal and Healthcare Professionals Program March 4-5, 2011

For updated information about the program, go to www.depauw.edu/alumni. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 33


Alumni Programs

(Photo: Larry Ligget)

Highlights from Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010

The Lost Chords performed as part of the 50th Reunion program.

President Brian W. Casey had a conversation about campus planning with alumni in the Memorial Student Union Building, ballroom.

Alumni enjoyed Alumni Colleges, including a book discussion by Gregory L. Schwipps ’95, associate professor of English and author.

34 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

Margaret McElwain Kemper ’60 and performance on the J. Stanford Smith


(Photo: Larry Ligget)

(Photo: Larry Ligget)

Alumni Programs

Alumni athletes received ‘‘D” blankets.

d Jason A. Asbury ’95 gave an Alumni College h Concert Organ in Kresge Auditorium.

The Class of 1960 displays its class gift.

The Alumni Celebration program featured, from left, President Brian W. Casey, Alumni Association President Janet L. Johns ’85, Lawrence W. Clarkson ’60, Kathy P. Vrabeck ’85 and James D. Larson ’05.

The Super Sixty 50th Reunion class prepares for the Alumni Celebration.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 35


Alumni Programs

Highlights from Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010

The 25th Reunion class began a new tradition this year by holding the class reception at The Elms, President Brian W. Casey’s home. The Class of 1985 even had Marvin’s famous food delivered to The Elms.

36 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Alumni Programs

New Alumni Association Board members are, from left, Tyler B. Somershield ’69, Carolyn E. Whittier ’97, Cathy A. Bryant ’86, J. David Gislason ’82, Nicole C. Craker ’10, James M. Tomsic ’69, Debra Haerr Victor ’80, Denny P. Bennett II ’85 and Thomas R. Schuck ’72.

Bagpipers and the DePauw Tiger led the 5th Reunion class to the Alumni Celebration.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 37


Class Notes 1934 Ronald W. Gilbert was re-elected for a two-year term as representative of his cluster of homes on the Resident Council at Robin Run Village retirement community in Indianapolis.

1941 Alexander Vraciu’s biography, Fighter Pilot: The World War II Career of Alex Vraciu, written by Ray E. Boomhower, has been released by the Indiana Historical Society Press. Alex was an ace fighter pilot in the Pacific during World War II.

1942 William F. Laramore and his wife, Betty, celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary, June 25, 2010. They live in Plymouth, Ind., in the house they designed and built before their wedding in 1950.

1950 Marion Goldthwaite Harcourt retired as a social worker at Midtown Mental Health in Indianapolis. She volunteers for the American Red Cross in disaster work and is a supervisor in disaster mental health. She has been deployed to hurricanes, tornadoes and fires both locally and nationwide and was in Manhattan after 9/11. Marion is a docent for Indiana Landmarks, advanced master gardener through Purdue Extension, member of Mensa and active in her church. She was the Indiana Social Worker of the Year in 2008. Charles H. Heaton was featured in a fourpage article complete with several pictures and reproductions of recital programs in the

May 2010 issue of The Diapason, a national magazine for organists. The article, “Dear Diary 1954-56,” consists of diary excerpts from two years of study and living in New York City at the School of Sacred Music of the Union Theological Seminary. Charles was an organ major at DePauw and studied with Dr. Van Denman Thompson. Charles’ e-mail address is chas.heaton@verizon.net.

1951 Maclyn “Mac” T. Parker was recipient of the Community Spirit Award given by the Fort WayneAllen County (Ind.) Economic Development Alliance. After Maclyn “Mac” T. presenting the Parker ’51 award to Mac, the alliance renamed the award the Maclyn Parker Swagger Award for Community Spirit. Mac is a retired lawyer. (See photo, above.) Norval B. Stephens Jr. retired as president of Delta Tau Delta international foundation. He has served as president of the foundation since 1995. He is a lifetime member of DePauw’s Board of Trustees.

1953 Raymond A. Mattson Jr. was recognized as the 2010 Honorary Alumnus by Greenville Technical College in recognition of dedicated service and support.

1954

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

William A. Pendl was inducted into the Cincinnati Tennis Hall of Fame, Aug. 14, 2010. Bill was also inducted into DePauw’s Athletic Hall of Fame. He is a retired IBM executive. William “Bill” F. Rasmussen’s book, Sports Junkies Rejoice! The Birth of ESPN, has been published in a paperback edition. Bill and his son, Scott W. Rasmussen ’86, are co-founders of ESPN.

Class Notes Policy The class notes section of DePauw Magazine allows DePauw alumni to keep their classmates and the University current on their careers, activities and whereabouts. All information for class notes should be sent to DePauw University, DePauw Magazine, 300 E. Seminary Street, P.O. Box 37, Greencastle, IN 46135-0037. You may also fax the information to 765-658-4625 or e-mail to dgrooms@depauw.edu. Photographs will be used as space allows and cannot be returned. If you submit digital photos, the images should be shot at the highest resolution on the digital camera. Images must be saved at the highest resolution or 300 ppi minimum in JPEG format. In the interest of privacy, we will publish home and e-mail addresses only if an alumnus or alumna specifically requests us to do so. Class notes printed in DePauw Magazine will also be included in the online version of the magazine. Please direct class note questions to Larry Ligget, editorial assistant, DePauw University, P.O. Box 37, 300 E. Seminary St., Greencastle, IN 46135-0037. Phone: 765-658-4627; fax 765-658-4625; e-mail larryligget@depauw.edu. – Editor University in Angola, Ind. He is a life member and past chair of DePauw’s Board of Trustees. Raymond E. Wachter Jr. and Matthew R. Gorrell ’97 met in Bermuda on May 17, 2010. Ray contacted Matt via e-mail based on his

1955 Ian M. Rolland is retired chairman of Lincoln National Corporation. He is a member of the board of trustees of Trine

Raymond E. Wachter Jr. ’55 and Matthew R. Gorrell ’97 met in Bermuda.

For a schedule of alumni events and information about alumni services, go to: www.depauw.edu/alumni/index.asp 38 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes listing in the DePauw Alumni Directory. They had an enjoyable meeting and made plans to meet again when Matt visits the United States. (See photo, bottom previous page.)

1957 Robert M. Burleigh is author of The Crossing. He is a writer and artist living in Chicago. He creates art under the name Burleigh Kronquist. During March 2010, six members of Sigma Chi fraternity and their spouses joined for dinner and a fun evening at the Florida home of Frank D. Walker ’57 and his wife, Jane. Frank was inducted into The Indiana Academy, June 7, 2010. The Academy was established by the Independent Colleges of Indiana to recognize honorees for lifetime achievement and contributions to the cultural, scientific, literary, civic, religious and educational development of Indiana. Frank is chairman emeritus of Walker Information Inc., an Indianapolis firm specializing in customer loyalty and survey research. (See photo, right.)

1958

Cambridge, England in August 2010, where representatives from more than 50 countries met for discussion, learning, listening and discovering. Vincent’s first work for solo classic guitar, Peireus, op. 52, was performed April 11, 2010, at the Guitar Festival in Macomb. Belinda (Nickel) and Albert A. Watts celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary wearing their original wedding attire. (See photo, top next page.)

The 1958 Delta Delta Delta members held a reunion in April 2010 in San Diego, at the home of Marilyn “Jo” (Hansen) and Thomas A. Lancaster. (See photo, center next page.)

1959 Eugene N. Brewer, author of K-PAX, adapted his novel into a stage play. He greeted those attending the performance of the play at the Geneva Underground Playhouse, May 16, 2010.

Photo: KIWI Photography

Vincent S. Frohne is an internationally acclaimed composer as well as organist at St. Paul Church in Macomb, Ill. He received an invitation to take part in the World Forum in

Sigma Chi members and their spouses met in Florida. Those attending included Merle F. Allshouse ’57, Myrna Mansfield Allshouse ’56, Eugene N. Halladay ’57, Virginia “Gina” Halladay, Richard F. Maroney ’57, Joyce Ragland Maroney ’58, Maynard D. Poland ’57, Eleanor Rapp Poland ’61, Ronald T. Hafer ’57, Ellen Hafer, Jane Walker and Frank D. Walker ’57.

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1955 and Prior Row 1: Patricia Mottweiler Jacobs ’50, Jane Clements King ’55, Barbara Savage Feld ’55, Ethel Zimmer (friend), Robert C. Zimmer ’50, Ruth Ritz Rusie ’40, Jack D. Bennett ’50, David J. Ware ’50, Robert “Rick” J. Ricketts. Row 2: O. Eugene “Gene” Taylor ’55, JoAnne Bauer Taylor ’55, Charles A. Vickers ’55, Martha Johnson Vickers ’55, Nancy Herr McCormick ’55, Carol Rodebaugh Brandt ’55, Benjamin G. Cochran ’55, Cynthia Allen Ricketts ’51. Row 3: Marilyn Davis Boyles ’50, E. Zillah Janes Novak ’50, Dora May Hildebrand Meredith ’50, George R. Glass ’50, John R. Mote ’50, Norman H. Hake ’50, Russell H. Hart Jr. ’50. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 39


Class Notes Members of the 1957-59 classes of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority met in Oak Park, Ill., May 29, 2010. (See photo, bottom left.)

1960

Belinda (Nickel) and Albert A. Watts ’58 ’58 celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. Other DePauw alumni attending included Robert J. Jacobson ’58 (best man) and Eleanor Selle Stanley ’58 (matron of honor).

The DePauw Black Friars of 1960 held their 50th reunion, May 11, 2010. Those attending included Peter J. Klingler ’60, Michael C. Hicks ’61, John “Whitey” Stelle ’62, Richard “PT” M. Bobb ’60 and Fred A. Liedtke ’61. Ronald L. Gillum was inducted into the Wall of Fame at Danville (Ill.) High School, May 20, 2010. He is a pathologist and served as chief of the clinical pathology labs at University Hospitals, Oklahoma Children’s Memorial Hospital and the Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center in Oklahoma City. Phyllis C. Leppert is a professor at Duke School of Medicine and is the head of a lab studying the molecular biology of uterine fibroids. She is the principal investigator of a large study comparing MRI focused ultrasound vs. uterine artery embolization for the treatment of uterine fibroids.

1961 John S. Null is the 26th recipient of the John W. Nichols Bridgebuilder Award from Delta Tau Delta fraternity. The award recognizes local house corporation volunteers whose volunteer work creates the bridge from generation to generation at a chapter. John is the first DePauw alumnus to receive the award. He has served on the Beta Beta house corporation since 1999. The 1958 Delta Delta Delta class met in San Diego. Those attending included Nancy Lindquist Temple ’58, Janet York Babcock ’58, Martha Obear Huggins ’58, Marilyn “Jo” Hansen Lancaster ’58, Susan Stevenson Imel ’58, Leslie Yoder Lynch ’58, Georgia Basore Kropf ’58, Lois Stewart Perry ’58, Katherine Keith Milne ’58, Janet Prindle Seidler ’58, Jane McDaniel Keller ’58 and Nancie Clark Williams ’58.

Members of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority met in Oak Park, Ill. Those attending included Susanne Proud Kroeger ’59, Ann McClanahan Gilchrist ’59, Ann Ugland Troha ’59, Beverley Johnson Atkins ’59, Rae Lahti Donnelly ’59, Myrna Magnuson Trowbridge ’59, Janet Barton Dring ’59, Mary McCallum Henrichs ’58 and Jean Anderson Weliver ’57. 40 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

1962 Alpha Omicron Pi 1962 classmates Sharon Early Atherton, Diane Haas Haven and Mary “Ginger” Wahl Clark got together in Annapolis, Md., in March 2010. Sharon lives in Virginia. Diane and Ginger live in Maryland. (See photo, below.)

Alpha Omicron Pi 1962 classmates Sharon Early Atherton ’62, Diane Haas Haven ’62 and Mary “Ginger” Wahl Clark ’62 in Annapolis, Md.


Class Notes

Jane Sansomer Boyer ’62, center, received

1963 Dr. Philip N. Eskew Jr. is writing a book about the positive lifelong impact of participation in sports. Phil was a high school and college athlete. He was inducted into DePauw’s Hall of Fame in 1994. He invites anyone to share – in their own words – the lessons, values, ideals or practices they learned from sports. You can send your comments to Phil at valueofsports@gmail.com. Mary Price Swain retired as provost at Binghamton University/State University of New York after 17 years of service. She plans to return to teaching in Spring 2011.

Photo: KIWI Photography

an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree from Eastern Kentucky University.

The DePauw School of Nursing Class of 1962 held a reunion, May 17-20, 2010, in the Harbor Country of Michigan. The group enjoyed time together and a variety of activities arranged by event planners Carol Olson Emens and Dorothy Sams Pitner-Healy. (See photo, top next page.) Jane Sansome Boyer was keynote speaker at the Eastern Kentucky University spring commencement ceremony in June 2010. She received an honorary Doctor of Humanities degree. She is a former member of Eastern Kentucky University’s Board of Regents. (See photo, left.)

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1960 Row 1: Carol Williams Stelle, Doris “Dorie” Taylor Maxwell, Helen DeLong Gilbert, Judeth “Judy” Kropp Macdonald, Marlene Schild Bilger, Carol Roesener Jackson, Sandra Major Wiese, Beth Bogie, Melinda “Mindy” Fuller Mayhall, A. Jeanne LaDuke, Dorothy “Dede” Lockwood Jamison, Marlene Josephson Pawlowski, Barbara Kuber Maurer, Marcia G. Life, Katrina “Bunny” Longenecker Nummela, Patricia “Patti” Fogle Wallace, Inghvid Ramstad Scheible. Row 2: Marjorie Moore Julian, Nancy Grant Harvey, Sandra Fotiades Tovey, Nadine Tovey Thornton, Carol Rea Marks, Marilyn Houseman Strakowski, Susan Risk Beck, Elizabeth “Libby” Prunty Weber, Mary Bottrell Cowie, Christine Nehf Chesley, Karen Hoven Fleece, Thomas H. Waltz, Hubert “Hugh” T. Hinds, Ann Harger Hinds, Lawrence W. Clarkson. Row 3: Janet McAdam Johnston, Dorothy “Dody” Barth Phipps, Susanne Graham Jacobsmeyer, Louise I. Regnier, Nancy E. Henningsen, Marilyn Meyer Diloreto, Larry E. Sayre, Robert W. Gibson, Robert R. Lee, Charles L. Martin, Donald H. Driemeier, Sharon Stallings Wardrum, John “Jack” R. Giesecke, Marian “Molly” Mitchell Davidson. Row 4: Margaret “Meg” Stahl Tomlin, Beverly Fernwood Burgess, Phyllis C. Leppert, Marcia Mead Thomas, Josephine “Jo” McCormick Wood, Holly Hulburt Wilkes, James E. Strayer, Gary L. Wegenke, Robert C. Canfield, Rev. Brenda Enmeier Stiers, Rev. Thomas L. Stiers, Vera Ferris Dowell, Ann W. Elder, Margaret McElwain Kemper. Row 5: Robert J. Fauth II, Joseph S. Goddard Jr., Dorthe Neidhardt Banholzer, Elizabeth Feigel Gillum, Ronald L. Gillum, James O. Huisinga, Terry A. Cromwell, James E. Leath, Carolyn “Flip” Phillips Leath, Bonnie Tall Gauger, Jane Medaris Paine, Carol Meade Laborde, Betsy Greenlee Stampe, Stephan S. Morgan, Jill Holtgrieve Morgan. Row 6: Arlene Calkins Zachritz, Sonja Nay Wise, Margaret “Marge” Verhulst Bradford, Gloria Reichenbach Hill, Virginia Walsh Knight, Marilyn Horak Herrick, Helen Lockhart Smiley, James A. Braunsdorf, John E. Crum, Michael A. Herrell, Paul P. Sabine, John B. Gregg. Row 7: Margaret Lane Brown Wagoner, Tom H. West, John “Jack” O. Gifford, Claudia Melby Deasy, S. Jill Walter Poynter, Deanna Cooper Evans, Judith McNew Kiely, Martha Jackson Layton, Ann Phillips Prosser, Rev. Anthony F. Andres, John G. Hurley, Rev. David W. Pomeroy. Row 8: J. Kenneth “Ken” Smail, Patsy Vaughn Gartley, Linda Brainard Lewis, Richard “Dick” B. Findley, Robert A. Hume ’59, Mary Ann Miner Hume, Meredith Towner Palmer, Lenora “Lennie” Mann Fossum, Marilyn Miller Schmid, Jane C. Rininger, Carol Schmeichel Tennessen, Nancy Crane Heller, Cheng Lok Chua. Row 9: William E. Harris, Judith Gardner Linengood, Judith Laadt O’Dell, Sharon Mallough Clarkson, Robert P. Snyder, Kenneth R. Todd, Robert W. Ryan, David B. Hill, Gareth H. Gilkey, Robert J. Darnall, Robert L. Mitchell, Michael C. Hicks ’61, Richard “P.T.” M. Bobb. Row 10: Craig A. Peeples, John M. Cassady, Michael E. Crawley, Richard “Dick” H. Tomey, William M. Dugan Jr., Phillip R. Sams ’61, Roger W. Martens. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 41


Class Notes 1964

1966 J. Allen Kerr Jr. was named a Connecticut’s Chief Human Rights Referee by the

Photo: KIWI Photography

School of Nursing Class of 1962 reunion at Lake Michigan in Warren Dunes State Park. Those attending included Carol Olson Emens ’62, Linda Layman Haney ’62, Lynn Anderson Lee ’62, Barbara Weber McNeely ’62, Carolyn Hungness Dunlap ’62, Dorothy Sams Pitner-Healy ’62, Jill Galbraith Meider ’62, Marjorie Eaton Blocks ’62, Patricia Park Gloor ’62, Julia Asbell Hale ’62 and Susan Birdzell Cumming ’62.

Charles A. Adams was named 2010 Citizen of the Year by the Mattoon, Ill., Chamber of Commerce. Charles is chairman of Howell Asphalt Company and president of Howell Paving. James M. Callane was parade marshal in Freedom Festival’s annual parade, July 5, 2010, in Linton, Ind. Jim coached basketball at Danville, Linton-Stockton and Kokomo high schools in Indiana. He retired as athletic director at Kokomo High School in 2005. He was inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame as well as DePauw’s Athletic Hall of Fame. Vincent C. Stauffer and his wife, Bev, continue to do stats for the University of Utah Lady Utes basketball team and are members of the booster clubs for both women’s basketball and volleyball. They remain active in their churches and playing golf.

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1965 Row 1: William C. Hauber, Valerie Watson Hamilton, Gail Childs Glover, Jeffrey E. Lortz, David W. Gilbert. Row 2: Richard “Rick” B. Ferrell, Sarah Roberts Houghland, John A. Drees, Betsy Parker Schweers, Marjorie A. “Anne” Self Lee, Robert L. Lee, Elizabeth “Betsy” Gross Holland, Robert B. Holland. Row 3: Frederick S. Gass ’64, Earl R. Liebich, Patricia “Pat” Boynton Frey, Joan Porte Abrahamsen, Mary Ewing Gosline, Katherine Hays Fox, Joan Fausch Schachtner, Arlene Shaneyfelt Ehlers, Judith Samuel Meyer. Row 4: Larry R. Morrison, Nancy Mueller Morrison, Michael W. Street, Margaret “Margie” Seaman Spikerman, Judith Detrick Gowing, Jane Eklund Anderson, Karen Pearson Staulcup, Kathryn “Penny” Murvin Morse, Peter A. Morse. Row 5: Keith A. Gossard, Bruce J. Bondurant, William E. Decker, Clark Orr, Harold “Hal” L. Marquardt. Row 6: Thomas W. McClain, Schuyler “Sky” W. Huck, Richard “Dick” H. Rossmiller, T. Doyle Letbetter, Dennis F. Siebert, James H. Arkebauer. 42 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. Allen and his wife, Veronica, live in Washington, Conn.

1968 Cheryl Slagell Kinsinger and her husband, Dan, are state committee members of Mosaic Allied Voices, a national organization that engages volunteers to promote public awareness of disability issues and to advocate for equality. Cheryl’s e-mail address is ckinsinger@comcast.net.

1969 John C. Campbell, sports director for KCRGTV in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was the Media Fellows speaker at DePauw March 30, 2010.

Alan B. Cloe is executive vice president of WFYI Public Broadcasting in Indianapolis. He was honored June 19, 2010, by the National Association of Television Arts Alan B. Cloe ’69 and Sciences for service to the Indianapolis television market. He was inducted into The Silver Circle, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to television for more than 25 years. (See photo, above.) Terry M. Skocher and his wife, Susie,

have adopted three children – ages 2, 4 and 6 – to bring their total to five. Terry is president of Regal Home Lending, Inc. in Palm Harbor, Fla. His e-mail address is terry@ regalhomelending.com. Frederick Tucker III retired as president of the F. C. Tucker Company after 33 years of service. F.C. Tucker Company was founded by his grandfather, Fred C. Tucker Sr. Class of 1908, and is the largest residential real estate firm in the Indianapolis area. Mark B. Vittert was inducted into the St. Louis chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists’ Print Hall of Fame. Mark cofounded the St. Louis Business Journal and Indianapolis Business Journal.

Photo: KIWI Photography

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, parties,go to: www.depauw.edu/alumni

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1970 Row 1: Margaret “Twinkle” Lavidge Gosselink, Molly MacGreevy O’Connell, Sally Reid Dinwiddie, Sarah “Sally” Robinson Lister, Anne Beekman Kraege, Catherine “Katie” Huff Gottfred, Jamie McDaniel Schulte. Row 2: Marie Rhine Harris, Charles M. Harris, George R. “Rick” Matteucci, Stephen L. Weinig, James R. Newman, Stephen W. Bridge. Row 3: Randy W. Hildebrandt, Thomas E. Lister, Robert “Rocky” D. Reed, Mary Lou Keppen Donkersloot, Marjorie Lentz Porter, Judith A. Edstrom, Sue Anne Starnes Gilroy. Row 4: Thomas V. Kruse, Richard E. Kimmel, Willard “Bill” J. Frederick, Robert B. Trowbridge, William W. Doyle Jr., Stephen D. Boyce. Row 5: James S. MacDonald, Christine Collyer MacDonald, Dale A. Barrett, unidentified, John B. Norberg, James E. Robinson. Row 6: Thomas G. Spiece, Ronald B. Eich, A. Trent Detamore, William P. Sweeney Jr., Thomas S. Yeo, Dwight S. Woessner. Row 7: Michael L. Smith, Richard “Dick” C. Kraege, R. Scott Walker, Steven A. Holt. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 43


Class Notes 1970

1971 W. Blythe Gifford is author of His Border Bride, her fifth medieval romance. (See Recent Words, page 26.) Anne Korb Shane was inducted into The Indiana Academy June 7, 2010. The Academy was established by the Independent Colleges of Indiana to Anne Korb Shane ’71 recognize lifetime achievement and contributions to the cultural, scientific, literary, civic, religious and educational development of Indiana. Anne is vice president of BioCrossroads in Indianapolis. (See photo, above.)

1972 Dorothy Cochrane Brizi retired and is living in Vienna, Austria. Her address is Alszeile 3/5, A-1170, Vienna, Austria. Her e-mail address is dorothy.brizi@chello.at. Barbara Howe Parker retired from Wayland’s (Mass.) Happy Hollow School after nearly four decades. Barbara taught elementary and middle school levels during her career. R. Eric Pound retired from the Central Intelligence Agency after more than 33 years. He is a program manager with Raytheon

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

Photo: KIWI Photography

Stephen W. Bridge is a librarian for the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library. He has two grown step-children and a stepson heading for college as well as two adopted daughters from Vietnam, ages 11 and 12. He is the adviser for Alcor Life Extension Foundation. Willard J. Frederick retired from Meridain Services after 33 years. Meridain Services is the community mental health center in Muncie, Ind. He practices psychotherapy in private practice. His e-mail address is wjfrederick25@ comcast.net. Michael L. Smith was inducted into The Indiana Academy June 7, 2010. The Academy was established by Independent Colleges of Indiana to recognize lifetime achievement and Michael L. Smith ’70 contributions to the cultural, scientific, literary, civic, religious and educational development of Indiana. Mike is retired executive vice president and

chief financial officer of Anthem, Inc., and its subsidiaries. He was a founding member of Cardinal Equity Partners. He is current chair of the Indiana Commission for Higher Education as well as a trustee of DePauw. (See photo, below left.)

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1975 Row 1: Jeannie Hesser Leaman, Janet Crawford Schwartz, Laura Sandberg Yeo, Elizabeth Ricketts Battey, Kathy Ritzer Farren. Row 2: James S. LoPrete, Robert A. Greising, Peter C. Vaky, Robert L. Bever, Carolyn Bednar Good. Row 3: Nancy Grimmer Kanatzar, Pamela J. Garland, Kristine A. Iverson, Sondra Baughman Brewster, Teri Zimmer Parker. Row 4: Scott J. Schneider, Elizabeth “Betsy” Chilton Schneider, Marcus R. Veatch. 44 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Company. He and his wife, Sharon, live at 2026 Peppermint Court, Reston, VA 20191. His e-mail address is rspound2@yahoo.com.

of corporate responsibility for Marathon Petroleum Company, June 1, 2010, after 33 years of service to Marathon and Ashland Oil.

1973

1975

Rev. Rebecca Swindler Curry is the Louisville district superintendent of the Kentucky Conference of the United Methodist Church. Dr. John “Jack” L. Vander Schilden will be honored by the University of Alabama at Little Rock in recognition of contributions to the University, on Oct. 14, 2010. Jack is Jackson T. Stephens Distinguished Professor in the department of orthopedic surgery at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine. He has been team physician for more than 25 years, donating countless hours to care of the student-athletes.

William F. Martin is a psychotherapist in private practice in Chicago. His website is www.counselinginchicago.com. His e-mail address is bmartin222@aol.com.

1974

Daniel N. Sutherin was a member of a team of 30 individuals who participated in national immunization days targeting countries with endemic polio. He traveled to Nigeria in May 2010 as a result of his involvement with the Bedford Rotary and its Poliophus program. Daniel is president of the Sutherin-Melling Insurance Agency in Solon, Ohio. R. Lee Wilson is president and chief executive officer of First Capital in Boca

1977 Bruce W. Burking was elected membership director of the Diversity Roundtable of Central Indiana board of directors. The Roundtable is an Indiana forum for advocates of cultural diversity. Bruce is a senior training and employee relations specialist at DePauw. Katy L. Keck was one of 10 recipients of the 2010 Volunteer Leader Awards presented by H a n d s O N Network, the volunteer arm of the Points of Katy L. Keck ’77 Light Institute

Photo: KIWI Photography

Randy K. Lohoff retired as vice president

1976

Raton, Fla. Lee is a member of DePauw’s Board of Trustees.

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1980 Row 1: Blair A. “Andy’ Rieth Jr., Stephen P. Harris, Cathryn Poth Reick, Diane “Missy” Dubberley Richards, Pamela Doyle MacDonald, Winfield D. Ong. Row 2: Michael C. Henn, John C. Kesler, Keny A. Billingsley Jr., Sally Englehart Standley, Deborah Barritt Lyons, Catherine A. Foley. Row 3: Samuel R. Ardery, Patricia Stevens Ardery, James E. Swearingen, Jan Lukens Fredbeck, Elizabeth “Betsy” Mockovak Ekelof, Catherine “Cathy” Slisher Donaldson. Row 4: John T. Roberts, Robin Richey Roberts, Barbara Martin Tubekis, Ann Bauer Whitlatch, Lisa Dietz Young, Polly Cain Yount, Susan Lewis Woods. Row 5: Rev. Lisa Belcher Hamilton, Bonnie Schiffman Pearson, Robert L. Ward, Evelyn C. Wirsing, Debra Haerr Victor, Carol Figler Gordon. Row 6: Douglas A. Stanley, Theodore “Ted” E. Mioduski Jr., Jeffrey L. Hodge, Keith A. Kinney, Dr. Paul “Bo” D. McDougal.

For a schedule of alumni events and information about alumni services, go to: www.depauw.edu/alumni/index.asp Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 45


Class Notes and University of Phoenix. Katy is a volunteer leader with Infinite Family, an organization that connects teens and pre-teens in South Africa with adults internationally, using online videobased mentoring. (See photo, previous page.) Barbara Kingsolver was winner of Britain’s Orange Prize for fiction by women for her latest book, The Lacuna. She was one of five finalists for the 2010 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. Barbara is author of 13 books of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. Steven W. Peterson’s play, The Invasion of Skokie, will premiere Sept. 2, 2010, as part of the 2010-11 season of Chicago Dramatists. Steven is a Network Playwright at the Chicago Dramatists. Steven is a member of DePauw’s Alumni Association Board of Directors.

1978 Christine Boeke is a member of the board of directors of MiShinnah Productions, a New York-based nonprofit arts organization. MiShinnah was founded by Kevin D. James ’83 and Anne Schaaf Kermani ’83 to enrich the public through performances, films and Internet projects. Greg T. Greenwood is founder and chairman of the board of Home for the Holidays, a nonprofit organization that helps bring service families together during important occasions. Larry C. Spears fulfilled a longstanding dream in January 2010 by traveling Route 66 roundtrip from Chicago to the Santa Monica Pier. He made the 5,000-mile roundtrip by car in 21 days, traveling through Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. During his trip, he launched a Route 66/Servant-Leadership blog on The Spears

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

Brig. Gen. James C. Nixon, Deputy Commanding General (Operations) 25th Infantry Division; Mary Kasales; Col. Michael Kasales ’87; Connie Abrams; Brig. Gen. Robert B. Abrams, Commanding General, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif. Center website at www.spearscenter.org. Larry made a side trip to Flagstaff, Ariz., to visit D. Bruce and Carole (Battey ’62) Frobes ’62.

1979 Dr. Mark R. Kelley is professor and associate director of Indiana University Cancer Center at Indiana University School of Medicine. His biotechnology company, Apex, is now online.

1980 Ian B. Davidson, an oboist, was nominated for a Grammy Award in December 2009. His concerts in 2010 will take him to Rome, New York, Cape Town and Sydney. His latest recordings, Wild Music and Ugly Duckling and Other Stories, were released in June 2010 and are available on iTunes. Ian is the associate principal oboe of the Austin Symphony Orchestra and professor of music at Texas State University. He and his wife, Allyson, and their son, Collin, live in Austin, Texas. Ian’s e-mail address is ian.davidson@txstate.edu. Thomas N. Tunnicliff and Scott K. Shelbourne ’03 were speakers for the March 11, 2010, Robert C. McDermond Center Lecture Series at DePauw. Tom is executive vice president for Grubb & Ellis/Krombach Partners in Chicago. Scott is vice president. Elizabeth Wolfe Bull retired in March 2008 after 26 years at Texas Instruments, serving as vice president and treasurer. She now serves as chief financial officer for Communities

Foundation of Texas. She and her husband, Ed, live in Dallas. They have two children.

1981 Eric A. Henning released an album, Keep Makin’ Memories, made with the help of Nashville, Tenn., musicians. A free download is available at www.erichenningmusic.com. Eric and his wife live in Zionsville, Ind. Eric’s e-mail address is nordicblue@yahoo.com. Pamela E. Tracey is vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary for Osram Sylvania. She is based in Danvers, Mass. Martha Weber Victor is an event planner with Designs by Jody, Inc., in Chicago. Her team designs and plans weddings, private parties, corporate events and floral arrangements for the home and garden. Martha’s e-mail address is marthavictor@sbcglobal.net.

1982 David A. Small was featured soloist for Canton (Ohio) Symphony Orchestra’s 200910 MasterWorks Series, May 2010. David is an associate professor of music at the University of Texas at Austin and a concert and operatic stage performer.

1983 David A. Brounley is senior vice president of sales at GuidedChoice, an independent investment advisory firm.

Don’t miss out on news from DePauw!

Post your e-mail address at: https://www.depauw.edu/e/alu/login.asp 46 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Eric M. Jensen is a partner in the law firm of Morgan & Pottinger in the Lousiville, Ky., office. Sandy Matthys Roob was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Best of the Best in Indiana award. She shared first place with four colleagues at Indianapolis National Public Radio station WFYI for both Best Investigative Reporting and Best Radio Public Affairs.

1984

Michael C. Kasales is a colonel in the United States Army. He is an Army War College selectee and is the G3 Operations officer for the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. As G3 Operations officer, he focuses on setting the conditions for successful National Training Center rotations for units deploying to Iraq and Afghanistan. Michael’s e-mail address is strykerscout@hotmail.com. (See photo, previous page.) Michael W. Lynch retired from active duty with the title of major in the United States Marine Corps after 21 years of service. He served as a Marine aviator for most of his career, accumulating more than 3500 flight hours. He served in various campaigns, including Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. Mike and his family live in New Bern, N.C. He is the aviation safety officer for

Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. Amy Newbanks Letke was a finalist in the 2010 EPIC Awards. Hosted by the Louisville, Ky., chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), the Epic Awards “honor women business owners who demonstrate a winning combination of excellence as entrepreneurs, professional accomplishments, initiative and creativity in addressing major business challenges along with civic and community involvement.” Amy is founder and chief executive officer of Integrity HR Inc. Brian G. Petrando is managing partner of the Texas Financial Group Fort Worth. His e-mail address is brian.petrando@nmfn.com. G. Matthew Ranelli is secretary and chairman of the projects committee for the board of directors of the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund, which promotes growth and

Photo: KIWI Photography

David A. Reidy Jr. is professor of philosophy and adjunct professor of political science at the University of Tennessee. He was named Distinguished Professor of Humanities and head of the department of philosophy at the University of Tennessee. He, his wife and their two children live in Knoxville, Tenn.

1987

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1985 Row 1: Mark R. Populorum, Geoffrey M. Day, Remington P. Fairlamb IV, Jennifer Robinette Fairlamb, Lori Spoon Rafkin, Michelle “Shelley” Appel Parente, Laura Kelly Pruitt, RaeAnn Ruder Overberg, Christine A. Newcombe, Nancy Hasler Gregg, Rebecca “Becky” Ruehl Farley, Mary Lee Geoghegan Stephens, Linda Lukens Grider, Sheryl Smith Hays. Row 2: David G. Shedd, David J. Salama, Kent M. Grathwohl, Steven R. Grundy, Christopher F. “Buff” Martin, Megan Jones Gregor, Lisa Baggott McCauley, MaryBeth Sullivan Flannery, Kathy Patterson Vrabeck, Lorraine Phillips Vavul, Stacey Hettmansperger Grellman, Jennifer Parker Burrus. Row 3: Robert T. Jones, John A. Perry, Francisco Paz, Eric C. Frye, Sibley Smith Frye, Nancy Rehm McCloskey, Robert M. Gynn, Marvin E. Flewellen, Sarah Lewis Johnston, Mary Elizabeth “Beth” Axelberg McCoy. Row 4: Kristin Lundy DeMello, Richard H. Rose II, David C. Hess, Brett P. Edwards, David W. Johnson, Matthew S. Darnall, Jennifer Lindamood Darnall, Michael B. Sellers, Gary R. Life, Andrew C. Ray. Row 5: Zaida Lopez Benassi, Christina Wilson-Sholl, Craig D. Smith ’86, Douglas I. Smith, Robert D. Ulmer, Daniel K. Davidson, Stephen C. Wilson, Todd D. Mitchell, Desiree S. Dimond, Richard J. Bonaccorsi. Row 6: Lucius “Luke” E. Reese, Bonnie Lindrooth Masterman, Darrell R. Johnson, Rand D. Richey, Kenneth C. Yott, Daniel R. Miller, Eric K. Ford, Karen Carlson Howard, Roxanne Berry Gilbertson. Row 7: Betsy Stelle Morgan, Lorelei Ward McDermott, Kathleen Galliher Locke, Elizabeth Hanahan Wortman, Rebecca Brumbaugh Thiem, Leslie Gast Steskal, Jane Carpenter Frech, Cathy McCracken German, Christopher A. Nichols, Thuy T.B. Nguyen, Karen Morton Rhoades, Van T.B. Nguyen Diep. Row 8: Eric K. Carlson, Denzil “Denny” P. Bennett II, Charles J. Nelson, Robert H. Heyde. Not pictured: Byron L. Wilson II, Gary P. Downs.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 47


Class Notes development of renewable clean energy and clean energy technologies. Matt is an attorney with Shipman & Goodwin LLP in the Hartford, Conn., office. His e-mail address is mranelli@goodwin.com.

Scott B. Ullem is vice president and chief financial officer for Bemis Company, Inc., a major supplier of flexible packaging and pressure sensitive materials.

1990

1988

Mark D. Johnson ’88

1989 Jeffrey B. Burchfield is a colonel in the United States Air Force. He serves as space and nuclear policy planner at the United States Delegation to the NATO Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium. Jeffrey L. Harmening was the speaker for The Robert C. McDermond Center Lecture Series at DePauw, April 8, 2010. Jeffrey is the president of Big G Cereal Division. Wallace “J” Nichols was nominated for a Heart of Green award, which is presented to men and women who are working to protect the environment and life of the oceans. J is a research associate with the California Academy of Sciences and founder of OceanRevolution.org.

Shibani R. Bathija showed her film, My Name is Khan, at the Ashley Square Theatre in Greencastle, Ind. After the showing, a discussion of the film was held at the Walden Inn in Greencastle. Gregg T. Eaton and his wife, Maura, announce the birth of their son, Connar Eaton, Aug. 31, 2009. They live at 87 Tournament Dr. N., Hawthorn Woods, IL 60047. Gregg’s e-mail address is g-eaton@sbcglobal.net. Diana McCord Nilhas is treasurer of Schnuck Markets, Inc., a St. Louis-based regional grocer. Julie Taylor Hurbanis is executive vice president at Weber Shandwick in the public relations firm’s consumer marketing practice in Minneapolis.

1991 Keira A. Amstutz is president and chief executive officer of the Indiana Humanities Council. Evan F. Beauchamp and his wife, Jennifer,

Photo: KIWI Photography

Steven D. Bussberg is senior vice president of Staples Business Delivery. Shannon Gath Forsell was a featured performer in the Indianapolis Jazz Tribute Concert that paid tribute to female jazz musicians, March 24, 2010. Mark D. Johnson was an embedded reporter with the 82nd Airborne Division when it deployed to Haiti in January 2010 immediately after the earthquake. Mark is a reporter for the Charlotte Observer and The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. He recently became communications director for North Carolina’s governor. His e-mail address is mjohnson@charlotteobserver.com. (See photo, above right.) D. Bruce Nelson celebrated the first anniversary of his Web comic mygeekodyssey. com, which he started after his second Lilly Endowment Teacher Creativity Fellowship. Bruce teaches elementary school in Indianapolis.

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1990 Row 1: Kersten Wagschal Gorski, Julie McKeag Meyer, Tobi L. Pagach, Anthony R. Jost, Patricia A. Scott. Row 2: Michiko Lloyd Corriette, Lisa M. Snider, Jeffrey A. Rawlins, Robert B. Batchelder Jr. Row 3: Richard B. “Bart” Findley Jr., Jon D. Lundy, Lawrence W. Serewicz. 48 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes announce the birth of their son, Holtz Reagan Beauchamp, Jan. 18, 2010. Holtz joins sister Grace, 4, at their home in Lexington, Ky. Evan’s e-mail address is evan@insureyourhorse.com. Bradley R. Brownell is men’s head basketball coach for Clemson University in Clemson, S.C. Christopher P. Felts is a member of the board of directors of the Immigrant Welcome Center, which helps immigrant newcomers to Indianapolis connect with a variety of community organizations. Christopher is a partner in the Barnes & Thornburg LLP law firm in Indianapolis. Elizabeth “Lisa” Murtaugh Gangi is the owner of ELLE Language Services and assists small-to-medium sized businesses with their preproduction review needs, such as editing and proofreading. She writes a monthly fashion column for Glancer Magazine in Naperville, Ill. Her e-mail address is elleservices@comcast.net. Vikash Yadav delivered the Walker Horizon Lecture in Political Science at DePauw, April 14, 2010. Vikash is an assistant professor of political science at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in New York. Amy Yarbrough Cuomo and her husband, Mario, announce the birth of their triplets, Caterina Cress, Elena Christianna and Mario “Trey” III, Dec. 10, 2009. They live in Carmel, Ind.

1992 A n n i e Derrickson Burnside is author of Soul to Soul Parenting. She is a soul nurturer specializing in conscious relationships. Annie; her Annie Derrickson husband, James Burnside ’92 P. Burnside ’90; and their three children live in Chicago. (See photo, above, and Recent Words, page 26). Daniel E. Kiely is president of the board of Clark Fork Coalition. The coalition’s goal is to protect and restore the Clark Fork River Basin in Montana. Daniel made a 20-day, 320-mile floating journey down the river, June

27-July 15, 2009 to draw attention to the river’s restoration. Daniel lives in Missoula, Mont. He is the vice president of the Missoula County United Way. Brian W. McEachen is an attorney with the law firm of South & Associates P.C. Brian works in the commercial and special assets department.

1993 Marian “Mimi” Altman Makar lives at 835 March St., Lake Zurich, IL 60047. Christina Knutson Honos and her husband, Edward, announce the birth of their son, Luke Henry Honos, April 6, 2009. Luke joins sisters Grace, 6, and Catherine 4, at their home in Marblehead, Mass. Christy’s e-mail address is ckhonos@comcast.net. Julie Ruffolo Gilpin and her husband, Brian, announce the birth of their son, Luke Thomas Gilpin, April 23, 2010. Luke joins brother Jack William, 3. They live in Whitefish Bay, Wis. Julie’s e-mail address is jkgilpin@wi.rr.com. Terri Stevens McConville and her husband, John, announce the birth of their twin daughters, Mallory Stevens and Josephine Ruth McConville, May 15, 2009. They join sister Tess, 7, and brother Drew, 5, at 625 N. Taylor Ave., Oak Park, IL 60302. Terri’s e-mail address is terrimcconville@yahoo.com.

1994 Kirby Brafford is a partner at Venetia Systems Inc., a consulting and solutions firm in enterprise and business transformation. He; his wife, Kristin; son Brayden, 4; and daughter Paige, 2; live in Libertyville, Ill. Kirby’s e-mail address is kirby.brafford@gmail.com.

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

Kimberly Crampton Chambers earned a doctoral degree in educational administration and accompanying superintendent certification from Aurora University in March 2010. She is assistant superintendent of administrative services at Community High School District 94, West Chicago. Kim serves on the executive board of the Illinois Association of School Personnel Administrators. She and her husband, Josh, live in Geneva, Ill., with Josh’s three children. Kim would enjoy hearing from DePauw classmates. Her e-mail address is kimchambers2005@sbcglobal.net. Jason W. Kistler and his wife, Yuliya, announce the birth of their daughter, Kseniya Lusi Kistler, Feb. 14, 2010. Jason is a firefighter with the Indianapolis Fire Department. His e-mail address is jasonkistler.@me.com. John R. Perkins II is executive vice president of global commercial operations at Talecris Biotherapeutics Holdings Corporation.

1995 Jason A. Asbury earned a Doctor of Sacred Music degree from the Graduate Theological Foundation, May 2010. He is director of music at Prospect Jason A. Asbury ’95 Presbyterian Church in Maplewood, N.J., and teaches at St. Ann’s School in Brooklyn, N.Y. Jason’s e-mail address is jasonaasbury@hotmail.com. (See photo, above.) Susan Dinkel Jensen was honored, April 23, 2010, by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Best of the Best in Indiana award. She received second place for Best Documentary/Special. Susan is news director and mid-day anchor for WTHI-TV in Terre Haute, Ind. Derek E. Empie is associate general counsel for Clarian Health Partners, Inc., Indiana’s largest healthcare system. Derek and his wife, Amber Walker Empie ’94, live in Carmel, Ind. They have a son, Carson, 6, and twin daughters, Adisyn and Aubree, 5. Derek’s e-mail address is dempie@clarian.org.

To update your address call 765-658-4205 or e-mail jenniferhassler@depauw.edu or fax 765-658-4172. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 49


Class Notes jmrhodes@comcast.net. Kevin’s e-mail address is kmhern@comcast.net. Alisa Torres DiLorenzo and her husband, Tony, are founders of ONE Extraordinary Marriage, where they teach couples how to take their marriage from ordinary to extraordinary.

1996 BethAnn Gisel Meier and her husband, Jonathan, announce the birth of their daughter, Bronwyn Lois Meier, May 13, 2009. Bronwyn joins sister Gretchen at their home in Sun Prairie, Wis. BethAnn works in marketing and promotions for The Promotional Edge, a Los Angeles-based agency. Amy J. Houston and Christopher B. Oler ’95 were married Aug. 2, 2008. Fourteen DePauw alumni from the classes of 1960-2002 attended the wedding. Amy is a senior graphic designer for Deborah Wood & Associates in Carmel, Ind. Chris is an English and theory of knowledge teacher at the International School of Indiana.

1997 Shawnne Dussinger Carter and her husband, Chivas, announce the birth of their daughter, Lily Anna Carter, April 6, 2010. They live in Lexington, Ky. Shawnne is online

campaign and production manager for BloodHorse Publications. Chivas is a graphic artist with AdColor, Inc. Shawnne’s e-mail address is shawnne@insightbb.com. Matthew R. Gorrell and Raymond E. Wachter Jr. ’55 met in Bermuda, May 17, 2010. Ray contacted Matt by e-mail based on his listing in the DePauw Alumni Directory. They had an enjoyable meeting and made plans to meet again when Matt visits the United States. (See photo, page 38.) Loren P. King Sr. is a member of the board of directors for Indiana Apartment Association. Loren is the chief operating officer and general counsel for Trinitas Ventures, LLC, in West Lafayette, Ind. W. Hunter Wolbach is one of Ingram’s Magazine’s top 40 Under Forty, which recognizes the most successful and influential individuals under the age of 40 in the Greater Kansas City area. Hunter is a certified financial planner and vice president of advisory and brokerage services at UBS Financial Services. He would enjoy hearing from DePauw classmates. Hunter’s e-mail address is h.w.wolbach@UBS.com.

1998 Dr. Christian H. Bridgwater is medical director for the Parkview Samaritan flight

Photo: KIWI Photography

Sarah Hart Miller and her husband, Eric, announce the birth of their son, Hiatt Stone Miller, Feb. 5, 2010. Sarah’s e-mail address is snc_hart@yahoo.com. Kristin Ingwell Goode and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their daughter, Abigail Elizabeth Goode, Nov. 15, 2009. Abby joins brother William McKenna, 2. Kristin is a grant writer and fundraiser at God’s Pantry Food Bank, which serves 50 counties in central and eastern Kentucky. Kristin would enjoy hearing from DePauw classmates. Her e-mail address is kingwell4@yahoo.com. Christopher B. Oler and Amy J. Houston ’96 were married Aug. 2, 2008. Fourteen DePauw alumni from the classes of 19602002 attended the wedding. Chris is an English and theory of knowledge teacher at the International School of Indiana. Amy is a senior graphic designer for Deborah Wood & Associates in Carmel, Ind. Jennifer M. Rhodes is a member of the Community Health Charities National Capital Area board of directors. Jennifer is an associate at Booz Allen Hamilton, where she focuses on change management strategy and organization for the military health system. She and her husband, Kevin M. Hern, live in Virginia. Jennifer’s e-mail address is

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 1995 Row 1: Caroline Sullivan Wagstaff, Karen Reeves King, Melissa Hayden Kramer, Melanie R. Clark, Shatrese M. Flowers. Row 2: Heather S. Bryce, Stephanie Nahra Johnson, Jennifer Bieber Barlow, Catherine Burkhardt Kolbeck, Justin P. Christian. Row 3: Kelly Watling Stroburg, Rebecca Howard Logan, Krina Hoopis Huddlestun, Kaia Van Dam Kraus, Darrianne Howard Christian. 50 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes

Anne S. Becker ’99 and Paul Wierbicki wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Ryan W. Higgins ’00, Joni Crosley Higgins ’99, Cynthia S. Brinker ’73, Robert F. Stayman ’68, Ned P. Rule ’61, Lynn Rezek Rule ’61, Jean D. Brubeck ’69, John G. Peryam ’99, Erin L. Majka ’99, David A. Copple ’00, Caroline E. Nagy ’99, Cheryl A. Gonzalez ’99, Olivia M. Castellini ’99, Scott M. Kalmus ’99, Jennifer Raney Kalmus ’99, Ryan J. Danks ’99, Ryan C. Palmer ’99, Anna Eidson Palmer ’99 and Elizabeth Hamilton Macy ’00. Also attending but not pictured was Krista Lutterman Hurt ’99.

program at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne, Ind. Christian is a board-certified emergency medicine physician. Jonathan M. and Cara (Crosby ’99) Clippinger announce the birth of their son, William George Clippinger, May 5, 2009. They live in Indianapolis. Jon’s e-mail address is jclippin01@comcast.net. Cara’s e-mail address is cclippin01@comcast.net. Anthony E. Graves is director of government and community affairs for Visit Denver, the city’s convention and visitors bureau. Dr. Sara Peters Luckhaupt returned to DePauw, April 7, 2010, to participate in a question-and-answer session about public health. Sara works at the Centers for Disease Control at the University of Cincinnati.

1999 Anne S. Becker and Paul Wierbicki (Vanderbilt University) were married Oct. 3, 2009, in Evansville, Ind. They live in Chicago where they are both attorneys. Anne’s e-mail address is abecker@mwe.com. (See photo, above.) Cara (Crosby) and Jonathan M. Clippinger ’98 announce the birth of their son, William

George Clippinger, May 5, 2009. They live in Indianapolis. Cara’s e-mail address is cclippin01@comcast.net. Jon’s e-mail address is jclippin01@comcast.net. Catherine Force Koczaja and her husband, Christopher, announce the birth of their son, Keegan James Koczaja, Oct. 11, 2009. Keegan joins sisters, Abigail and Emily. Walter J. Lenckos is superintendent of Indiana’s Porter County Department of Parks and Recreation. Matthew L. MacPherson was inducted into the Northridge (Ind.) High School Athletic Hall of Fame, April 2010. Matt is a member of the coaching staff at Northwestern University. Bradley K. Stevens was speaker for The Robert C. McDermond Center Lecture Series, April 13, 2010. Brad is Butler University’s head basketball coach and led his team to a historic season, culminating in participation in the national championship game. Brad was honored by the Chicago Clubs and threw out the ceremonial first pitch at the May 10, 2010, Cubs-Marlins game at Wrigley Field.

2000

Trebuchet Financial Group, was speaker for The Robert C. McDermond Center Lecture Series at DePauw on Feb. 23, 2010. Dr. Eugene G. Chio completed his residency in otolaryngology at The Ohio State University Medical Center in June 2009. He is assistant professor at Ohio State University. His e-mail address is eugenechio@hotmail.com. Catherine Hall Wong and her husband, Ray, announce the birth of their daughter, Amelia “Mia” Catherine Wong, July 7, 2009. Catherine is a second-grade teacher in Irvine, Calif. Ray coaches swimming and water polo and teaches math at Irvine High School. They live in Foothill Ranch, Calif. Catherine’s e-mail address is catherinehall4378@yahoo.com. Stephanie Lincoln Davidson earned a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Pepperdine University. She has begun a postdoctoral psychological assistantship working with older adults in long-term care settings. She lives in the Los Angeles area with her husband, Vernon, and her daughter, Isabella. Stephanie’s e-mail address is stephaniedavidsonpsyd@gmail.com. Steven J. Lubiarz is a violinist with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra in Canada, as well as artistic director of the St. Roch Chamber Music Festival in Caseville, Steven J. Lubiarz ’00 Mich. Steven performed at the Greencastle Summer Music Festival on July 21, 2010. (See photo, above.)

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

Michael D. Adams, president of Chicago

For a schedule of alumni events and information about alumni services, go to: www.depauw.edu/alumni/index.asp Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 51


Class Notes Nathan A. and Kristen (Bamberth) Ulery announce the birth of their son, Emerson Andrew Ulery, Sept. 7, 2009. Nate is a director at West Monroe Partners, LLC, a business and technology consulting firm in Chicago. Kristen is associate principal at Gemini Junior High in Niles, Ill. They live in Arlington Heights, Ill. Their e-mail address is us@ulery.net. Lee (Wright) and Michael E. Roberts announce the birth of their daughter, Alexandra Jade Roberts, March 22, 2010. Lee is a veterinarian. Michael is an assistant professor of psychology at DePauw. They live in Greencastle, Ind.

2001

Christine M. Hohenberger ’01 and Daniel Novalis wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Amber C. Stewart ’02, Jennifer N. Szynal ’01, Kelly Banchak Grady ’98, Michelle R. Gough ’03, Kristi M. Spears ’03, Anne Bracken Gavin ’00 (bridesmaid), Meagan M. Sinn ’02 (maid of honor), Michelle L. Evans ’01, Deborah Dalenberg Eskew ’98, Kevin R. Eskew ’94, Sara A. Chamness ’01, Alison N. Krebs ’01 (bridesmaid), Jesse J. Roehrich ’02, Sarah Fuchs Gustafson ’01 and Bridget K. Chase ’01 (matron of honor).

Photo: KIWI Photography

Jonathan B. Burns is an associate with the Indianapolis law firm of Baker & Daniels LLP. He works in the firm’s intellectual property practice group. (See photo, left.) Jonathan B. Burns ’01 Molly (Carrell) and Bradley A. Pierce announce the birth of

their daughter, Emily “Emmy” Adele Pierce, May 6, 2010. They live in Chicago. Brad works in finance. Molly is a stay-at-home mom. Andrea C. Cooley is beginning a threeyear fellowship in cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Andrea would enjoy hearing from DePauw classmates. Her e-mail address is andicools@gmail.com. Ivan D. and Andrea (Clark ’02) Hoffman announce the birth of their daughter, Avery Elizabeth Hoffman, Sept. 18, 2009. They live in Indianapolis. Ivan is a financial adviser with Valeo Financial in Carmel, Ind. Andrea is a consultant for the Department of Child Services. Ivan’s e-mail address is ivan_hoffman@hotmail.com. Andrea’s e-mail address is ac2384@yahoo.com. Christine M. Hohenberger and Daniel Novalis (Washington University) were married Feb. 6, 2010, in St. Louis. Christine is a manager with Accenture Management Consulting and focuses on human resources talent initiatives. Dan is a senior manager of sales engineering at BlueKai as well and attends New York University’s Stern School of Business. They live in Manhattan. Christine’s e-mail address is christine.novalis@gmail.com. (See photo, right.)

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 2000 Row 1: Charlie J. Yeo, Daniel D. Hamilton-Lowe, Angie Lyn Hamilton-Lowe, John R. Witt II, Monica R. Ayhens, Kevin J. Shehan, Amy Ferone Saxby, Gayle Shrock Lessmann, Ryan P. Lessmann. Row 2: Christopher H. Drewes, Scott R. Reynolds, Shon S. Moss, Alissa Ewald Trowbridge, Elizabeth “Betsy” Hambidge Seitz, Zachary P. Mugge, Nathaniel L. Hobbs, Ted Kapsalis. Row 3: David A. Copple, G. Scott Spears, Kimberly M. Rymer, Ryan J. Opeka, Mikelle Holt Brady, Sarah Burnett Fischer, Dawn Ahlgren Chapman. Row 4: Claire Bishop Abely, Jillian Boote Parsons, Kelly Drane Coker, Sandra Sherman George, Rachel E. Forde, Mary A. Potts, Christen Kennedy Prible, Michelle Ross Kelly, Jill M. Skogheim, Megan M. Scherer. Row 5: Lauren Padalino Nichols, Elizabeth “Libby” Emison Cochrane, Margaret L. Stahr, Laura Downs Young, Brooke Knudson Cox, Cameron R. Mott, Ryan J. Gackenheimer, Amanda L. Miller. Row 6: Meredith Greenawald McMahan, Tonya Heetland Fenske, Amber Franklin LaRue, Katy S. Dow. 52 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Morgan E. Lyn earned a master’s degree in public relations and advertising from DePaul University, June 13, 2010. She lives and works in downtown Chicago. Scott K. Shelbourne and Thomas N. Tunnicliff ’80 were the speakers for the March 11, 2010, Robert C. McDermond Center Lecture Series at DePauw. Scott is vice president for Grubb & Ellis/Krombach Partners in Chicago. Tom is executive vice president.

2004

Shawn S. Odle ’02 and Pendana A. Wooten wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Kai R. Martin ’03 (best man), James R. Foster ’02, Nikki D. Price ’03, Adrienne J. Woods ’03 and Charles R. Stanback Jr. ’03. Attending but not pictured were Christopher A. Bennett ’04, Adam W. Johnson ’11 and Shanna Martin Malott ’98. Timothy J. Sutton is assistant professor at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Meyers, Fla. Timothy’s book, Catholic Modernists, English Nationalists, was published earlier this year. Erik B. VanScyoc and his wife, Erin, announce the birth of their son, Gavin Dara VanScyoc, May 20, 2010.

2002 Andrea (Clark) and Ivan D. Hoffman ’01 announce the birth of their daughter, Avery Elizabeth Hoffman, Sept. 18, 2009. They live in Indianapolis. Andrea is a consultant for the Department of Child Services. Ivan is a financial adviser with Valeo Financial in Camel, Ind. Ivan’s e-mail address is ivan_ hoffman@hotmail.com. Andrea’s e-mail address is ac2384@yahoo.com. Tiffany A. Hodge is a 2010 Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellow. The fellowship will support the completion of her doctoral degree in religion at Emory University. Shawn S. Odle and Pendana A. Wooten (Indiana University) were married Sept. 6, 2009, in Carmel, Ind. Shawn recently completed a M.B.A. degree in marketing from the University of Indianapolis, where he is an assistant director of admission. Pendana works in human resources at Rolls-Royce. The couple live in Indianapolis. Shawn’s e-mail address is shawn_odle@hotmail.com. (See photo, above.) Sara Owsley Sood received a 2010 Wig Distinguished Professor Award for Excellence in Teaching during Pomona College’s 117th commencement, May, 16, 2010, in Claremont,

Calif. The award “recognizes exceptional teaching, concern for students and service to the college and the community.” Sara is assistant professor of computer science Sara Owsley Sood ’02 at Pomona College. (See photo, right.) Nicole L. Pacino is recipient of an award from the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program. Nicole is a doctoral candidate in history at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She will use the award to travel to Bolivia to conduct research for her dissertation.

2003 Stanislaus P. Jastrzebski was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with Best of the Best in Indiana awards, April 23, 2010. He received first place for best medical/ science reporting; third place and honorable mention for best spot news; and third place honor for best radio writing. Stan is news director of Bloomington (Ind.) National Public Radio affiliate WFIU. Marcelino G. Lopez was named a 2010 Indiana Rising Star Attorney by Indiana Super Lawyers magazine. He is in private practice in the Indianapolis area. His e-mail address is mlopez@mlopezlaw.com.

Tonya R. Barr and Edward P. Treble II (University of California, Berkeley) were married Aug. 15, 2009, in LaPorte, Ind. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Emily D. Yunker ’05 (maid of honor), Katherine S. Whitaker ’05 (bridesmaid), Amanda Link Krenson ’04 and Paul M. Johnson ’04. Tonya is pursuing a master’s degree in public affairs, concentrating in nonprofit management and social entrepreneurship, at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Tonya R. Barr ’04 and Edward P. Treble II

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 53


Class Notes

Photo: KIWI Photography

Susan M. Ostermann ’04 and Johnathan Hoppa wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Kendra L. Chaney ’04 (maid of honor), Lindsay Broberg Nesbitt ’04 (bridesmaid), Meredith H. Siemens ’05, Amber L. Farr ’04, Melissa E. Paulen ’04, Abundance L. Boekestein ’04, Ashlee Nisley Walsh ’04, Erin S. Hayne ’04, Kathy Eagan McNamara ’04 and Ryan P. McNamara ’03.

Emily K. Johnson ’06 and Bryce A. Skeeters ’04 wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Clint H. Capps ’04, Christopher K. Kessler ’03, Wesley J. Molyneaux ’04, Thomas J. Powers ’04, Janet “Jess” Blandford Lukens ’06, Janis E. Steck ’06, Erin Dodd Coulter ’06, David R. Thompson ’04, Christopher M. Olson ’04, Molly Herrmann Kozlowski ’05, Jessica D. Schneider ’04, Ashley Boling Molyneaux ’04, Lauren Keyes Fahey ’06, Kyle T. Clemens ’05, Kristen Thrine Clemens ’05, Danielle Courier Prosser ’05, Mark A. Prosser ’05, Mary Jane Musca ’06, Kathryn Magill Bannister ’06, Graham A. Lukens ’06, Andrew K. Kirk ’06, Craig D. Lippincott ’06, Marc D. Pfleging ’03, N. Evan Shook ’05, Kenneth M. Cochran ’03, Tara Bevington Fleck ’03, Megan L. Bevington ’03, Laura V. Benjamin ’06, Peter G. Hogg ’05, Lisa H. Chambers ’06, John A. Wallace ’04, Michael F. Foster ’06, Erik C. Janesky ’07, Tanner J. Coulter ’05, R. Page Cotton ’05, Jonathan D. Salisbury ’05, Kristopher A. Kozlowski ’05, Rebekah L. Gebhard ’06, Wesley T. Thornbill ’04, Paul J. Blasdel ’71, Bradford T. Wochomurka ’04, Carly R. Sutton ’04, Arthur D. Fisher Jr. ’04, Kelly J. Patterson ’04, Cody W. Rogowski ’04, Union M. Williams ’04 and Jonathan R. Taylor ’04.

Alumni Reunion Weekend 2010 – Class of 2005 Row 1: Anthony J. Jacob, John P. “JP” Kinerk, Scott P. Nees, William “Jake” Cohn, John B. De Mauro, Obinna D. Ugokwe, Michelle L. Rhodes, John “Jack” F. Avery III, Heather R. Marszalek, Kellie Duke Arnold. Row 2: Travis J. Arnold, Evan A. Kennel, David M. Fox, Paul M. Lamb, James R. Hamlin, Matthew P. Bereman, Alison Slipher Todd, Erin Greenlee Nixon, Lauren E. Saigh, Kelly E. Workinger, Sally Wallace Heckman, Gianna Belluscio, Row 3: Mihithika N. Navaratna, Clinton D. Schroer, Laura L. Kurdys, Jennifer B. Ryan, Anna C. Vander Broek, Bret D. Smith, Brittan E. Fowler, Katherine S. Smith, Caitlin A. DeBord, Bethany Brewer Hart, Annie R. Gowland, Daina D. Rice, Kyle P. McGrath. Row 4: Brandon E. Beeler, Kyle J. Danforth, James D. Larson, Marshall F. Kuresman, Tyler S. Hollett, Nancy A. “Annie” Garrigus, Jill C. Mecklenborg, N. Evan Shook, Anthony M. Williams, Danielle Currier Prosser, Mark A. Prosser, Ann Speidel, Sara E. “Beth” Stoner, unidentified. Row 5: Kyle E. Johnson, Matthew J. Lytle, Daniel E. Sheehan, Matt M. Fleck, Michael S. Mioduski, unidentified, Jonathan D. Salisbury, Robert P. “Page” Cotton, Bret M. Govert, Delores Nicole N. Colone, Ariane R. Jaskolka, Kathryn Olivier Runge, Meghan E. McNulty. Row 6: Dana Hudson Stone, Ian M. Stone.

To update your address call 765-658-4205 or e-mail jenniferhassler@depauw.edu or fax 765-658-4172. 54 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Edward is pursuing a master’s degree in finance and management at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. They live in Bloomington, Ind. Tonya’s e-mail address is tbtreble@ indiana.edu. (See photo, page 53.) Susan M. Ostermann and Johnathan Hoppa were married May 16, 2009, in St. Louis. Susan’s e-mail address is sohoppa@ yahoo.com. (See photo, previous page.) Bryce A. Skeeters and Emily K. Johnson ’06 were married Sept. 12, 2009. (See photo, previous page.) Anmol A. Wadhwa and Mihithika N. Navaratna ’05 were married Dec. 18, 2008, in Sri Lanka. (See photo, left.) Amy Walsh Slowik earned a master’s degree in library science from the University of Iowa, December 2009. She is assistant professor at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky. She serves as electronic resources librarian.

2005

Anmol A. Wadhwa ’04 and Mihithika N. Navaratna ’05 wedding.

Lauren K. Conlon ’05 and Andrew B. Rosner ’05 wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Robert L. Bruder ’05, Katherine E. Dalin ’08, Richard A. Livingston ’05, Brad M. Ward ’05, Melissa A. Llano ’05, Allison Ehinger Schalk ’06, Meghan E. Freeman ’04, K. Ashley Richards ’06, Andrea L. Impicciche ’03, Ja’Niene T. Mitchem ’05, Antony D. Rhine ’06, Jennifer Borowski Morris ’05, William T. Reiners IV ’06, Allison Fory Hall ’05, David M. Trogden ’04, Jennifer Williams Rhine ’05, Jeremy L. McNally ’05 and Casey L. Brackney ’04.

For a schedule of alumni events or information about Old Gold Weekend and Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/alumni

Jonathan B. Bailor helped develop a coauthoring tool for Microsoft’s Office 2010. Jonathan is a Microsoft Word program manager. Stephanie Bewley Kress is an associate with the law firm of Rolfes, Garvey, Walker & Robbins in Greensburg, Ind. Kasandra L. Call and Josiah Brown (St. Francis University) were married June 12, 2010. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Stephanie R. Yee Loong ’05 and Melanie Brewer Rentsch ’05. Lauren K. Conlon and Andrew B. Rosner were married Jan. 23, 2010, in Indianapolis. (See photo, left.) Ryan J. Fenstermaker is one of the Forty Under 40 individuals named by the South Bend (Ind.) Tribune in recognition of professional contributions and dedication to service and volunteerism to their community. Ryan is a small business banking officer at 1st Source Bank. Kristen Hindman James and her husband, Duff, announce the birth of their daughter, Olivia Ann James, Nov. 2, 2009. Kristi’s e-mail address is kristi.james4@gmail.com. Peter G. Hogg and Laura V. Benjamin ’06 were married June 5, 2010, in Indianapolis. (See photo, page 57.) Megan Luecke Boots and her husband, Shane, announce the birth of their son, Kaleb Andrew Boots, May 11, 2010. Megan’s e-mail address is mboots@crossroadsbsa.org. Drew J. Miller is a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at Purdue University. During the fall of 2010, he will begin a oneyear internship focusing on correctional/ Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 55


Class Notes forensic psychology at the Federal Medical Center in Rochester, Minn. His e-mail address is mille444@psych.purdue.edu. Mihithika N. Navaratna and Anmol A. Wadhwa ’04 were married Dec. 18, 2008, in Sri Lanka. (See photo, previous page.) N. Evan Shook and Lauren Smith (Butler University) were married Dec. 31, 2009. They live in Zionsville, Ind. (See photo, left.) Carolyn S. Walker and Andrew B. Cole ’07 were married March 7, 2009, in Indianapolis. Carolyn’s e-mail address is carriescole@gmail. com. Andrew’s e-mail address is acole84@ gmail.com. (See photo, below left.)

2006

N. Evan Shook ’05 and Lauren Smith wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Bret M. Govert ’05, Tanner J. Coulter ’05, R. Page Cotton ’05, Andrew E. Breeden ’05, Mark A. Prosser ’05 and Jonathan D. Salisbury ’05.

Carolyn S. Walker ’05 and Andrew B. Cole ’07 wedding party. DePauw alumni and friends attending the wedding included Andrianne Johnson Faulkner ’06, Carolyn R. Thatcher ’07, Christine M. Garrabrant ’05, Cynthia M. Geiger ’07, Lindsay A. Bartlett ’07, Ashley L. Baxstrom ’07, LaDonna J. Hayden ’06, Kevin R. Kaiser ’07, Clinton M. Hasenour ’07, Jeremy P. Brok ’07, David T. Furman Jr. ’07, Aaron M. Gotway ’05, Adam K. Hilkert ’08, Alexandra Lutzow Cole ’76, Elizabeth Phelps Cole ’46, Jane Crum Seigel ’76, Laura A. Ginger ’76, Elizabeth Cole Dickerson ’72, Timothy A. Good (DePauw associate professor of communication and theatre), Caroline L. Good (DePauw costume shop supervisor and communication and theatre instructor), Andrea E. Sununu (DePauw professor of English), M. Susan Anthony (DePauw associate professor of communication and theatre), G. Duane Skoog (DePauw technical director for the Green Center for the Performing Arts) and Marjorie Smith (former DePauw employee).

Jill C. Anderson and Brian A. Tweedie ’07 were married Oct. 10, 2009, in Bloomington, Ill. Jill’s e-mail address is jillcarver@gmail.com. They live in Chicago. (See photo, page 58.) Laura V. Benjamin and Peter G. Hogg ’05 were married June 5, 2010, in Indianapolis. (See photo, next page.) Dr. Kelly N. Carlberg earned a medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine, Spring 2010. She is a resident in orthopedic surgery at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich. Joel C. Elliott completed his service in the Peace Corps and has returned to the United States. Joel spent 27 months serving in South Africa as a community HIV/AIDS Outreach Peace Corps volunteer. Zachary C. Harris and Christina Borgstrom were married Aug. 8, 2009, in Chicago. Zachary’s e-mail address is harris. zach@gmail.com. (See photo, next page.) Emily K. Johnson and Bryce A. Skeeters ’04 were married Sept. 12, 2009. Emily’s e-mail address is emilyskeeters@gmail.com. (See photo, page 54.) Nicole R. Pence is morning news coanchor at Lexington, Ky., NBC affiliate WLEX-TV and is also the station’s noon news reporter. Emily M. Steele and Joel R. Duckworth were married Dec. 19, 2009, in Indianapolis. (See photo, page 58.)

2007 Christopher A. Ball earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Akron School of Law, May 16, 2010.

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Post your e-mail address at: https://www.depauw.edu/e/alu/login.asp 56 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Class Notes Andrew B. Cole and Carolyn S. Walker ’05 were married March 7, 2009, in Indianapolis. Andrew’s e-mail address is acole84@gmail. com. Emily’s e-mail address is carriescole@ gmail.com. (See photo, previous page.) Brian A. Tweedie and Jill C. Anderson ’06 were married Oct. 10, 2009, in Bloomington, Ill. They live in Chicago. (See photo, page 58.)

2008 Andrew M. Bever is a Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellow. The fellowship is awarded by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, N.J. As a fellowship recipient, Andrew will do his master’s work in education at Purdue University. John M. Kochanczyk and Katie E. Burpo were married Aug. 22, 2009, in Martinsville, Ind. (See photo, next page.)

2009 Amanda N. Hendricks is a Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellow. The fellowship is awarded by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, N.J. As a fellowship recipient, Amanda will enroll at the University of Indianapolis for her master’s program.

Laura V. Benjamin ’06 and Peter G. Hogg ’05 wedding. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Brian E. Power ’03, David M. Trogden ’04, Casey L. Brackney ’04, Jared D. Mann ’06, Kate Evans Mann ’06, Scott A. Childers ’05, Anthony J. Borgmann ’06, Matthew L. Behrensmeyer ’05, Keith A. Marshall ’05, Ryan J. Fenstermaker ’05, Benjamin R. Stallsworth ’06, Lauren Keyes Fahey ’06, Lauren I. Brummett ’06, Heidi L. Gonso ’06, Nicole R. Pence ’06, Ashley E. Sewell ’06, Kelly R. Velazquez ’06, Lauren Archerd Donaldson ’06, Lisa H. Chambers ’06, John A. Wallace ’04 and Nadya S. Schmitter ’06. Attending but not pictured were Mary Zeiger Peers ’04 and Elisabeth Goldman ’06

2010 Kaley E. Robbins is a Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellow. The fellowship is awarded by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, N.J. As a fellowship recipient, Kaley will enroll at the University of Indianapolis for her master’s program.

For a schedule of alumni events or information about

Old Gold Weekend and

Monon Bell parties, go to: www.depauw.edu/ alumni

Zachary C. Harris ’06 and Christina Borgstrom wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included William H. Metzinger IV ’06, Brett A. Bohlander ’06, Matthew B. Strautman ’09, Kevin J. McAteer ’06, Lowell M. Huffman ’06, Gregory D. DeBeer ’06, Jennifer Miller Triplett ’05, Michael P. Triplett ’06, C. Landis Cullen ’06, Mark R. Alson ’05, Christopher B. Consolo ’05, Carli C. Worthman ’07, Mark A. Gonzales ’06, Sarah K. Gagle ’07, Patrick J. Mitchell ’06, Brian S. Gooch ’06, Christopher C. D. Sprehe ’07, Melissa Walpole Mattingly ’07, Matthew J. Deahl ’06, Eric T. Mattingly ’06, Allison A. Baccich ’07, Alexander B. Penning ’06, Christopher H. Thiele ’06, Andrew W. Watterson ’06, Ryan M. Sipe ’06, Scott C. Southard ’04, Jesse L. Groh ’08, Scott T. Sadowski ’06 and Adrian L. Norris ’06.

To update your address call 765-658-4205 or e-mail jenniferhassler@depauw.edu or fax 765-658-4172.

Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 57


Class Notes

Emily M. Steele ’06 and Joel R. Duckworth ’06 wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Michael S. Stanek ’06, Jessica Beeson Tocco ’06, Kathleen A. Gutting ’06, Tyler S. Hollett ’05, Adam G. D’Alton ’06, Richard C. O’Donnell Jr. ’06, Claire Sorenson Devlin ’06, Brian G. Millis ’06, Blair A. Loftspring ’06, Elizabeth H. Steele ’08, Sara E. McMahon ’08, Jonathan C. Coffin ’06, Matthew J. Lytle ’05, Carolyn Cook Nichols ’80, Scott H. Nichols ’80, David I. McMillin ’06, William M. James ’06, Adam J. Devlin ’05, Matthew M. Fleck ’05, Anne R. Gowland ’05, Patrick Y. Matheny ’06, Kyle J. Danforth ’05, John C. Stephens ’06, Whitney M. Long ’06, Michael S. Mioduski ’05 and C. Alexander Plese ’06.

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(Graduates of the Last Decade) Stay connected to DePauw online Facebook group

Jill C. Anderson ’06 and Brian A. Tweedie ’07 wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Margaret McCullough Bianco ’06 (bridesmaid), Kerri P. Angel ’06 (bridesmaid), Scott C. Moen ’07 (groomsman), Michael D. Claus ’07 (groomsman), Kyle T. Hampton ’07, Jane Schaadt Johnson ’04, Cory R. Johnson ’04, Geoffrey E. Zabinski ’07, Timothy D. Lyon ’07, Spencer H.B. Kunath ’07, Kristyn Currier Klear ’06, Jill C. Adamson ’06, Christina A. Leavy ’06, Amy M. Wilcox ’06, Jason A. Spilbeler ’07, Anne K. Stephens ’08, Sara N. Hedrick ’06, Michael T. Motch ’07, Andrew E. Brandstatter ’07, David J. Pope ’07, Nicole M. Kernan ’06, Elizabeth A. Lewis ’06, Colin T. Lakin ’07, Patrick M. Doumas ’07, Sarah A. Wurzburg ’06, Marian J. McLaughlin ’07, Margaret P. McDermott ’07, Katie M. Jaskierski ’06, Daniel P. Butler ’06, Michael R. Klear ’06, Lindsay E. Houin ’06 and Wrede H. Smith II ’06.

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John M. Kochanczyk ’08 and Katie E. Burpo ’08 wedding party. DePauw alumni attending the wedding included Emily K. Frame ’05, Kyle B. Turpin ’08, Ryan P. Hoffman ’08, Monica A. McClure ’08, Benjamin A. Gibson ’08, Sarah Jewell Gibson ’78, Marjorie Lentz Porter ’70, Ruth Ritz Rusie ’40, Barbara C. Bean (DePauw professor of English), Michael H. Stiver ’67, Erin Kell Cauble ’98, Susan Cotts Kell ’70, David J. Kochanczyk ’69 (father of the groom), Shiva Sinha (cousin of the bride), Matthew P. Kalasky ’08, Christopher W. Packnett ’08, David R. Cheeseman ’08, Kendall E. Grady ’08, Nicholas E. Hollis ’66, Ronald D. Tedrow ’72, Harry J. Brown (DePauw associate professor of English) and Gregory L. Schwipps ’95 (DePauw associate professor of English). 58 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

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Class Notes Obituaries Evelyn Bond Napier ’29, March 10, 2010, in Frankfort, Ind., at the age of 102. She taught business in Cook County (Ill.) schools and, later, typing and business in Frankfort (Ind.) High School from 1935-70. She was preceded in death by her first and her second husbands. Frances Cory Hoehn ’31, June 14, 2010, of Jeffersonville, Ind., at the age of 100. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She was a music teacher and retired as music supervisor of Jeffersonville (Ind.) city schools. Her survivors include her husband. Jane Wells Jarvis ’31, Feb. 18, 2010, in Sacramento, Calif., at the age of 99. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She was a homemaker and, later, a librarian retiring in 1973. She was preceded in death by her husband, Paul Jarvis ’30. Jean Johnston Richardson ’33, May 20, 2010, of Martinsville, Ind., at the age of 97. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She worked at the Martinsville (Ind.) Daily Reporter and, later, as administrative assistant to the dean of the Indiana University School of Law. She was assistant managing editor for the Journal of the Indiana State Medical Association from 1972-78. She was preceded in death by her husband. Barbara Gustafson Blair ’34, Jan. 7, 2010, in Louisville, Ky., at the age of 95. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She retired in 1949 from Harris Trust & Savings Bank in Chicago and became a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Her survivors include her daughter, Ellen Blair Welham ’72. Ryan B. Hall ’34, March 18, 2010, in Hamilton, Ohio, at the age of 96. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He retired as executive director of The Hamilton Association of Trade and Industry in 1978. He was preceded in Obituaries in DePauw Magazine include name of the deceased, class year, fraternity/sorority/living unit, occupation and DePauw-related activities and relatives. When reporting deaths, please include as much information as possible. Newspaper obituaries are very helpful. Information should be sent to Alumni Records, DePauw University, Charter House, 300 E. Seminary Street, P.O. Box 37, Greencastle, IN 46135-0037. You may also FAX us the information at 765-658-4172 or e-mail to jenniferhassler@depauw.edu. Obituaries in DePauw Magazine do not include memorial gifts.

death by his wife. Joseph M. Lumpkin ’34, May 10, 2010, of Hayward, Calif., at the age of 99. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He retired from a career in the furniture business. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Jeannette Rising Lumpkin ’36, and sister, Lois Lumpkin McKnight ’34. His survivors include his wife. Robert L. Duncan ’35, May 16, 2010, of Port Richey, Fla., at the age of 97. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He retired as a colonel in the United States Army and, later, he retired as an assistant dean of students and director of financial aid at Bloomsburg State College in Pennsylvania in 1978. He was preceded in death by his wife. Rev. Harold W. Ewing ’35, Feb. 28, 2010, of Sebring, Ohio, at the age of 96. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a United Methodist minister for more than 50 years, retiring in 1983. After retirement, he served as an interim pastor. He was preceded in death by his wife and sons, Stephen L. Ewing ’61 and William W. Ewing ’63. M. Janette Fisher Johnson ’35, May 12, 2010, of Salt Lake City, Utah, at the age of 95. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She was a music teacher and, later, a local artist. She was preceded in death by her husband. Ruth Donnell Rogers ’36, March 10, 2010, of Rancho Santa, Fe, Calif., at the age of 95. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Joseph M. Marquis ’36, May 10, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 97. He retired as vice president of Wright Coal and Oil Company after 50 years of service. His survivors include his wife. M. Lucille Moore Washburn ’37, April 21, 2010, of Lafayette, Ind., at the age of 93. She was a librarian. She was director of West Lafayette (Ind.) Public Library for 27 years, retiring in 1981. She was preceded in death by her first and her second husbands. Galen A. Porter ’37, June 5, 2010, of Glenwood, Ohio, at the age of 94. He was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He retired as chief chemist of Union Carbide Metals. He was preceded in death by his wife. Wilbert J. Eckardt ’38, Feb. 19, 2010, of Northfield, Minn., at the age of 93. He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He was employed for 17 years as purchasing agent at DePauw. Later, he became purchasing agent

and director of housing at Carleton College in Northfield, Minn., retiring in 1979. He was preceded in death by his wife, Jane Brown Eckardt ’38; brother, L. Bowne Eckardt ’31; sister, Frances Eckardt Smith ’28; and sister, Mona Eckardt Darnell ’29. He is survived by a daughter, Joan Eckardt Watts ’64, and son, William J. Eckardt ’68. Catherine Greene Howell ’38, Sept. 29, 2009, of Manistee, Mich., at the age of 92. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Ruth McKim Moor ’38, June 4, 2010, of Palo Alto, Calif., at the age of 95. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, Arthur D. Moor ’35, and sister, Clare McKim Roy Coates ’32. Her survivors include a niece, Sally Roy Minning ’64; and nephew, Thomas M. Roy ’63. Dr. John R. Showalter Jr. ’38, May 4, 2010, in Roswell, Ga., at the age of 94. He was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a physician in Terre Haute, Ind. He was preceded in death by his father, John R. Showalter Class of 1906; mother, Grace Colliver Showalter Class of 1908; and brother-in-law, J. Stanford Smith ’36. His survivors include his wife; son, J. Stuart Showalter ’68; daughter, Susan Showalter Hayden ’78; sister, Elaine Showalter Smith ’36; grandson, Steven C. Showalter ’97; and son-inlaw, Kris A. Hayden ’78. Lucille Blayney Wilford ’39, Nov. 6, 2009, of St. Petersburg, Fla., at the age of 92. She was retired owner of Blayney Catering Company in St. Louis, as well as a music teacher. She was preceded in death by her husband. F. Ouida Davis Schwartz ’39, June 17, 2010, in Gorham, Maine, at the age of 93. She was a private piano teacher as well as a homemaker. She was an author. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles D. Schwartz ’38. Doris Goodenough Mabee ’39, June 1, 2010, of Mansfield, Ohio, at the age of 91. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband and brother, Benton H. Goodenough ’36. Dr. Brown McDonald Jr. ’39, Aug. 26, 2009, in Eugene, Ore., at the age of 91. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He was a physician. He had several small practices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland as well as an obstetrics practice with the Bellflower Medical Group in Bellflower, Calif. From 1975Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 59


Class Notes 77, he was on staff as a training physician in Tabuk, Saudia Arabia. Later, he was a staff member at the Student Health Center at The California State University in Long Beach. He was preceded in death by his wife. C. Bruce Hardy ’40, March 25, 2010, of Berea, Ohio, at the age of 91. He was a member of Delta Chi fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was an advertising and marketing executive. He was preceded in death by his wife. Vincent C. L. Holmstrom ’40, May 12, 2010, of Lake Bluff, Ill., at the age of 91. He was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He was president of Holmstrom & Associates, Inc., in Glenview, Ill. He was preceded in death by his wife. W. Kenneth Wilkinson ’40, Feb. 14, 2010, of Fredericksburg, Va., at the age of 92. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was retired senior research fellow and consultant for E. I. DuPont & Company. His survivors include his wife. Caroline Wise Pinney ’40, Oct. 19, 2009, of McCordsville, Ind., at the age of 91. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, and brother, John K. Wise ’33. Her survivors include a brother, Robert S. Wise ’36. Charles W. Yeo ’40, April 19, 2010, in Evanston, Ill., at the age of 93. He was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was personnel manager for Indiana Steel and Wire Company, Moore Company and Warner Gear for more than 29 years, retiring in 1983. He was preceded in death by his wife. Dr. Gordon D. Arnold ’41, Dec. 20, 2009, of Amherst, Mass., at the age of 92. He retired as chief of surgery at Cooley Dickinson Hospital in Northampton, Mass., in 1985. After retirement, he volunteered his surgical services with Project Hope. He was preceded in death by his first wife. His survivors include his wife. Betsy Conner Coons ’41, Feb. 20, 2010, in Colorado Springs, Colo., at the age of 90. She was a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. She taught homebound students in Washington, Ill., and held a variety of teaching positions in the Washington, Ill., area. She retired as guidance counselor from Washington (Ill.) Community High School in 1980. She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard J. Coons ’41, and son, Douglas C. Coons ’65. Her survivors include 60 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

a granddaughter, Andrea R. Coons ’89. Charles M. Beardsley ’42, June 5, 2010, in Salemtowne, N.C., at the age of 89. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He was a consulting actuary and served as president, director and chairman of the board for Booke and Company for nearly 50 years. His survivors include his wife, Marjorie Gahan Beardsley ’42; daughter, Karen Beardsley Taylor ’70; and son-in-law, Perry L. Taylor Jr. ’70. Margaret Boyd Kashner ’42, May 3, 2010, of Valparaiso, Ind., at the age of 89. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She taught music and later pursued a career in teaching special education students. She was preceded in death by her husband. Merton L. Davis ’42, May 6, 2010, in Burlington, N.C., at the age of 91. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a Rector Scholar. He was a chemist and worked for DuPont in Camden, S.C. Robert J. Frey ’42, April 8, 2010, in Chicago, at the age of 89. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He was founder and partner of Metropolitan Coffee Service in Chicago. His survivors include his wife, Sharlee Mayer Frey ’42. Harriett Hawkins Field ’42, March 11, 2010, in Mission Viejo, Calif. She taught eighth-grade mathematics for 27 years at Huntington Junior High School in San Marino, Calif. She was preceded in death by her first and her second husbands. Robert E. Houk ’42, Feb. 28, 2010, in Vero Beach, Fla., at the age of 89. He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a lifetime member of The Washington C. DePauw Society. He was former member of the DePauw Alumni Board of Directors. He retired as partner and executive vice president of F.C. Tucker Company. His survivors include his wife, Marion Pfitzner Houk ’42; son, David C. Houk ’70; daughter, Julie Houk Goodrich ’73; and grandson, Christian W. Goodrich ’09. Robert W. Lott ’42, Feb. 23, 2010, in Galesburg, Ill., at the age of 89. He was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was chairman of the board of Farmers State Bank in Elmwood, Ill. His survivors include his wife, Bettye Shoop Lott ’41; daughter, Pamela Lott Paige ’66; and son-in-law, Frederick O. Paige ’66. Joyce Webster Cramer ’42, Feb. 25, 2010, of Hot Springs Village, Ark., at the age of 89. She was a member of Delta Delta Delta

sorority. She was a retired elementary school teacher as well as a homemaker. Her survivors include her husband, Alwin M. Cramer ’37, and son, James L. Cramer ’70. Evelyn Anderson Hite ’43, May 15, 2010, in Hollidaysburg, Pa., at the age of 88. She was a homemaker and worked more than 30 years in the family business. She was preceded in death by her husband. Elizabeth Bankhardt McCammish ’43, Dec. 28, 2009, in Winchester, Ky., at the age of 88. She was a member of Alpha Phi sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Dr. James A. Felts ’43, May 31, 2010, of St. Louis, at the age of 88. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He retired as associate professor of anesthesiology at Washington University Medical School. He founded and administered the first outpatient surgical unit at Barnes Hospital. He was preceded in death by his first wife. His survivors include his wife, and daughter, Anne Felts Belmont ’75. Earl C. Morse ’43, March 20, 2010, of Muncie, Ind., at the age of 88. He was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He retired as division directory manager of Mountain Bell in Phoenix, after 34 years of service. He was preceded in death by his wife, Dorothy Rominger Morse ’44. Richard E. Norberg ’43, April 20, 2010, in Oakland, Mo., at the age of 87, from complications of heart disease. He was a member of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was chairman of the physics department at Washington University from 1962-91. He retired from full-time teaching in 1993. He taught parttime until 2003. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Patricia Leach Norberg ’46. His survivors include his wife; son, Peter D. Norberg ’75; and daughter-in-law, Janie Blackburn Norberg ’73. Robert F. Slutz Jr. ’43, Dec. 29, 2009, in Manassas, Va., at the age of 88. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a retired Foreign Service officer. His survivors include his wife, Rose Vierling Slutz ’43. Glenn H. Thomas ’43, May 15, 2010, of Munster, Ind., at the age of 89. He was a member of Delta Chi fraternity. He retired after 30 years at NIPSCO as manager of advertising and sales. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Carol Thomas Pratt ’68. His survivors include his wife, Jane Carroll Thomas ’44, and son, Mark L. Thomas ’72.


Class Notes Elizabeth Bogue Obertreis ’44, Aug. 5, 2009, in Encinitas, Calif., at the age of 86. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, Harry L. Obertreis ’47. Sarah Ingle Richards ’44, March 7, 2010, in Coos Bay, Calif., at the age of 87. She was a member of Delta Zeta fraternity. She was a retired physical therapist and homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. L. Dale Lambert ’44, May 13, 2010, in Springfield, Ill., at the age of 89. He was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a dentist, retiring in 1987. His survivors include his wife. H. Kenneth Mackey ’44, April 26, 2010, of Evansville, Ind. He was a member of Alpha Tau Omega. He was a Rector Scholar. He retired, after 43 years of service, from Bristol Meyers Squibb in Evansville, Ind. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Cheryl Mackey Colby ’69. His survivors include his wife. Helen Rudesill Chroniak ’44, May 4, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 87. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She taught nursing at Methodist Hospital and was a faculty member at the Indiana Medical Center. She was preceded in death by a son, Thomas N. Chroniak ’80. Her survivors include her husband, and two daughters, Elizabeth Chroniak Warrick ’79 and Gwyneth Chroniak Wolke ’79. Marjorie Schwybold Wilcox ’44, May 1, 2009, in Lakeside Park, Ky., at the age of 87. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She was a breeder and trainer of show horses. She was preceded in death by her husband. Elizabeth A. Cave ’45, May 6, 2010, of Mansfield, Ohio, at the age of 86. She was a member of Alpha Phi sorority. She was a high school art teacher and, later, began a career in contemporary art quilts. Eleanor Crosby Leigeber ’45, May 30, 2010, in Carbondale, Ill., at the age of 88. She was a music teacher in public schools as well as a private piano teacher. Her survivors include her husband and son, John C. Leigeber ’75. Doris Hendrickson Overbay ’46, Dec. 27, 2009, in Indianapolis, at the age of 84. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a homemaker and community volunteer. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Wendy Overbay Trakimas ’76. Her survivors include her husband. Marcia Johnson Lemon ’46, June 7, 2010, in Bloomington, Ind., at the age of 85. She was a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority.

She was a lifetime member of The Washington C. DePauw Society. She was an art teacher and director of the Art Association of Richmond, Ind. She was preceded in death by her husband. Jeanne Klusmeier Frank ’46, April 1, 2010, in Fallbrook, Calif., at the age of 85. She was a member of Alpha Phi sorority. She retired as personnel director for Human Resource Management in Los Angeles after 23 years of service. She was preceded in death by her husband. Elaine Barnaby Groner ’47, March 22, 2010, in Cincinnati at the age of 84. She was a member of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. She was a homemaker. Her survivors include her husband. Beneta Kemp Harshman ’47, June 11, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 85. She worked as a home economist for Kemp Brothers Packing Company and, later, as a receptionist for Habegger and Price. She was preceded in death by her first and her second husbands. H. Joan Longshore Goodwin ’47, May 11, 2010, of Columbus, Ohio, at the age of 84. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a retired teacher. She was preceded in death by her sister, Margaret Longshore Lytle ’44. Her survivors include a sister, Nancy Longshore Brest ’50; granddaughter, Heather C. Oster ’02; and two grandsons, Matthew T. Goodwin ’06 and Graham H. Oster ’08. Margaret Keach Williamson ’47, April 27, 2010, of Chico, Calf., at the age of 83, of congestive heart failure. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She was a real estate agent in Chico, Calif., for more than 35 years. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her mother, Katherine Elliott Keach Dickson ’25, and her husband. Patricia Lenzen South ’47, April 15, 2010, of Novato, Calif., at the age of 85. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, W. Stanley South ’49, and brother, V. Francis Lenzen ’51. Her survivors include a sister-in-law, Nancy Decker Lenzen ’50. Barbara Mayne Gasser ’47, Feb. 26, 2010, of Evanston, Ill., at the age of 84. She was a member of Alpha Phi sorority. She was a lifetime member of The Washington C. DePauw Society. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Her survivors include a son, R. David Gasser ’74, and sister, Jean Mayne Welter ’42. Miriam Nelson Ballmann ’47, April 17, 2010, of St. Augustine, Fla., at the age of 84. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega

sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Lila Childers Woodworth ’48, Feb. 17, 2010, in Vero Beach, Fla., at the age of 84. She was a registered nurse. She was preceded in death by her husband. William E. Gill ’48, April 30, 2010, in Tallahassee, Fla., at the age of 85. He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He was vice president of sales and marketing at Wheeler-Van Label Company for several years. Later, he retired from Hagerstown Bookbinding and Printing in Hagerstown, Md., as sales and marketing manager in 2005. He was preceded in death by his wife. John W. Mast ’48, April 18, 2010, of Glenview, Ill., at the age of 83. He was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. He was owner of Mast & Associates, a manufacture representative agency, for 50 years. His survivors include his wife, Sonja Thiessen Mast ’50. Marion McBurney Rice ’48, May 11, 2010, of Roscoe, Ill., at the age of 87. She taught at Rockford College from 1962-65. From 1965-88 she was professor of biology at the University of Wisconsin. Robert A. Meredith ’48, March 30, 2010, in Sarasota, Fla., at the age of 82. He was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a Rector Scholar. He was former vice president and actuary at The Travelers Insurance Company in Hartford, Conn. He was preceded in death by his father, Aubert L. Meredith Class of 1908; and mother, Flossie Allen Meredith ’16. His survivors include his wife and brother, Aubert L. Meredith Jr. ’51. Rev. E. Richard Lewke ’49, March 18, 2010, in Plymouth, Ind., at the age of 85. He was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He was a pastor with the United Methodist Church, retiring in 1994. Betty Neal Towal ’49, April 22, 2010, in Bloomington, Ill., at the age of 82. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was a school psychologist for the Decatur (Ill.) public schools and later worked for the Illinois State Department of Corrections. She was preceded in death by her husband. Mary Sherer Lukens ’49, March 26, 2010, of Terre Haute, Ind., at the age of 82. She was a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Her survivors include daughters, Jan Lukens Fredbeck ’80 and Carolyn Lukens Nyren ’87, and son-in-law, Eric W. Fredbeck ’78. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 61


Class Notes Richard W. Coons ’50, April 10, 2010, of Glen Ellyn, Ill., at the age of 83. He was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was an advertising executive at Leo Burnett Advertising Agency in Chicago. He was preceded in death by his wife, Barbara Hirt Coons ’48; father-in-law, Lewis R. Hirt ’25; and mother-in-law, Alice Wheeler Hirt ’27. His survivors include two sons, James W. Coons ’79 and Steven R. Coons ’77, and daughter, Nancy Coons Pearson ’85. Norma Davidson Novak ’50, April 17, 2010, of Oak Brook, Ill., at the age of 82. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. George W. Emmert ’50, April 14, 2010, of Bend, Ore., at the age of 81. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was chief executive officer of Packaging Dynamics, Inc., in Los Alamitos, Calif. His survivors include his wife and daughter, Jennifer Emmert Berg ’91. Phillip H. Farris ’50, Jan. 29, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 84. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He spent his working career in the electronics industry. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Isabelle Otis Farris ’50. His survivors include his wife, Barbara Evans Farris ’50, and son, Robert A. Farris ’81. Robert E. Holmes ’50, March 20, 2010, in Sacramento, Calif., at the age of 80. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a reporter at the Elkhart Truth from 1955-58. From 1958-69 he was an investigative reporter and city editor for Press-Enterprise in Riverside, Calif. From 1970-92 he was a consultant for the California State Senate. Edwin G. Hudspeth ’50, May 28, 2010, of St. Louis at the age of 81. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He pursued a career in banking and became senior vice president of Mark Twain Bank Shares. Mary Lewellen Neff ’50, Dec. 30, 2009, of Indianapolis, at the age of 81. She was a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ned D. Neff ’49. Her survivors include a daughter, Mary Neff Agneineri ’72. Mary Longshore ’50, Feb. 17, 2010, in Brazil, Ind., at the age of 81. She worked in business offices until her retirement in 1988. Dorothy Sidney Smith ’50, May 24, 2010, of Madison, Ind., at the age of 81. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She was an editor and reporter for the Carmel 62 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010

(Ind.) Topics Newspaper as well as the first fulltime executive director of the Carmel-Clay (Ind.) Chamber of Commerce. Her survivors include her husband, Robert W. Smith ’48. Marilyn Strening Brading ’50, Feb. 9, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 85. She was a retired animal technician. She was preceded in death by her husband, Benjamin H. Brading ’50. William A. Sweeney ’50, Feb. 6, 2010, of Crown Point, Ind., at the age of 85. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a retired tool and die designer for the Ford Motor Company. His survivors include his wife, Kathleen Main Sweeney ’49. Martha Holman Prochnik ’51, April 30, 2010, of Old Saybrook, Conn., at the age of 80. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Janet Stevens Papworth ’51, June 6, 2010, of Bellevue, Wash., at the age of 80, from cancer. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. She was a homemaker and, later, an internal auditor for Detroit and Northern Savings Bank for several years. She was preceded in death by her husband. Betty Boyd Brengle ’52, Aug. 15, 2009, of Carmel, Ind., at the age of 79. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Robert L. Queller ’52, March 11, 2010, of Harper Woods, Mich., at the age of 80. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He worked for 43 years at the Citizens Research Council of Michigan, where he was executive director for 15 years, retiring in 1994. His survivors include his wife. Warren A. Rhoades ’53, March 27, 2010, in Naples, Fla., at the age of 80. He served as assistant treasurer, vice president, president and chairman of the board for Peoples Bank of Holyoke, Mass. His survivors include his wife. Jean Houston Watts ’54, May 8, 2010, of Brazil, Ind., at the age of 77. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her brother, Sheldon G. Houston ’58. Her survivors include her husband; son, Gregory A. Watts ’75; and niece, Alice Houston Abney ’89. Ernest G. Scotten III ’54, Oct. 19, 2009, of New Castle, Ind., at the age of 77. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He retired from Smith Dairy, Wayne Division, as controller after 26 years of service. He was

owner of Kumfy-Togs Manufacturing and a former Indiana Department of Internal Revenue Service employee. He was preceded in death by his wife. John L. Spencer ’54, April 27, 2010, in Lakeland, Fla., at the age of 77, from multiple myeloma. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He was employed for 28 years with Eli Lilly & Company in Indianapolis, retiring in 1988. Later, he was Jesse Ball DuPont Chair in chemistry at Florida Southern College for 15 years, retiring as professor emeritus. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Sandra Burget Spencer ’56. His survivors include his wife and daughter, Deborah A. Ettinger ’77. Judith West Galliher ’54, Feb. 25, 2010, in Muncie, Ind., at the age of 78. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her father, Harley B. West ’26; mother, Alice Reeves West ’26; and her husband. Eleanor Jenkins Wright ’55, April 21, 2010, in St. Louis, at the age of 76. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was a freelance photographer and illustrator as well as homemaker. Her survivors include her husband, Thomas A. Wright ’53. Richard A. Schultheis ’55, May 24, 2010, of Hinsdale, Ill., at the age of 76. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He pursued a career in business management, including consumer products for Avon, Inc. His survivors include his wife, Joan Prieb Schultheis ’56. Sarah Seiler Wilson ’55, June 27, 2010, of Evansville, Ind., at the age of 76. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was a reporter and editor at the Vincennes SunCommercial from 1970-74. Later, she worked for the Vincennes (Ind.) Community School Corporation; Seidman and Seidman CPAs in Evansville, Ind.; University of Southern Indiana; and Reitz High School. She was preceded in death by her husband. Adrianne Nail Coats ’56, March 9, 2010, in Pawley’s Island, S.C., at the age of 75, from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She was a kindergarten and elementary school teacher in Niles, Mich., and, later, in Greenville, S.C. Her survivors include her husband, Sidney O. Coats ’56. Donald G. Reiff ’56, June 16, 2010, of Rochester, N.Y., at the age of 75. He was a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. He was a linguist at the University of Rochester and, later, a speech and language pathologist in private


Class Notes practice. His survivors include his wife, Mary Shauman Reiff ’57, and daughters, Rebecca Reiff Smith ’85 and Sarah Reiff Hekking ’87. Sally Scales Lauber ’56, March 23, 2010, of Squaw Lake, Minn., at the age of 75. She was a Rector Scholar. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her father, Rufus Scales ’25. Her survivors include her husband; sister, Sue Scales Howard ’53; and brother-inlaw, Frederic W. Howard ’53. E. Georgienne Burow Cleveland ’57, Feb. 23, 2010, of Castle Rock, Colo., at the age of 74. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She was a retired school teacher and homemaker. Her survivors include her husband, Joseph C. Cleveland ’57. James B. Cash ’57, May 22, 2010, of Kettering, Ohio, at the age of 74. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a member of DePauw’s Center for Contemporary Media Board of Advisers. He was a contracting executive with the National Institute of Health and, later, with private industry. After retirement, he became a writer and a speaker. His survivors include his wife, Nancy Neely Cash ’58. Charles W. Johnson ’57, Feb. 1, 2010, of Tampa, Fla., at the age of 74, from cancer. He was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He was the founder of Cast-a-Net Seafood. His survivors include his wife. Ronald L. Thomas ’57, May 17, 2010, in Danville, Ill., at the age of 79. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He was a manufacturing executive and industrial engineer, retiring in 1993. His survivors include his wife. Thomas A. Johnson ’58, Jan. 8, 2010, of San Antonio, Texas, at the age of 73. He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. He retired as lieutenant colonel from the United States Air Force. His survivors include his wife, Ruthanne Williamson Johnson ’58. William C. Krueger Jr. ’58, April 24, 2010, of Tulsa, Okla., at the age of 73. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a geologist and retired from B. P. Amoco in 1990 after 27 years of service. His survivors include his wife, Carol Koock Krueger ’59. Delight Mace Dowell ’58, June 25, 2010, of Terre Haute, Ind., at the age of 73, from cancer. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She was a retired teacher for Vigo County (Ind.) School Corporation. Her survivors include her husband. Donald A. Extrom ’59, Nov. 14, 2009,

of Schaumburg, Ill., at the age of 73. He was a member of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He worked at U.S. Life Insurance Company for more than 40 years and became senior vice president of operations. His survivors include his wife. John T. Marvel ’59, Feb. 27, 2010, in Tucson, Ariz., at the age of 71, He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. From 1964-68 he was assistant professor of chemistry and biochemisty at the University of Arizona. Later, he joined Monsanto’s Agricultural Products Company, and from 1985-87 he was Monsanto’s general manager of science and technology Europe/Africa. In 1988 he joined Ethyl Corporation as corporate vice president for research and development, retiring in 1995. He was preceded in death by his first wife. His survivors include his wife. David N. McClure Jr. ’59, Feb. 16, 2010, in Mason City, Iowa, at the age of 72. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. His survivors include his wife, Julie Ware McClure ’59; sister-in-law, Linda Ware Logan ’61; and brother-in-law, C. Sumpter Logan ’59. David C. Nicholson ’59, June 4, 2010, in Fitchburg, Wis., at the age of 73, of kidney cancer. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He was a furniture buyer and retired as co-owner and vice president of Monona Furniture. He was preceded in death by his wife. His survivors include a brother, Richard P. Nicholson ’55, and sister-in-law, Beverly Lewis Nicholson ’55. Cynda Bayliff Kehl ’60, June 7, 2010, of Kettering, Ohio, at the age of 72. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She was a retired school teacher. Her survivors include her husband. Rev. William H. Clark ’60, May 31, 2010, of Elgin, Ill., at the age of 72. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He was pastor at First Presbyterian Church in Elgin, Ill., for more than 32 years. His survivors include his wife. David E. Duell ’60, Feb. 11, 2009, of Reelsville, Ind., at the age of 74. He was a manager in the shipping department of IBM from 1959-87. After his retirement, he worked as a security guard for Hoffa Security. He was preceded in death by his wife. S. Jean Killebrew Carhart ’60, April 20, 2009, of Omaha, Neb., at the age of 70. She was a member of Alpha Phi sorority. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband. Raymond L. Profant ’60, March 16, 2010,

of Sarasota, Fla., at the age of 71. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. He was a Rector Scholar. He was a dentist in the United States Air Force. His survivors include his wife. John R. Coble ’61, March 27, 2010, in Bonita Springs, Fla., at the age of 71, from cancer. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He was founder and chief executive officer of Cargo Systems, Inc., in Elkhart, Ind. He was preceded in death by his sister, Marietta Coble Ivey ’57. His survivors include his wife. James H. Endres ’61, July 28, 2009, of Aurora, Colo., at the age of 70. He was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. He worked for RCA in St. Louis and, later, for Computer Sciences Corporation in El Segundo, Calif. He was preceded in death by his wife, Elizabeth Hagemann Endres ’64. Dr. H. Leslie Ericson ’61, June 5, 2010, in Madison, Wis., at the age of 71, from pulmonary fibrosis. He was a member of Men’s Hall Association. He was a Rector Scholar. He was an orthopedic surgeon in Racine, Wis., retiring in 2007. He was preceded in death by his mother, LaVaughn Smith Ericson ’34. His survivors include his wife. Gail Nichols Ackles ’61, Nov. 28, 2009, in Olathe, Kan., at the age of 69. She was a member of Delta Zeta sorority. She was a homemaker. Her survivors include her husband. Dr. Harry R. Stimson Jr. ’61, March 21, 2010, of South Bend, Ind., at the age of 70. He was a member of Delta Upsilon fraternity. He was a physician. His survivors include his wife. Nancy Burns Adams ’63, Nov. 2, 2009, in Indianapolis, at the age of 68. She taught English at Butler University and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. James L. Claflin ’63, March 17, 2010, in Plainwell, Mich., at the age of 69. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was a marketing account executive for Helkel Loctite Corporation in Chicago for more than 30 years. He was preceded in death by his wife. Roger “Ron” F. Goodwin ’63, May 27, 2010, in Center City, Pa., at the age of 69, from complications of prostate cancer. He was owner of Magus Films. His survivors include his wife. Susan Parker Jones ’63, Dec. 4, 2009, of Carmel, Ind., at the age of 68. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was an ink, pen and watercolor artist as well as homemaker. She was preceded in death by her sister, Janet Parker Farnsworth ’56. Her survivors include her husband. Summer 2010 I DePauw Magazine 63


Class Notes Stanley E. Curtis ’64, April 25, 2010, of Urbana, Ill., at the age of 68. He began his career as assistant professor in dairy husbandry at the University of Missouri in 1968 and, later, taught at the University of Illinois. In 1990 he became head of Pennsylvania State University’s Department of Dairy and Animal Science. He returned to the University of Illinois in 1998 and retired as a professor in the Department of Animal Sciences. He wrote numerous articles, scientific meeting papers and 45 book chapters as well as the first comprehensive textbook on animal-environmental management. His survivors include his former wife. Rev. James A. Hallmann ’64, March 2, 2010, in San Diego at the age of 67, from a scuba diving accident. He was senior pastor at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Hemet, Calif. His survivors include his wife. John M. Cronin ’66, Aug. 18, 2009, of Carmel, Ind., at the age of 65. He was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He was an attorney in Indianapolis for more than 40 years. He was preceded in death by his wife. Janet Kartalia Stewart ’66, Feb. 15, 2010, of Wayne, Pa., at the age of 65. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. She was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She was a homemaker. Carol Thomas Pratt ’68, Dec. 21, 2009, of Albany, Ore., at the age of 64. She was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. In 2005 she retired as budget manager for Varian, Inc., in San Jose, Calif. She was preceded in death by her partner. Her survivors include her father, Glenn H. Thomas ’43, and mother, Jane Carroll Thomas ’44. Ruth Vollrath Roberts ’70, March 11, 2010, of Shelbyville, Ind., at the age of 61, from a hemorrhagic stroke. She was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She was coordinator of rights and reproduction at the Indianapolis Museum of Art for the past 20 years. Her survivors include her husband and sister, Jean Vollrath Staley ’76. Rebecca Cary Trela ’72, May 5, 2010, of New Harmony, Ind., at the age of 60. She had worked as a Head Start teacher, family childcare provider, classroom teacher, early childhood mentor and an infant toddler specialist. Her survivors include a son, Casey F. Trela ’03. Robert D. Franks ’73, April 9, 2010, in

New York City, at the age of 58, from cancer. He was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He was a member of the New Jersey General Assembly for 14 years and, later, served four terms in the United States House of Representatives. In 2001 he became director of the HealthCare Institute of New Jersey. His survivors include his wife. Andrea Wagner Chizek ’73, May 5, 2010, of Hamilton, Ohio, at the age of 59, from cancer. She was a member of Pi Beta Phi sorority. She was an elementary school teacher for 30 years in the Hamilton, Ohio, schools. Her survivors include her husband. Diana L. Newsom ’77, March 29, 2010, in Chicago, at the age of 54, from cancer. She was a member of Phi Beta Pi sorority. She was a manager of employee relations and organization development for Kraft Foods for 20 years. M. Robin Kloppenburg Heenahan ’79, May 31, 2010, of Bartlett, Ill., at the age of 53. She was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. She worked for telecommunication companies in Chicago. She was preceded in death by her husband. Her survivors include a brother, John C. Kloppenburg ’85. Wanda Jeschke Ronk ’80, Dec. 17, 2008, in Cook Springs, Ala., at the age of 89. She was a retired elementary school teacher. She was preceded in death by her husband. Jan J. Kinzie ’81, Jan. 27, 2010, of Indianapolis, at the age of 51. He was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He served on DePauw’s Board of Fraternal Affairs. He was a member of DePauw’s Greek Life Advisory Council. He was an attorney.

Friends of the University Donnie L. Alexander, March 1, 2010, in Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 71. He retired from DePauw as a Physical Plant second-shift supervisor after more than 49 years of service. His survivors include his wife. Katherine Bergethon, March 26, 2010, of Dover, Mass., at the age of 92. She was a lifetime member of The Washington C. DePauw Society. She was a community and civic volunteer as well as homemaker. She was preceded in death by her husband, K. Roald Bergethon ’38. Roger L. Cox, May 3, 2010, in Hockessin,

Del., at the age of 79. During his 40-year academic career, he taught at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine; DePauw; and University of Delaware. He retired as a professor emeritus of English at the University of Delaware. He was preceded in death by his wife. Edna P. Dickson, April 12, 2010, of Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 96. She retired from A & P Grocery after 19 years of service. She also retired from Alpha Tau Omega fraternity where she was a cook. Peggy Gilmer, June 10, 2010, in Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 86. She taught English and classical studies at DePauw. She also served as a president of the DePauw chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and for 25 years co-sponsored the New York Winter Term with her husband, Walker Gilmer, professor emeritus of English. Her survivors include her husband, F. Walker Gilmer, DePauw professor emeritus of English. Roy S. Keith, March 29, 2010, in Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 73. He retired from Public Service Indiana and DePauw University. He was preceded in death by his wife. Larry E. Porter, March 25, 2010, in Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 68. He worked for IBM for 25 years and, later, for DePauw. His survivors include his wife. Virginia M. Runyan, June 1, 2010, of Greencastle, Ind., at the age of 83. She retired from the food service staff at DePauw. She was preceded in death by her husband. Jim “Smitty” H. Smith, April 3, 2010, in Indianapolis, at the age of 76. He was a former Greencastle, Ind., police officer; dairy farmer for 25 years; firearms instructor for the Putnamville (Ind.) Correctional Facility; and the house dad for Alpha Phi sorority at DePauw. His survivors include his wife, Marie Smith, the current Alpha Phi sorority house mother. Otto L. Sonder Jr., April 19, 2010, in Oneonta, N.Y., at the age of 85. He was a lifetime member of The Washington C. DePauw Society. He was an assistant professor of sociology at DePauw from 1951-56. He taught at several other colleges and universities, including Pennsylvania State University, Lycoming College and Williamsport Area Community College.

To update your address call 765-658-4205 or e-mail jenniferhassler@depauw.edu or fax 765-658-4172. 64 DePauw Magazine I Summer 2010


Summer 2010