State of Downtown 2024

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STATE OF DOWNTOWN

A

look into the economic health of

Downtown New Orleans.

2024
LETTERS FROM LEADERSHIP ....................................................... 2 STAFF & BOARD ............................................................................. 4 STATE OF DOWNTOWN: HIGHLIGHTS ......................................... 5 DEFINING DOWNTOWN .................................................................. 6 DOWNTOWN DEMOGRAPHIC DETAILS ....................................... 7 DISTRICT MAP ................................................................................. 8 OFFICE .............................................................................................. 9 RETAIL ........................................................................................... 11 TOURISM + HOSPITALITY .......................................................... 12 MOBILITY + TRANSPORTATION ............................................... 13 TECH + INNOVATION .................................................................. 15 ARTS + CULTURE ......................................................................... 17 HOUSING SUPPLY ....................................................................... 18 DDD 2023 CLEANING INITIATIVES .............................................................. 19 PUBLIC SAFETY INITIATIVES .................................................. 20 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC SPACE ........................... 21 MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS ........................................ 22 Table
Contents
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DEAR FRIENDS

On behalf of the great State of Louisiana, I would like to extend a warm welcome to the attendees of the 2024 Downtown Development District ‘State of Downtown’ Breakfast.

The Downtown Development District (DDD) is the heartbeat of the Crescent City. I applaud the DDD’s continuing efforts to grow the Bio-technology, Retail, Higher Education, and Tourism sectors. I am especially pleased by recent collaborations between the Downtown Development District and my administration in infrastructure improvement, public safety, and economic development.

With large concerts, conventions, the conclusion of the NBA regular season, the French Quarter Festival, New Orleans Jazz Fest, and, of course, Super Bowl LIX upcoming, the State is committed to assisting local and regional efforts to make Downtown New Orleans as attractive, safe, and prosperous as possible.

I wish you a productive and fruitful meeting.

For Louisiana, Governor Jeff Landry

CITIZENS OF NEW ORLEANS

I am so excited for this year’s State of Downtown. As one of the cultural and economic focal points in New Orleans, Downtown has always been a priority for my administration. The city’s Downtown area provides diverse career opportunities and is recognized as the gateway to the city’s thriving tourism economy.

Our Downtown has multiple access points for public transportation and our iconic streetcar lines, and this past year, we’ve been working to diversify our economy by growing opportunities in the biosciences that will position the BioDistrict to help change the game for the city’s economic landscape.

The City of New Orleans has always been known as a city that is “Built to Host.” I am so excited about the many events and opportunities to showcase our culture over the next year. Kicking things off with Super Bowl LIX on February 9, 2025, and then the global recognition of the 20th anniversary of Katrina will showcase New Orleans on the world stage. Couple that with Mardi Gras and our annual festivals, which will create a transformative year and economic impact for our city.

Thank you for supporting downtown and our great city; it is truly our time to shine!

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DOWNTOWN NEW ORLEANS

On behalf of the DDD Board of Commissioners, I am pleased to bring you the State of Downtown 2024.

The last year has been an exciting one for Downtown New Orleans. As Chair of the DDD, I can confidently report that our Downtown is performing well, and we continue to see private investment make a difference in our skyline. As you read through this report, you will see various metrics that highlight the current state of Downtown and its importance to our great city. For example, Downtown New Orleans collects over $130 million in sales taxes each year –just over one third of the total sales tax collected citywide. Downtown is also the largest employment center in the state of Louisiana employing citizens from throughout the city and region.

It’s through important data points like these that DDD can tell the story of Downtown New Orleans. Whether marketing our unique collection of neighborhoods to outside investors to open a new retail store on Canal Street or to local citizens looking for a night out on the town, the DDD team takes a data-first approach. With data, we can determine that the office vacancy rate in New Orleans outperforms nearby cities like Atlanta or Birmingham. We are also able to showcase trends in visitation like the fact that 65% of total visitors to Downtown came from over 250 miles away last year.

As you read through the report, I encourage you to take these stories to your friends, family, and colleagues. Thank you for your ongoing interest in Downtown New Orleans –

I look forward to another exceptional year of growth, investment, and positive change.

Sincerely,

DEAR DOWNTOWN STAKEHOLDERS

I am truly honored to share with you the 2024 State of Downtown report – a culmination of data points, research, and year-in-review of accomplishments for Downtown New Orleans.

Across all economic sectors, Downtown has seen a year of recovery and investment. With Super Bowl LIX just around the corner, all hands are on deck to ensure a sensational and attractive public realm. I am happy to showcase some of the accomplishments of the DDD team throughout this report. These accomplishments span everything from enhanced cleaning services to growing marketing impressions.

In keeping in line with our priority on clean and safe activity, DDD completed a variety of new campaigns, contracts, and programs aimed at supporting a more attractive built environment. For example, a new cleaning contract went into effect on January 1st with a renewed emphasis on Canal Street and the adjacent “100 blocks.” The new service brings more manpower to the neediest areas of Downtown to help enhance the experience for residents and visitors alike while helping to attract new retail offerings. Thanks to Senator Royce Duplessis and his efforts to avail state funding support, we also installed 3 new Real Time Crime Center (RTCC) cameras along Canal Street to deter crime and assist with criminal prosecution Downtown.

Another example of DDD’s emphasis on cleaning up Downtown was the signing of a CEA with the City of New Orleans to provide dedicated code enforcement services to the District. Since starting their duties in January 2023, these individuals have brought over $70 thousand in new fines to derelict properties with a focus on property maintenance violations like graffiti, broken windows, and structural deficiencies. In addition to supporting code enforcement, DDD also provides façade improvement grants to assist property owners with making necessary improvements. In 2023, DDD funded 18 improvement projects across 13 properties, with more of these previously funded projects on track for completion in 2024. These projects include complete façade overhauls, security lighting enhancements, and new signage.

As we move quickly into 2024, new projects are on the horizon that will enhance our sense of place through parks and green space. In late 2023, DDD received a grant to support a new Open Space and Parks Activation Plan that will outline recommendations for underutilized spaces. We are also moving forward with design of a reimagined Harmony Circle – funded with state capital outlay dollars – that will serve as a renewed space for community and reflection. Thank you all for your continued interest and support of a thriving Downtown New Orleans.

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Staff + Board

STAFF

Davon Barbour PRESIDENT & CEO

Bianka Brown CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Hunter Hebert CHIEF PLACEMAKING OFFICER

Ashley Mills CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

Ren é Pastorek, AICP CHIEF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Jared Brossett DIRECTOR OF POLICY & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

Donald G. Clouse PUBLIC SAFETY MANAGER

John Roussell PUBLIC SPACE OPERATIONS MANAGER

Esther Boone MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST

Tyler Correa ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST

Meaghan Nguyen ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST

Stuart Taylor FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION SPECIALIST

Francia Barradas CHIEF OF STAFF TO THE PRESIDENT & CEO

Tempestt E. Woods ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Gregory Curtis WINDSOR COURT HOTEL | CHAIR

Carla Major DELGADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE | VICE CHAIR

Chris R. Ross NAI/LATTER & BLUM, INC. | TREASURER

Kristi Taglauer HOTEL PROVINCIAL NEW ORLEANS | SECRETARY COMMISSIONERS

Coleman Adler ADLER’S JEWELRY

William Bradshaw GREEN COAST ENTERPRISES

Damon Burns FINANCE NEW ORLEANS

Alex Glaser JONES WALKER

Leann O. Moses CARVER, DARDEN, KORETZKY, TESSIER, FINN, BLOSSMAN & AREAUX, LLC

Edwin Murray LSU HEALTH NEW ORLEANS

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State of Downtown: Highlights

Top 3 Industries in Downtown: Professional/Technical Services, Healthcare/Medical Services, and Accommodation/Food Services

1584 Hotel Rooms in the Development Pipeline

32 Retail Openings in 2023

$892M+ in Real Estate Investment Value in the Development Pipeline

9 Incubators and 7 Co-working Spaces in Downtown

23 Downtown Transit Routes (Bus, Streetcar, and Ferry)

6.9M Unique Visitors to Downtown in 2023

1000+ Housing Units Delivered Over the Last 5 Years

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Defining Downtown

The Downtown Development District of the City of New Orleans (DDD) was created by the Louisiana Legislature

Area

Downtown New Orleans stands as the largest center of employment in the State of Louisiana. Moreover, this collection of neighborhoods represents nearly $1B in property value.

1.2 Walkable Square Miles Residents

3,882

Source: Census 2022 5-Year ACS

Though Downtown comprises of just 0.7% of New Orleans’ total geographic area, it still:

Contributes to 14% of the City’s Real Estate Property Taxable Value 14%

City of New Orleans: $5,571,784,820

Downtown Development District: $776,085,950

Registered Businesses

1,206

Source: City of New Orleans Department of Permits and Safety

Downtown represents 1/3 of the City’s total sales tax collection

$131,525,963

Downtown Development District

City of New Orleans $381,003,339

Source: City of New Orleans, 2023 approximate

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Industry
Demographic
Source: Census on the Map (2021) PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND TECHNICAL SERVICES 16.90% HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE 16.70% ACCOMMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES 14.80% ADMINISTRATION & SUPPORT, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REMEDIATION 9.70% FINANCE AND INSURANCE 6.60% PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 6.40% INFORMATION 5.80% RETAIL TRADE 3.50% ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT, AND RECREATION 3.40% MINING, QUARRYING, AND OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 3.20% MANAGEMENT OF COMPANIES AND ENTERPRISES 3.20% OTHER SERVICES (EXCLUDING PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 2.40% REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL AND LEASING 1.80% TRANSPORTATION AND WAREHOUSING 1.60% WHOLESALE TRADE 1.50% EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 0.80% MANUFACTURING 0.70% CONSTRUCTION 0.50% UTILITIES 0.40% AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, FISHING AND HUNTING 0.10% Race + Ethnicity Source: Decennial 2020 Census White 56.9% Black 19.0% Two or More 7.8% Asian 7.4% Single Race Other 0.9% Hispanic or Latino 7.8% American Indian or Alaskan Native 0.02% Nearly 57% OF WORKERS Downtown travel to work from within Orleans Parish Residential Median Age 49.64 Source: Census 2022 5-Year ACS Median Household Income $104,934 Source: Weighted Avg of Available ACS 5 Year 2022 Block Groups New Orleans 57% Metairie 12% Gretna 5% Marrero 4% Kenner 3% Harvey 3% Slidell 3% Westwego 1% Chalmette 1% Mandeville 1% Other 10% Source: Placer.ai (2023) 6
Breakdown Where Workers Live Downtown
Details

District Map

C A E S A R S S UP E RDOME S MOO T HIE K ING CE N T E R T r i a n gl e S t S .Diamond S .DiamondCONVENTIONCENTERBLVD. MIS S IS S IP P I RI V E R HE RI TAGE PA RK DUNC A N P L A Z A L OUIS A R MS T RONG PA RK CH A MP IONS S QUA RE H YAT T HO T E L S A E NGE R T HE AT RE T UL A NE ME DICA L CE N T E R S T L OUIS CE ME TA RY B AS IN S T VIS I T ORS C T R M AH AL I A JACKS ON T HE AT RE NE W ORL E A NS M A RRIO T T S HE R AT ON NE W OL RE A NS CI T Y H A L L H A R MON Y CIRCL E L E G AC Y PA RK LOYOLAAVE
. S . R A MPA R T S T E L KS P L S CL A IB ORNE AVE T ULAN E AVE . N CL A IB ORNE AVE O R L E A N S A V E B AS IN S T . T S L A N A C N. R A MPA R T S T BOURBON S T P O N T C H A R T R A I N E X P Y . E V A D R A W O H T S L A N A C Dryades St BaronneSt CarondeletSt St.CharlesSt. ChurchSt. CampSt MagazineSt. ConstanceSt Laf a yette St . Natchez St . PicayunneSt C a pdevill e St . Girod St . Notre Dame St . TchoupitoulasSt CommerceSt ConstanceSt. Andrew Higgins Blvd . Poeyf arre St . CJohnChuchill haseSt . GaiennieSt . AnnunciationSt. TchoupitoulasSt. S.PetersSt. FultonSt. JuliaSt . JuliaSt . St .Joseph St . Laf a yette St . PerdidoSt . Union S t . Gravie r S t . C om mon S t . 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0 4 0 0 5 0 0 6 0 0 8 0 0 9 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 2 1600 1500 1400 1300 1200 1000 900 800 700 600 500 O’KeefeAve. S.RampartSt Roosevelt Way PennSt Carroll St. Girod St . S .Maestri Pl . L A FAY E T T E S QUA RE N AT ION A L W WII MUS E UM NE W ORL E A NS E RNE S T N MORI A L C ONVE N T ION CE N T E R RIVE RWA L K OU T L E T S A L GIE RS F E RRY T E RMIN A L CA N A L P L ACE AUDUB ON AQUA RIUM & AUDUB ON INS E C TA RIUM N .Maestri Pl . Commercial Jul i a S t . Magnolia Ave. W StadiumDr. Lasalle St Lasalle St S LibertySt LoyolaCt. LasalleSt S.LibertySt. Gravi er S t S u gar Bowl D r . FreretSt. S.RobertsonSt ClaraSt Perd i d o S t Howard A ve . POYDRAS ST . S Rober ton St N Rob er ton St S V illere St La S alle St S Lib er t y St S S ar atoga St Mar ais St Mar ais St N V illere St N V illere St Treme St Treme St Treme St Croz at St B a sin St Croz at St I b e r v i ll e S t B i e n v i ll e S t C o n t i S t Bur gundy St Dauphine St E xchange Pl Royal St Char tres St W i l k i n s o n S t M a d i s o n S t French Market Pl N Peters St D e c atur St D or siere St Clinton St N.PetersSt N.FrontSt WellsSt. AlgiersFerryRoute S t L o u s S t T o u l o u s e S t S t P e t e r S t S t P e t e r S t O r l e a n s S t S t A n n S t S t A n n S t D u m a i n e S t St Cl aude Ave U r s u n e s A v e C l e v e l a n d A v e I b e r v ll e S t . F OUR S E AS ONS HO T E L C A E S A R S CAS INO WOL DE NB E RG PA RK JACKS ON S QUA RE S T L OUIS CAT HE DR A L P OL ICE CAF É DU MONDE CRUIS E T E RMIN A L S P OL ICE F RE NCH M A RK E T M I S S I S S I P P I RIVER PA RKS F RE NCH QUA R T E R ( VIE U X C A RRÉ ) BIOME DIC A L DIS T RIC T S P OR T S & E NT E R TA INME N T DIS T RIC T WA RE HOU S E & AR T S DIS T RIC T CE N T R A L B U S INE S S DIS T RIC T (CB D) T RE MÉ NE IGHB ORHO OD DIS T RIC T S & PA RKS D O W N T O WNNO LA C O M
POYDRASST
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Class A

Office Inventory

Office Market

With over 17.1M square feet of office space, the office market in Downtown New Orleans serves as the epicenter for a wide range of employment opportunities, catering to both high-skilled professionals and entrylevel workers alike. From corporate headquarters to essential support services, the office market fuels not only the local economy but also the surrounding retail and service sectors.

The Downtown New Orleans office market continues to surpass regional and national trends in both occupancy and “return to office” recovery rates.

Property Address Property Name Square Footage Year Built 701 Poydras St Hancock Whitney Center 1,256,972 1972 201 St. Charles Ave Place St. Charles 1,004,000 1984 1100 Poydras St Energy Centre 757,237 1984 1615 Poydras St DXC Technology Center 696,253 1984 601 Poydras St Pan American Life Center 672,742 1980 1555 Poydras St 1555 Poydras 657,478 1982 365 Canal St One Canal Place 630,875 1979 400 Poydras St 400 Poydras Tower 620,000 1983 1515 Poydras St 1515 Poydras 594,240 1982 909 Poydras St First Bank & Trust Tower 563,550 1987 650 Poydras St Poydras Center 543,799 1983 1450 Poydras St Benson Tower 486,692 1989 935 Gravier St Exchange Centre 414,519 1983 1250 Poydras St 1250 Poydras Plaza 324,904 1978 TOTAL 9,223,261 Source: Costar Source: Costar Office Space Asking Rents/ SF 17.1M Total SF 9.2M Class A SF 4.4M Class B SF 3.4M Class C SF Class A 2024 (YTD): $19.90 Class B 2024 (YTD): $17.68 Class C 2024 (YTD): $14.18 A B C 8

2023

2023

Market Conditions Benchmarked Nationally Return to Office Recovery (Total Number of Visits) (2019 vs 2023) The total number of employee visits to Class A Office Buildings from 2019 to 2023 has recovered 69% Source: Costar Source: Placer.ai 2019 2023 Class A 10.3% Class B 4.9% Class C 3.4% Class A 17.4% Class B 6.5% Class C 5.3% Vacancy Rate Class A Return to Office Visitation 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 Millions of Visits 2019 2.6 2020 1.3 2021 1.1 2022 1.3 2023 1.8
National Vacancy Source: Cushman and Wakefield 19.2% NATIONAL
Downtown Memphis Vacancy Source: Cushman and Wakefield 16% MEMPHIS
Downtown New Orleans Vacancy Source: CoStar 12.2% NEW ORLEANS
2023
2023
2023
Downtown Birmingham Vacancy Source: Cushman and Wakefield 19.6% BIRMINGHAM
Downtown Atlanta Vacancy S ource: Cushman and Wakefield 24.5% ATLANTA 9

Retail

Within Downtown New Orleans’ dynamic retail landscape, the food and beverage industry serves as a catalyst, driving a surge in new establishments and culinary ventures. These enterprises not only showcase the city’s gastronomic diversity but also contribute significantly to its economic fabric, attracting both local patronage and tourist foot traffic.

Downtown occupancy and leasing data suggest a strong and healthy Downtown retail market. Despite some closures during the year, Downtown saw 32 new retail openings in 2023.

Source: DDD Analysis of City of New Orleans Department of Permits and Safety Valid Occupational Licenses Number of Retail Businesses 486 Source: Costar Source: City of New Orleans Department of Safety and Permits 2019 2024 5.84% 11.58% Vacancy Rate 2019 2024 $30.74 $37.38 Asking Rent Types of Establishments Retail Pipeline 6 Fitness & Recreational Sports 251 Eating And Drinking Places 67 Apparel And Accessory Stores 39 Personal Service 29 Misc Retail 22 General Merchant Store 21 Art Gallery 12 Tour Operators 9 Entertainment 8 Food Store 8 Pharmacies & Drug Stores 8 Auto Dealer, Renter, Gas Station 6 Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores # of New Openings 2023 32 95,771 sf Projects under construction Source: Costar Retail Market Conditions 2024 (YTD) Retail - Primary Use (SF) 5.5M Retail - Mixed Use (SF) 1.7M Total SF 7.2M Vacancy Rate (%) 11.58% AVG Asking Rent Per SF (YTD) $37.38 Market Cap Rate (YTD) 6.60% SF under construction 8 10

Tourism + Hospitality

Made up of a diverse array of accommodations, from boutique hotels to renowned chains, Downtown New Orleans stands as a premier destination for travelers seeking to immerse themselves in the city’s vibrant culture. Throughout the years, new hotel developments have been a crucial element of Downtown’s economy, and 2023 was no exception.

Notably, tourism and hospitality represents one of the largest sectors of the Downtown economy. Currently, there are over 1500 new rooms in the development pipeline.

Hotel Market Conditions ROOM OCCUPANCY AVERAGE DAILY RATE REVPAR 2023 (AVG) 61.4% $194.85 $122.17 # of Hotels 109 # of Hotel Rooms 22,332 Source: Costar Tourism Recovery 76% tourism recovery since 2019 Downtown Visitors Source: Placer.ai 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Millions 2019 9.1 2020 4.1 2021 5.1 2022 6.6 2023 6.9 Source: City of New Orleans Department of Safety & Permits Active Hotel Developments Under Construction 1,207 15 Entitled 283 4 Seeking Entitlement 94 6 Total 1,584 25 Projects | Rooms 11

Mobility + Transportation

Urban connectivity in Downtown New Orleans is comprised of a unique network of public transit options, including buses, streetcars, and ferries, coupled with intercity rail, pedestrian-friendly streets, and bike lanes. This system works together to provide efficient transportation for residents, workers, and visitors alike. With investments in electric buses, a new Bus Rapid Transit system, and an upgraded ferry terminal, Downtown New Orleans is preparing for a more sustainable and accessible future.

Downtown continues to be the main transportation hub of the region with numerous transit lines, major thoroughfares, and intercity route connections. In 2024, RTA is set to begin design of a brand-new transit center at Canal and Basin Streets.

Downtown Boardings and Alightings by Mode

Avg, Daily BUS Ridership in Central Business District (CBD) Avg, Daily STREETCAR Ridership in Central Business District (CBD) Source: Regional Transit Authority 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Avg. Daily Passenger Boardings in CBD Neighborhoods Avg. Daily Passenger Boardings in CBD Neighborhoods Spring 2023 (JAN-MAY) Spring 2023 (JAN-MAY) Summer 2023 (JUN-AUG) Summer 2023 (JUN-AUG) Fall 2023 (SEP-DEC) Fall 2023 (SEP-DEC) WEEKDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY # of Transit Routes Downtown Bus 18 Streetcar 4 Ferry 1 Rail (via Amtrak service) 3 12
Visitor Count by Major Streets since 2019 Average Daily Visitor Counts by Corridor Annual Ridership Union Passenger Terminal Source: Amtrak FY 2021: 70,092 FY 2022: 99,672 FY 2023: 156,720 Blue Bike Stations Downtown 25 Miles of Bike Infrastructure 9.32 mi total Transit Infrastructure Active bus and streetcar stops Downtown 108 Fully accessible ADA curb ramps 77 2.78 MI Bike Lane 2.18 MI Buffered Bike Lanes 0.21 MI Bike/Bus Lanes 4.15 MI Shared Lanes Source: City of New Orleans Office of Transportation, New Orleans Bike Blueway Map 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2019 2021 2020 2022 2023 CANAL STREET POYDRAS STREET CONVENTION CENTER BLVD LOYOLA AVENUE Source: Placer.ai 13

Tech and Innovation

Downtown New Orleans is rapidly transforming into a hub for cutting-edge technology. This dynamic shift not only marks a significant departure from the city’s conventional image but also lays the groundwork for a promising ecosystem of entrepreneurship and innovative life science businesses. From state-of-the-art research facilities like the New Orleans BioInnovation Center to collaborative co-working spaces like The Shop at CAC, the infrastructure supporting this wave of emerging tech is fostering an environment where ideas can flourish, and large-scale problems can be solved.

Co-Working Spaces

The local tech and innovation industry is hotter than ever with numerous anchor institutions working to develop a thriving ecosystem of entrepreneurial activity. For example, Idea Village helped 13 companies raise over $14M in capital and supported 81 new jobs in 2023.

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ADDRESS CONNECT HUB 400 Poyrdas Avenue HQ – NEW ORLEANS 201 Saint Charles Ave THE SHOP AT THE CAC 900 Camp Street SCALE NEW ORLEANS 612 Andrew Higgins Drive BLACK TECH LAB 612 Andrew Higgins Drive NEW ORLEANS BIOINNOVATION CENTER 1441 Canal Street WOMEN’S BUSINESS ENTERPRISE COUNCIL SOUTH 401 Saint Joseph Street
Co-Working Spaces Downtown 9 Incubators + Accelerators Downtown Incubators + Accelerators ADDRESS 4.0 SCHOOLS 600 Andrew Higgins Drive ADAPTATION HEALTH 900 Camp Street CAMELBACK VENTURES 612 Andrew Higgins CERES 504 938 Lafayette Street GREATER NEW ORLEANS INC 1100 Poydras IDEA VILLAGE 900 Camp Street INVEST NOLA 1250 Poydras NEW ORLEANS BIOINNOVATION CENTER 1441 Canal Street POWER MOVES NOLA 1100 Poydras Source: Idea Village 14

Higher Education Institutions

Tulane University

10 City Blocks

LSU 8 Square Blocks

Idea Village 2023 Snapshot

171 founders participated in IDEAinstitute in 2023

$14M in capital raised by 13 companies, creating 81 jobs, and achieving a combined annual revenue of $5.4M

4,100 registrants to 2023 New Orleans Entrepreneur Week (NOEW) (58% increase YoY)

$1.7B

total alumni exit value (all time)

Source: Idea Village

New Orleans BioInnovation Center Snapshot (All

95% occupancy within the facility

Time)

350 entrepreneurs served $5M invested by BioFund in 30+ startups

1000+ high wage jobs created

66,000 SF of state-of-the-art wet lab, office, and conference space

$775M in funding raised by BioFund-invested companies

4,500 attendees at 120 public workshops and 600 technical assistance meetings

Source: New Orleans BioInnovation Center

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Arts + Culture

With plenty of historic theaters and contemporary galleries to visit, Downtown New Orleans radiates with creativity and expression, attracting artists, performers, and enthusiasts from around the world. With its rich musical heritage, celebrated culinary scene, and diverse array of cultural events, Downtown serves as a dynamic hub for artistic innovation and exploration.

Arts and culture are paramount to the health and vibrancy of any downtown. Here in New Orleans, this sector continues to grow – for example, the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience recently announced an expansion to include a new research center and event space.

The Art and Warehouse District saw the most unique visitors in 2023 with 4.5M

Museums

AMERICAN ITALIAN CULTURAL CENTER

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER

LOUISIANA CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

LOUISIANA’S CIVIL WAR MUSEUM

MUSEUM OF THE SOUTHERN JEWISH EXPERIENCE

MUSEUM OF TRADE FINANCE AND THE FED

NATIONAL WWII MUSEUM

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART

SAZERAC HOUSE

Large Entertainment Venues

CAESARS SUPERDOME

CHAMPIONS SQUARE

CIVIC

FILLMORE

GENERATIONS HALL

THE HOWLIN’ WOLF

JOY THEATER

NEW ORLEANS ERNEST N. MORIAL

ORPHEUM

SAENGER

SMOOTHIE KING CENTER

CONVENTION CENTER
Art
Entertainment Venues
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Museums 9+
Galleries 21+
11+

Housing Supply

Characterized by a mix of modern apartment complexes and historic residences, the multifamily market in Downtown offers a range of housing options to residents. Notably, the housing market continues to adapt to changing demographics and lifestyle preferences aimed at growth and sustainability, ensuring that Downtown New Orleans remains an attractive and vibrant place to live.

The Downtown residential sector remains stable with a healthy rate of new supply entering the market since 2019. Moving forward, there will be opportunities for both new construction and conversion of lower quality office space to housing.

Number of Condos/ Apartments: 6,300
Costar Source: © 2009-2024 Realtors Property Resource®, LLC. All rights reserved. $2.40 / SF Average Sale Price per Unit $201,448 Avg Residential Vacancy Rate 7.7% Rent (2023) Price (2023) $1,971 / UNIT Delivered units 1000+ units delivered since 2019 Multifamily Sold 115 Properties (2023) Active Multifamily Units in Development Under Construction 377 Entitled 5 433 Total Proposed 51 17
Source:

DDD in 2023

Clean up Campaign:

In partnership with the City of New Orleans Department of Code Enforcement, DDD’s Marketing team launched the “Clean Up to Get Down” campaign in the spring. The campaign was designed to educate Downtown Stakeholders on quality-of-life issues such as sanitation violations, sidewalk maintenance, rodent abatement, and conditions posing imminent danger.

Active Cases: 187

CEA for Code Enforcement

GET RIGHT WITH THE CODES

ofMaintainasafeandsanitarypropertywiththedisposal anytrash,litter,debris,garbage,waste,andrubbishof kindinappropriatecontainers.

SIDEWALKS & DRIVEWAYS parkingEnsurepropersidewalks,walkways,driveways,and andsimilarspacesarefreefromhazardssuchasdeterioration,deformation,fractures,fissures, spalling,ordetached,dislodgedorfailingconnections.

ACCESSORY STRUCTURES & FENCES Maintainandkeepallaccessorystructuressuchas detachedgarages,fencesandwallsingoodrepair. shrubs,grasses,annualplants,vegetation,otherthantrees, andplantsover10-inches;noxiousweedsare

PREMISES IDENTIFICATION Properlyidentifyallstructureswithcorrectly streetnumbered,clearlyvisible,andlegiblydesignated inchesaddresses;markersnolessthan4inchesby.5 background.indimensions,andinsharpcontrastwiththeir

DEFACEMENT & DAMAGE Restoreandrepairwillfullyorwantonlydamagedand mutilatedpropertyandexteriorstructuresdefacedby marking,carving,orgraffiti.

RODENT & PESTS rodentKeepallstructuresandexteriorpropertycontinuously eliminationandpest-free;ownersresponsibleforofinfestationsindefectivestructures. Otherwise,rodentswillbeexterminatedbynon-toxic, EMERGENCY PROCEDURES publicRemoveimminentdangerstolife,health,propertyor safetywiththesafedisposalofpaints,cleaners,oils,batteries,gasoline,pesticidesandavarietyof combustibles.

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In 2022, DDD negotiated a Cooperative Endeavor Agreement with the City to support the cost of a Code Enforcement Agent and Title Inspector dedicated to Downtown cases. These individuals began their duties in January 2023 with a focus on property maintenance code issues such as graffiti, broken windows, and structural deficiencies.

In 2023, the City brought just over $72k in fines to derelict property owners Downtown.

Doo Dat Campaign

DDD installed ten new pet waste pick-up stations in Downtown New Orleans. These free bag dispensaries— marked by the bright blue & green “Doo Dat” signs— will help to remind our dog-owning residents and visitors of appropriate waste disposal practices and aid in our communal effort to keep Downtown clean.

New Cleaning Contract

In Q4 2023, DDD solicited proposals for Enhanced Cleaning and Public Maintenance, ultimately awarding the contract to Henry Consulting. These contractors, dubbed the DDD Clean Team, are responsible for expanded sidewalk pressure washing, special event clean up, and addressing illegal dumping. The contract commenced on January 1st, 2024.

Downtown Development District 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 3912 New Orleans, LA 70170 John Smith 123 Main Street Small Town, USA 00000-0000
PROPERTY AREA
GET IT RIGHT KEEP IT CLEAN PUT ON A GOOD FACE BE IN THAT NUMBER STAND UP STRAIGHT MAKE IT SAFE SAY GOODBYE FOR GOOD IMMINENT DANGER & QUALITY OF LIFE CODES SCAN THE QR CODE TO LEARN MORE The Downtown Development District exists to drive smart, sustainable development for Downtown businesses and residents, maximizing value for each and every property investment, mining potential on every block and making an impact at every turn on behalf of preserving and promoting our one-of-a-kind culture and community. By hiring Code Enforcement personnel dedicated to Downtown and providing grants* to business and property owners to maintain their buildings, we are wholly committed to making meaningful improvements towards brighter future for all New Orleanians. *GRANTS ARE ONLY AVAILABLE FO NON-TAX-EXEMPT PROPERT S. TIME TO RISE & SHINE When it comes to a clean Downtown, we all have part to play. Clean Up to Get Down is about stepping out and stepping up. Knowing the city codes that are in place to keep us clean and safe is the first step. It’s a familiar refrain — If you see something, say something. If you observe potential code violation or have concerns about an imminent danger and quality of life issue, please submit a report for review by our Code Enforcement Team. Just scan the QR code to learn how. Just like you, we have a part to play, too, and we’re here to help. Our Code Enforcement Team will work with diligence to be available to you and to ensure Downtown properties are well maintained so that we can have a vibrant city center.
EXTERIOR
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2023 DDD CE Fines $72,100
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Public Safety

NOPD Details

The DDD provides 24/7 NOPD Officer Details for Downtown NOLA. At any given time, there are 1-3 NOPD Officers patrolling Downtown, who respond to an average of 20 incidents per day.

Public Safety Rangers

The DDD created the Public Safety Ranger program as an integral element of Downtown’s public safety network. The Public Safety Rangers are a noncommissioned force of two dozen safety professionals who patrol Downtown on foot and on a bicycle. They act as extra eyes and ears for the police and the DDD. Rangers are customer-friendly and provide visible coverage throughout Downtown.

Private Security

In 2023, DDD funded the deployment of an additional private security firm, Vets Securing America, to augment our existing firm Pinnacle Security and Investigations. Both private patrols are available to respond to phone calls, perform regular business checks, report suspicious activity, and address quality of life issues. Additionally, both private patrols provide provides armed, uniformed officers and a marked vehicle to patrol Downtown.

Public Security Cameras

In 2023, DDD successfully coordinated the installation of three (3) public security cameras on Canal Street that link to the City’s Real Time Crime Center (RTCC). DDD thank Sen. Royce Duplessis for availing state funding for this effort.

Downtown Public Safety Alliance

In March 2023, DDD launched the Downtown Public Safety Alliance, an ad hoc working group of security professionals representing the public safety interests of Downtown properties and businesses.

300 Safe Walks 19,470 Business Checks 3,268 Homeless Outreach Engagements 9,083 Hospitality Checks
Public Safety Stats 19
2023

Crown Park

The City of New Orleans recently dedicated the property adjacent to New Orleans Fire Department Fire Station #2 as Crown Park. The dedication of this park space coincided with the unveiling of a mural by artist Journey Allen celebrating the passing of the CROWN Act, which prohibits discrimination based on hairstyle and hair texture in schools and workplaces.

DDD’s Crown Park project aims to layer additional beauty to this space through placemaking. The redevelopment will create a functional and inviting urban respite for public use. By incorporating native plants into the landscape, the park will showcase the beautiful diversity of Louisiana’s flora and fauna and become a certified habitat through the Louisiana Native Plant Society.

Q3 / 2023 THE MARKET REPORT Where work and culture meet what’s possible. Economic Development
THE MARKET REPORT Where work and culture meet what’s possible. Q4 / 2023 THE MARKET REPORT Marching forward as the good times roll. THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS IN DOWNTOWN NEW ORLEANS Q2 / 2023 THE MARKET REPORT Marching forward as the good times roll. THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS IN DOWNTOWN NEW ORLEANS Q1 / 2023 Research – Market Reports Quarterly Market Reports Produced Outreach 6 Public Engagement Meetings 165 Business Retention and Expansion Visits Facade Grant Program Improvement Projects funded by DDD (2023) 18 Façade Improvement Grants Completed $100,138 Exterior Lighting Grants Completed $5,131 Facade Micro Grants Completed $10,942
Public Spaces
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Harmony Circle

In early 2023, DDD worked in partnership with the City of New Orleans to secure funding from the State of Louisiana Capital Outlay Fund to complete designs for the Harmony Circle Redesign with an estimated construction cost of $5 million. In early 2024, a Request for Qualifications was issued through DDD to select a firm to begin the design and community outreach process. The vision for a redeveloped Harmony Circle is to create an active and attractive public space for all who live in and visit New Orleans.

Social Media: What We Use Them For

Creative Placemaking

In 2023, DDD worked in tandem with SCAPE, a local landscape and design architect, regarding placemaking initiatives throughout the District. The study culminated in 3 documents: an initial existing conditions analysis, results from 3 public engagement meetings, and a final deliverable document with subdistrict brand guidelines, renderings, and several "quick win" deployable strategies. The study was made possible through Wisner Trust grant funds.

Marketing

eINSTAGRAM

@DDDNewOrleans

Visually tells the story of the people and places of Downtown New Orleans

GFACEBOOK

@DowntownNOLA

Sharing the heart of Downtown through communityfocused stories and partner agency initiatives

Events:

kLINKEDIN

@downtown-developmentdistrict-of-new-orleans Hub for Downtown business updates

DDD produces a variety of events throughout the year designed to celebrate Downtown, engage residents and visitors, and showcase the unique place Downtown New Orleans holds in the city.

LEGACY PARK

Downtown’s smallest park brought big crowds for the Summer Solstice Comedy Showcase, National Night Out, and Petit Parc Concert Series.

DOWNTOWN NOLA AWARDS

This annual event recognizes exceptional accomplishments of Downtown New Orleans property owners, businesses, residents, workers, and organizations who inspire, innovate, and integrate the Downtown New Orleans brand into the DDD. In 2023, DDD recognized

SOURCES AND THANK YOU

City of New Orleans

RIDE New Orleans

7 Honorees, presented a lifetime achievement award, and honored the Clean Team Ambassador, Public Safety Officer, and Public Safety Ranger of the year. The event was held at the Audubon Aquarium and Insectarium after their $43 million renovation.

LIGHTING OF CANAL STREET

DDD sets the stage for the holidays on Canal Street and kicks off the holiday season each year with the Lighting of Canal Street Press Conference. Mayor Cantrell and Santa Claus joined DDD leadership to “push the button”

Regional Transit Authority

Idea Village

and turn on hundreds of thousands of lights illuminating Canal Street.

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL NEW ORLEANS LCMC HEALTH

HOLIDAY PARADE

DDD was proud to be a major partner of the reimagined holiday parade for the second year. The holiday-themed floats, helium balloon characters, and local marching groups and bands drew thousands of visitors to the streets, restaurants, and retailers throughout Downtown.

New Orleans BioInnovation Center

Anthony LaMothe (Photo Credit Page 11)

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LET’S MOVE FORWARD TOGETHER

ABOUT THE DDD

Downtown Development District of the City of New Orleans 201 St. Charles Ave, Ste 3912 New Orleans, LA 70170 | 504.561.8927

Created by the Louisiana Legislature in 1974 (LA Rev Stat § 33:2740.3) as the nation’s first assessmentbased Business Improvement District, the Downtown Development District of the City of New Orleans (DDD) provides enhanced economic development and public space services to Downtown New Orleans. It accomplishes its mission through initiatives such as employing dedicated city planners to assist Downtown property and business owners, administering multiple grant programs, employing Public Safety Rangers and Clean Team sanitation workers, providing significant funding for outreach to the homeless and additional New Orleans Police Department patrols and armed private security throughout the District. The DDD services the area bounded by Iberville Street, the Pontchartrain Expressway, Claiborne Avenue, and the Mississippi River.

DDD is funded by a property tax millage assessed on each non-exempt property within the District. DDD’s lifespan was initially ten years, and on December 8, 1979, a successful citywide referendum secured longevity for DDD. It authorized DDD to raise its property tax rate to as much as 22.9 mills (a privilege the DDD has never exercised); it gave DDD the authority to sell up to $7.5 million in bonds for use in capital improvement projects; it extended DDD’s lifespan for an additional 25 years to December 31, 2005; and it provided for a future election in which voters could extend DDD for an additional 25 years beyond 2005. An election was held on April 7, 2001, with 60% voting in favor, and DDD’s lifespan was extended through 2030.

DOWNTOWNNOLA.COM
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