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ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Explore your core

all access pass

GET IN ON THE ACTION Downtown comes alive with more options for you than ever before

DPhxJ.com NOV | DEC 2011


top 5 in the U.S. for corporate recruitment ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus is now home to over 9,300 students, 1,200 faculty and staff and is an integral part of the downtown community. The nation is noticing ASU’s pursuit of excellence in developing the workforce of tomorrow. The successful partnership between the City of Phoenix and ASU will continue to flourish ensuring a brighter future for our city, state and our world.

asu.edu/excellence


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The Buzz

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District Beat

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Forward Thinker Dr. Michael Crow

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Creating Downtown

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Roundtable

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Seamless Bunky and misty Fashion Exhibit at PAm

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Eats & Drinks Staff Picks

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Destinations Map

Behind the cover photo: In one short month, Crescent Ballroom has established itself as ThE place for live music in downtown, with a full slate of hot acts, consistently playing to packed houses.

EXPLORE YOUR CORE

publisher CATRINA KAhlER | guest editor DAVID lEIBOwITZ creative director ERIK KARVONEN | art director JASON GARCIA | web designer AmANDA hAwKINS communications manager JIll BERNSTEIN | web team INVExI | DuSTIN mOORE | mIKE lISBONY | JEFFREY PuTNum fashion editor CORBIN ChAmBERlIN | contributors SuSAN COPElAND | COuRTNEY mcCuNE | JASON hARRIS photography JACK lONDON | JASON GARCIA contact EDITORIAl | editor@dphxj.com | ADVERTISING | advertising@dphxj.com | GENERAl | info@dphxj.com

DPJ is supported by:

Downtown Phoenix Journal | Published by urban Affair, llC. | 365 N 4th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85003 All rights reserved. Copyright 2011. urban Affair, llC is not responsible or liable for any misspellings, incorrect dates, or incorrect information in its captions, calendar or other listings. urban Affair, llC assumes no responsibility for the loss of any unsolicited materials, or for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. The opinions expressed within Downtown Phoenix Journal magazine do not necessarily represent the views or policies of Downtown Phoenix Journal or urban Affair, llC or any of its agents, staff, partners, employees, interns, volunteers, or distribution venues. Bylined articles and editorial represent the views of their authors. Downtown Phoenix Journal magazine accepts advertisements from advertisers believed to be reputable but cannot guarantee the authenticity or quality of objects and/or services advertised. Also, Downtown Phoenix Journal magazine is not responsible for any claims made by advertisers. urban Affair, llC reserves the right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising matter.

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Downtown Phoenix Journal

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PhoenixCommunityAlliance.com

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welcome It takes a special occasion, something to mark a point in time like an anniversary, to allow one to pause and reflect on all that has been accomplished within that period. It’s amazing to think it has been one year since we were at (the just opened) CityScape and Mayor Gordon was holding up the premiere issue of Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine at his annual State of Downtown event. Our inaugural issue celebrated many of the people, places and happenings that make this place special to us and we invited residents and visitors alike to Escape to our City. A year later we remind you that you have an All Access Pass to all the experiences that our greater Downtown has to offer. If time is a key ingredient to success then collectively we’ve put the past 12 months to good use. There are so many successes to celebrate in the past year, too many to try and list here. From the ground up, the Downtown community is contributing to its core. With all the success in the past year, there is still a lot of work to do. We are still very early in the recovery cycle. The good news is, there are many who feel the same way and are actively putting their time and energy into the next phase of the evolution. In this issue of DPJ we bring together some of these community leaders, who shared their vision on how we move forward to make it an even greater Downtown. There are many people to thank for their generous support, including Mayor Phil Gordon for his eight successful years of service and for inspiring this publication; Phoenix Community Alliance for being a true ally; and our own DPJ team for their contribution of talent and spirit. Most importantly, we thank the Downtown community for making DPJ your journal.

Catrina Kahler Publisher

from the guest editor For the better part of the last decade, Downtown Phoenix has stood at a perpetual crossroads. It’s like that when a place, an institution, a set of ideas, is coming to life. Every new addition is critically important. Every new idea is fragile, in need of TLC and a healthy dose of vision. This state of downtown is no less true today that it was 10 years ago, in the days before light rail and our thriving stadium district. It’s even more true, in fact, than it was at this time last year, when CityScape was busy throwing open its doors and full houses at the Arrogant Butcher and Stand Up Live were merely a hope. To explore this crossroads, Downtown Phoenix Journal has called upon a terrific cast of movers and power players this month (page 13), from the brilliant mind that is Michael Crow to the tireless spirit that is Marty Shultz, to “get it done” folks like Mike Ebert, Dave Roderique, Don Keuth and Dave Krietor. To hear these gentlemen discuss the evolution of our community’s core, Phoenix today stands on the cusp of Downtown 2.0, a place where commerce more neatly meets the creative community and where the private sector and city government need to find new ways to partner up and evolve. Me, I was just glad to be in the room and to have the chance to ask a few questions. The answers, as fascinating though they are, are simply words. The truth of what’s next downtown will have more to do with deeds, with where we go from today’s crossroads. I’m rooting for more of the neat shops, more great restaurants, more galleries that astonish and even more fashion finds like those uncovered by Corbin Chamberlin (page 16). Here’s to more students, more visitors, more conventions, more jobs and more dollars spent at the creative businesses Susan Copeland explores (page 10), in a Phoenix economy that needs the boost. That’s the downtown America’s sixth-largest city deserves. That’s the downtown that will help the Valley mature into a top-tier place, a city where culture and entertainment options are as grand as the canyons and the views. Hope you enjoy the reading as much as we enjoyed assembling the magazine.

David Leibowitz Guest Editor

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the

buzz

eats and ice at cityscape One year on, CityScape is giving us new ways to enjoy our cool weather. We’re heading outdoors and hitting the Downtown streets in search of good eats and unique holiday fun, and CityScape has the answers to both. Three restaurants, including local hotspot, The Breakfast Club; The Strand, a “fast casual” Italian restaurant; and Chipotle, are adding a whole new variety of dining options for breakfast, lunch and dinner. And for added fun, come down for the free Holiday Tree Lighting, a visit with Santa, and the opening of the seasonal CityScape ice rink on Saturday, November 26. Visit cityscapephoenix.com.

iconic arizona Did you know you can view the state’s famous places without leaving Downtown? Phoenix Art Museum is hosting a visual commemoration of Arizona’s 100 years in The Center of Creative Photography, featuring works from renowned photographers that hail from the Grand Canyon State. Have a pic or two that you want to share? Your favorite Arizona photo could be added to a digital slideshow on view in the gallery and online. Visit phxart.org for more.

over the moon We’re calling it. Crescent Ballroom is an instant classic. The new live music venue (and cover model for this edition of DPJ Mag) opened in October and immediately became the place that had you asking the question; how did we make it this long without it? Owner Charlie Levy of Stateside Presents knows a thing or two about concert venues. That experience served him and his team well as they opened their doors to excited music fans. Find the full calendar of upcoming shows at crescentphx.com.

ride on, metro! What’s better than setting a ridership record in the heat of September? Setting another record one month later! METRO light rail recorded 1,258, 711 total boardings in October, an eight percent increase over October 2010 and the highest in their already impressive history. Phoenix events certainly contribute to these rising numbers, with the Arizona Diamondbacks reaching the playoffs doesn’t hurt. But Downtown businesses are also hailing the line as a significant contributor to a quality workforce. That’s a return on investment we all benefit from.

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buzz

what’s the

buzz events Get the latest. Nov 12 | 12th Annual Day for Downtown From park cleanups to tree plantings, this annual Day for Downtown mobilizes volunteers like no other. Presented by the Downtown Phoenix Partnership, HandsOn Greater Phoenix, and the Phoenix Community Alliance. handsonphoenix.org

Nov 15 | GoGreen ’11 Phoenix This one-day conference has a full slate of speakers that will share the best of green practices for business owners. phoenix.gogreenconference.net

Follow @dtphxjournal Mingle @radiatephx Like - Facebook Downtown Phoenix Journal Sign-up DPhxJ.com

Downtown Phoenix Journal

Nov 25 – Dec 4 | Buy Local Week If it is better to give than receive, then buying local and giving to our local economy is truly great. localfirstaz.com

Dec 2 | Artlink’s First Fridays Art Walk Cool weather and art make for a festive First Friday. For the shoppers among us, the December edition is a perfect time to stock up on unique gifts that support the artists among us. artlinkphoenix.com

December 9 | The Nutcracker The season isn’t complete without the Sugar Plum Fairy taking the stage at Symphony Hall. Ballet Arizona brings the holiday tradition to life. balletaz.org

Dec 14 & 21 | 2nd Annual Phoestivus Market Another holiday tradition has begun in Downtown Phoenix: Phoestivus. Hosted at the Phoenix Public Market, Phoestivus puts a creative spin on buying local during this gift-giving season. phoenixpublicmarket.com

Leaders for a Greater Downtown Phoenix

Find us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter: @phxcommal www.phoenixcommunityalliance.com

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district beat

taking the pulse of the city by Courtney McCune DOWNTOWN CORE

Downtown’s Civic Space Park and Independent Lens will present a free screening of the film, “Taking Root,” on Saturday, December 10th at 3pm as part of the second Saturday Community Cinema series. The film tells the inspiring story of Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan woman whose tree-planting initiative in 1977 led to broader social change in her country and ultimately a Nobel Peace prize in 2004. A panel discussion will follow at the A.E. England building, also located in the park. phoenix.gov/PARKS/civicprk.html If you’re looking for that warm, fuzzy feeling this holiday season, try the Phoenix Tequila Fest at the U.S. Airways Arena December 10th-11th from 1pm-5pm both days. Pros will be on hand to help you sample reposados, anejos, and blancos the right way and to explore what’s new in the world of tequila from exotic infusions to innovative margarita concoctions. And because tequila is not for the faint of heart or the empty of stomach, some of Phoenix’s most fabulous Mexican restaurants will be there with samples of their mouthwatering munchies. The 20th Anniversary Christmas Mariachi Festival will follow the Saturday date of this event at the arena, beginning at 7pm. This is also a light rail ride event, which means ticketholders can catch a free ride on the light rail that day. Ticket info for both events can be found on their website: phoenixtequilafest.com/index.html

HISTORIC ROOSEVELT Life in downtown Phoenix is oh so sweet, but of course there’s always room for a little more sugar! And if that sugar happens to be mixed with premium ingredients to make homemade ice cream, well all the better! This is why The Sweetness Ice Cream is a welcome addition to the Historic Roosevelt landscape. They recently set up shop inside the Fair Trade Café at 1st Ave. & Central and are ready to delight downtowner’s taste buds with their delicious assortment of flavors. And another thing to love: they’re open late night: 2pm-2am ThursdaySaturday and 2pm-12pm on Sunday. facebook.com/thesweetnessicecream

EVANS CHURCHILL/ ROOSEVELT ROW The holidays are all about tradition and downtown Phoenix has one of its own in the Phoestivus Market. Returning for its second year at the Phoenix Public Market, this festival will have plenty of holiday cheer and just a touch of Seinfeldian flair (an actual Phoestivus Pole, perhaps?) Shop for holidaythemed food and products, enjoy performances by the North Phoenix Chorale and witness Pheats of Strength in the true spirit of the holiday. This year’s event will extend the merry-making to two nights, December 14th and 21st, both from 4pm-8pm. According

to organizer Ken Clark, “Phoestivus is just a fun way to get a long tradition started . . . Last year, we had over 500 people without much advertising. This year, we have more sponsors, two nights and twice as much fun. Next year, we plan to over-run Poland.”

F.Q. STORY Frances Quarles Story was one of the forefathers of downtown Phoenix development. Of course, back in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, when he was helping to build areas like Grand Avenue and his namesake neighborhood, F.Q. Story, it wasn’t downtown, it was, well, just “town.” Today, these historic areas are some of the most vibrant and visually compelling in the central Phoenix area and in December, admirers can get an inside look at what makes them so special at the 27th Annual F.Q. Story Home Tour & Holiday Gift Sale. A selection of these homes will be open to the public, showcasing their unique historic features and a variety of architectural styles, including Spanish Colonial Revival, English Tudor, Craftsman Bungalow, and Transitional Ranch. Explore the neighborhood by candlelight with luminarias and Dickens carolers on Saturday, December 3rd from 6-9pm or during the day with arts, crafts, and food vendors on Sunday, December 4th from 11am-5pm. Tickets are $15 or $14 with a non-perishable food donation. Learn more at fqstory.org

WAREHOUSE

The Duce gives you lots of reasons to want dance to the classics, drink old school cocktails, shop for hip vintage threads or even box the night away in their historic 1928 warehouse building. With swing dancin’ on Tuesdays, Mad Woman Wednesdays, a whole slew of DJ’s and karaoke throughout the weekend, and brunch on Sundays, there is a whole lot of old timey fun to be had in this Warehouse District hangout. Take advantage of their Cocktail Hour TuesdayFriday from 4-6pm with $2 beer, $2 off cocktails and $5 slider baskets. theducephx.com/

UPTOWN In a perfect world, we would all be surrounded by art, beauty and creativity at every turn. This may sound like a fanciful notion, but it’s exactly the sort of utopia that Practical Art boutique and gallery space is striving to create. This Uptown District shop carries handcrafted, unique pieces of (practical) art that also happen to be stuff we use every day, like kitchen items, house wares, clothing, jewelry, paper goods-you name it. And to make things even dreamier, everything they sell is made by local Arizona artists. Practical Art also hosts community events like knitting groups, wine tastings, book discussion, First Friday events and art classes, like their Paper Marbling Demonstration & Holiday Card Making workshop on Sunday, November 27th. Look for kids D P h x J . co m

art classes to start up after the holidays. Find their monthly schedule of events and other important details at Practical-art.com When it comes to holiday shopping, you’re bound to have some people on your list who are more meat and potatoes and others who are all about the veggies-lots and lots of veggies. The clear solution in this situation is the 6th Annual Crafeteria, hosted by local vintage-vibed boutique Frances and Smeeks candy shop. This annual holiday shopping feast will take place on Friday, December 2 from 6-10pm in the parking lot of Medlock Plaza (home to the host shops, along with Stinkweeds record store and Halo Piercing & Jewelry.) 40 carefullyselected local crafters will offer heaping portions of handmade awesomeness, from jewelry and accessories to art and clothes – enough to satisfy even the most refined palate on your list. Enjoy live music sponsored by Stinkweeds and a section devoted to sweet treats! Find details at Francesvintage.com

CAPITOL MALL In February 2012, our Grand Canyon state will mark its 100th birthday and the celebration will be centered in the Capitol Mall district. Preparations are underway for the Phoenix leg of Arizona Best Fest, part of the state’s official Centennial celebration, which will recognize the best of Arizona over the past 100 years. After stops in former Arizona territorial capitals Prescott and Tucson, the party rolls into town from February 10th-12th. Keep an eye on az100years.org for more details.

MELROSE

Exposed Studio and Gallery on 7th Ave. in Melrose will hold their Annual Teddy Bear Art Auction on December 16th from 6-10pm. The gallery’s in-house artists will use mixed media to put their own creative spin on blank canvas teddy bears made by local artist Vincent Minor, creator of Minor Bears. The bears will be auctioned off with proceeds to benefit Aunt Rita’s Foundation. The event is free with snacks and live music. Exposed will also be having a 20-50% off sale through December 23rd. Find out more at exposedgallery.com.

CORONADO The worlds of art and fashion go hand-inhand and Phoenix couldn’t have a better example of this than the Coronado District’s own The Bees Knees boutique and The Hive art gallery. Husband and wife team and longtime Coronado residents, Steven Helffrich and Julia Fournier, keep this hotbed of style and culture buzzing under the roof of a mid-century modern building on 16th Street. The Bee’s Knees specializes in resale fashion for men and women, vintage goodies, and locally made accessories, while The Hive showcases local artist’s work in its gallery and |

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courtyard spaces. Upcoming art shows include “On the Wall: Richard Wallace” opening November 18th and “ReZolution,” a show by valley muralist Thomas Breeze Marcus starting December 16th. The space also serves as a cultural hub for the community, with a monthly book club meeting and a lecture series with speakers ranging from architects to authors. Also beginning December 8th at The Hive, a “Best of The Phoenix Film Festival” series every second Thursday of the month at 7pm. Learn more about the exciting line up of events by finding The Bee’s Knees on Facebook or by calling 602-254-1641.

GRAND AVENUE In a building where many a sweet handmade treat has been turned out over the years, the tradition continues at Bragg’s Pie Factory in the Grand Avenue District with Coffee, Cookies & Crafts 5, an annual indie craft fair and craft supply swap. Presented by Moderncat Studio, lucky15creative, and Sticker Club Girl, the event will take place on Saturday, November 19th from noon-5pm. Crafty types can participate in demonstrations and let their creativity loose at the community craft table. Just in time for the holidays, there will be plenty of shopping for handmade goodies from local vendors, including a special group of under-18 vendors in the “Springboard” section, which encourages young entrepreneurs, And don’t forget to bring your old craft supplies to exchange with your neighbor at the craft supply swap, because as they say, one crafter’s scraps are another crafter’s bread and butter! Jobot Coffee Shop, new food truck Pizza People and various local bakeries will keep tummies full and energy levels high throughout the day. Find event information and learn about participating vendors at facebook.com/CoffeeCookiesCrafts The symphony of sounds in the Grand Avenue District just got a little bit sweeter with the recent relocation of the RobertoVenn School of Luthiery (guitar making) to the area. The school was established in 1975, making it the longest-running institution of its kind in the nation. Students from around the world have come to RobertoVenn to learn the art of crafting and repairing guitars and now that creative energy will be centered right along Grand Avenue. With all of the creative energy already radiating from this district, Robert-Venn makes a very cool addition to the line up. www.roberto-venn.com

District Beat Contributors: Meghan Olesen, Julia Fournier, Kara Roschi, Ken Clark, and Gregg Edelman.

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development

site plans Downtown is attracting new residents, employers and visitors to an expanded mix of independent local businesses and unique urban experiences found nowhere else in the state.

T H E TA S T E T E S T: S EE HOW QUALIT Y AND D E SIGN COM E I N A VA R I E T Y O F F L AVO R S .

by Jason Harris Even though the nation, region and state continue a slow economic recovery, Downtown Phoenix remains active. Residential - The key to a sustainable and vibrant downtown is people living here. Occupancy is strong and the multifamily housing market is hot. The Lofts at McKinley, a 60 unit multifamily urban loft-style building for seniors, is under construction at 5th Avenue and McKinley, and slated to open in summer 2012. University Impact - ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus continues to grow. ASU is renovating portions of the historic Post Office building at Central Avenue and Fillmore for student-union services. The final phase, scheduled to open in Spring 2012, will feature a large shade canopy that will cover the area next to the former Post Office loading dock, creating a seamless connection with Civic Space Park. As the park continues to engage the public and ASU, so does the YMCA as it works with ASU on a significant expansion to its facility. A four-story facility is under design, which will feature additional recreation and exercise spaces as well as a roof-top pool.

With catering partner Aventura’s reputation for sourcing organic food from local, sustainable farms, the Phoenix Convention Center has quickly become the top choice for meeting, social and catering events. But don’t take our word for it. Put us to the taste test today and contact us to see everything that downtown Phoenix has to offer.

The Phoenix Biomedical Campus is thriving. The six-story, 275,000- squarefoot Health Sciences Education Building, an expansion to the University of Arizona Medical school, is scheduled to open next summer, and will also welcome Northern Arizona University’s allied health program, UA’s College of Pharmacy and Zuckerman College of Health. CityScape and Streetscapes - CityScape continues to amaze with new entertainment and retail tenant openings. The 125-room Hotel Palomar is expected to open in spring of 2012. Lastly, continued streetscape improvements are currently under way on 1st Street between McKinley and Fillmore to better connect the local businesses to the ASU campus. Upcoming streetscape improvements are scheduled on Roosevelt between Central Avenue and 4th Street. We can celebrate the great success that has been achieved so far, and continue to support the many local restaurants and businesses that provide the services and experiences that make Downtown Phoenix the unique place that it is. 8

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E X C L U S I V E C AT E R I N G P A R T N E R

PHOENIXCONVENTIONCENTER.COM | 602-262-6225 100 North 3rd Street | Phoenix 85004

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feature

forward thinker Arizona State University President Michael Crow shares his vision on ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus and the future of the city center with guest editor David Leibowitz. David Leibowitz: How would you characterize Phil Gordon’s last term as Mayor of Phoenix? Dr. Michael Crow: I would characterize Phil Gordon’s term as highly energizing to the development of a central core to Phoenix which is essential to its success. And this energizing then creates the environment in which the private sector, the public sector, the education sector and others can make meaningful investments, and know that they’ve got a good chance of being successful.

Relative to the University, we’re looking to expand our program offerings. We’re hoping to move the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law down here to be a part of what we’re calling the Arizona Center for Law and Society. We’re looking to expand our enrollment and expand our programs. We’re looking to go from 1,300 students living on campus to 5,000 students living on campus. Expanding recreation facilities and all kinds of things. We’re very excited and very positive but, we need all of that to happen. DL: Talk to me a little bit about the role of downtown and the Valley as a whole.

DL: Is that at risk as we change administrations?

MC: For Phoenix to be successful it will need more urbanization. To urbanize more you need a central core and then several other core areas. So the central core becomes Downtown Phoenix. That can then connect to and become one of the places where highly efficient, highly intense, large number of people can work and live. And you need a few of those for the Valley to become more successful and more energized and Downtown Phoenix is critical as the center of the center.

MC: Both remaining candidates have to know that the success of Downtown Phoenix is critically important to the success of Phoenix overall, and to the success of the region. And I don’t see it at risk, no. DL: What do you see as the big successes for ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus? MC: The biggest success is that we know that the setting actually works as an educational asset for us. The students are actually benefiting from the downtown setting, and our colleges of public programs, journalism and nursing are either engaged in internships or involved in clinical training that is facilitated by being downtown. We see that all the programs we have down here are better because of the location.

DL: How do you balance the need to evolve in the 21st Century with the need to preserve history and historic buildings? MC: You find a way to blend all of that together as best as you can. Downtown Phoenix has immense amounts of vacant land and so there shouldn’t be immense stresses to have conflict between the past and the future. There’s just got to be a way to blend the past and the future together.

DL: What can be done better? What do you see improving on in the upcoming years? MC: Well, on two fronts. We need to go from less than 10,000 people living downtown to more than 30,000 people living downtown over time. We need more people living down there. We need more intense working relationships, more activities, more events, more venues, all those things. We need more economic diversity, more types of businesses. We need more family-owned businesses and family-owned retail. We need all those things as a mix of the downtown as it evolves.

DL: Have we done a good job of that so far? MC: I think that in any area you can always do a better job. “Should we do a better job in that?” The answer is yes.

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feature

creating

downtown

What is it about Downtown Phoenix that interests a college student, a developer, a cyclist, a chef, an artist or an engineer? It’s the energy on the streets and the buzz in the cafes. It exists in every coffee-house conversation, every stroll down a newly shaded street, at any art opening, and in the first bite of sushi. It’s the young couple with the stroller, baby and fuzzy dog walking after dark. It’s the lunchtime food truck queues, the thunder of balls in the bowling alley, and the smell of fresh peaches at the market. Engaged people are creating new life in downtown Phoenix and the evidence can be seen, heard, felt and tasted. This buzz is firmly rooted in the creative community that has worked for many years to bring downtown to life. It is evident in the history of the arts-led transformation of downtown, and how it has fueled revitalization and overcome the obstacles that challenge the continuation of this transformation. Early Urban Arts Pioneers The roots of this transformation can be traced through the history of Beatrice Moore and Tony Zahn, who came to Phoenix sight-unseen in 1986. They were drawn by the optimism behind the city’s name, the desert and the non-hip art scene. They created the very first Art Detour, an annual tour of artists’ studios with a small group of 20 art spaces. “It was a way for artists to show their own work independent from galleries. It was an educational event for the public,” Moore said.

Their purchase and renovation of historic buildings along Grand Avenue

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not only created affordable artist studios, but also helped to transform a formerly decrepit downtown stretch of boarded-up buildings into a revitalized corridor that draws thousands of people to art openings, studios, a growing number of bars and restaurants and the annual Grand Avenue Festival. A Detour Takes Hold of Fridays The success of the yearly Art Detour led another group of artists to start a monthly tour called Phoenix Arts After Hours. This gave birth to the nationally lauded First Friday, a self-guided tour of art spaces and galleries held on the first Friday of every month. It has become the core of the downtown arts scene. The Phoenix Art Museum has participated in Artlink’s First Friday art walk on and off since its inception. “We’ve had a very positive connection with First Friday,” said museum director Jim Ballinger. “We’ve had anywhere from 800 to 2,000 people come through the museum on a First Friday evening. It is a diverse and younger crowd, and has introduced a lot of new folks to the museum.”

The presence of the creative community has brought life, vitality and identity to downtown.

Moore and Zahn watched gentrification take place, often spurred by the unwitting ability of artists to make a place cool. Their first artist studio was in an old brick warehouse on the site where U.S. Airways Arena now stands. A new jail occupies the site of their second studio. Recognizing that a renter’s fate is determined by his landlord, they bought their first building. “Artists need to get ownership,” Moore said. “Young artists are not planning for their future. New construction is often not affordable for studio space.”

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by Susan Copeland

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Would there be as many new restaurants, condos, galleries and hotels downtown without the presence of 10,000-plus people wandering around downtown on First Friday? The presence of the creative community has brought life, vitality and identity to downtown. The Row Takes Shape When Cindy Dach and Greg Esser moved here from Denver, they struggled to find a community. Eager to renovate and without any appealing living spaces available, they began an odyssey. Fifteen years, several buildings and many projects later they helped make Roosevelt Street a cornerstone of the downtown arts community. “The easiest way to find a community in Phoenix is to participate, get involved,” says Dach. That they have. They formed the successful eyelounge and 515 artists’ collectives, MADE

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Art Boutique, Kitchen Street Studio and the Roosevelt Row Community Development Corporation (CDC). Wayne Rainey, Kimber Lanning and Dach/Esser all bought buildings and created art spaces within six months of each other. The prices were low enough at the time to make the spaces affordable. Dach says that artists are natural problem solvers. “We looked at the closed up buildings and dark spaces and said, ‘Yeah, this sucks. How can we fix it?’ ” It is this type of creativity, community involvement, forward thinking and innovation that many people believe will move Phoenix forward. Ed Lebow, Public Art Director for the City of Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture, says, “It’s the small things that form the connective tissue that makes the big things work.” Small ideas yielding big results are creating an organic identity for downtown today. The little farmers’ market that grew into a grocery store, coffee house, wine bar and community gathering space is another perfect example. Community Sustenance Chicago transplant Cindy Gentry fell in love with the historic Santa Fe Depot in the warehouse district near Jackson Street. Her goals were to create easy access to healthy food for low-income residents, help keep farmers on their land and create jobs. “Our focus was on low income people but we didn’t want to do it in a vacuum,” Gentry said. “We wanted to create a place where people from all backgrounds could come together.” She was drawn to downtown because “the creative energy of the city lies here. A connection to the arts community was a logical choice.” Although the Santa Fe Depot market never happened, Gentry did create the Phoenix Public Market, a grocery store and a thriving farmers market, with a strong emphasis on organic produce and handmade crafts, that anchors Saturday mornings downtown. Says Gentry, “The creative energy that is here in Phoenix is looking for places to get out.” That creative energy is apparent in the art-centric downtown development of developer and indie rocker Tim Sprague, of Habitat Metro. Two of his current projects are the adaptive reuse of an old hotel, the Oasis, to create affordable living and work spaces for artists, and, most recently, a

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remodeling of the Lexington hotel that centers around arts and culture. “Humans have talent that we should recognize and celebrate,” Sprague said. “Performing arts, music, media, theatre – they are the spice of life. Art has the ability to bring people together to initiate discussion. It’s an automatic switch for turning on tolerance and bringing together diverse ideas.”

Performing arts, music, media, theatre – they are the spice of life.

“The organic arts scene that developed brought focus to the downtown,” he said. “It provided the cushion and continuity for things to keep happening. It brought traffic and people downtown that would not have come. It made downtown relevant.” This ability of the artistic community to create relevance and continuity was evident to George Kritikos and his wife Stacy, who left Chicago to buy and take over the Athenian Grill, a Greek restaurant on Central just south of Roosevelt. Kritikos believes that the arts community is good for the area. Historically, he watched how the arts helped in the transformation of downtown Chicago from a scary dark place. “(Mayor Richard) Daly cleaned up the streets. There was artwork, painted cows, landscaping, lighting. All of it together helped take away the scary aspect of the streets. Then coffee shops and restaurants starting popping up.”

Filling the Gaps The biggest stumbling block to this transformation in Phoenix may be the empty lots that divide all of the cool, hip things from each other. When you look down First and Third streets at night, south of Roosevelt, it is dark and scary. People are afraid to walk north from the Sheraton and Alta Lofts. But the creative community is working on a solution for that too. Many temporary uses for empty lots have been proposed, but shot down

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for fear of them becoming too popular and permanent - leading to a potential for public outcry when the temporary project has to make way for a permanent structure. Nevertheless, two artistic uses have recently been implemented. On Roosevelt near Fourth Street, the Roosevelt Row CDC, has cleaned up, dust-proofed and put temporary lighting in an empty lot to create the First and Third Friday A.R.T.S.(Adaptive Reuse Temporary Spaces) Markets, giving small local vendors the opportunity to become part of the popular art walks. Small booths dot the lot twice each month selling everything from ice cream to hand-crafted wood items.

for handmade one-of-a-kind items at MADE; finding organic locally grown produce at the Public Market; mingling with neighbors at Faces, Places and Spaces amidst the art at Bragg’s Pie Factory; or lingering over a late night imported beer at Carly’s. If none of these places and events are familiar, then you are missing out on the core of the new Phoenix.

A few blocks southeast of the A.R.T.S. Market is Valley of the Sunflowers, another Roosevelt Row temporary adaptive reuse project, which broke ground in September, and will feature an entire block of sunflowers. It is the brainchild of Kenny Barrett, downtown resident and newly appointed project director for Roosevelt Row’s A.R.T.S. program. With grant funding from Intel and volunteer support from the community, the project will produce sunflower oil that the students at the adjacent BioScience High School will help harvest. They will then use the oil to run the biofuel car that they are creating. As little as it is, the Valley of Sunflowers project may just be one of the most important projects in downtown Phoenix in the past 10 years. It has brought together young people, artists, engineers, developers and the city to create a project that is sustainable, creative and breaks the boundaries of what it is possible to accomplish in downtown Phoenix. Most importantly, it removes the barrier of fear and apathy toward addressing the problem of the empty lots. It is easy to see why a college student, a developer, a cyclist, a chef, an artist and an engineer would be drawn to a place like Phoenix. The vibrancy and buzz that created places like Paris, Chicago and Portland are in their infancy here. Phoenix will not recreate or become any of those places. It is creating its own identity. It is growing organically because people want this sustainable lifestyle. More and more people are choosing an authentic experience: enjoying coffee and a crepe at JoBot; shopping

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roundtable

So You Say You Want An Evolution? Downtown Phoenix evolves on a near-daily basis. Guest editor David Leibowitz and a panel of city leaders explore what a difference a year makes. ‘To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advance…’ - Albert Einstein

Participants in the conversation include Deputy City Manager David Kreitor, Phoenix Community Alliance Board Chair Marty Shultz and President Don Keuth, Downtown Phoenix Partnership President and CEO David Roderique, and RED Development Managing Partner Mike Ebert. David Leibowitz: Comments from a year ago suggested Downtown was at a crossroads (see Nov/Dec edition of DPJ Magazine). Where are we today? Martin Shultz: We’re at a very good point of the development stage in the Downtown and Central City area because major investment by the public and the private sector has occurred. There have been great discussions among and between the leaders in the Downtown and Central City area, from neighborhood groups to corporate and civic leaders. You look at the vision and ask where does it all fit in the context of D P h x J . co m

downtown? This place called downtown is really a series of places. But how does it get knit together operationally and in the minds of the people all over the world? They are going to use, be attracted to, and enjoy downtown Phoenix in a sense that hasn’t occurred in about 40 years in our community. We’re ready to come to some conclusions to determine what organizations – and relationships – would be in the future so that we can do what we need to do. Leibowitz: Does that produce a sense of anxiety, or a sense of excitement, knowing that what you’ve done for a long time is now about to change in some way shape or form? Don Keuth: It’s exciting. Downtown is changing, the central city is changing. So do how do we make sure we’re tuned up to respond? |

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Shultz: We’ve done things the same way for a number of years, and it’s been a great success. It was a great model for growing and developing the downtown. But for what’s next? It probably is not the best model. Leibowitz: What components need to be present to continue what we’ve done correctly in the past but to expand it in a different way? David Roderique: What we really need to focus on moving forward is this kind of small scale, street-level experience we keep talking about that is so critical. It’s really got to improve in order to truly be a great downtown. We’ve talked about the need for a lot more residential, so we have to have bodies here 24/7. I mean that’s critical to that experience. I also think it’s very important to think about downtown in a broader context. Because it’s not just us (the Downtown Phoenix Partnership) and PCA (the Phoenix Community Alliance). There are lots of organizations around the fringes that are part of the fabric of downtown that haven’t felt like they’ve had as much of a voice. I think that’s a perception out there that we need to work on. It’s important that we look at what’s going to be the most effective way for us to push forward in the future. Leibowitz: Mike, as a guy whose company has a fair amount of risk in downtown, does what you’re hearing square with your sense of what is needed to drive downtown to another level? Mike Ebert: The last 20 years has been about the mega-project, because you had to create the nest. The nest has been formed, so now how do you become great? How do we adopt best practices and create an environment where we have a lot of people at the table for these discussions? We have

to come up with organizational formats that give people a voice, so they can get engaged. How do we together communicate a real vision for downtown? We’ve added a university, hotels, a convention center, and lots of jobs. We’ve added grocery stores, drug stores, restaurants, entertainment venues and retail stores just in the last couple of years. The Downtown work force population has increased significantly. How do we educate the public? Leibowitz: Does the City have the resources to be a partner in this effort or does the City have to find a new way to be involved? David Krietor: I think it’s about the will more than the resources. We’ve outgrown the current model. The bottom line is how do we create a vibrant, throbbing neighborhood that functions as a coherent community? How do you structure yourself so that you can provide leadership for this diverse community and function as one voice and advocate? Leibowitz: What is the City’s role in that? Krietor: I think that the City needs to be a really strong partner, but the City can’t be in charge. I think this has to be more of a generic effort among the divergent interests that are downtown and the City has to be there. We have to tie these divergent groups together. And the model that we have right now is just not able to do that. Leibowitz: How do you bring diverse groups to this conversation? Shultz: Some people say the guys who have been around forever think that

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that’s the way it has to be – and always will be. I don’t believe that. In this day and age, the millennials are going to dictate the kinds of stores and activities [here]. They’re involved. These are the individuals who are actually going to people this place in the future. They are welcome and they have to be in a position to at least express their viewpoint. We have to facilitate that. Leibowitz: The people that you are making the offer to often believe that it’s not really the case. Keuth: I think you’ve seen that there is a common interest. We may not agree today but someday we’re going to agree. We’ve seen that happen time and time again. People realize that we’re all looking for the same good things to happen to this area – we might come at it differently – but eventually it’s like, Hey, we’re doing the same thing. Leibowitz: Do we have a clear sense of what Downtown Phoenix is, or is that still sort of up for grabs to a certain degree? Roderique: Brands evolve constantly. We had Copper Square. That obviously wasn’t well received and it particularly wasn’t well received by the outlying area. So we went through a re-branding process and we now are just plain old Downtown Phoenix. As we move from more of a development phase to more of an operations phase for downtown, the brand will likely shift again. I mean that’s just kind of expected.

Athletics

Shultz: The people who are in charge of the established organizations need to figure out what the new organization is for the purpose of moving forward. We have not set up the structure that allows us to get together at

this point and talk through what the future is going to be. Krietor: We need an organization that’s nimble enough to help CityScape be successful, but can also be an advocate for other parts of downtown, like the emerging collection of businesses in the McDowell corridor, for example. We need to do this not just for the big players, but we also need to be a strong advocate for these other people that are putting a stake in the ground, that are making an economic commitment, that are vested. The key is don’t worry if they’re big or small. Shultz: We recognize that maybe we’ve grown out of this pair of pants and now the question is what’s the next suit of clothes? But we know this. There will be many more interested constituencies that are ultimately going to be, not only listened to, but heard. The organizations of the future are going to need to be nimble enough to envelope a larger, and frankly, irregular shaped new entity. David’s operation (DPP) is chartered for 90 square blocks, and we are not 90 square blocks. There are strategic corporate changes that need to be made. Leibowitz: Mike, do you feel a kinship with the folks who are up at 7th Ave. and McDowell or is that a foreign country from where you sit? Ebert: I’m hoping (what’s happening on) McDowell makes the neighborhood around it stronger, which makes downtown stronger. What’s going on at Central and Camelback with Windsor and Postino is great for downtown. The success of nearby neighborhoods is the key to downtown. So whatever we can do to help support central city development, we’re all over it. It’s the old saying, ‘a rising tide lifts all boats.’ As these other areas DwntwnPhxJournal LungCancerAd_Layout 1 9/30/11 11:39 AM Page 1 are successful, we become more successful.

Arts

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Now available at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center. St. Joseph’s now offers individuals who are at high risk for lung cancer the opportunity to screen for and diagnose lung cancer before symptoms develop. Who is at high risk? Current and former smokers over the age of 50 are at the greatest risk for lung cancer. Why get the screening? A study by the National Cancer Institute showed that screening people at high risk can reduce lung cancer deaths by 20 percent.

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What kind of screening is it? e screening is a low dose CT scan.

Is there at cost? e cost is $199 which includes a review by a team of specialists and a session with a lung cancer screening doctor to review the results. Currently, most insurance companies do not cover this type of screening. How can I find out more information? Call our toll-free number at

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downtown community wants more retail, and they really appreciate local businesses trying to better their community. I’ve had such a great response to my vintage and style! It’s also been great meeting new clients. They really appreciate my quality of merchandise. I get so many complements on my Dog Station that’s outside. So not only do I have new clients, but I have my round of neighborhood dogs on a daily.

seamless

Bunky and Misty

Dress Downtown Business owners in the orbit of retail have to shine brighter than ever by constantly reinventing themselves... by Corbin Chamberlin The economic clinch is still lingering. Business owners in the orbit of retail have to shine brighter than ever by constantly reinventing themselves, and yet, at the same time, stay true to the roots of their brand to maintain a comprehensible consumer image. In addition, those dealing in fashion have to answer to the never-satisfied beast of ‘trend’ -- in today, out tomorrow. Two Phoenix stores that are privately owned and flourishing are Bunky Boutique and Vintage By Misty. Bunky Boutique is a hip and happening store owned by Rachel Malloy. Bunky, which has been open for four years, carries contemporary brands that are unique and approachable in design and price. The explosion of glamour on Central Avenue, otherwise known as Vintage By Misty, is a mishmash of Missoni and other vintage gems that is owned by Misty Guerriero. The store targets those looking to purchase a serious vintage treasure -- not those looking to buy on the cheap. It’s worth every penny. I sit down with Misty and Rachel, two owners of very different stores that have found their ‘niche’ and are thriving because of it. How has the local downtown community responded to your store? Rachel Mallory - Downtown Phoenix has completely embraced Bunky Boutique since we opened four years ago. The central Phoenix community is enthusiastic about supporting mom-and-pop businesses, and they crave the eclectic experience that independent businesses add to a neighborhood. Fellow business and boutique owners are always sending customers our way, and it’s a relationship of working together, rather than of being in competition. Misty Guerriero -The downtown community is excited. They love that I decided to venture and bring Vintage by Misty to the downtown! I feel the 16

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How would you best describe your customer? R.M The Bunky customer is looking for timeless styles, but with a twist. They love supporting local businesses, and they appreciate finding unique and innovative pieces for their wardrobe. V.G I have very cool/chic cliental that loves being different. It’s really easy when you offer something for everyone with a range of price points. My clients love that I travel all over the world to find my vintage treasures. VBM is the place to shop if you want that one-of-a-kind look, and my clients love that. What aspects do you contribute to the success of your store? R.M Our loyal customers and the word of mouth success that we have. We also work very hard, and keep consistent hours and are open seven days a week. V.G Work, work, work and more work! Putting my clients first, this is the key. Always keeping the store fresh with unique merchandise. What makes your store unique? R.M One of the things that makes us unique is our location, with its modernyet-comfortable vibe. We also stock merchandise that you cannot find at other retailers in the valley. We go out of our way to find unique jewelers and clothing that isn’t at other boutiques. We are also very price-conscious, and provide a selection that is high quality but doesn’t break the bank. V.G I don’t even know where to begin. First I believe it would be me, I have a great sense of style and I really love what I do. I’m not just selling clothes. I really want each and every one of my clients to feel good when they walk out of VBM. They are my walking billboard. VBM has a sense of confidence and comfort, and that’s how I want my clients to feel when wearing or accessorizing their self or home. VBM not only carries great vintage styles, but offers great designers like Dior, Gucci, YSL, Chanel, and Missoni. I love my work, and we all know when you do something in life that’s out of love, it shows.

What did Rachel and Misty say about this season’s trends? Visit DPHXJ.COM/FASHION and find out.

D P h x J . co m


art by design Phoenix Art Museum’s fashion design curator Dennita Sewell is one of those responsible for placing the Valley of The Sun in fashion’s spotlight. Sewell has appeared on Martha Stewart’s television show and, most recently, her newest exhibit has been in Elle magazine and the topic of conversation with Andre Leon Talley via Vogue.com. In the Elle article, Andre talks with Yves Saint Laurent’s Stefano Pilati, expressing his interest in the Giorgio di Sant’Angelo exhibit at Phoenix Art Museum. The late Giorgio di Sant’Angelo could be considered a keystone designer of the look ‘hippie chic,’ as Sant’Angelo mesmerized with bold prints and ultra-feminine cuts in his designs. The exhibit will explore Giorgio’s work through the early 1970s on. The exhibit opened runs through February 12, 2012. I discussed the exhibit and the logic behind it with Dennita. Why Sant’Angelo versus another designer known for ‘hippie chic?’ Giorgio di Sant’ Angelo was a very innovative and important designer. I don’t feel he has gotten the recognition in the history books that he deserves yet. While his work has been shown as part of other exhibitions, they have tended to divide his early work from his later work. I am hoping that in our exhibition, the first to survey his career, that people will be able to see the larger picture by seeing all the work in the same room, and be able to see the connections and the impact of his career. What inspired the idea of curating an exhibit around Giorgio di Sant’Angelo? I learned about di Sant’Angelo’s work when I was collections manager at the Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His work was stored in a bank of drawers in the archive. I remember looking in the drawers with amazement at the fabrics and colors he combined. His designs were distinct and completely unlike anything else in the collection. Then someone showed me a fantastic photo editorial from Look magazine (from) October 1970 which featured di Sant’ Angelo’s “Natives of the Americas” collection. I was in awe of how brilliantly styled the Native Americaninspired works were, and how cool they looked in the setting of the Grand Canyon. I became a fan, but I had no idea at the time that I would ever live in Arizona.

Around that time Martin Price donated di Sant’ Angelo’s entire archive to the Costume Institute. Fast forward to the year 2000, when I moved to Arizona. I thought of di Sant’ Angelo and how great it would be to show the works here, a region he was so inspired by. But the works are very limited, as not a lot of them were produced and most of the iconic pieces were already in museums. What are some of your favorite articles from the collection? I love the natives of the Americas pieces. They have such an aura of romance about them, yet they have a strong feminine image. This collection demonstrates his virtuoso combining of the primitive and the technological in design and fabrics. For example, he uses natural shapes of antelope skins for wrap skirts and jackets with a Lycra spandex T-shirt with an abstracted graphic that emulates native American body painting. The way he uses color is fantastic throughout his career. The gallery will be very colorful and very cheerful. They reflect his personality. You’ve mentioned that Sant’Angelo had nativeinspired designs in the ’70s. Elaborate on that. This collection was his way of saying thank you to America for giving him the opportunity to work as a successful designer. It was an homage to America. He wanted to make the point to the fashion community that there was a tremendous amount of inspiration right here, and that designers didn’t need to look to Europe all the time for direction and chic. Do you expect the exhibit to travel to another museum? We are open to the discussion, but there are no current plans to. Fashion exhibitions are hard to travel because the mannequins are so specific. We are very lucky in that Phoenix Art Museum has invested in a stock of high-end mannequins that work very well for Museum exhibitions. Textiles, like works on paper, are susceptible to light damage. That also contributes to why we have to limit the length of time they are on view, and why they travel less frequently than other types of exhibitions.

Later, Richard Martin did American Ingenuity, an exhibition which featured several innovative American designers, including di Sant’ Angelo. Around that time I met Martin Price, di Sant’ Angelo’s creative assistant, who came by to help with dressing and styling them. He was kind and generous with sharing information about di Sant’ Angelo. D P h x J . co m

So what exactly is “Hippie anti-fashion style? Visit DPHXJ.COM/FASHION and find out.

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eats & drinks

favorite bites and sips The DPJ team shares favorite hotspots. Windsor – the drinks are fab, the staff is courteous and knowledgeable, the music is great, plus I can grab an ice cream next door. - Jason Garcia, art director

Hanny’s – without a doubt. A spectacular building that is a perfect example of adaptive reuse. Hanny’s is classy, stylish, and urban with the best manhattans in town. - J. Seth Anderson, writer

Alice Cooperstown – Iconic destination deserving more credit for its place in the downtown sports scene and hometown connections. - Kyle Maki, blogger

Sidebar – exceptional, personal service, often from the owner. Creative drink specials, awesome beer selection, rotating art exhibition, retro movies on the TV, great music and DJs. A fun time at 5pm or 2am! - Jack London, photographer

Crecent Ballroom’s Cocina 10 – Phoenix’s best small music venue has an equally impressive kitchen. - Dustin Moore, Invexi web team

Phoenix Public Market – really great deli food, congenial staff, local wine, terrific coffee, groceries, tamales and real mint chip ice-cream! - Susan Copeland, writer

Carlys Bistro - Nothing is better than a beer and hummus late at night, am I right? Carlys rotates one of my favorite beers, Full Sail Amber, on tap. And make sure you try the soup of the day. It’s always delicious. - Alexandra Flamini, writer

I love Pita Jungle for the “secluded but urban” ambiance of the patio, and the people watching - Jill Bernstein, communications manager

Would you like to wine and dine? Visit our website for more information. DPHXJ.COM/EATS-DRINKS

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Book your Holiday Events & Lunches Now! Office Parties. Group Dinners. Happy Hours. Reserve Today. 602.795.1792

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destination map

‘tis the season

to shop

Downtown offers plenty of options for those looking for unique gifts. The map on the following pages offers over 100 destinations in the Greater Downtown area, many of which are open on Artlink’s First and Third Friday’s Art Walk. Explore, buy, grab a bite and enjoy! Uptown

Map

Pages 20 – 22

Midtown

enix... Only on o h P n w to n w o D in ly On

.com Downtow: BlnogPs /hTwoitteer /nFaix cebook / Flickr

Join the community

Visit us online for • A schedule of events • Maps • Coupons + deals • Dining guide • What to do • Directories

Downtown

The Urban Heart of Arizona

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For First Fridays and every day in between Phoenix

Art Museum

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Evans Churchill Roosevelt Row

602.256.MADE madephx.com

Downtown Core

Grand Ave

1) First Studio 631 N. 1st Ave. #101 602.957.7760 firststudio.net

1) The Trunk Space 1506 W Grand Ave. 602-256-6006 thetrunkspace.com

2) Artlink A.E. England Gallery 424 N. Central Ave. aeenglandgallery.com

2) Indie ArtHouse 1504 W Grand Ave. Facebook.com/IndieArtHouse

3) Hotel San Carlos/Ghost Lounge 202 N. Central Ave. 602.253.4121 hotelsancarlos.com

3) The Bikini Lounge 1502 W Grand Ave. 602-252-0472 Facebook > The Bikini Lounge Phoenix

4) Downtown Phoenix Ambassadors 101 N. 1st Ave. #190 602.495.1500 downtownphoenix.com

4) Kooky Krafts Shop 1500 W Grand Ave. 602-391-4016 Facebook > Kooky Krafts Shop

1) CO+HOOTS 825 N. 7th St. incohoots.com

5) Wells Fargo History Museum 145 W. Adams St. 602.378.1578 wellsfargohistory.com/museums

5) Valley Pizza Downtown 1348 W Roosevelt St. 602-513-1248 valleypizzadowntown.com

46) Breadfruit 108 E. Pierce St. 602.267.1266 thebreadfruit.com

1) Roosevelt Church 924 N. 1st St. 602.495.3191 rooseveltchurch.org

23) JoBot Coffee 918 N. 5th St. jobot-coffee.com

2) Warehouse 1005 1005 N. 1st St. 602.258.1481

24) Jones Studio 916 N. 5th St.

3) The Firehouse 1015 N. 1st St. 602.300.7575 strivedreams.com

25) The Lost Leaf 914 N. 5th St. 602.258.0014 thelostleaf.org

4) Afida’s Hair Culture 116 E. Roosevelt St. 602.258.4992 myspace.com/afidashairculture

26) Chaos of the Earth Cafe 910 N. 5th St. 602.633.3008

5) Golden Rule Tattoo 120 E. Roosevelt St. 602.374.7533 thegoldenruletattoo.com

27) Spread the Weird Animation Studio 906 N. 5th St. 602.441.5877 spreadtheweird.com

6) Carly’s 128 E. Roosevelt St. 602.262.2759 carlysbistro.com

28) Conspire 901 N. 5th St. 602.228.7373 myspace.com/conspirephoenix

2) Welcome Diner 924 E. Roosevelt St. 602.495.1111 marthaandmary.net/welcomediner

6) Anderson Studio 805 W. Madison St. 602.369.7798 michaelandersonsculpture.net

7) Art Awakenings 1014 N. 2nd St. 602.340.1675 artawakenings.org

29) Galeria de los Muertos 905 N. 5th St. galeriadelosmuertos.org

3) Alwun House 1204 E. Roosevelt St. 602.253.7887 alwunhouse.org

7) Hanny’s 40 N. 1st St. 602.252.2285 hannys.net

30) Longhouse Studio 917 N. 5th St. 602.423.8396

Historic Roosevelt

8) Revolver Records 918 N. 2nd St. 602.795.4980 revolveraz.com 9) just breathe, a wellness sanctuary 828 N. 2nd St. 602.256.1400 justbreathewellness.com 10) FilmBar 815 N. 2nd St. 602.595.9187 thefilmbarphx.com 11) Monorchid Creative Studios 214 E. Roosevelt St. 602.253.0339 monorchid.com 12) Phoenix Center for the Arts 1202 N. 3rd St. 602.262.4627 phoenix.gov/PARKS/phxctr.html 13) Kitchen Sink Studios 828 N. 3rd St. 602.258.3150 kitchensinkstudios.com 14) Roosevelt Tavern 816 N. 3rd St. 602.254.2561 15) Gallery Red 812 N. 3rd St. 16) Phoenicia Association 821 N. 3rd St. 602.441.3385 wearephoenicia.com 17) Holgas 821 N. 3rd St. 602.487.5134 18) A. Hazel 724 N. 4th St. B. Punkouture 718 N. 4th St. 602.617.punk punkouture.com C. gallery:SUHU 335 E. McKinley St. gallerysuhu.wordpress.com 19) Bliss/ReBar 901 N. 4th St. 602.795.1792 blissonfourth.com 20) Modified Arts 407 E. Roosevelt St. 602.462.5516 modifiedarts.org 21) eye lounge a contemporary art space 419 E. Roosevelt St. 602.430.1490 eyelounge.com

22) MADE Art Boutique 922 N. 5th St.

31) Think Graphics 917 N. 5th St. 602.466.7311 thinkpro.net 32) Pravus Gallery 501 E. Roosevelt St. 602.363.2552 pravusgallery.com 33) Gallery Celtica 509 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.2160 galleryceltica.com 34) Hayden Art & Design Studio 509 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.2160 35) Daughters of the Frozen North 511 E. Roosevelt St. 602.252.4762 36) Five15 arts 515 E. Roosevelt St. 602.256.0150 515arts.com

47) Alta Space @ Alta Phoenix Lofts 600 N. 4th St. 602.374.7133 altaphoenixlofts.com 48) Space 55 636 E. Pierce St. 602.663.4032 space55.org 49) Valley Youth Theatre 525 N. First St. 602.253.8188 vyt.com

Garfield

1) Cheuvront Restaurant & Wine Bar 1326 N. Central Ave. 602.307.0022 cheuvronts.com 2) Irish Cultural Center 1106 N. Central Ave. 602.258.0109 azirish.com 3) Cycle 1100 N. Central Ave. Facebook > Cyclephoenix Jordre Studio jordre.com 4) Portland’s 105 W. Portland St 602.795.7480 portlandsphoenix.com 5) Fair Trade 1020 N. 1st Ave. 602.354.8150 azfairtrade.com

37) Regular Gallery 918 N. 6th St./Alley

6) The Olney Gallery at Trinity Cathedral 100 W. Roosevelt St. 602.254.7126 azcathedral.org

38) Butter Toast Boutique 908 N. 6th St. 602.258.3458 buttertoastboutique.com

7) Centurion Restaurant 214 W. Roosevelt St. 602.687.8796 centurionrestaurant.com

39) The Roose Parlour & Spa 906 N. 6th St. 602.274.6942 theroose.com

8) Lola Coffee 1001 N. 3rd Ave. 602.252.2265 lolacoffeebar.com

40) Grow-Op Boutique 902 N. 6th St.

9) Pita Jungle 1001 N. 3rd Ave. 602.258.7482 pitajungle.com

41) Perihelion Arts 610 E. Roosevelt St. 602.334.6299 perihelionarts.com 42) Moira 215 E. McKinley St. #102 602.254.5085 moirasushi.com 43) Sens 705 N. 1st St. #120 602.340.9777 sensake.com 44) Turf 705 N. 1st St. 602.296.5043 theturfpub.com 45) PHX Public Market Urban Grocery & Wine Bar 14 E. Pierce St. phoenixpublicmarket.com

10) Great Arizona Puppet Theater 302 W. Latham St. 602.262.2050 azpuppets.org 11) Cibo 603 N. 5th Ave. 602.441.2697 cibophoenix.com 12) Local Breeze 606 N. 4th Ave. 602.368.3613 localbreeze.com 13) Crescent Ballroom 308 N. 2nd Ave. crescentphx.com 14) Mercantile 828 N. Central Ave. 602.410.9475 phoenixmercantile.com

8) Herberger Theater Center 222 E. Monroe St. 602.254.7399 herbergertheater.org 9) Galeria 147 - AZ Latino Arts & Cultural Ctr 147 E. Adams St. 602.254.9817 alacaz.org 10) Artlink Heritage Square Gallery 115 N. 6th St. 602.264.8232 artlinkhsgallery.com 11) First Fridays at Heritage Square 115 N. 6th St. 602.264.8232 ffinheritagesquare.com 12) Rossen House Museum 113 N. 6th St. 602.261.8063 rossonhousemuseum.org 13) Pizzeria Bianco 623 E. Adams St. 602.258.8300 pizzeriabianco.com 14) Nobuo at Teeter House 622 E. Adams St. 602.254.0600 nobuofukuda.com 15) CityScape 1 East Washington St. 602.772.3900 cityscapephoenix.com Arrogant Butcher Charming Charlie Designer District Five Guys Burgers and Fries Jimmy John’s Lucky Strike Oakville Grocery* Rasputin Vodka Bar* Republic of Couture Stand Up Live Urban Outfitters Vitamin T West of Soho 16) Sing High Chop Suey House 27 West Madison 602-253-7848 singhighphx.com 17) Coach & Willie’s 412 S. 3rd St. 602.254.5272 coachandwillies.com 18) Foundry on First* 402 S. 1st St. foundryaz.com 19) The Duce 525 S. Central Ave. 602.866.3823 theducephx.com *Pending opening

6) Bragg’s Pie Factory 1301 W Grand Ave. A. Bragg’s Main Gallery Facebook.com/BraggsPieFactory B. My Goodness Cakes mygoodnesscakes.com C. Lady Luck Tattoo ladylucktattooaz.com D. Barry Sparkman Studio 786-543-2207 barrysparkman.com E. Icaro Studio F. Moderncat Studio 480-203-6523 moderncatstudio.com G. Studio 8 602-252-0864 studio8phx.com 7) The Lodge Art Studio 1231 W Grand Ave. 480-329-7998 Facebook > The Lodge Art Studio 8) Shop Devious 1229 W Grand Ave. 602-330-5794 shopdevious.com 9) Paisley Town 1030 W Grand Ave. A. Paisley Violin Café 602-254-7843 thepaisley.com B. Lazy Lab Art Studio 602-485-0441 thepaisley.com C. S.P. Villain 602 410-0411 facebook.com > S.P. Villain D. Annie Boomer Vintage annieboomer.com E. Dragonfly Boutique 602-687-7649 funkydragonfly.com F. Wicked Wear 602-522-0625 thepaisley.com G. Be.Headed Salon 602-434-4224 beheadedsalon.com 10) La Melgosa 1023 W Grand Ave. A. Phoenix Fall Space 602-525-0643 phoenixfallspace.com B. Deus Ex Machina Gallery 602-487-0669 sites.google.com/site/improbableart C. Palm Reader Pottery PalmReaderPottery.yolasite.com D. Rusty Spoke Bicycle Collective E. Gallery Serendipity 480-228-1500 Facebook > Gallery Serendipity 11) Gallery Marsiglia 1018 W Grand Ave. 602-573-3933 gallerymarsiglia.com 12) Aviary 1020 W Grand Ave. 602-367-4019 13) Soul Invictus 1022 W Grand Ave. 602-214-4344 soulinvictus.com 14) Tilt Gallery 919 W Fillmore St. 602-716-5667 tiltgallery.com


Uptown 1) Postino Wine Cafe 5144 N. Central Ave. 602.274.5144 postinowinecafe.com 2) Practical Art 5070 N. Central Ave. 602.264.1414 practical-art.com

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3) Esprit Décor Gallery 5555 N. 7th St. #122 602.248.0700 espritdecor.com 4) St Francis 111 E. Camelback Rd. 602.200.8111 stfrancisaz.com

Camelback Rd.

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8

2

9

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10

7th St.

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Central Ave.

7th Ave.

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5) Frances 10 W. Camelback Rd. 602.279.5463 francesvintage.com 6) Stinkweeds 12 W. Camelback Rd. 602.248.9461 stinkweeds.com 7) Smeeks 14 W. Camelback Rd. 602.279.0538 facebook.com/smeeks.phoenix

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12 13

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3rd Ave.

10

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8) Maizie’s Cafe 4750 N. Central Ave. #B1 602.274.2828 maiziescafe.com

Steele Indian School Park

9) Lola Coffee 4700 N. Central Ave. 602.265.5652 lolacoffeebar.com

2

Indian School Rd.

10) Hula’s Modern Tiki 4700 N. Central Ave. 602.265.8454 hulasmoderntiki.com

2 3

3

11) The Torch Theatre 4721 N. Central Ave. 602.456.2876 thetorchtheatre.com

MidTown 1) LUX Coffee Bar 4404 N. Central Ave. #1 602.266.6469 luxcoffee.com

3

Osborn Rd.

4

2) George & Dragon 4240 N. Central Ave. 602.241.0018 georgeanddragonpub.net 3) FEZ 3815 N. Central Ave. #B 602.287.8700 fezoncentral.com 4) Willo North Gallery 2811 N. 7th Ave. 602.717.2499 willonorth.com

Thomas Rd.

4

5

5) Wild Thaiger 2631 N. Central Ave. 602.241.8995 wildthaiger.com

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Montgomery Park

6) Durant’s 2611 N. Central Ave. 602.264.5967 durantsaz.com

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8

Phoenix

10

McDowell Rd.

7th St.

3rd St.

Central Ave.

3rd Ave.

7th Ave.

9

8

Art Museum

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7) Switch Restaurant & Wine Bar 2603 N. Central Ave. 602.264.2295 switchofarizona.com

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8) Heard Museum 2301 N. Central Ave. 602.252.8848 heard.org 9) Garfield Gallery 316 W. McDowell Rd. 602.349.3049 garfieldgallery.com

10) After Hours Gallery 116 W. McDowell Rd. #120 602.710.2398 afterhoursgallery.com

3) studio 6 at the artery 623 E. Indian School Rd. 602.332.1849 studio6.mosaicglobe.com

11) Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave. 602.257.1880 phxart.org

4) Bards Books 3508 N. 7th St #145 602.274.7530 bardsbooks.com

7th Ave./Melrose 1) The Academy Gallery at the Junior Drama Club Academy 4805 N. 7th Ave. 602.434.9265 jdcaweb.com 2) Black Lantern Tattoo 4636 N. 7th Ave. 602.332.4419 blacklanterntattoo.com 3) HTC 4634 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0088 htcaz.com 4) Olive in Paris 4624 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0966 oliveinparis.blogspot.com 5) Paris Envy 4624 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.0966 parisenvy.blogspot.com 6) America’s Taco Shop 4447 N. 7th Ave. 602.515.0856 americastacoshop.net

5) Urban Beans 3508 N. 7th St. #100 602.595.2244 urbanbeans.com 6) The Main Ingredient 2337 N. 7th Street 602.843.6246 tmialehouse.com 7) Living Room Wine Bar 2333 N. 7th St. 602.229.1289 livingroomwinebar.com 8) SuTRA Midtown 2317 N. 7th St. 602.252.9525 sutramidtown.com 9) MacAlpines Soda Fountain 2303 N. 7th St. 602.262.5545 macalpines1928.com 10) La Piccola Cucina 2241 N. 7th St. 602.358.7415 andyslpc.com

7) Blueberry Deluxe Boutique 702 W. Montecito Ave. 602.717.8376 blueberrydeluxe.com

11) Seven Hookah Bar & Lounge 2237 N. 7th St. 602.252.2552 sevenloungeaz.com

8) Go Kat Go/Bo’s Funky Stuff 4314 N. 7th Ave. 602.234.2528 go-kat-go.com

12) Coronado Cafe 2201 N. 7th St. 602.258.5149 coronadocafe.com

9) Retro Ranch 4303 N. 7th Ave. 602.297.1971 www.RetroRanch.net

13) America’s Taco Shop 2041 N. 7th St. 602.682.5627 americastacoshop.net

10) Home Again Antiques and Home Furnishings 4302 N. 7th Ave. 602.424.0488 cochrans.com/homeagain

14) Vikki Reed Studio 2009 N. 7th St. 602.943.6173 vikkireedwatercolors.com/ chakramandalas.net

11) Z Girl Club 4301 N. 7th Ave. 602.265.3233 zgirlclub.com

15) Young Arts Arizona Ltd. At SEAD Architecture+Construction 2009 N. 7th St. 602.852.3605 youngartsaz.org

12) Bend-a-light 4232 N. 7th Ave. #C 602.278.6855 bendalightneon.com 13) Wag n’ Wash 4230 N. 7th Ave. 602.462.WASH wagnwash.com/phx 14) Exposed Studio & Gallery 4225 N. 7th Ave. 602.248.8030 exposedgallery.com 15) Copper Star Coffee 4220 N. 7th Ave. 602.266.2136 copperstarcoee.com 16) Flo’s on 7th 4116 N. 7th Ave. 602.254.7861 ocrit.org/oson7th.html

7th St./Coronado 1) Urban Cookies 4711 N. 7th St. 602.451.4335 urbancookies.com 2) The Collective at the Artery 623 E. Indian School Rd. 602.332.1849

16) Tuck Shop 2245 N. 12th St. 602.354.2980 tuckinphx.com


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Downtown Phoenix Journal  

November-December edition of Downtown Phoenix Journal Magazine.

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