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Map Inside! A Guide to PHX Hotspots Explore your core

summer

bounty

PHX IS RIPE FOR THE TAKING Visitors descend on a Downtown ready to serve up hot local culture

DPhxJ.com JUNE | JULY 2011


welcome Before we provide a fresh take on the Summer season ahead, I want to express my appreciation to Si Robins for his service as DPJ’s managing editor for the past 18 months. His natural curiosity about our Downtown community helped DPJ get to where it is today. As we move forward, we welcome fresh new voices to share their view of Downtown, and that starts with our first guest editor, David Leibowitz. While David’s voice may not be “new” in the strict sense of the word, given his previous positions with many major media outlets in the Valley, his take on Downtown is decidedly fresh. We are grateful for his contribution to this exciting issue of DPJ Magazine. More than ever before in Downtown Phoenix, if you can’t stand the heat, you’re going to miss out on some cool action. Thanks to the MLB All-Star Week and other events, Phoenix will play host to a record number of visitors in the Downtown area this summer. The Phoenix Convention Center will be hosting well over 200,000 visitors between Memorial Day and Labor Day. It is as if every person from Spokane WA (or Scottsdale for that matter) was packing up and coming here for a visit - and they would be most certainly welcome! Meanwhile, there are more residents in the Downtown area than ever before. They don’t hibernate during the summer. World class destinations and local small businesses don’t close their doors at the first sign of blazing sun. In fact just the opposite is happening. Locals are bringing their own heat with exciting theater openings, new festivals and restaurants popping up, literally, all over during this traditionally “down” time. These friendly folks are always happy to help visitors tap into the local scene. We hope you enjoy getting to know them, and our Downtown, a little better.

Catrina Kahler Publisher

from the guest editor I’m not a freeway guy. I favor surface streets, to feel the city around me, the people on the move, the rhythm of their lives. That’s what I love about Downtown Phoenix. To me, Downtown is to the Valley as the gut is to the body. It’s where you feel things most, where your core resides. Of course, in Phoenix it hasn’t always been that way. When I moved here in 1995, Downtown was where you went to see the Suns play. Period. The addition of the baseball stadium – and the vision of leaders like Jerry Colangelo and my friend and client Phil Gordon – began an evolution that continues today. Light rail, First Fridays, the presence of ASU and U of A, the biomedical campus, new hotels, CityScape; these additions have given Downtown a reinvigorated heartbeat you can feel in your bones. Just as important: The little moments that for me have made so many days. I’m talking about Chris Bianco’s Sonny Boy pizza. The iced tea at Giant Coffee and Fair Trade. The pretzels at Roosevelt Tavern and the beers at Turf and the Bikini. I’m talking about the lunchtime roundtables I’ve been to at Irish Cultural Center, the meetings under the misters at Local Breeze, the shows at the Herberger and the Dodge and dozens of Suns and D-backs games. There was the night the Diamondbacks won the World Series and I saw strangers hugging in the streets. And the many morning conversations I had with the late Mike Ratner, the former owner of Tom’s Tavern, who fought cancer with ferocity and grace. And the nearly five years I spent working at Moses Anshell, down in the warehouse district, where I turned a career in journalism into an education in advertising at the feet of Louie Moses and Jos Anshell, two smart guys who adopted downtown long before it became the rage. We’ll be on display this month, with the All-Star Game in town, surrounded by visitors looking for a good time. I know we’ll be consummate hosts, because Downtown Phoenix, like a teenager on the verge of being all grown up, craves adrenaline and excitement. I also know that once the excitement fades, and it’s just us Phoenicians again, the rhythm of the city’s core will never cease to fascinate me.

David Leibowitz Guest Editor

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june july in this issue 04

15

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17

05

The Buzz

05

All-Star Buzz

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District Beat

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Core Values

11 Pullout Map: Guide to PHX Hotspots 15

Paving The Way

17

Eats & Drinks

22

Interview: Luis Gonzales

Behind the cover story: Grabbing vegetables on a Saturday morning from One Windmill Farm at the Phoenix Public Market. A great way to start the day and the season. onewindmillfarm.com phoenixpublicmarket.com

EXPLORE YOUR CORE

publisher CATRINA KAHLER |Â guest editor DAVID LEIBOWITZ creative director ERIK KARVONEN | art director JASON GARCIA | web designer AMANDA HAWKINS web editor TYLER HURST | communications manager BRANDY HOWARD dining editor JUSTIN LEE | contributors J SETH ANDERSON | COURTNEY McCUNE | TAZMINE LOOMANS | PAUL MARTINEZ photography JACK LONDON | PAUL MARTINEZ | JASON GARCIA contact EDITORIAL | editor@dphxj.com | ADVERTISING | advertising@dphxj.com

DPJ is supported by:

Downtown Phoenix Journal | Published by Urban Affair, LLC. | 365 N 4th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003 All rights reserved. Copyright 2011. Urban Affair, LLC is not responsible or liable for any misspellings, incorrect dates, or incorrect information in its captions, calendar or other listings. Urban Affair, LLC assumes no responsibility for the loss of any unsolicited materials, or for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. The opinions expressed within Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine do not necessarily represent the views or policies of Downtown Phoenix Journal or Urban Affair, LLC or any of its agents, staff, partners, employees, interns, volunteers, or distribution venues. Bylined articles and editorial represent the views of their authors. Downtown Phoenix Journal magazine accepts advertisements from advertisers believed to be reputable but cannot guarantee the authenticity or quality of objects and/or services advertised. Also, Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine is not responsible for any claims made by advertisers. Urban Affair, LLC reserves the right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising matter.

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the

buzz slow and low Check out the often-ornate designs and intricate craftsmanship found on custom low-rider bicycles and cars at The Art of Lowriding: A Cultural Exhibition, June 3rd and 4th at Bragg’s Pie Factory.

PHOTO: The Torch Theater

no place like home After nearly four years of borrowing space from The Trunk Space and Space 55, the Torch Theatre improv troupe has finally nested in its own little storefront on Central Ave. Opening in July, the intimate 32-seat theater will provide a permanent home for the troupe’s long-form improv shows and workshops. The space will also host six other house troupes: Apollo 12, Galapagos, Light Rail Pirates, Mail Order Bride, Phoenix Neutrino Project and The Remainders.

In addition to a showcase of award-winning vehicles, there will also be an art exhibition, car-hop and hydraulic demonstrations, and music. grandavephoenix.com

“The Torch Theatre will be home to great comedy and theatre and we can’t wait to bring in Phoenicians who are constantly looking for arts, culture and creativity in our city,” said Jose Gonzalez, Torch Theatre Workshop Instructor and Co-Director of the Galapagos troupe.

this way to City Hall

hot convention

The Torch Theatre is located at 4721 N. Central Ave. For more information, visit the torchtheatre.com.

The race for mayor is more sprint than marathon, with election day right around the corner on August 30. There are only a few chances to get acquainted with the candidates before the registration deadline on August 1. One of those opportunities is a Mayoral Candidate Forum on June 13, hosted by Phoenix Community Alliance along with other community stakeholders (including DPJ). Taking place at the ASU College of Nursing and Health Innovation, the event hopes to shine a light on the candidates view of Greater Downtown Phoenix. Check dphxj.com for details.

With nearly a quarter of a million guests expected through August, the Phoenix Convention Center (PCC) is on track for its busiest summer ever. Starting with Comicon, PCC has 10 large conferences booked. The smallest two gatherings weigh in at 2,000 guests each, while the largest, the MLB All-Star Fanfest anticipates 100,000 visitors. All those people are expected to bring a lot of cash into Arizona. It’s estimated that the conferences will have a direct spending impact of $187 million on the Arizona economy. And, that’s some good news we can all use. For more information, visit phoenixconventioncenter.com.

shop local In celebration of National Independents Week, aka Indie Week, Local First Arizona is encouraging local purchases with its Golden Coupon. Use as many coupons as you like June 27th - July 4th to save 20% off your transaction at local businesses. Cut out the coupon printed here, download a copy from localfirstaz. com or grab a few at events and farmers markets around town that week.

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all-star buzz

by Paul Martinez

The 82nd Major League Baseball All-Star Game comes to Phoenix for the first time this summer. With a plethora of All-Star Week activities, we bet even non baseball fans will find plenty to do. The All-Star Game, also known as the Mid-Summer Classic, has been an exciting game to watch year after year as the fans choose who they would like to have represented on the two teams. The two MLB divisions play head-to-head in a game that used to be just a talent exhibition, but now determines home field advantage for the winning league in that year’s World Series. Now this former exhibition counts. With baseball fans from all over the world with their eyes on Phoenix, there will certainly be tens of thousands of visitors in the Downtown Phoenix area. Some estimates say that over $60 million will be injected into the Arizona economy as a result of the week+ celebration of baseball. In addition to the monetary impact, there have been some structural improvements as well. The west gates of the Chase Field, which have always been baked by the sun, now have shade. APS has teamed up with the D-backs for long overdue shade structure that doubles as a solar power collector. Built to give more comfort to the fans outside it also sends clean energy straight to the APS power grid for use. The Phoenix All-Star Game will have a lasting impact on the local community. More that $4 million will go towards projects in the local communities and beyond. Funds generated from the Gatorade All-Star workout day will be donated to a number of local and national charities. Local programs benefitting include the Boys and Girls Club Renovation

Project of Metro Phoenix, The Foundation for Blind Children Vision and Technology Center and Rebuilding Together, an organization focusing on renovations to the Arizona State Veteran Home in Phoenix. Additional items that lasting items include environmental initiatives, like the APS shade at the ballpark, and include making recycling a priority throughout All-Star Week and addressing energy usage by investing in renewable energy offsets. All this will be going on, in sequence, with the rest of the events throughout All-Star Week. Events begin Friday, July 8th, with the Major League Baseball All-Star Fan Fest kicking off the Phoenix Convention Center. The Fan Fest will take place until the day of the All-Star Game on July 12th. Saturday, July 9th, brings a Dance-A-Thon at the Phoenix Convention Center from 3 p.m. to midnight benefitting the Prostate Cancer Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer and the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation. On Sunday July 10th at Chase Field, there will be an All-Star Futures game as well as a legends and celebrity softball game. Monday July 11th will feature the All-Star workout as well as the State Farm Home Run Derby. Finally, on Tuesday July 12th, the 82nd All-Star will take place at Chase Field. Please note that individual tickets to all events may not be available without purchasing a ticket package. See our special All-Star events calendar on page 6.

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buzz

what’s the

all-star events

Get the latest.

Friday, July 8th - Tuesday, July 12th 9am - 8pm Friday - Monday, 9am - 6pm Tuesday MLB All-Star FanFest - Phoenix Convention Center A ball-lovers paradise, this interactive theme park will feature games, exhibits, skill clinics, memorabilia and more. Single day tickets are $25-$30. July 8th buy one adult ticket, get another free. Saturday, July 9th, 3pm - Midnight All-Star Dance-A-Thon - Phoenix Convention Center Get your groove thing on to benefit charity. Glee choreographer Zach Woodlee will be on hand for dance lessons and to judge the dance contest. Discounted tickets are $10-$15 until July 1st.

Follow @dtphxjournal Mingle @radiatephx Fan Facebook/UrbanAffairPHX Sign-up DPhxJ.com

Downtown Phoenix Journal

Sunday, July 10th, 3pm Taco Bell All-Star Sunday - Chase Field Two games for the price of one! See the Minor League’s up-and-comers in the XM All-Star Futures Game and watch your favorite celebs play alongside baseball greats in the Taco Bell Legends/Celebrity Softball. Tickets are $2 and up. Monday, July 11th, 5pm Gatorade All-Star Workout Day - Chase Field See your favorite All-Stars get ready for the big game and catch the action as MLB’s biggest sluggers compete in State Farm Home Run Derby. Tickets are $83 and up. Tuesday, July 12th, 5PM - Chase Field, televised on Fox 10 82nd All-Star Game The moment you have been waiting for! Watch the American and National League teams battle for victory. Tickets are $161 and up.

Leaders for a Greater Downtown Phoenix

Visit allstargame.com for information on these events and to purchase tickets.

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @phxcommal www.phoenixcommunityalliance.com

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district beat

taking the pulse of the city by Courtney McCune DOWNTOWN CORE The scene at CityScape in Downtown continues to evolve into a true destination for downtown dwellers, suburbanites, and tourists alike. The newest addition, Stand Up Live comedy club, will bring in heavy hitters throughout the summer like Norm Macdonald, Kevin Pollack, and Steve-O from the Jackass posse. The other much-anticipated opening is the Napa-based Oakville Market. Aiming for an early June opening at press time, the gourmet grocery will feature a combination of Napa Valley foods and locally produced goods. cityscapephoenix.com Although the Phoenix Suns season may have ended sooner than we would have liked, there will be no shortage of hot hoops action throughout the summer. The Phoenix Mercury launch their 15th season at the U.S. Airways Center on Friday, June 17th at 7pm vs. San Antonio. The first 6,000 fans through the door will receive a t-shirt marking the team’s 15th anniversary. wnba.com/mercury Planning is underway for the first ever Arizona Science & Technology Festival and Downtown Phoenix will be one of many key settings for the event. In February of 2012, science and technology aficionados will converge upon Arizona to celebrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The festival will be coordinated through partnership with downtown groups like Arizona State University, The University of Arizona, TGen and many other community, business, education, and philanthropic organizations. Keep an eye out for kick-off festivities during the February 2012 First Friday weekend, including art and science fusions and Best Fest celebrations. And of course, the much-anticipated 2011 Major League Baseball All-Star Game rolls in to Downtown Phoenix on Tuesday, July 12th. Flip over to our Buzz Section to find out the deets on this major summer event and all of the fun activities planned around it!

HISTORIC ROOSEVELT Things around the The Lexington Hotel have been pretty hot since pop-up restaurant, Cycle, set up its temporary shop in their restaurant space. And now that the Lexington is getting a revamp thanks to an all-star crew of designers, including Thomas Schoos, DAVIS architects, Habitat Metro, Bond HD, and McKinney Capital, downtown’s hip factor is about to get another nudge upward. The vision for the property includes a complete remodel of its 104 rooms, a contemporary, though comfortable restaurant, an art gallery and catering space. Though the makeover may not be completed until spring of 2012, you can enjoy sweet room rates in the meantime. centralphoenixinn.com The famously challenging novel “Ulysses” by Irish author James Joyce has left more than a few readers needing a drink upon turning its final

page. Whether they were inspired by protagonist Leopold Bloom’s Dublin pub crawl or just totally confused by the story, it seems appropriate that the Irish Cultural Center, located in the Historic Roosevelt district, is honoring the novel with a beer festival. The 5th Annual Bloomin’ Beerfest will celebrate Bloomsday, the holiday inspired by the events of Ulysses, on Saturday, June 11th from 7-11pm at the center. Enjoy food, drinks, Irish music, and readings from the novel. Event and ticket information can be found on the Irish Cultural Center website. azirish.org Exciting things are happening at 335 E. McDowell Rd.! The former home of Sage Antiques was recently purchased by downtown enthusiast Ashley Harder of Harder Development. Harder is in the process of redeveloping the property into retail space for three tenants, but in the meantime, she is putting the space to very good use. Look for events like art shows and a Short Leash Hot Dogs pop-up restaurant, which will happen every Wednesday during lunch from 11:00am-1:30pm through the end of July. harderdevelopment.com

EVANS CHURCHILL/ ROOSEVELT ROW Hey local artists and crafters! Has Roosevelt Row got a deal for you! Participation in the A.R.T.S. Market, which takes place during the First Friday Art Walk and the Third Friday Gallery Night, will be offered at a reduced fee of $50 for each of the summer months. This includes access to both the First and Third Friday markets-talk about a hot deal! Plans are also heating up for the very first Evans Churchill home tour, scheduled for October 22nd. Yet another reason to spend some time on The Row! rooseveltrow.org The weather in Phoenix may get a little roasty over the summer, but that doesn’t mean you have to completely abandon the outdoors. Lounge on the patio at Bliss/ReBAR in the Evans Churchill district, where shade umbrellas, evaporative coolers, TVs, and plenty of delicious food and cold beverages will keep you blissfully happy on those lazy summer days. Bliss/ReBAR is also now available for private events, which is the perfect way to make those happy hours a little hipper and staff meetings a little swankier! blissonfourth.com

GRAND AVENUE Every desert needs an oasis and Phoenix is about to get a very cool one of its own. The Oasis Motel, one of Grand Avenue’s classic 1960’s motor lodges, is being transformed into The Oasis on Grand. Project developers, Habitat Metro, envision affordable housing for the arts community, with living and retail space and community studios and galleries. Construction officially began at the end of May and is expected to wrap up by fall, just in time for the Grand Avenue Festival on October 22nd. oasisongrand.com In a delicious new development, the menu at Grand Avenue’s Paisley Violin Cafe has gotten an

upgrade. According to owner Gina Suarez, guests can now get their hot little hands on mouthwatering new items like crab cake sandwiches, falafel wraps, and red potato fries - oh my! The Paisley Violin is located at 1030 Grand Avenue and offers happy hour specials Monday-Friday from 3-6pm. thepaisley.com

UPTOWN

GARFIELD Proving that a whole bunch of heads are in fact better than one, Co+Hoots, the collaborative work space located in the historic JB Bayless building on 7th St. & Roosevelt, will mark its one year anniversary on July 1st. Along with celebrating a year of bringing together Phoenix’s creative professionals, the fete will also feature a display of art, photography, poetry and other inspired pieces submitted by the public. incohoots.com Since 1971, The Alwun House in the Garfield District has kept the arts and culture conversation going. Now forty years later, Downtown Phoenix’s original arts venue is bringing yet another fresh idea to the table. The folks at Alwun are in the midst of a capital campaign to build a Green Art Park in two blighted lots adjacent to their property. Their goal is to raise $150,000 for a space that will feature lush trees and shrubs, cacti, and sculpture gardens and will provide a gathering place for community events. Donations of money or services are welcome and can be submitted via the Alwun House website. alwunhouse.org

CAPITOL MALL On February 14th, 2012, Arizona will light 100 candles on its birthday cake. In preparation for this major milestone, Washington Street between Central and 19th Avenue is getting a major makeover at the hands of the City of Phoenix, the Arizona Department of Transportation, and the Arizona Centennial Commission. The streetscape project, known as Centennial Way, will include sidewalk and crosswalk improvements, shade elements, bike lanes, and enhanced lighting, signage, and benches. Work on the project is already underway and is scheduled to be completed by December, just in time for Arizona’s centennial celebration. centennialwayaz.com

WAREHOUSE Come July 2nd, the Warehouse District will start rocking a whole lot harder with the opening of Foundry on First, a music venue with a capacity of 1600, a speakeasy-style bar, and a bistro serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Legendary valley concert promoter Danny Zelisko will be booking music for the venue and the first act to grace the stage on July 8th: New Orleans party rock outfit, Cowboy Mouth. foundryaz.com

SOUTH CENTRAL Here’s something to tweet about in South Phoenix: every third Thursday of the month from 5:30-7:30pm, Audubon Arizona will host their Birds N’ Beer event at the Nina Mason

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Pulliam Rio Salado Audubon Center. Enjoy local beers from Four Peaks Brewery, learn about birds and wildlife, and network with fellow nature enthusiasts. Events over the summer will take place on June 16th, July 21st, and August 18th. riosalado.audubon.org

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From the wonderful people who brought Postino to the central city comes two, count ‘em, two fabulous new additions to the Uptown dining scene. For the main course, Windsor perfects the fine art of comfort food with offerings like corndog poppers, crabcake BLTs, and a meatlovers fantasy called the Porkwich. Take advantage of the full bar with their daily happy hour special: $5 pitchers, glasses of wine and signature cocktails until 5pm. And for dessert, scoot over to Churn, the sweet little ice cream shop situated right next door to Windsor. Their artisan ice cream, pastries, and coffee will be the cherry on top of your evening! Windsoraz.com and Churnaz.com

MIDTOWN We may not have a beach in Phoenix, but we do know plenty of ways to chill out – like at a tiki bar! More specifically, Hula’s Modern Tiki on Central Avenue, where fruity drinks with umbrellas make it easy to forget our landlocked status. And if the drinks don’t make you feel warm and fuzzy enough, stop in for Mahalo Mondays, when Hula donates 10% of the day’s profits to a local non-profit organization. The designated charity for the month of July will be the New Song Center for Grieving Children. hulasmoderntiki.com

7th AVE./MELROSE If the summer in Phoenix isn’t quite hot enough for you, the folks in Melrose have the remedy. On July 10th, the district will celebrate the sweet heat with their Hotter Than July Festival. Break out those top-secret recipes for spicy salsa and killer chili, because both items will be the subject of competition as part of the celebration. Proceeds from the event will benefit a selected charity.

7th ST./CORONADO Stay cool, calm, and collected in Coronado this summer with Sutra Midtown Yoga’s awesome summer specials! Their June/July deal includes four weeks of yoga classes for $40. Or take advantage of their Midtown Matinee promo when classes held Monday through Friday between 9am and 2pm will be offered for just $9 each and any massage service will be 20% off. While you’re there, chill out at Sutra’s Chop Shop Café and enjoy a post-yoga, coffee, tea, or a mixed-to-order fruit cooler. sutramidtown.com Thanks to those who contributed to the Beat… Jeremy Babendure, Cindy Dach, Tony Felice, Matthew Fritz, Mark Howard, Meghan Oleson, Leslie Statt, Tim Sprague, and Gina Suarez.

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mayoral race

core

values No one cares more about the future of Downtown Phoenix than we do. With the next mayoral election heating up, we spoke to each of the announced candidates about their vision for the core of the city. What did we find? Lots of similarities, but some key differences too about the best future for the heart of Phoenix. We asked mayoral candidates Claude Mattox, Peggy Neely, Greg Stanton, Wes Gullett and Thane Eichenauer where they stand on Downtown because we wanted to see if and how they would continue Mayor Phil Gordon’s efforts to revitalize the area and also because we believe that their attitude on Downtown is indicative of their proposed leadership of the city as a whole. The candidates agree on the importance of building on the foundation put in place over the last ten years made up of the big game-changers like ASU Downtown, the bio-medical campus and Light Rail. Beyond that, they also agree that there’s still a lot more work to be done. As Mattox puts it, “We’re just out of the gate. We’re not that far along and we have a ways to go.” So exactly how do these candidates propose to build on what we already have? To Mattox and Gullett, it’s important to have a mix of both high-end condominiums and attainably or affordably priced housing. Gullett says that “we need to diversify the housing stock in Downtown so that there is a balance of high-end urban residential mixed with market rate apartments and affordable workforce housing options.” Diversity of housing types, believes Mattox, is a key factor to attracting people to live in Downtown. He says, “We want to make housing more attainable for people who want to live and work in the Downtown area. Not everyone wants to or can afford to live in a high-rise. There needs to be diversity there.”

...we believe that their attitude on Downtown is indicative of their proposed leadership of the city as a whole.

But a mix of housing isn’t the only thing that will increase the number of residents in the area. Candidates Gullett and Stanton recognize that

by Tazmine Loomans livability factors such as walkability play a role as well. “It’s important that Downtown work for everyone – including the residents who call it home. We need to make sure that our Downtown is walkable and has all the neighborhood amenities that other communities enjoy,” says Stanton who thinks it’s important that Downtown become a viable neighborhood as well as a center of business. Hand in hand with walkability and livability is the introduction of the Light Rail in Phoenix. The candidates are in favor of the Light Rail, but they differ on their view of its expansion. Neely looks forward not only to the expansion of Light Rail, but to the implementation of Transit Oriented Development along expanded routes, promising to take the idea beyond just the planning stages. She states, “I believe that Phoenix must lead in transportation that is multimodal and serves as connectors to our neighborhoods and villages rather than dividers that create barriers that take away our sense of community.” Mattox is also for the expansion of Light Rail, pointing out that future routes into the west and south parts of the Valley would help bring people to work in Downtown and would also provide a convenient way to connect students living in those areas to ASU Downtown and ASU Main Campus in Tempe. continued on pg 10

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G N E I N M U O J C DI M

continued from pg 8

Gullett, however, warns that we haven’t yet taken full advantage of the Light Rail as a way to create jobs and boost the economy as other cities like Boston and Minneapolis have. He believes that before we consider expansion, “we must do a much better job of creating economic activity at the stations along Light Rail.” According to Neely, Mattox and Gullett, the best way to leverage the foundation of the civic and education facilities that we have today is to bring more private investment and development in Downtown. Neely boasts of her record in the City Council of bringing businesses into District 2 and says that she would do the same in Downtown, asserting “just as I have been successful in my district, I know I can do the same for Downtown.” Mattox also believes we need to change the character of Downtown from being a center of government to being a center of business. And he proposes to start this shift by adding a business school in Downtown. He contends that “A business school will provide a trained workforce and it also provides an opportunity for business people who want to advance their education and advance their careers. And for those executives that want to share their knowledge, it gives them a place to go.

Downtown’s newest “SWEET SPOT”

[The candidates] recognize that the economic impact and livability of Downtown are two major components to its success.

8 flavors 30 toppings

Gullett sees an economic opportunity that lies within the existing infrastructure of Downtown. He explains that “by leveraging the City’s infrastructure - natural resources like Papago Park, vacant city properties and infrastructure investments like Light Rail and the Convention Center, we can strike the right balance to create vibrancy throughout our city.”

Phoenix Convention Center Metro Marche North Building 100 N. 3rd Street

In contrast, Stanton doesn’t single out bringing business to Downtown as the magic bullet that will make the area successful. He takes a more holistic approach, aiming to make the central core “a vibrant hub of arts, culture, sports and science”. This is a reverse approach from the assumption that big business will lead to a great Downtown and instead proposes that if Downtown is first a desirable place to live, work and play it will then attract larger economic investment to our city. Downtown is definitely on the minds of the mayoral candidates, though their approaches and priorities for its improvement may vary. They recognize that the economic impact and livability of Downtown are two major components to its success. We’re glad to see that the mayoral candidates for the coming term plan to build on the legacy of a strong Downtown focus that Mayor Gordon took a risk on and implemented during his tenure. Email Tazmine at tazmine@dphxj.com 10

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first fridays

First Fridays FAQ What is First Fridays? Artlink First Fridays is an art walk. It is a FREE monthly self-guided tour of galleries, studios, and unique businesses in downtown Phoenix, showcasing art by local, national, and international artists.

Where do I start? Now that you have this map in your hands, you can start at any of the participating galleries. Where you start and where you go is up to you! If this is your first time out, you may want to start at:

When is First Fridays? On the First Friday of every month from 6 – 10 PM. (Many galleries are open even later)

How do I get around? In most cases, you can simply walk, or you may prefer to bicycle, pedicab, or drive.

Where do I park? At the Phoenix Art Museum there is FREE PARKING and it is conveniently located near the Light Rail stop at Central & McDowell. Artlink Volunteers are available at the Phoenix Art Museum to answer your questions. There is also on-street parking and parking garages throughout Downtown. When about town, be mindful of “No Parking” signs, and refrain from parking on dirt lots, or you may be ticketed.

Not just First Fridays! Many of the stops on the tour are full-time businesses that have regular hours throughout the month. Be sure to visit them throughout the month for all sorts of great events. Feel free to check out Third Friday as well as many of the galleries are open 6 – 10 PM, just like First Fridays.

What about the Shuttles? The shuttles are on hiatus during the hot summer months of July & August and will resume full service again in September.

Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Avenue 602-257-1880 phxart.org

Midtown

Downtown

Uptown

Who runs First Friday? First Fridays is run by Artlink, INC., an all-volunteer grass roots organization of artists and supporters dedicated to showcasing the amazing variety of art in Phoenix. Artlink is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. No staff members are paid. Artlink relies solely on participants like you to make it successful. How can I help? By volunteering! Artlink needs volunteers not only on First Fridays but also throughout the month. It’s fun, and a monthly training session will help get you started. Call 602-256-7539 for more information. Become a member of Artlink, INC. First Fridays are made possible by the people who enjoy it. If you enjoy First Fridays please become a member. Your annual membership enables us to continue to offer the quality art events you have come to expect in downtown Phoenix. Call 602-256-7539 for more information. TIPS - Many of the galleries accessible by Light Rail and are within walking distance of each other. - Bicycles are also a great way to explore First Fridays, but please don’t forget lights, a helmet and to lock your bike! - You can’t see everything in one night, so see what you can and come out again during the month or for the next First Friday! Don’t forget about the galleries off the beaten path; they will be marked at the map edges with major crossroads intact.


PHX Hotspots

For First Fridays and every day in between Phoenix

Art Museum

McDowell Rd.

7th St.

3rd St.

Central Ave.

7th Ave. Margaret T. Hance Park

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I-10 Moreland St.

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Fillmore St.

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McKinley St.

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Garfield St.

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Taylor St.

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2nd St.

Pierce St.

11th Ave.

12th Ave.

15th Ave.

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9 8

Portland St.

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Roosevelt St.

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3rd St.

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Portland St.

2nd St.

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I-10

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Pierce St. 47

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Fillmore St.

14 13

Polk St.

Van Buren St.

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Monroe St.

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3rd St.

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2nd St.

2nd Ave.

3rd Ave.

4th Ave.

5th Ave.

Washington St.

6th Ave.

7th Ave.

Adams St.

7th St.

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5th St.

3rd St.

University Park Van Buren St.

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Civic Space Park

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12 11 10

14 13

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Washington St.

Madison St.

15th Ave.

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16

7th St.

Madison St.

1st St.

Jefferson St.

5th St.

15

Central Ave.

15

Jefferson St.

Jackson St.

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Evans Churchill Roosevelt Row 1) Roosevelt Church 924 N. 1st St. 602.495.3191 rooseveltchurch.org 2) Warehouse 1005 1005 N. 1st St. 602.258.1481 3) The Firehouse 1015 N. 1st St. 602.300.7575 strivedreams.com 4) Afida’s Hair Culture 116 E. Roosevelt St. 602.258.4992 myspace.com/afidashairculture 5) Golden Rule Tattoo 120 E. Roosevelt St. 602.374.7533 thegoldenruletattoo.com 6) Carly’s 128 E. Roosevelt St. 602.262.2759 carlysbistro.com 7) Art Awakenings 1014 N. 2nd St. 602.340.1675 artawakenings.org 8) Revolver Records 918 N. 2nd St. 602.795.4980 revolveraz.com

24) Jones Studio 916 N. 5th St. 25) The Lost Leaf 914 N. 5th St. 602.258.0014 thelostleaf.org 26) Chaos of the Earth Cafe 910 N. 5th St. 602.633.3008 27) Spread the Weird Animation Studio 906 N. 5th St. 602.441.5877 spreadtheweird.com 28) Conspire 901 N. 5th St. 602.228.7373 myspace.com/conspirephoenix 29) Galeria de los Muertos 905 N. 5th St. galeriadelosmuertos.org 30) Longhouse Studio 917 N. 5th St. 602.423.8396

32) Pravus Gallery 501 E. Roosevelt St. 602.363.2552 pravusgallery.com

11) Monorchid Creative Studios 214 E. Roosevelt St. 602.253.0339 monorchid.com

33) Gallery Celtica 509 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.2160 galleryceltica.com

15) Gallery Red 812 N. 3rd St. 16) Phoenicia Association 821 N. 3rd St. 602.441.3385 wearephoenicia.com

34) Hayden Art & Design Studio 509 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.2160 35) Daughters of the Frozen North 511 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.4762 36) Five15 arts 515 E. Roosevelt St. 602.256.0150 515arts.com 37) Regular Gallery 918 N. 6th St./Alley 38) Butter Toast Boutique 908 N. 6th St. 602.258.3458 buttertoastboutique.com

17) Holgas 821 N. 3rd St. 602.487.5134

39) The Roose Parlour & Spa 906 N. 6th St. 602.274.6942 theroose.com

18a) Hazel 724 N. 4th St.

40) Grow-Op Boutique 902 N. 6th St.

18b) Punkouture 718 N. 4th St. 602.617.punk punkouture.com

41) Perihelion Arts 610 E. Roosevelt St. 602.334.6299 perihelionarts.com

18c) gallery:SUHU 335 E. McKinley St. gallerysuhu.wordpress.com

42) Moira 215 E. McKinley St. #102 602.254.5085 moirasushi.com

19) Bliss/ReBar 901 N. 4th St. 602.795.1792 blissonfourth.com 20) Modified Arts 407 E. Roosevelt St. 602.462.5516 modifiedarts.org 21) eye lounge a contemporary art space 419 E. Roosevelt St. 602.430.1490 eyelounge.com

2) Artlink A.E. England Gallery 424 N. Central Ave. aeenglandgallery.com

2) Indie ArtHouse 1504 W Grand Ave. Facebook.com/IndieArtHouse

48) Space 55 636 E. Pierce St. 602.663.4032 space55.org

3) Hotel San Carlos/Ghost Lounge 202 N. Central Ave. 602.253.4121 hotelsancarlos.com

3) The Bikini Lounge 1502 W Grand Ave. 602-252-0472 Facebook > The Bikini Lounge Phoenix

49) Valley Youth Theatre 525 N. First St. 602.253.8188 vyt.com

4) Downtown Phoenix Ambassadors 101 N. 1st Ave. #190 602.495.1500 downtownphoenix.com

4) Kooky Krafts Shop 1500 W Grand Ave. 602-391-4016 Facebook > Kooky Krafts Shop

1) CO+HOOTS 825 N. 7th St. incohoots.com

5) Wells Fargo History Museum 145 W. Adams St. 602.378.1578 wellsfargohistory.com/museums

5) Valley Pizza Downtown 1348 W Roosevelt St. 602-513-1248 valleypizzadowntown.com

2) Welcome Diner 924 E. Roosevelt St. 602.495.1111 marthaandmary.net/welcomediner

6) Anderson Studio 805 W. Madison St. 602.369.7798 michaelandersonsculpture.net

3) Alwun House 1204 E. Roosevelt St. 602.253.7887 alwunhouse.org

7) Hanny’s 40 N. 1st St. 602.252.2285 hannys.net

47) Alta Space @ Alta Phoenix Lofts 600 N. 4th St. 602.374.7133 altaphoenixlofts.com

10) FilmBar 815 N. 2nd St. 602.595.9187 thefilmbarphx.com

14) Roosevelt Tavern 816 N. 3rd St. 602.254.2561

1) The Trunk Space 1506 W Grand Ave. 602-256-6006 thetrunkspace.com

23) JoBot Coffee 918 N. 5th St. jobot-coffee.com

31) Think Graphics 917 N. 5th St. 602.466.7311 thinkpro.net

13) Kitchen Sink Studios 828 N. 3rd St. 602.258.3150 kitchensinkstudios.com

Grand Ave

1) First Studio 631 N. 1st Ave. #101 602.957.7760 firststudio.net

46) Breadfruit 108 E. Pierce St. 602.267.1266 thebreadfruit.com

9) just breathe, a wellness sanctuary 828 N. 2nd St. 602.256.1400 justbreathewellness.com

12) Phoenix Center for the Arts 1202 N. 3rd St. 602.262.4627 phoenix.gov/PARKS/phxctr.html

Downtown Core

22) MADE Art Boutique 922 N. 5th St. 602.256.MADE madephx.com

43) Sens 705 N. 1st St. #120 602.340.9777 sensake.com 44) Turf 705 N. 1st St. 602.296.5043 theturfpub.com 45) PHX Public Market Urban Grocery & Wine Bar 14 E. Pierce St. phoenixpublicmarket.com

Garfield

Historic Roosevelt 1) Cheuvront Restaurant & Wine Bar 1326 N. Central Ave. 602.307.0022 cheuvronts.com 2) Irish Cultural Center 1106 N. Central Ave. 602.258.0109 azirish.com 3) Cycle 1100 N. Central Ave. Facebook > Cyclephoenix Jordre Studio jordre.com 4) Portland’s 105 W. Portland St 602.795.7480 portlandsphoenix.com 5) Fair Trade 1020 N. 1st Ave. 602.354.8150 azfairtrade.com 6) Cathedral Center for the Arts Olney Gallery 100 W. Roosevelt St. 602.254.7126 trinitycaa.org 7) Centurion Restaurant 214 W. Roosevelt St. 602.687.8796 centurionrestaurant.com 8) Lola Coffee 1001 N. 3rd Ave. 602.252.2265 lolacoffeebar.com 9) Pita Jungle 1001 N. 3rd Ave. 602.258.7482 pitajungle.com 10) Great Arizona Puppet Theater 302 W. Latham St. 602.262.2050 azpuppets.org 11) Cibo 603 N. 5th Ave. 602.441.2697 cibophoenix.com 12) Local Breeze 606 N. 4th Ave. 602.368.3613 localbreeze.com 13) Coe House 365 N. 4th Ave. dphxj.com 14) Mercantile 828 N. Central Ave. 602.410.9475 phoenixmercantile.com

8) Herberger Theater Center 222 E. Monroe St. 602.254.7399 herbergertheater.org 9) Galeria 147 - AZ Latino Arts & Cultural Ctr 147 E. Adams St. 602.254.9817 alacaz.org 10) Artlink Heritage Square Gallery 115 N. 6th St. 602.264.8232 artlinkhsgallery.com 11) First Fridays at Heritage Square 115 N. 6th St. 602.264.8232 ffinheritagesquare.com 12) Rossen House Museum 113 N. 6th St. 602.261.8063 rossonhousemuseum.org 13) Pizzeria Bianco 623 E. Adams St. 602.258.8300 pizzeriabianco.com 14) Nobuo at Teeter House 622 E. Adams St. 602.254.0600 nobuofukuda.com 15) CityScape 1 East Washington St. 602.772.3900 cityscapephoenix.com Arrogant Butcher Charming Charlie Designer District Five Guys Burgers and Fries Jimmy John’s Lucky Strike Oakville Grocery* Rasputin Vodka Bar* Republic of Couture Stand Up Live Urban Outfitters Vitamin T West of Soho 16) Sing High Chop Suey House 27 West Madison 602-253-7848 singhighphx.com 17) Coach & Willie’s 412 S. 3rd St. 602.254.5272 coachandwillies.com 18) Foundry on First* 402 S. 1st St. foundryaz.com 19) The Duce 525 S. Central Ave. 602.866.3823 theducephx.com *Pending opening

6) Bragg’s Pie Factory 1301 W Grand Ave. A. Bragg’s Main Gallery Facebook.com/BraggsPieFactory B. My Goodness Cakes mygoodnesscakes.com C. Lady Luck Tattoo ladylucktattooaz.com D. Barry Sparkman Studio 786-543-2207 barrysparkman.com E. Icaro Studio F. Moderncat Studio 480-203-6523 moderncatstudio.com G. Studio 8 602-252-0864 studio8phx.com 7) The Lodge Art Studio 1231 W Grand Ave. 480-329-7998 Facebook > The Lodge Art Studio 8) Shop Devious 1229 W Grand Ave. 602-330-5794 shopdevious.com 9) Paisley Town 1030 W Grand Ave. A. Paisley Violin Café 602-254-7843 thepaisley.com B. Lazy Lab Art Studio 602-485-0441 thepaisley.com C. S.P. Villain 602 410-0411 facebook.com > S.P. Villain D. Annie Boomer Vintage annieboomer.com E. Dragonfly Boutique 602-687-7649 funkydragonfly.com F. Wicked Wear 602-522-0625 thepaisley.com G. Be.Headed Salon 602-434-4224 beheadedsalon.com 10) La Melgosa 1023 W Grand Ave. A. Phoenix Fall Space 602-525-0643 phoenixfallspace.com B. Deus Ex Machina Gallery 602-487-0669 sites.google.com/site/improbableart C. Palm Reader Pottery PalmReaderPottery.yolasite.com D. Rusty Spoke Bicycle Collective E. Gallery Serendipity 480-228-1500 Facebook > Gallery Serendipity 11) Gallery Marsiglia 1018 W Grand Ave. 602-573-3933 gallerymarsiglia.com 12) Aviary 1020 W Grand Ave. 602-367-4019 13) Soul Invictus 1022 W Grand Ave. 602-214-4344 soulinvictus.com 14) Tilt Gallery 919 W Fillmore St. 602-716-5667 tiltgallery.com


Uptown 1) Postino Wine Cafe 5144 N. Central Ave. 602.274.5144 postinowinecafe.com 2) Practical Art 5070 N. Central Ave. 602.264.1414 practical-art.com

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1 2 7

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3) Esprit Décor Gallery 5555 N. 7th St. #122 602.248.0700 espritdecor.com 4) St Francis 111 E. Camelback Rd. 602.200.8111 stfrancisaz.com

Camelback Rd.

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4 1

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7th St.

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Central Ave.

7th Ave.

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5) Frances 10 W. Camelback Rd. 602.279.5463 francesvintage.com 6) Stinkweeds 12 W. Camelback Rd. 602.248.9461 stinkweeds.com 7) Smeeks 14 W. Camelback Rd. 602.279.0538 facebook.com/smeeks.phoenix

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3rd Ave.

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8) Maizie’s Cafe 4750 N. Central Ave. #B1 602.274.2828 maiziescafe.com

Steele Indian School Park

9) Lola Coffee 4700 N. Central Ave. 602.265.5652 lolacoffeebar.com

2

Indian School Rd.

10) Hula’s Modern Tiki 4700 N. Central Ave. 602.265.8454 hulasmoderntiki.com

2 3

3

MidTown 1) LUX Coffee Bar 4404 N. Central Ave. #1 602.266.6469 luxcoffee.com 2) George & Dragon 4240 N. Central Ave. 602.241.0018 georgeanddragonpub.net

3

Osborn Rd.

4

3) FEZ 3815 N. Central Ave. #B 602.287.8700 fezoncentral.com 4) Willo North Gallery 2811 N. 7th Ave. 602.717.2499 willonorth.com 5) Wild Thaiger 2631 N. Central Ave. 602.241.8995 wildthaiger.com

Thomas Rd.

4

5

6) Durant’s 2611 N. Central Ave. 602.264.5967 durantsaz.com

6 7

Montgomery Park

7) Switch Restaurant & Wine Bar 2603 N. Central Ave. 602.264.2295 switchofarizona.com

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8

Phoenix

10

McDowell Rd.

7th St.

3rd St.

Central Ave.

3rd Ave.

7th Ave.

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8

Art Museum

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8) Heard Museum 2301 N. Central Ave. 602.252.8848 heard.org

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9) Garfield Gallery 316 W. McDowell Rd. 602.349.3049 garfieldgallery.com 10) After Hours Gallery 116 W. McDowell Rd. #120 602.710.2398 afterhoursgallery.com

11) Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave. 602.257.1880 phxart.org

7th Ave./Melrose 1) The Academy Gallery at the Junior Drama Club Academy 4805 N. 7th Ave. 602.434.9265 jdcaweb.com 2) Black Lantern Tattoo 4636 N. 7th Ave. 602.332.4419 blacklanterntattoo.com 3) HTC 4634 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0088 htcaz.com 4) Olive in Paris 4624 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0966 oliveinparis.blogspot.com

4) Bards Books 3508 N. 7th St #145 602.274.7530 bardsbooks.com 5) Urban Beans 3508 N. 7th St. #100 602.595.2244 urbanbeans.com

6) The Main Ingredient 2337 N. 7th Street 602.843.6246 tmialehouse.com 7) Living Room Wine Bar 2333 N. 7th St. 602.229.1289 livingroomwinebar.com 8) SuTRA Midtown 2317 N. 7th St. 602.252.9525 sutramidtown.com

5) Paris Envy 4624 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0966 parisenvy.blogspot.com

9) MacAlpines Soda Fountain 2303 N. 7th St. 602.262.5545 macalpines1928.com

6) America’s Taco Shop 4447 N. 7th Ave. 602.515.0856 americastacoshop.net

10) La Piccola Cucina 2241 N. 7th St. 602.358.7415 andyslpc.com

7) Blueberry Deluxe Boutique 702 W. Montecito Ave. 602.717.8376 blueberrydeluxe.com

11) Seven Hookah Bar & Lounge 2237 N. 7th St. 602.252.2552 sevenloungeaz.com

8) Go Kat Go/Bo’s Funky Stuff 4314 N. 7th Ave. 602.234.2528 go-kat-go.com 9) Retro Ranch 4303 N. 7th Ave. 602.297.1971 www.RetroRanch.net 10) Home Again Antiques and Home Furnishings 4302 N. 7th Ave. 602.424.0488 cochrans.com/homeagain 11) Z Girl Club 4301 N. 7th Ave. 602.265.3233 zgirlclub.com 12) Bend-a-light 4232 N. 7th Ave. #C 602.278.6855 bendalightneon.com 13) Wag n’ Wash 4230 N. 7th Ave. 602.462.WASH wagnwash.com/phx 14) Exposed Studio & Gallery 4225 N. 7th Ave. 602.248.8030 exposedgallery.com 15) Copper Star Coffee 4220 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.2136 copperstarcoee.com 16) Flo’s on 7th 4116 N. 7th Ave. 602.254.7861 ocrit.org/oson7th.html

7th St./Coronado 1) Urban Cookies 4711 N. 7th St. 602.451.4335 urbancookies.com 2) The Collective at the Artery 623 E. Indian School Rd. 602.332.1849 3) studio 6 at the artery 623 E. Indian School Rd. 602.332.1849 studio6.mosaicglobe.com

12) Coronado Cafe 2201 N. 7th St. 602.258.5149 coronadocafe.com 13) America’s Taco Shop 2041 N. 7th St. 602.682.5627 americastacoshop.net 14) Vikki Reed Studio 2009 N. 7th St. 602.943.6173 vikkireedwatercolors.com/ chakramandalas.net 15) Young Arts Arizona Ltd. At SEAD Architecture+Construction 2009 N. 7th St. 602.852.3605 youngartsaz.org 16) Tuck Shop 2245 N. 12th St. 602.354.2980 tuckinphx.com


feature

paving

the way Can Phoenix be cooled down? When the soles of your shoes feel like they are melting beneath you, chances are you’re walking across pavement in Phoenix during the scorching summer months. Parking lot temperatures in the Valley now average between 150º and 160º, but freshly poured asphalt can be even hotter, reaching upwards of 200º. For example, the parking lot of the Robert Duffy Charter School, a few miles east of Downtown near the 24th Street light rail station, reached 214º last summer. The thermal radiated heat reflected off the pavement is so intense that oftentimes heat waves can be seen rising like a dancing cobra above the surface. Phoenicians tolerate these months; after all, “you never have to shovel heat.” Even so, the desert can infuse a sense of doom into those not prepared for the summer, so why push the mercury higher with more asphalt? Why can’t the built environment be both functional and sustainable? Cool Pavement, a new product developed by Scottsdale-based Emerald Cities USA, may be the solution to cooling surface temperatures by upwards of 30º to 50º. To prove the benefits of Cool Pavement, Emerald Cities USA donated the labor and the product to resurface the Duffy School, a collection of four monolithic, energy-efficient domes. The lot was resurfaced with beautiful aqua-colored Cool Pavement to match the domes, and now the school boasts the world’s first solar-reflective “green” asphalt parking lot, making it a zero-carbon facility. Now, the Duffy School lot averages 120º to 125º during the hottest part of the day. Chill the desert Though Phoenix is naturally hot, the temperatures increased as the city attracted residents and grew dramatically in the 20th century, paving over the gardens and trees the area was known for in a patchwork quilt of black asphalt. Not surprisingly, black asphalt retains heat, contributes to increased smog and carbon emissions and is prevalent in most U.S. cities, including Phoenix. As the summer sun scorches us from above, our concrete jungle absorbs DPHXJ.COM

by J Seth Anderson

the solar rays and bakes us from below. The materials and surface colors used over time contribute to increased temperatures. Urban Heat Island, the phenomenon of increased nighttime temperatures, is not unique to Phoenix, but because of our already extreme summer temperatures, the effects are more pronounced. According to the Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Phoenix recorded 50 occasions when nighttime temperatures stayed above 90º from 2000 to 2009. During the 1990s, Phoenix recorded only eight occasions when nighttime lows reached 90º. Summertime lows in the 100s are realistic if Phoenix fails to reverse this heating trend. As one of the hottest cities in the U.S., Phoenix faces a great challenge given its environment, but with that challenge comes an opportunity to be innovative. The use of a state-of-the-art product like Cool Pavement could be part of the solution. Cool Pavement comes Downtown At the time this story went to press, the City of Phoenix was finalizing a deal for the use of Cool Pavement on a temporary parking lot at 1st and Taylor streets. The city acquired the lot for the development of the ASU Downtown Phoenix campus as the likely home of the Arizona Center for Law & Society, which should start construction in three to five years, according to Jeremy Legg, Economic Development Program Manager for the City of Phoenix. Legg says the parking lot is still planned to be temporary. In the meantime, the use of Cool Pavement on the lot would help Downtown cool off. | J U N E / J U LY 2 0 1 1

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continued from pg 15

photo credit: Emerald Cities USA LTD.

If the deal goes through, Phoenix will be the first city in the 100 Cities Cool Pavement Initiative — launched by Emerald Cities USA in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley Heat Island Group to provide immediate and cost-effective solutions to cool 100 of the world’s largest and smoggiest cities simply by changing surface colors in urban landscapes. The first Department of Energy Cool Pavement Seminar will be held in Phoenix in June.

demands of adjacent buildings, resulting in lower electric bills and CO2 emissions.

Lower temps explained In a speech given in 2009, Professor Steven Chu, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist who was appointed as Secretary of Energy by President Obama, offered an idea so simple it could actually work. By changing the surface colors of rooftops, roads and pavement to reflect the sun’s light and heat, cities could cut carbon emissions by 44 billion tonnes, equivalent to taking all the world’s cars off the road for 11 years.

With a background in physics and chemistry, Roese worked in the lab with the production of an ultra high-performance thin coating that is solar reflective and roadworthy. She also designed a color palette ranging from shades of grey, to earth tones, to other decorative, cooling colors. At only $1 per square foot, it’s a bargain.

When the sun sets, Cool Pavement appears to glow...

Cool Pavement has also been shown to reduce volatile organic compounds in smog. When the sun sets, Cool Pavement appears to glow since it reflects light, reducing the need for electric lighting while increasing visibility and safety.

Application is easy and cheap since the existing asphalt doesn’t have to be removed, milled or sandblasted prior to resurfacing. Heavy road equipment is not necessary because Cool Pavement can be sprayed or rolled on and dries within two hours.

With this idea in mind, Sheri Roese, CEO of Emerald Cities USA, took her 35 years of architectural surface design knowledge and went in search of something that could change surface colors while reflecting heat from roads and parking lots.

In addition to inner-city parking lots, urban Phoenix could easily become a mosaic of cooling colors by resurfacing some of our 600 miles of bike paths to make biking more appealing and comfortable; resurfacing crosswalks to make pedestrians more visible at night; or resurfacing jogging trails along the canals to make them esthetically pleasing and cooler.

“I couldn’t find anything,” Roese recalls. “Rooftops can be whitewashed to reflect the sun, but cities don’t allow roads to be painted white. We had to develop our own formula.”

But why use such a transformative product on a parking lot that the city says will be redeveloped in three to five years? “Even though the parking lot is temporary, [that] doesn’t mean we want to do it the wrong way,” Legg explains. The benefits of the city using Cool Pavement, even if only for a short time, are better than not using it at all.

With Lawrence Berkeley National Labs and research from MIT, Emerald Cities USA developed Cool Pavement, a road-worthy, solar-reflective nanoengineered concrete that earns LEED points, generates carbonoffset credits and has been proven to cool surface temperatures. Lower surface temperatures yield the added benefit of reducing air-conditioning

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“If we can make Downtown cooler in the process,” Legg says, “that’s a great achievement, too.” Email Seth at seth@dphxj.com. |

DPHXJ.COM


eats & drinks

flavor

of PHX Welcome to Greater Downtown Phoenix. The urban heart (and stomach) of an area 4 million strong. Whether eating soulful Mexican out of styrofoam and tinfoil from Carolina’s; skillful, inspired Japanese comforts from Nobuo at Teeter House; or, sanctified artisan pizza from Pizzeria Bianco, a contrasting roster of indulgent experiences exist to be unearthed, and digested. Discovering your new surroundings or re-exploring the neighborhood you call home, guidance can go a long way. In the mood for hangouts popular for their locals-only appeal? Craving see-and-be-seen experiences, hitting destinations preyed upon by Downtown’s more self-aware? Or, are you one of those globe-trotting chowhounds on an immortal search for bucket-list worthy eating in every new city (or neighborhood) you visit? As more of a rough template than a step-by-step, exhaustive travel guide, we’ve assembled a light-footed list of notable and respected neighborhood institutions pointed by easy categorization. Pick and choose, mix and match, here are some ideas. Day One: Native Assimilation Forgo blatant tourist traps, event-driven sports bars and corporate outposts and spend the day with those who live and breathe Downtown Phoenix on a daily basis. This is someone’s home, after all. Early Morning: Catch up on e-mails and morning caffeine deprivation at Royal at the Market, the cockpit-sized coffee bar tucked toward the rear of the Phoenix Public Market’s indoor grocery. Understated, high-design meets some of the best coffee in the city, roasted in-house daily.

thinking at Hana Japanese Eatery, a compact neighborhood sushi spot dedicated to pitch-perfect, seafaring goodness. Afternoon: Even the natives enjoy their late-afternoon libations. For a chilled brew consider The Main Ingredient Ale House. Located in the quirky Coronado Historic District, TMI (as locals have affectionately chopped it) offers a wide range of beers, craft and known, alongside elevated pub grub favorites.

Mid-Morning: Great any hour of the day, opt for a late breakfast at the original Lo-Lo’s Chicken and Waffles for Phoenix’s best known (and best tasting) example of the classic soul food combination.

Dinner: Go casual, go pizza. Though Downtown has no shortage of exceptional pizza, locals frequently by-pass more traveled paths for something more mellow, though no-less delicious. At home in the historic Roosevelt neighborhood, Cibo Pizzeria is a gem dedicated to artisan pies constructed with superior ingredients.

Lunch: Did you arrive thinking premium-sourced seafood couldn’t be found in the desert? Trek a few miles north to Uptown and reset your

Late-Night: Hankering for a place habituated by Downtown’s tried-andtrue? Begin casually at the Lost Leaf, a personable beer and wine address

DPHXJ.COM

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flooded nightly with artists, musicians and other locals searching for an informal night-cap. Got a buzz and feeling adventurous? Polish the night at Phoenix’s quintessential dive bar (and last-standing tiki bar) the Bikini Lounge. A little off the beaten path along Grand Avenue; expect nononsense bartenders, stiff pours and dirt-cheap tabs.

Late-Night: Downtown’s in-crowd beckons come twilight at local watering holes Hanny’s and the Roosevelt Tavern. Take your pick, or by all means, hit both―it can always be that type of night. Hanny’s is spartan and urbane; Roosevelt Tavern brooding and low-key. The former known for well-crafted swills, the latter for its wide range of wines and brew.

Day Two: Taking the Town Sometimes it feels good to get gussied up, and actually have somewhere to go. Packed your Sunday best, or your Friday night armor? These spots will guarantee that you not only find great eating and drinking, but that you also tap into Downtown’s more brassy vein; places to not only see, but yes: be seen.

Day Three: Chowhound Sometimes you travel to sightsee, sometimes for occupational mandates, sometimes, frankly for the food. Just scratching the surface, below exists common hangouts institutionalized by their exceptional food, as well as easy gateways into Phoenix’s ever-present (if not always overt) multi-cultural fabric.

Early Morning: Though known mutually for their pulse-warming, houseroasted java, Midtown’s Lux Coffeebar is also willingly understood as one of the most conspicuous coffee shops in the city. Daylight hours are eternally packed with right-brains and hungry creatives both primped and carefully disheveled.

Early Morning: Even traveling food nerds require caffeine, and Giant Coffee delivers. With its collection of superlative pastries and premiumsourced beans, Giant satisfies food-focused inclinations with ease.

Mid-Morning: Want breakfast that won’t cramp your existential desires to pounce around town? Known for wallet-friendly takes on Mexican street foods as well as traditional breakfast classics done well, Gallo Blanco Cafe, located inside Midtown’s hip Clarendon Hotel, proves a hangout for locals and visitors alike looking for edible relief within snappy surroundings. Lunch: Central Phoenix’s groomed often gravitate toward St. Francis for self-conscious dining in a well-designed habitat. From power lunches to ladies lunches, St. Francis gives good face to modern American comfort foods and vamped cocktails. Happy-Hour: Few places draw larger happy hour crowds (not to mention some of the best-looking happy hour crowds), than Postino Central. Customized bruschetta spreads have become whims of legend, and with an efficient selection of wines by the glass (or bottle), Postino Central has become a late-afternoon magnet for glossy hob-knobbers and postwork professionals dressed effortlessly well. Looking for something just as hip, but possibly a hue more masculine? Try the Vig Uptown for daily happy hour specials and creative bar food in a cool, mid-century space that impresses all persuasions. Dinner: Snagging a table at Pizzeria Bianco is one of life’s great accomplishments―especially if you’ve never been to Phoenix before. Plan ahead, be patient and welcome a pour at adjacent Bar Bianco while your wait ticks by. Continually voted, baptized, shouted, “the best pizza (insert point of geography here),” Pizzeria Bianco sincerely serves glorious pizza. 18

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Breakfast: No breakfast in Phoenix would be complete without a visit to Matt’s Big Breakfast. Destination Number One for breakfast hunters far and wide, jewel box sized Matt’s eternally draws for their airy omelettes, husky waffles and varieties of earnest(?) scrambles. Lunch: Duo of plausible directions: Middle Eastern, or Mexican (you are in Phoenix, after all). Baiz Market, a sequestered specialty foods market that draws ardent fans from a wide radius, offers its in-house AlHana Restaurant for pitch-perfect pita (made daily in-house), shawarma and Middle Eastern baked goods galore. For a taste of Arizona’s more pronounced food heritage, showcasing the state’s most known and indigenous example of Mexican eating (often referred to as Sonoranstyle) Carolina’s shines. A workhorse housed in modest digs, Carolina’s has served its signature red chile and homemade tortillas to crowds for over half a century.

Dinner: Didn’t decide on Mexican for lunch? Go Barrio Cafe for dinner. Rich, contemporary takes on regional Mexican cooking come to play at this perpetually popular Midtown outpost. From the margaritas to the mole, to the tableside guacamole and melting cochinita pibil, Barrio is a must-stop. Otherwise, cap off your food-friendly day with a meal worthy of all hyperbole. James Beard Award-winning chef Nobuo Fukuda, and his distinguished Japanese cooking cued with modern American quirks, glisten at the quaint, buzzing Downtown hotspot Nobuo at Teeter House. Up for a splurge? The reservations-only, 4-seat-only omakase (chef’s choice) dining experience, chaperoned by the master technician and artist himself, is arguably one of the best meals in Phoenix. Late-Night: Looking for something different? Try the engaging, mellow RumBar at the Breadfruit for its studious, 100-plus catalog of specialty rums, well-crafted rum-based cocktails, authentic daiquiris and mojitos built with just-squeezed citrus and natural sweeteners.

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eats & drinks

beer & a dog

by Justin Lee

Few partners flatter each other like cold, frothy pints of beer, and savory, deckedout sausages piled high with as many (or as few) trimmings as you might prefer. In honor of Downtown Phoenix hosting this year’s MLB All-Star Game, and the timehonored sentiments ballpark franks and chilled beer conjure in regard to America’s favorite pastime, we decided to window shop (and sample) a few of Downtown’s most glorious couplings.

Roosevelt Tavern Dimly lit and dapper, the Roosevelt Tavern is as much a destination as it is a below-the-radar find. Residing in a retooled, century-old house due north of Downtown, the Roosevelt is tight, even cramped during peak hours, with buzzing patrons jostling for prime perches in which to guzzle and graze. Brought to us by local restaurateur Matt Pool (Matt’s Big Breakfast, Giant Coffee), though the Roosevelt is known for its devotion to craft beers and studied wine selections, what many not always know: It also serves some of the best bar food in the city. With sly takes on weathered comfort foods like smoky franks and beans, pressed grilled cheese and tomato soup, as well as giant, doughy pretzels made in house, food wise, the Roosevelt takes just as much care in its menu as it does with its libations and stylish atmospherics. The snacking standout? A sturdy, beer-steamed Niman Ranch frank called the Underdog. All-beef, crisp and smoky, the elevated hot dog sits under, among other condiments, sweet onions and a tart house relish, all between a toasty roll. Side the experience with a cold, tall Roosevelt House Beer (crafted specially by local brew institution Four Peaks), and you’re reminded why the stalwart dog-brew combo ever came to be. 816 N. 3rd St., Evans Churchill. (602) 254-2561 The Main Ingredient Ale House & Café A refurbished house in the Coronado neighborhood, charming and neighborly, The Main Ingredient has patiently bloomed into an upright Central Phoenix pick for tried-and-true pub grub made anew with toptier ingredients and a modern sensibility. Though there are familiar wine options, TMI (as it’s commonly referred to) is more widely known as an outpost for beer, with a admirable lineup of brews bottled, canned and on tap. To match food wise, don’t forget the superlative Coronado Coney — a hulking Schreiner’s all-beef frank covered in red onions, a generous spread of spicy mustard (made with Arizona-bred Oak Creek Brewing Company’s Amber Ale), all slid inside a large, crusty sourdough roll. Hearty and sincerely stomach pleasing. 2337 N. 7th St., Coronado. (602) 843-6246 Short Leash Hot Dogs at Phoenix Public Market Short Leash Hot Dogs is the sprightly, precocious food cart that has captivated legions of Phoenix area patrons with its signature, gourmet hot dogs. Built with often unorthodox ingredients and cradled in homemade naan (Indian flatbread), all specialty dogs are individually (and cheekily) named after actual canine companions of proprietors Brad and Katherine Moore. Crisscrossing the city each week, parking to serve its famed franks to the devout of all stripes, it’s Short Leash’s thrice-weekly gig outside the Phoenix Public Market where many of its most ardent fans regularly turn up. Holding anchor adjacent to Public Market’s Urban Grocery & Wine Bar, Short Leash customers immediately gain access to an array of interesting wines and craft beers to bolster their takeaway experience. Order a dog, pick up a cold beer and grab a table — simple tasks for simple pleasures. Phoenix Public Market, 14 E. Pierce St., Evans Churchill. (602) 254-1799 Email Justin at justin@dphxj.com.

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eats & drinks | game day dines

St. Francis [New American] Uptown One of Uptown’s most polished dining halls also provides one of the most stylish venues to catch the big game. While sipping on premium specialty cocktails and grazing alfresco on the eatery’s sharp patio, catching your favorite team becomes effortless thanks to TV projectors beaming the action live on the space’s white walls. Come for the game, stay for tenured chef Aaron Chamberlin’s focused menu of French-hued, rustic American chow. 111 E. Camelback Rd. (602) 200.8111

Rose & Crown [Pub] Downtown Fetching and warm, Rose & Crown seems perfectly rooted in its historical digs. Located in an updated, circa early 1900s Victorian charmer within Heritage Square, the British pub offers more than 50 different stripes of local and imported brews alongside heartwarming edible standbys like burgers, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie and yes: bangers and mash. High-definition screens surround, providing great perches for primetime spectator sports. 628 E. Adams St. (602) 256.0222

The Arrogant Butcher [American] Downtown Sam Fox brings big-city edge to his blossoming restaurant empire with this energetic, handsome Downtown restaurant serving a wide range of harmless fare, from burgers and sandwiches, to seafood and charcuterie. Game nights bring added electricity when events du jour overtake the bar area’s flatscreen televisions. Added perk? The Arrogant Butcher has one of the best cocktail programs Downtown. 2 E. Jefferson St. (602) 324.8502

Majerle’s [Bar and Grill] Downtown The original outpost of former Phoenix Suns star Dan Majerle’s prosperous local restaurant chain, Majerle’s Downtown branch continues to be a preferred hangout for lively game watching. Serving heightened versions of familiar bar foods in a comfortable setting (think burgers, sandwiches, salads and fried finger foods), it’s hard to find fault with such a dependable standby. 24 N. 2nd St. (602) 253.9004

LUNCH Monday - Friday 11am - 2pm

DINNER Monday 5pm-9pm Tuesday - Thursday 5p-10pm Friday+Saturday 5p-11pm 603 NORTH 5TH AVENUE | PHOENIX

602.441.2697

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Seamus McCaffrey’s [Pub] Downtown A sturdy Downtown favorite for years, whether for a dependable workday lunch or late-night crawl, Seamus McCaffrey’s Irish Pub effortlessly delivers the goods — and the atmosphere. With Guinness on tap and straightforward bar food on the menu, a day’s waylay at Seamus’ while catching up on the scoreboards (via one of the bar’s numerous televisions) is an experience ensured to deliver. 18 W. Monroe St. (602) 253.6081 The Vig Uptown [Tavern] Uptown A restored, mid-century gem, the Vig’s Uptown location has become a south-after Central Phoenix pit stop for bar hoppers in search of hip confines and elevated bar food. It’s also become a choice address for sports enthusiasts. While eyeing the latest game on one of the many flat-screen tubes, the Vig Uptown rounds off the spectator experience with a lengthy menu of beers and high-fashioned cocktails, as well as a wide-casting food menu of gourmet burgers, salads and clever finger foods like pulled pork nachos and Thai-basil hot wings. 6015 N. 16th St. (602) 633-1187


interview

an all-star regular

by David Leibowitz

Back in 1999, when Luis Gonzalez was traded to the Arizona Diamondbacks from Detroit, the biggest thing about Downtown Phoenix was the new ballpark and the Big Unit, Gonzo’s 6-foot-10-inch teammate, Randy Johnson. A dozen years later, so much has changed. These days, Gonzalez has a job in the team’s front office, working as a special assistant to D-backs’ president Derrick Hall and as an ambassador to the July 12th All Star Game.

our club. And of course we have Friday’s Front Row at the ballpark.” And the new Stand Up Live comedy club at CityScape and the new Lucky Strike Lanes. Gonzo reels them off in answer to the question of how Phoenix nightlife will stack up when thousands of visitors pour into town for three days of All Star hubbub. Having traveled as a player for 19 years, he’s seen more than his share of downtowns across the country. What the father of 12-year-old triplets (pictured below) likes best about Phoenix is the growing versatility.

And Downtown? It has grown up in a major way, says Gonzalez, from a small, sports-centric universe into a thriving urban core full of restaurants, diversions and life. “When the stadium was first built, this was the place to be,” Gonzalez remembers. “We’d get 30,000 people, 40,000 for ballgames. That was the newness, I think, the excitement of everything starting to happen. Then it kind of died out. Now it’s back to where it was before and then some. You’ve got ASU down here now, which brought a huge number of students. There’s just so much more going on than we ever had before.” As a player, Gonzalez turned solid work habits and a lunch pail mentality into five All Star appearances and 354 career home runs. He brings the same “regular guy” attitude to work every day downtown, as likely the only multimillionaire answering his own emails in a baseball team’s PR department. You can find him hoofing it to lunch with the rest of staff, trying to find the next new thing.

“There’s no doubt there’s a family atmosphere down here now. We want people to come down here and be comfortable,” he says. “At the same time, if you’re on a date or looking for somewhere to go for a drink, Downtown has those options, too.”

“All you need is a winning team and you have a winning atmosphere.”

“This place is still developing,” says the sports hero who plans to stay here for life. “There’s a lot of exciting things going. I think in a couple years, this place will be amazing – and so will our team. All you need is a winning team and you have a winning atmosphere.”

“We’re always looking for new places to go at lunchtime,” he says. “The new place we like to go is the Arrogant Butcher; we’re there a lot. Coach and Willie’s has always been great supporters of 22

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And the number of options continues to multiply, says the whose bloop single on a November night in 2001 delivered not only Arizona’s lone major sports championship, but the largest downtown parade crowd in this history of the city.

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Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine  

June-July 2011 edition of Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine.

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