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On this important 15th Anniversary of September 11, 2001 Forest City Ratner Companies congratulates visionary Larry Silverstein on his commitment and contribution to the rebuilding of Downtown Manhattan.

Eataly NYC Downtown thanks Larry Silverstein for making the New New York possible. As an Italian company that has adopted NYC as our home away from home, we are proud to be a part of the rebirth of Downtown Manhattan. Grazie, Mr. Silverstein, for our new home on the 3rd Floor of 4 WTC. To share our thanks, coffee is on us. Join us for a complimentary small Gran Filtro Drip Coffee. Just rip out this ad and redeem it at our Lavazza Caffè from 7am-11am. One time use only.

CEO & PUBLISHER Grace A. Capobianco EDITOR-AT-LARGE Mike Hammer CREATIVE DIRECTOR Martin Danjue MANAGING EDITOR Eva Maria Troester SENIOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR / COPY EDITOR Darren Paltrowitz CONTRIBUTING BEAUTY EDITOR dnicole CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR Laurean Ossorio CONTRIBUTING FAMILY & LIFESTYLE EDITOR Denise Courter FOOD EDITOR Jessica Rovira SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER Tony Shi FREELANCE COPY EDITOR Brett Forman CONTRIBUTORS: Brian Duprey, Julie Ring-Hansen Holt, Rachel Wirkus, Harry Kong, R. Couri Hay, Jillian Blume, Kendall Dorsey, Aaron Burdge, Clive Rousseau, Dr. Scott Wells, Dr. Doris Day, Paige Murphy, Rafael Rautha, ChinTwins, Sophie Kietzmann INTERNS: Hayley Morris, Sophie Slotnick, Maya Mesica, Elene Solomnishvili, Caisse Davis TECHNOLOGY: Bradley Kirkland, Nicu Lordachescu, Neal Marshad

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT John ‘Cap’ Capobianco

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BUSINESS CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER: Jeff Fields ADVISOR TO THE PUBLISHER: Andy Wheatcroft FINANCE & TAX CONSULTANT: Clifford Romain CIRCULATION DIRECTOR: Frank Rosner

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Copyright 2016 by DOWNTOWN Magazine NYC, Inc. All rights reserved. DOWNTOWN (ISSN2164-6198) is published six times per year in January, March, May, July, September and November for $20 per subscription by DOWNTOWN Magazine NYC. Application to mail at periodical postage rates is pending at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editor are not responsible for unsolicited material. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. To order a subscription, please call (212) 962-1916 or visit downtownmagazinenyc.com. For customer service, please inquire at customer@ downtownmagazinenyc.com. To distribute DOWNTOWN, please email distribution@downtownmagazinenyc.com.

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EXPERIENCE THE

PERSPECTIVE

FALL 2016 7 Publisher’s Letter 8 Advisory Board 10 Contributors NEWS 12 Style 13 Culture 14 Food 15 Gear

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SOCIAL 16 On the Town 17 Out and About 18

DOWNTOWN PERSPECTIVE Lower Manhattan Skyline

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PROFILE Brooke Baldwin | CNN's Top Story Louise Phillips Forbes | Broker of Change

INSIGHT 25 Philanthropy | The Charities of Downtown 26 Arts & Culture | Holiday Inn 28 Arts & Culture | Art in the World Trade Center 30 36

COVER STORY Larry Silverstein | Architect of Lower Manhattan Towering Tributes | Applause to Larry Silverstein

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STYLE VAULT Editorial | Fais de Beaux Rêves Designer | Chiara Boni Beauty | Her Look Grooming | His Look Procedures | New Beauty Fashion Profile | Roopal Patel

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LITTLE APPLE Léman | Cultivating Mastery Essentials Downtown Mom | Contessa Brewer Pawblisher Barclay | Barclay’s Spot

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Sum Sum Summertime! Leaves of Change What a great time to live in lower Manhattan! This summer there will be plenty to do in Downtown with the opening of Saks, The Four Seasons, Westfield, Eataly and the new Pier 17, not to mention a slew of exciting concerts and art and cultural activities s we head into the colorful autumn months, let’s take a second to from the Lower East Side to FIDI, Chelsea to Brookfield Place. reflect on the all-too-short, sweet summer season that is passing us So don’t close your eyes for one second because you will surely miss something. For the past six and a half years we have been by. Gone but not forgotten: the day trips to sandy shores, sun-kissed boasting about Downtown as the epicenter of NYC and now it’s more apparent than ever that Downtown is the new black! Keep skin drenched an eye out for the Fall issue as we go into more detail with the very people and corporations who made this Renaissance happen. and coated with both Shiseido and MD Solar Sciences forinprotection, and enjoying beautiful sunsets on the lovely Classic Harbor Line. But for now let’s just enjoy summer. Make sure go to our online calendar (www.????) to get the latest all of the many concerts, But it’s just as wonderful to wake up free from air-conditioning and opening festivals and events at your disposal from sailing and paddle boarding on the Hudson to free dance classes and Shakespeare in the the window to let in that crisp, fresh fall air. It’s time to change over your park, or just sitting outside in the many outdoor restaurants and bars. wardrobe; take the sweaters out of your ovens (New Yorkers know what I In this issue pull up a hammock and read about our cover talent Julia Stiles. We got up close and personal with the blonde mean) and don a beautifully colored autumn Tapered Jodhpur from Urban Zen; beauty and native New Yorker in LA as she discusses her interest in directing and her starring turn in the latest installment of the baby your lips with Eve Lom Kiss Mix; and take your swimming indoors to blockbuster action franchise, Jason Bourne. Asphalt Green! Ladies, can you spell Cristiano? Yes, check out the devastatingly handsome soccer star who has the Our Fall Issue is one of my all-time favorites—as we celebrate the man most social media followers on the planet. He’s joined by six world cup winners who came to who helped Downtown Manhattan rise like a Phoenix from the ashes, not support The Youri Djorkaeff Foundation, which the retired Red Bulls star runs to help only restoring one of the world’s most stirring skylines, but creating a real underprivileged city kids. 24/7 community. And you’re never too old for a carousel ride. So go round and round with Downtown as Reviving Downtown Manhattan while respectfully remembering those we take a spin on the stunning Seaglass carousel with our colorful summer fashion 2,996 lives lost on 9/11 is a legacy for which Larry Silverstein must be celebrated. editorial, shot right here in Battery Park. A special thank you to Ami Abramson owner Our entire team was honored to tell his story and learn from his rich and of the Carousel and Warrie Price President and founder of The Battery Park philanthropic life. The man who said, “We will rebuild,” on 9/11, has more than Conservancy, for making this shoot possible. You can also read about one of my fulfilled his promise 15 years later! favorite designers Chiari Boni who was singularly responsible for reinventing the You’ll enjoy the cocktail of complimentary comments from downtown little black dress. luminaries, friends, co-workers and others who pay tribute to the architect of Near and dear to my heart is NYSouth, which I developed back in 1997 after Lower Manhattan. We thank each and every one of them for their support and moving to the city from South Florida. Despite embracing NYC I still longed taking the time to be a part of this historic issue. to hear about South Florida’s new and coming residential developments, My dream to shoot our Fall Fashion section came true at Ladurée SoHo. restaurant openings and cultural movements. Well, 1997 turned into 2016, Regardez our exquis shoot, by famed stylist Freddie Lebia, Brazilian born Art so enjoy a sampling of NYSouth. South Florida has not been this hot since Director Marina Barlage and world famous model turned photographer Philippe Crockett and Tubbs! Reynaud. Merci beaucoup, to the owners of Ladurée SoHo, Elisabeth Holder So this summer don’t let the great divide of the Westside Highway or a Raberin and Pierre-Antoine Raberin! quick subway ride hinder you from venturing back and forth to Our Arts and Education coverage includes information from Léman about discover every part of Downtown. cultivating mastery in tomorrow’s leaders. We also offer up art from New York A big thank you to Matt Coppa for sitting in as acting Editor-in-Chief. City’s top artists on display in the World Trade Center. We appreciate your experience while leading us though our Be sure to purchase tickets to the Irving Berlin Musical Holiday Inn, starring summer issue. Also to Darren Paltrowitz for stepping up each and Bryce Pinkham and Lora Lee Gayer at the historic Studio 54. In our Dying every day. Stay for as long as you would like! Breed section, you’ll learn about Nino Corvato, a traditional Italian tailor with clients ranging from businessman Ronald O. Perelman to David Letterman. From your hearts to your wallets, we’ll help you navigate many of our favorite worthy charities right here in Downtown Manhattan. You may never have to venture above Canal Street to shop again! This September we were awed by the opening of the new Saks Downtown and get an inspiring view of the industry from Fashion Director Roopal Patel, who Grace A. Capobianco shares her passion for fashion AND her love of downtown—having called this CEO & Publisher neighborhood her home for 24 years! Watching this area transform from dim lights and desolate streets to a bustling center of retail, luxury hotels and five-star restaurants has been a thrill in the last 15 years. Chefs like Mario Batali, Jean George, Tom Colicchio and Todd English are all bringing their talents south, and our mouths are watering in anticipation. We are thrilled to offer you a menu of excellence in a delicious package in this Photography by Carmelo Donato wonderful fall issue that celebrates our neighborhood, our city and the people Stylist: Lisa Madani who make Downtown Manhattan our special home.

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Dress: Chiara Boni Grace A. Capobianco CEO & Publisher


ADVISORY BOARD MARIA CASTELLUCCIO

Head of School, Léman Manhattan Preparatory School Ms. Castelluccio joined Léman Manhattan as Head of School in July 2016. A proven educational leader and visionary, Ms. Castelluccio has dedicated her career to driving student performance and building community in PreK–12 schools in the U.S. and internationally for more than 25 years. Originally from the Bronx, Maria raised her four children in Fairfield County, Connecticut.

MICHAEL C. BRUCK, M.D., FACS

Plastic Surgeon Dr. Bruck is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He has been featured on Good Morning America, The Learning Channel, CBS News and ABC News. He is a senior attending in the Department of Surgery (Plastic Surgery) at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York.

LOUISE PHILLIPS FORBES

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker, Halstead Property For more than 27 years, Louise Phillips Forbes has been an industry leader in the NYC real estate market. A multi-time winner of Halstead’s esteemed Broker of the Year award with career sales in excess of $2.5 billion, she is considered one of the elite power brokers representing buyers and sellers worldwide. Luxury developers have relied on Louise as both an advisor and onsite sales director, and to date she has successfully completed over 30 development projects.

LAURA FORESE, M.D.

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/ Weill Cornell Medical Center Dr. Forese is responsible for programs, operations and strategic direction of medical, surgical and psychiatric beds on two campuses. Dr. Forese graduated from Princeton University and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and holds a degree in health services management. She is a Trustee of Princeton University and active in charitable organizations.

ANTHONY NOTARO

Chair, Manhattan Community Board 1 Anthony Notaro has been a member of NYC Community Board #1 since 2000, and was elected Chair on July 1, 2016. He has been a resident of Battery Park City for the past 18 years and is also active in organizations such as NYPD First Precinct Community Council and Battery Park City Neighbors’ Association. Anthony is a principal with the firm Luminex Software, a data protection software company and holds a BA in Psychology from St. Francis College as well as a certificate in Urban Horticulture from Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Anthony is married to Susan Nitahara.

BENOIT LAGARDE

Co-Founder, Splashlight Benoit Lagarde is the founder of Splashlight, a visual content studio based in New York City, Miami and Montreal. Splashlight offers creative development, production, digital and studio services for top fashion brands and retailers. His creative vision has been integral to Splashlight’s growth into a multi-million-dollar corporation over the years. Trained as a professional photographer, Benoit studied at the International Center for Photography in New York, where he is now a member of the President’s Council.

ALBERT M. LEFKOVITS, M.D., P.C. Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine The co-director of the Cosmetic Dermatology Post-Graduate Surgical Program at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Lefkovits is listed in Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare, and Science and Engineering. He sits on the scientific advisory boards of the Skin Cancer Foundation and the Foundation Society of Greater New York, and is known for his work with skin cancer detection and treatment.

NEAL MARSHAD

Founder, Marshad Technology Group Emmy Award winner Neal Marshad is the founder of Marshad Technology Group, a Google Partner digital agency that develops next generation marketing services for its clients worldwide. Prior to starting his agency, Neal is credited with producing and shooting films for NBC's Saturday Night Live over a 30 year period. Neal is a resident of TriBeCa and lives and works in the neighborhood with his family and their Borzoi hounds since 1974.

SAMANTHA COX

Asst. VP of Writer/Publisher Relations, BMI Samantha Cox is Assistant Vice President of Writer/Publisher Relations at Broadcast Music, Inc. She has worked closely with many prominent artists including Lady Gaga, Halsey, Shinedown, 3 Doors Down, and Flyleaf. She also provides advisement and supports a myriad of projects at the Center for Performing Arts at New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell.

DREW NIEPORENT

Founder and Chairperson, Myriad Restaurant Group One of New York’s most accomplished and renowned restaurateurs, “The Mayor of Wall Street” opened his first downtown restaurant in the ‘80s. He has devoted his efforts to growing his brand, the Myriad Restaurant Group, which includes the TriBeCa Grill and Nobu, while maintaining his connection to the community, which he supported through 9/11, and in his efforts to launch the TriBeCa Film Festival.

JEFF SIMMONS

Executive Vice President, Anat Gerstein, Inc. Every time relatives and friends visit NYC, Lower Manhattan is one of the key places Simmons recommends. Within one square mile, it has everything from history to ingenuity. He’s lived in NYC for nearly two decades, working with the Downtown Alliance and now The Rink at Brookfield Place. He has discovered that it’s only a short brisk walk to find a cozy eatery, exquisite gift items or a watering hole to celebrate with friends.

NEW YORK SALON 13 EAST 13TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10003 TEL: 212.929.9600 MIAMI SALON THE BAL HARBOUR SHOPS 9700 COLLINS AVE MIAMI, FL, 33154 TEL: 305.864.3978 WWW.REDMARKETNYC.COM


nyp.org/lowermanhattan

CONTRIBUTORS NIGEL BARKER

FREDDIE LEIBA

PHILIPPE REYNAUD

DAVID COTTEBLANCHE

MARINA BARLAGE

GEORGE MATTHEWS

RAQUEL SALAZAR

NISRAN AZOUAGHE

SAMUEL A. SOUTHWORTH

JENNIFER COCCIA

The internationally-renowned photographer opened his New York studio in 1996 and has never looked back. Barker is highly regarded for his 17 seasons as photographer and judge on America’s Next Top Model, which airs in over 140 countries and has 100 million viewers each week. He also hosted Oxygen Network’s The Face, starring alongside Naomi Campbell. Barker’s presence in fashion and entertainment has resulted in his own show on VH1, The Shot. He also directs and produces films, documentaries and commercials for clients and international charitable organizations.

Discovered by famed photographer, Mario Testino in Paris, Philippe has modeled for top global brands including Louis Vuitton, Ralph Lauren, Rolex, Calvin Klein. He has become a top photographer, learning from such luminaries as Bruce Weber, Peter Beard and Patrick Demarchelier. He has shot several features and covers for Downtown.

Originally from Brazil, Marina is a wellrespected creative director. She is the founder of creative22, a boutique design studio based in Manhattan, which serves international fashion, beauty and design clients. The launch of two fragrance campaigns for Oscar de la Renta is among her recent work. Marina is also a jewelry designer with a self-titled collection.

Born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Raquel received a compact camera from her father when she was a young girl and it changed the way she communicates with the world. Her passion for visual arts and the fashion world took her to New York, where she resides. She attended the Photography Program at New York Film Academy and developed an exceptional amount of skills in digital manipulation and retouching. Fashion and street style are what she enjoys shooting most.

Samuel was born and raised in Manhattan and attended The Episcopal and Buckley School when he was also a member of the famed Knickerbocker Greys Cadets Corps. Today, he is a poet and songwriter, as well as a military and espionage historian, having completed his fifth book on the subject.

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Freddie Leiba has been a fashion authority, beginning his career in London and moving to New York in the 1970s. During his career, Leiba has styled some of the world’s most iconic photographs, including Madonna with the gold suit, Diana Ross with a tank top, and 16-year-old Brooke Shields for INTERVIEW Magazine. He has also styled campaigns for notable brands like Clinique, Cover Girl and L’Oreal, as well as being a creative director for Harper’s Bazaar and Allure magazines.

This talented Parisian hair stylist to the stars launched the concept of late-night pampering when he opened the Red Market Salon in Miami and New York in 2005. His work has been seen in high-end fashion shows and in top titles such as Marie Claire, Allure, and ELLE. His talents are called on often at Splashlight Studios.

lower manhattan has many landmarks. but only one hospital.

Specializing in real estate sales at Warburg Realty in New York City, out of the firm’s Flatiron office George has lived in the TriBeCa/North Battery Park City neighborhood for over 12 years and is energized by the area’s revitalization. George previously worked in commercial real estate finance at Eurohypo and UBS.

Nisran Azouaghe is a young photographer, living in Antwerp, Belgium. As a Belgian city girl, she immediately fell in love and was at ease with Metropolitan New York City, whereas her African roots (both parents born and raised in Morocco) gave her a very wide worldview. Inspired by her cultural heritage and metropolitan lifestyle, Nisran holds a very colorful, multi-angled and urban photography style.

Jennifer was introduced to sports and an active lifestyle at a young age and continues to work personally at becoming a healthier and more active individual. Jennifer began working at Asphalt Green as the Associate Director of Fitness in July 2013, later as Director of Fitness and was most recently promoted to Director of Battery Park City in July 2016. She loves giving back to the community and is looking forward to the new relationships that she will build in the Battery Park City community.

NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. Just two blocks southeast of City Hall at 170 William Street.


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Giuseppe Zanotti

Courtesy of Gogobot—www.gogobot.com

by Laurean Ossorio

Men Ongoing through October—Chelsea Piers, Pier 62: W 22nd St. Classic Harbor Line’s Fall Foliage Cruises in October offer the perfect way to enjoy watching the colors of fall slowly transform New York. The cruise takes you up the Hudson River on the Kingston—a cozy, elegant, 1920s-style yacht—allowing you to enjoy perfect views of the beautiful fall foliage of the Palisades Park. (sail-nyc.com)

Lanvin

Among the sea of trends this fall, one of the most dominant for the season was poetic romanticism. At Prada we saw lavish prints and embellishments. From 50’s-style skirts and gilded silk to brocade dresses layered with utilitarian military coats and jackets. Lanvin also showed jewel-toned brocade floral print boots, shoes and embroidered floral details on handbags. Giuseppe Zanotti introduced a hand-painted floral motif embellished with studded booties. Phillip Lim also showed multicolor floral print saddle bags, and Nancy Gonzalez delivered her classic take on romanticism with embellished floral and butterfly accents. This trend is splendid for the romantic fashion-savvy downtown gal.

Rockaway

An outfit isn’t complete without a staple of an accessory included in the look. If you’re seeking to impress, F.P. Journe fits the bill. F.P. Journe is a high-end watch manufacturer located in Switzerland. Its newest watch, the Octa Quantième Perpétuel, is a platinum-faced watch priced at $71,700. Although expensive, F.P. Journe lives up to its price point. Fittingly, the brand’s motto is, “Invenit et Fecit,” meaning, “He invented it and made it.” All F.P. Journe watches are handmade with precise detail, ensuring its watches will last for at least 200 years. F.P. Journe’s watches use the same classical watchmaking that most Swiss watchmakers employ, using only the most pristine materials. Its watches are made with care and add class to your look, perfect for the sophisticated downtowner. (fpjourne.com)

Zazen Bear

Phillip Lim

Diamonds are still a girl’s best friend, no? Dedicated to three qualities— serenity, tranquility and harmony—Zazen Bear may be just the right jewelry for a busy New Yorker and the city that never sleeps. Founded in 2013, the brand set out to give its customers a touch of Zen in its everyday moments through its jewelry pieces. The simple designs of its jewelry are interwoven with its Zen-concepts and are meant to inspire a sense of peace and wellbeing. With a blend of high-quality materials, delicate touches and sturdy craftsmanship, you will cherish its collections for years. No more stress about choosing your favorite shiny accessory. Stop by the flagship boutique in SoHo, which was recently transformed from a gallery into a retail space, for a serene shopping experience. (zazenbear.com)

Photo by Hal Hirshorn

F.P. Journe

Photo by Kayt Mathers

Cider Week NYC

Nancy Gonzalez

Prada

Photo by Pablo Enriquez

Women

Autumn Cruise

Friday, Oct. 21 through Sunday, Oct. 30 Multiple Locations With a host of downtown locations, including Murray’s Cheese and ABC Kitchen, you would be wrong NOT to do some hard (cider) time at this autumn celebration. Beer is so 2012, anyway. (ciderweeknyc.com)

Candlelight Ghost Tour Select days and times through Sunday, Oct. 31 Merchant’s House Museum: 29 E 4th St. Thanks to the eight members of the Tredwell family who died in this spooky residence since 1835, there are plenty of ghost stories to share on a tour of what the New York Times has called “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House.” (merchanthouse.org)

New York Taste

Ongoing Through Wednesday, Nov. 30 Fort Tilden Beach: 69 State Rd, Breezy Point, NY Street artist Katharina Grosse has transformed a decaying aquatics building in Fort Tilden into a seemingly two-dimensional painting in a candy cane palette, recalling a vibrant past and reflecting its current decline. Catch it in its last month. (nyharborparks.org)

Happy Hour at the Rubin Friday nights from 6–10 PM The Rubin Museum of Art: 150 W 17th St. If the first place you think to go for a Friday night happy hour isn’t a Himalayan and South Asian art museum, the K2 Lounge at The Rubin will change your mind. Enjoy pan-Asian tapas and two-for-one drink specials, plus entertainment from DJs, jazz musicians, films, and more. Museum admission is even free on K2 nights. (rubinmuseum.org)

Tuesday, Nov. 10 Multiple Locations One evening to gorge yourself on food created by New York’s best chefs. We're talking Bobby Schaffer of Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Thomas Keller of Per Se, and Heather Pelletier of Osteria Morini, among other rock star chefs. We are not going to miss this—and neither should you. (taste.nymag.com)

Uniformity Through Saturday, Nov. 19 The Museum at FIT: 227 W 27th St. Uniforms aren’t just the lame outfit you had to wear at your first burger-flipping job. The clothes we wear to work and school have an impact on society, social order, and even high fashion, a topic explored in this Fashion Institute of Technology exhibit. (fitnyc.edu) D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M | FA L L 2 0 1 6

Photo by Evi Abeler

Bold bright colors for men were apparent on various runways this fall. At Ferragamo we saw crimson coats and jackets and marigold toggle coats with a modern twist. Also a mélange of geometric prints and classic tartans. The trend followed at Fendi with wild, bold colors and the color black on shoes and bags. Lanvin also showed hi-tech acid color accessories, including shoes and unexpected printed bags. There is definitely an artistic and modern art sensibility this season. These garments are essential for the downtown man making a statement with his wardrobe for the Fall 2016 season.

Photo: Courtesy of Getty Images

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Goodness Grazious

Gluten-Free Flours for Fall Bottled Vitamins Looking to quench your thirst with something healthy and refreshing, but want to switch up the water? Sambazon Acai Juice and Harmless Harvest Coconut Water both offer delicious alternatives. Not only are they tasty, but they are 100% organic and dedicated to a fair-trade lifestyle. Keep yourself healthy and hydrated throughout the fall with these drinks. (sambazon.com) (harmlessharvest.com) Looking for a little heartier pick-me-up? Fawen’s ready-to-drink soups are perfect to bring along for the new season. Their three super-vegetable varieties pack a healthy punch of vitamins and antioxidants, ensuring that you are both fit and ready for the year's colder months. (fawen.com)

Co-co-cookies Harboring a serious sweet tooth this fall, we are all about the cookies. Even better? Not having to brave the cold weather to enjoy them. Both Cookie DO Inc. and Blue Freckle Bakery will send over cookie dough and cookies straight to your door, so you can have them waiting for you after a long workday. Whether doughy or baked to soft, chewy and crunchy perfection, we cannot stop ourselves from sneaking bites. Good thing sweater weather is coming up! (bluefrecklebakery.com) (cookiedonyc.com)

Allergic to gluten? Don’t worry. You can still enjoy a world of baked goods! Whether you prefer pumpkin spice or apple cinnamon, you can do all of your regular baking gluten-free! Both Otto’s Naturals Cassava Flour and Pereg’s flours allow you to whip up your old favorites with the same great taste but none of the gluten—allowing you to make a healthy treat that is perfect for a fall day. (pereg.com) (ottosnaturals.com)

Triton Submarine Every New Yorker is all too familiar with the constant hustle and bustle of the city. If you are looking for some serenity, a Triton Submarine experience may be for you. The Triton Submarine ensures some peace and quiet while enabling its passengers to take in the beauty of the ocean longer, deeper and farther than any scuba diver can go. Safety is Triton’s number one priority, guaranteeing a secure and comfortable submergence for up to 12 hours. The submarine is useful for not only leisure, film and television, but for scientific and archaeological purposes, too. The rarity of this adventure is not to be missed—go forth and see the ocean as if you are one of its own. (tritonsubs.com)

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You just cannot beat birds-eye views of New York City. DJI’s Phantom 4 marks a milestone in consumer drones—it packs a professional-grade 4K camera, rock-solid stability and innovative computer vision and sensing technology into a single sleek white package. If you see someone flying a drone, there’s a good chance it’s a Phantom! And don’t worry—there’s a beginner mode to help you get used to its possibilities, and a sport mode that goes up to 45 miles per hour once you’re ready. With a posted battery life of up to 28 minutes, the Phantom 4 gives you plenty of time to explore what the world looks like from above. DJI hit the sweet spot with the Phantom 4, and there’s never been a better way to explore what the future will look like. (dji.com)

by Caisse Davis

Visijax Commuter Jacket

The Visijax Commuter Jacket makes commuting by bike in New York City much easier, especially at night. Using lithium-ion batteries, Visijax has highintensity LED lights that blink on the sleeve of the jacket when you raise your arm to signal a right or left turn. The directional signal blinks for 10 more seconds after you raise your arm, allowing you to ride with both hands on the handlebars. When wearing the jacket, you are visible from 400 meters away, ensuring your safety while cycling. The fabric is waterproof and Teflon-coated to keep you clean and dry during your commute. If you’re worried about reaching your destination in a sweaty stupor, say no more—Visijax is breathable with air vents built in to guarantee you look your best after biking. (visijax.com)

Sushi at KOSAKA

iPhone 7

KOSAKA—located on West 13th Street—brings the true Tokyo feel of a sushi restaurant with elegance right to New York. Complete with high-class décor and out-of-this-world cuisine, KOSAKA is one of the hottest places to be downtown. Executive Chef Yoshihiko Kousaka, a long-standing Michelin-starred chef, is an expert in the sushi craft and sticks to traditional practices in the kitchen. At KOSAKA, the mastery of sushi-making and the authenticity of Tokyo come together for a perfect night out. (kosakanyc.com)

As if you needed any more reason to love Apple and its products, the iPhone 7 made its debut in early September. The jet-black, glossy design of the new iPhone has exactly the aesthetic you know and love, complete with a brighter, more colorful display than any iPhone yet. Its water and dust resistance is just another perk in the long list of pros to this product. The iPhone 7 features a dual camera system, with one lens for wideangle shots and the other for clear close-ups. A monumental change to the iPhone 7 was the removal of the good ol’ headphone jack, which was replaced with another speaker for the sound of a true stereo. But don’t fret—the iPhone 7 still comes with original headphones, plus an adapter, so you can still use them the old way. If you are more of a modern technology embracer, AirPods, Apple’s version of completely wireless headphones, will be available in October. (apple.com)

From Grape to Table When it comes to wine, it is all in the grape—and the winemaking practices. Wines of Sicily (DOC) comes with an authentic Sicilian taste. To ensure sustainability and a natural process, the winery merges old-fashioned tradition with real-time modernity, delivering a taste that does not stray from the flavors known to Sicily. Forever Young and its award-winning wines come from vineyards all over the world, and its wineries are fully-equipped with the best French and Italian winemaking technology, tasted in every sip. (winesofsicily.com) (foreveryoungwine.com)

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GEAR

Phantom 4 Professional Drone

The busy downtown life means always being on the lookout for the ideal on-the-go snack. Enter Graze, a weekly snack subscription service that caters to all of your healthy needs. Using an algorithm called Darwin, Graze customizes each snack box to make each one unique for you. Graze offers 100 varieties of nourishing snacks, ranging from fruits, oats, dips and other delicious treats. If your snack pack isn’t right for you, you have the option to give it a low rating so you’ll never receive those snacks again. Planning out snacks has never been easier. (graze.com)

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Celestron Telescope The Celestron CGE Pro 1400 telescope is unlike any of its kind. Perfect for rooftop terraces on a crisp fall night, the Celestron CGE has more than three times the power of a standard 8-inch telescope. Now you can see even the most distant of planets with just a peek through the lens! Complete with a database of over 40,000 celestial bodies, the CGE Pro is able to stay at your desired star alignment without having to realign the scope. The detail you are able to capture with the CGE Pro is beyond impressive—it’s exactly the product you’ll need to see every bit of the Orionid meteor shower in late October. (celestron.com)

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O U T A N D A B O U T By R. Couri Hay

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BARTH HAMPTONS GALA, HOSTED BY CHRISTIE BRINKLEY

1 Host Christie Brinkley and Downtown’s Haylie Morris at the 5th Annual St. Barth Hamptons Gala.

EATALY PRESS EVENT

2 (left to right) Andrea Guerra, Nicola Farinetti, Oscar Farinetti, Alex Saper, Adam Saper, Armando Varicchio, Joe Bastianich and Mario Batali 3 CEO & Publisher of Downtown Grace A. Capobianco with Founder, Oscar Farinetti at Eataly’s sneak peek Press Event 4 Elene Somernishvili, Grace A. Capobianco and Maya Mesica

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1 Lighting artist Bentley Meeker presented solo shows at the National Arts Club and Core Club. nationalartsclub.org 2 Animal activist, author and actress Leesa Rowland celebrated the filming of her new TV show, A Perfect World. animalashram.com 3 Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka at Harlem Eat Up! Harlemeatup.com 4 Jean Shafiroff honored at the 20th Anniversary of the American Heart Association’s Hamptons Heart Ball in Southampton alongside gala co-chairs Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin, Tracy Stern, Nicole Noonan and Randi Schatz at Michael Kors. Americanheart.org 5 Fox News’ Legal Eagle and President of the Brooklyn Bar Association Arthur Aidala and Mariano Rivera at Detective Rafael Ramos Foundation benefit. detectiverafaelramos.org 6 The American Turkish Society hosted the 15th NY Turkish Film Festival in Soho. americanturkishsociety.org 7 Charity Warriors co-founders Christy Scott Cashman and Mary Chiochios with HMS MEDscience‘s Julie Joyal. charitywarriorschallenge.com 8 Cynthia Nixon and Sweet Hospitality Group catering company owner Julie Rose played in a poker tournament benefitting the Roundabout Theatre. sweethospitalitygroup.com 9 Naomi Watts and her sons Samuel and Alexander with Jeanann Williams at the Associates Committee of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s Bunny Hop. htmskcc.org

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DÎNER EN BLANC

5 Contributing Beauty Editor dnicole and CEO & Publisher of Downtown Grace A. Capobianco at Dîner en Blanc.

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6 Downtown’s Editor Eva Maria Troester, CEO & Publisher Grace A. Capobianco, Nicholas Appice of Edison Properties, LLC and Elizabeth Piechota of Velez Organization at Chiara Boni La Petite Robe. 7 Chiara Boni La Petite Robe 8 Georgine 9 Dennis Basso

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Taken from the roof of 180 Maiden Lane, the Woolworth Building (once the tallest building in the world in 1913) towers in front of One World Trade Center. 100 years later in 2013, the spire was installed onto the Freedom Tower, making it currently the tallest skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere at 1,776 feet. Photography by Tony Shi


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CNN’S TOP STORY

BALDWIN The CNN Newsroom anchor on working uptown and living downtown

by Darren Paltrowitz

Hair and Makeup: CNN

Photography by Philippe Reynaud Art Director: Marina Barlage

here may be some people in your life that you see every day without realizing it, and accordingly Brooke Baldwin could be one of them. The host of CNN Newsroom on weekdays from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM EST, Brooke joined the CNN team in 2008. A Peabody Award finalist, she double-majored in Journalism and Spanish for her undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her move to New York did not come immediately after college, nor was it something that she had always been working toward. “I had worked on and off with CNN in New York for years, so I came to love the city” she said. “And one day a few years ago, I wandered into Jeff’s office,” she recalled about meeting with Jeff Zucker, the CNN Worldwide President who was previously heading NBC Universal. “We were discussing my future and I remember him saying something like, ‘It’s time.’ I’m a native Atlantan, where CNN— thanks to Ted Turner—was born. It was special to start my CNN career back ‘home,’ but I was really ready for the move northward. Manhattan is now home.” Her move to New York City came in the summer of 2014, and Brooke became a West Village resident as of September 2014. This may seem surprising, given how CNN’s office is in Midtown Manhattan, located near Columbus Circle, but there were reasons why she decided to keep her distance. “First of all, I wanted to have a life away from work,” she said before adding, “yes, I am allowed to say that!” After a pause, Brooke continued. “Secondly, I had my eye on the West Village for a couple of years. I remember when CNN would fly me up to New York City to work for weeks at a time. When I found a spare moment, I’d hop the train from Columbus Circle down to 14th Street and just wander south. The river, the cobblestone, the charm—The Spotted Pig! I was hooked.” While Brooke’s rent—in her words—“might have tripled” with this move up north, she is certain it was worth every penny. “It’s cool, creative, quiet. I contemplated living in a fancy new building with a doorman but ultimately vetoed that for a pre-war third floor walk-up.” The steps in that walk-up actually provided inspiration for her to accomplish one of her biggest goals. “I convinced myself that all those stairs multiple times a day would be my ‘training’ for climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro last year— and it worked!” About her love for life below 14th Street, she said, “Honestly, it’s the vibe of the Village and also TriBeCa I just really dig. I’ve lived there for two years and every time I walk my pug along those charming tree-lined streets toward the river, I smile. Downtown Manhattan is everything.” When asked what a typical day at the office is like for Brooke, she was quick to point out the unpredictability of her job. “Erase the word ‘typical’ when referring to any job in journalism. Every day brings different stories, different guests.” But the workdays generally start the same for her. “My alarm goes off early and I start to read the papers. Then I hop on my team conference call at 8:15 AM. I get to hair and makeup at 10:30 AM, the ‘magic room’ as it’s affectionately known. And then I’m at my desk

“Erase the word ‘typical’ when referring to any job in journalism. Every day brings different stories, different guests.” working through interviews, writing questions until 10 minutes before my show.” Those questions are likely to change even after Brooke has done her prep-work. “Oftentimes our angles change each hour of the day, especially in this current crazy election cycle...I also happen to be in that seat when news breaks—often. When that happens, my teleprompter goes blank and I just go.” Some journalists shy away from tougher assignments, but Brooke always takes on what is pitched to her. “I think my strength lies in speaking to someone personally affected by, let’s say a mass shooting, I’ve covered too many of them,” she began. “Talking to someone who needs a journalist who will listen, really listen, be kind, and be respectful. I’ll never forget speaking to 40 survivors of gun violence in our CNN Town Hall.”

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That experience remains part of her. “I’ve remained close with many of them. We shared, we cried, we listened. It was incredibly-powerful.” Is there a kind of assignment she has not yet done but still hopes to? She joked: “Well, I’m assuming NASA isn’t going to send me up in space anytime soon!” Brooke does enjoy working with another government-affiliated institution, however. “I was honored to be asked by the U.S. Navy to a two-day embed on an aircraft carrier on the Persian Gulf this spring. I’d love to do more with the U.S. military abroad.” She added, “And I also would like to cover the Olympics—at least once in my life!” The Brooke Baldwin seen on-screen is not too far off from the Brooke Baldwin who favors The Elk, La Bonbonniere, Barbuto, McNulty’s, and the Gramercy Tavern, to name a few local spots. “The gal they see on TV is the same gal they’d get if they were to meet me,” she said. “One of the biggest compliments I get from people is that I’m ‘real’ and ‘authentic.’ And when it comes to my job, I really do care.” She continued: “A question I get a lot is, ‘How do you do it?’ My answer is that it isn’t easy. I put my heart into my work. And I am profoundly-grateful to a special group of friends who I need to call when I need to, sometimes, to talk it all out.” As someone with a degree in journalism, does Brooke ever see herself becoming an off-screen columnist? “I have written a few columns for CNN—I continue to do that periodically.” What about writing a book? “Perhaps. Gimme a few more years to work that one out...” So finally, Brooke, any last words for the kids? “Be kind. Find your passion. Listen. And LAUGH!” Brooke Baldwin can be followed on Twitter and Instagram via @BrookeBCNN.

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BROKER

“I love considering myself to be a connecter, whether there’s a benefit to it or not, just because good people should know good people.”

of Change

Real estate power broker Louise Phillips Forbes is successful in every way—from her career to her personal life to her charity work for Change for Kids.

Louise Phillips Forbes

by Eva Maria Troester Interviewed by Grace A. Capobianco

Left page: Dress and jacket: Mi Jong Lee. Shoes: Manolo Blahnik. Right page: Coat: Mi Jong Lee

Photography by Philippe Reynaud Art Director: Marina Barlage

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ith an undeniable talent for bringing people together, Louise Phillips Forbes greets everyone she meets with an affable Southern charm and a firm handshake. Growing up in Nashville, Tennessee, Phillips Forbes saw her mother connect many different kinds people with each another all her life, and it was a trait she quickly picked up on. “I love considering myself to be a connecter, whether there’s a benefit to it or not, just because good people should know good people,” she said. When she moved to New York in her early twenties, she took this mindset with her. “I think being Southern has been a great blessing for me, navigating New Yorkers and New York,” she said in regard to New York’s highly-competitive real estate market. Phillips Forbes didn’t originally plan to have a career as a real estate broker. Back in 1980s New York, the blonde beauty was modeling and working jobs at bars while pursuing a career in dance. She more or less fell into her first real estate job when a

customer at the restaurant she was working at saw her friendly touch with people and referred her to a friend in real estate. Although it was an adjustment, Phillips Forbes found a way to use her educational background to help her clients find the perfect home, which ultimately helped her find her way in the business. “I started out thinking that real estate was about architecture, about the brick and mortar,” she explained. “But it’s really the business of people.” As a people person, the passion to help others comes naturally to Phillips Forbes, both in her job as a broker for Halstead Property—helping urbanites find the perfect apartment—and as a board member for the charity foundation Change for Kids. “Whatever pulls your heart strings, invest in it,” she stressed. Since 1997 she’s been active in Change for Kids, which helps and advocates for children at underfunded public schools throughout the city’s five boroughs. “One of the things I loved about Change for Kids was that they didn’t just want a check from me,” she remembered about how she first got involved and

fell in love with the organization, on whose board her husband, Christopher, is also a member. She also manages to expertly balance work and home life, as she always makes time to have an active role in everything in which her two boys, ages 10 and 12, are involved. “I kind of like the philosophy, ‘If you play together, you stay together,’ so as a family that plays together, we stay together,” she said about the importance of doing things as a family. The family of four enjoys going on surfing vacations, and with her two sons playing hockey, you can expect to see her sitting next rink-side at every game. While the Phillips Forbes family resides on the Upper West Side, downtown is a special place for the power broker, as she’s done a great deal of business in the area. “I have a passion for downtown,” she stated. “And I will tell you that there will be a chapter of my life where I am [living] in the West Village or I am in TriBeCa. My soul is there, and I love it.”

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Inaugural M u s e u M o f J e w i s h h e r i ta g e r e a l e s tat e and allIed trades luncheon

philanthropy

by Eva Maria Troester

r o g e r s i lv e r s t e i n l i s a s i lv e r s t e i n a n D t a l K e r r e t

s av e t h e d a t e 1 1 : 3 0 a M | t h u r s Day, o c to B e r 2 7, 2 0 1 6 4 Wo r l D t r a D e c e n t e r , 1 5 0 g r e e n W i c h st r e e t

Fo r t i c K e t ava i l a B i l i t y, p l e a s e v i s i t M j h n yc .o r g / lu n c h e o n o r c a l l 6 4 6 - 4 3 7- 4 3 0 1 .

SPONSORS FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY (www.seo-usa.org)

In 1963, Michael Osheowitz founded Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO)—an all-volunteer mentoring organization formed to help underserved students gain admission to competitive colleges and universities. “Today, SEO serves more than 1,300 students every year through its core programs, all with the goal of providing superior educational and career opportunities for underserved and underrepresented youth,” said William Goodloe, President & CEO of SEO. For 53 years the organization has helped its Scholars attend and finish high school and college, and over the years the organization expanded to include programs such as SEO Career, to help students break the barriers to careers in corporate America, and SEO Alternative Investments. Goodloe attributes that growth and success to the volunteers. “Our program staff, they put no limits on what is possible for our young people,” Goodloe said. “When anyone asks me: ‘What’s your secret sauce?’—I say, it’s our people. They are simply the most talented group I’ve ever worked with, and they inspire me every single day.” Goodloe added with pride: “SEO’s students all share one trait— a burning desire to succeed. They want more for themselves and their families.”

l a r r y a n D K l a r a s i lv e r s t e i n

— B r u c e c . r at n e r , M u s e uM c h a i r M a n

insight

The Charities of Downtown

honoring t h e s i lv e r s t e i n F a M i ly

“We are delighted to recognize our beloved Trustee Larry Silverstein and his family, whose extraordinary contributions to building our city has ensured Lower Manhattan will have an enduring legacy for generations to come.”

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GIRLS INC. OF NEW YORK CITY (www.girlsincnyc.com) Since 1993, Girls Inc. of New York City has been helping underserved girls ages 6 to 18 in the City’s five boroughs. Its mission is to advocate for and improve the girls’ lives through an array of programs and mentoring. “Our overarching aim is to develop programs that help girls build character and become responsible, caring adults—and to acquire the skills and education that will enable them to lead financially independent, productive lives,” Girls Inc. NYC CEO Pamela Maraldo said. With roots in The Girls Club, an organization begun during the industrial revolution as a safe space for single women, Girls Inc. of New York City has always aimed to empower the girls, build their confidence and make them believe in themselves through great mentors. “[Our] teachers [from the same communities] are more in tune with the struggles of the girls we serve because they have lived them,” said Jasmine Barr, the organization’s Vice Chair of the Board and Luncheon Chair. The nonprofit emphasizes education and is especially proud of its students’ graduation rates. “95% of our girls not only graduate but go on to college,” she said. “This is compared to a 60% graduation rate in the communities in which they live.”

donating to charities are often hobbled by a lack of time, a lack of knowledge or a lack of trust in the charity,” Epic Foundation CEO and Founder Alexandre Mars said. To help the donors and companies overcome these obstacles, Epic Foundation builds and manages a portfolio of rigorously vetted social organizations; tracks and monitors their social impact through a data platform; and keeps donors connected and engaged with the portfolio organizations through ongoing reporting of performance and accountability via a mobile application. Everything is free of cost. Growing up, Mars was inspired by his mom helping the needy—and later he travelled to Delhi to spend time with his wife, who was working with the Missionaries of Charity—an organization founded by the late Mother Theresa. “I saw firsthand the effects of poverty and inequality on children, [and] I wanted to build an organization that would help children grow up healthy and protected from harm, so they can reach their full potential,” he told Downtown.

TUESDAY’S CHILDREN (www.tuesdayschildren.org)

EPIC FOUNDATION (www.epic.foundation) Give Better, Give Smarter, Give More. With that approach, Alexandre Mars founded Epic Foundation in 2014, a global nonprofit startup that connects donors with organizations working with children and youth around the world in an easier and faster way. “After some extensive market research, I discovered that those who are thinking of

Founded in the aftermath of 9/11, the response organization Tuesday’s Children set out to help the families who lost a loved one—with a special focus on children. There were—when all was sorted out and the dust had settled—more than 3,000 children who lost a parent that day, and so the charity’s initial goal was to make a long-term commitment to the recovery of those children and their families. Tuesday’s Children became a community and a safe place for both the parents and children to talk, share and recover. “Tuesday’s Children has always been about moving forward positively,” Tuesday’s Children Executive Director Terry Sears said. “It’s always been about rebuilding of life, to not live in 9/11. We think the rebuilding of New York is a wonderful metaphor for our families’ lives—and for what we do: We rebuild their lives.” Since its beginning, the organization has grown and its mission has expanded. Now it has a broader focus on supporting and helping youth, families and communities impacted by terrorism or traumatic losses all over the world. “If you bring people together, and you offer programs where they can connect with one another, it spurs greater healing,” Sears said.

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HOLIDAY INN stars Bryce Pinkham & Lora Lee Gayer are Broadway-bound. by Darren Paltrowitz Photography by Jenny Anderson

he was nominated for an Outer Critics Circle Award and a Drama League Award for Distinguished Performance in 2015. Lora, who portrays Linda, has been seen in a variety of on-stage roles, including turns as Tonia in Doctor Zhivago and Young Sally in Follies on Broadway. Her portrayal of Philia in the Shakespeare Theater Company’s A Funny Thing... was tied to a Helen Hayes Award nomination. This production’s cast will also include Megan Sikora, Corbin Bleu and prior Tony Award nominees Megan Lawrence and Lee Wilkoff. Darren Paltrowitz: Most actors for TV and film are based outside of New York. What is it that keeps you based in New York? Is theater “it” for you?  Bryce Pinkham: I think the model is actually shifting. More TV and film have come to New York, and more directors are realizing that actors trained in theater are wonderful on a film or TV set—we know how to jump right in and hit marks, learn lines fast and make bold acting choices. We show up ready to perform, and that saves time and money! Beyond that, I think training programs are broadening their actors’ skills sets in response to the fact that a New York actor can’t make a living without TV and film work. So, yes, I moved to New York for Broadway, but I’m still here because I have found that I can actually do it all in our fair Metropolis!  Lora Lee Gayer: There are so many TV shows and movies being shot in New York, it’s amazing! Nowadays, I don’t think you can be “just” a theater actor or “just” a TV actor, you have to do everything. I personally want to do everything, theater just happens to be where I started and there is nothing like theater or the theater community. What keeps me in New York is that everything I hate about this city is what I absolutely love about this city: the people, the subways, the cabs, someone screaming, the hustle, etc. New York is full of life, and every day you leave your apartment you are just thrown headfirst into it and that can be incredible and it can be awful. DP: On a brighter note, do you have a favorite restaurant in Manhattan? BP: The one I haven’t tried yet, that a friend is treating me to. LLG: Yes! Cocotte on Thompson. It’s French food served tapas-style— so good! 

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ne of New York’s leading companies on Broadway, The Roundabout Theatre Company, operates five venues in Manhattan: the American Airlines Theatre, the Stephen Sondheim Theatre, the Laura Pels Theatre, the Roundabout Underground Black Box Theatre and Studio 54. In turn, Roundabout has been associated with New York’s finest theatrical offerings for more than 50 years. The tradition continues with Holiday Inn, The New Irving Berlin Musical, as based on the Academy Award-winning 1942 film, which opens at Studio 54 on October 6th. Holiday Inn embraces the little things in life, as lead character Jim leaves the bright lights of show business to settle down in his farmhouse in Connecticut, only to encounter Linda, a spirited schoolteacher. Holiday Inn—as directed by Gordon Greenberg and choreographed by Denis Jones—was originally developed at The Goodspeed Opera House, one of the country’s most respected nonprofit institutions. Downtown had the pleasure of conducting a Q&A with two of the play’s leads, Bryce Pinkham and Lora Lee Gayer. Bryce, who plays Jim in Holiday Inn, originated the role of Monty Navarro in the Tony Award-winning production of A Gentleman’s Guide To Love And Murder, for which he was nominated for a Tony, Grammy and Drama Desk Award. He also appeared in the Broadway revival of The Heidi Chronicles as Peter Patrone, for which

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DP: Are there particular spots downtown that you find yourself going to when you have free time? BP: I find myself on the steps of the Public Theater quite a bit. Lafayette Street, does that still qualify as “downtown?” LLG: I love downtown. I live in Brooklyn so I tend to stay more downtown. I love all of it, the Village, East Village, TriBeCa, SoHo…I could wander those streets forever. DP: Any other projects coming up for you besides this play that you can talk about?  BP: In January I will start as a series regular on the second season of Mercy Street on PBS, it’s a Civil War hospital show. Think ER meets Gone With The Wind. Additionally, I will make a sparkly musical appearance on Baz Luhrmann’s series for Netflix, The Get Down, and do some more crooning in Robert DeNiro’s film, The Comedian. All cast out of New York! LLG: Broadway shows take a lot of work to actually make it to Broadway. They go through a series of readings and workshops before coming to Great White Way, and I am attached to a couple of those! We’ll see— fingers crossed!

New York University proudly salutes our alumnus and trustee Larry Silverstein. With vision and dedication, he has built a brighter New York City—just as he has built a brighter NYU for over six decades.


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artists as a three-dimensional exploration.” New York City plays into the artistic inspiration of both Bastidas and Demaray. “New York City is an ideal environment of tolerance, diversity, and cross-pollination, but it is difficult to live here,” Bastidas said. “Because of the pressure, I don’t waste any time when I am in the city.” Demaray added: “I originally moved to Downtown Manhattan to do an artist residency at the MOMA/P.S.1’s Clocktower studios on Leonard Street in TriBeCa. I had just relocated from Northern California and found myself thinking of the surrounding buildings as an extension of the landscape, like hills. This viewpoint led me to create the Lichen for Skyscrapers Project, which involves culturing lichen on the sides of buildings and other structures in urban environments.” Plenty is coming up for both artists. For Bastidas, it is a solo show at the Museo de Arte Universa Contemporario in Havana, Cuba. He described it as a “wonderful mix of works from the past three years.” Courtesy of support from the Instituto Cervantes and the curator Elvis Fuentes, his portrait series, The Re-Conquista, will be placed in outdoor sites in various New York City neighborhoods. Per Demaray, she is currently working on a project titled PandoraBird: Identifying The Types Of Music That May Be Favored By Our Avian Co-Inhabitants, a “site-specific installation that uses computer vision and interactive software to track the music choices made by local feeder birds.” She will also start research on “The Manhattan Tundra Project,” which involves creating dedicated spaces for naturally occurring plant and animal life on the tops of skyscrapers. Beyond these projects, the two stay occupied with their six-year-old son.

In The World Trade Center by Darren Paltrowitz

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hile the World Trade Center is recognized around the world for its exterior architecture, not everyone is aware of the art inside it. Throughout the WTC, original art projects were completed by some of New York City’s top artists, and Downtown was fortunate to catch up with many of these artists including: • Todd Stone, Painter • Conrad Stojak, Media Sculpture Artist • Joe Woolhead, Photographer • Hugo Bastidas, Fine Artist • Mike Marcucci, Filmmaker • Elizabeth Demaray, Fine Artist

CONRAD STOJAK

www.conradstojak.com

Mike Marcucci

TODD STONE

Todd Stone

www.toddstone.com “The work I have done at 4 WTC and 7 WTC was made in memory of those who were lost here in the spirit of the resilience of the rebuilding effort,” painter Todd Stone said of his Witness series. “I have been meditating on the evolution of WTC site with most of my artistic focus since the attack.” “I never was looking to become a ‘WTC artist painting ironworkers’ here at the site of the tragedy,” he continued. “I have been driven to document the transformation of my neighborhood and the short distance between Thomas and Liberty Streets.” Ultimately, it was his work that “brought him here,” he said. In addition to Witness, the Downtown Manhattan resident has a new exhibit opening on September 12 titled Rendering The Unthinkable: Artists React To 9/11, Stone's work will be seen at the 9/11 Museum.

MIKE MARCUCCI

www.16acresthemovie.com “Over the past 12 years I’ve been filming all the aspects of reconstruction at the World Trade Center,” filmmaker Mike Marcucci said. “There is a beauty about construction that is very unique. Many types of materials, in large quantities, and in dangerous conditions, that eventually evolve into architectural beauty.” Marcucci’s contribution, the film 16 Acres, is different from other projects he has worked on. “As a documentary filmmaker, with the goal of a feature-length projects, what I do on a day-to-day basis is like taking small snapshots of a project many years

away from completion,” he said. His WTC-related work was “often condensed into short, two to three-minute videos.” This was “quite challenging,” he said, as it entailed editing “an event that was perhaps a month long into a very brief narrative.” For Marcucci, inspiration came from “the gigantic mechanical scale of the WTC project and its participants.” He added, “There are many professionals of all shapes and sizes on a construction project as big as the WTC. Some are very prim and proper, while others are quite brash. Though they have various levels of talent, temperaments and style, all of them need to work in unison. The human/machine choreography is fascinating to observe.” A sequel to 16 Acres is something that he has considered, but in general, New York City is key to his artistry. “I have never lived anywhere else,” he said. “I do feel lucky to live in a city like New York where there are opportunities for incredible stories. I was fortunate to be selected as a project filmmaker of one of the biggest New York stories in a long time: the reconstruction of the World Trade Center.”

A notable media sculpture artist, Conrad Stojak is original from conceptualization to execution. Regarding his contribution to the World Trade Center, he explained: “What I do is up-cycle old and obsolete New York City parking meters which I turn into solar-powered urban dioramas depicting miniature New York scenes. I hope to turn my up-cycled parking meter idea into the largest public arts project in the history of New York City by replanting the meters back as interactive sculptures.” Stojak began his career in photography and filmmaking, but changed his direction when those media were altered by cellphone technology. “I felt compelled to reinvent myself by getting off the page and into the the public with my parking meter project idea. There’s no app for that.” For Stojak, inspiration tends to come naturally as a New Yorker. “All I have to do to get inspiration for whatever I do is to ride the train, take a walk or just wake up and look out my window. The city is alive with no shortage of ideas.” This is why Stojak prefers to create his art in our fine city. “I’m a New York born and bred artist making New York art inside of New York artifacts in the center of the world, which of course is New York City. Everyday I’m exactly where I belong.” He added: “I get great joy from my work so I always feel like I’m having free time.” With regards to what's coming up for Stojak, his parking meter project is currently “occupying a majority” of his time. But he is optimistic about what is ahead for him. “Once I create the largest city-wide art project of all time then I can feel truly accomplished.” Until then, he is thankful to have contributed this art downtown. “I’d like to thank Larry Silverstein and Silverstein Properties for giving me the opportunity to work at WTC 4. It’s helped me to be extremely motivated with my art.”

JOE WOOLHEAD

Hugo Bastidas

www.joewoolhead.com “Everything I do at the site is a work in-progress because the project itself is a work in-progress,” began photographer Joe Woolhead. “I walk around the site every day shooting construction progress, the workers and the materials and machines on-site. Now that three of the office buildings are finished and open, I also shoot from perspectives around Lower Manhattan on a weekly or monthly basis.” In turn, Woolhead is known to be a prolific photographer. “In my 11 years on site, I have taken about three million photos.” New York is not the only source of inspiration for the photographer, however. “I am inspired by New York but draw a lot of my influence from Ireland, where I was born and grew up. Ireland has a quietude and a mysticism to the land itself, while New York is a city that embraces you with energy, vitality and good times, but it’s also a city that can take away your soul if you’re not watching.” He continued: “I reckon the visitors who end up staying here inherit some of the gumption and the grit of the ones who sprang up from these streets and boulevards and that vitality and spirit no doubt can seep into any art form.” Does the acclaimed photographer have a favorite piece within his WTC exhibit? “The photograph of the crane inspectors on the slider crane of 1 WTC stands out for me because it reminds me of the day when I happened to catch them just…hanging out.” Although some may relate this work to the photograph of “Men At Lunch” on the girder at Rockefeller Center, Woolhead noted, “I appreciate the comparison, [but] I was just shooting the guys at work.” Per what’s coming up for Joe Woolhead, that very much ties into this project. “I’m so grateful to Silverstein for the opportunity to work here, so I am putting together several books related to the World Trade Center. Also, I’m continuing to add to an exhibit at 4 WTC. I do hope to continue with the construction photography and maybe branch out more into other areas like fashion and city/landscape photography.” From there may come other possibilities: “In a year or two, I’ll probably brush up on my writing and hopefully publish a few of my poems.”

HUGO BASTIDAS & ELIZABETH DEMARAY www.nohrahaimegallery.com/hugo-bastidas.html www.elizabethdamaray.org

Hugo Bastidas and Elizabeth Demaray’s contribution to the World Trade Center is a mix of old technology, new architecture, and stunning conceptualism. “We built a giant camera obscura on the 67th floor,” Bastidas said. “This is an early camera that uses an aperture to project the image of an external object onto an inside screen. This primitive apparatus creates stunning images of the aerial landscape that surrounds us at 800 feet above the city.” As a result, WTC3 looks different from up there. “From our position, we see World Trade 3 as concrete, I-beam anchors, and cast shadows. These giant growing buildings appear to be reaching for the sun. As we watch World Trade 3 rapidly come into being, our first simple exposures have the abstract appearance of Diebenkorn landscape paintings.” Appearing as 55” x 55” cibachrome on heavy watercolor paper, Bastidas notes that the project is a “big departure” for both him and Demaray. “I am a painter who normally works in oil. I favor a monochromatic palette, which is black paint over white primed linen,” he said. Demaray added: “I am a sculptor. My work concerns the relationship of the built environment to the natural world. In this vein, I create Floraborgs, entities that are part plant and part robot; fabricate alternative shelters for hermit crabs and culture lichen on the sides of skyscrapers.” Thus, this new project breaks ground for the two fine Conrad Stojak

Joe Woolhead D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M | FA L L 2 0 1 6

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Architect of Lower Manhattan by Mike Hammer Interviewed by Grace A. Capobianco Photography by Philippe Reynaud Art Director: Marina Barlage

Fashion stylist: Laurean Ossorio, Makeup: dnicole. Jacket: Giorgio Armani

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o be clear, our city was never brought to its knees by the horrific 9/11 attacks on its largest symbol of strength— The World Trade Center—and neither was the man who has been the architect of its amazing revival. The renowned developer is responsible for restoring not only the infrastructure of the world’s primary financial and cultural hub, but its pride as well. Today, a decade and a half after the most devastating assault on our nation—a catastrophe that obliterated the contours of our country’s most impressive landscape—a new city stands. Fifteen years on from those horrific events, Downtown Manhattan is the fastest growing community in New York City: Its population has increased since the attacks by a phenomenal 98 percent. It has emerged with a diversity of people, businesses, transportation hubs and first-class hospitality and shopping options, in addition to recreational facilities, that were never dreamed of before that horrific moment in history. And Silverstein has been the architect of this rebirth. His dedication to bringing new life to a crushed community is embodied in the many magnificent living monuments to the human spirit that define Lower Manhattan today. The Brooklyn-born Founder and Chairman of Silverstein Properties, Inc., has been widely and justifiably recognized as the driving force behind the rebuilding of the World Trade Center and the visionary inspiration for Downtown’s phoenix-like return to its position as one of the world’s most

desirable and visited communities. Despite bleak forecasts that this devastated neighborhood would never fully recover, the World Trade Center and everything around it has once again emerged as a commercial mecca. Today, twice as many people live and work in Downtown Manhattan than in 2006. The new office towers on the 16 acres where the original World Trade Center once stood have become a magnet for a multitude of new businesses, including media, real estate and emerging technology. New hotels, high-end shopping and restaurants draw multitudes of New Yorkers and excited visitors from around the world. They come to pay tribute to those who fell in the attacks at the impressive Memorial Park and 9/11 Museum…and they arrive there through the awe-inspiring transit hub “Oculus,” which stands as a symbol of Silverstein’s vision of the future, which was recently made a reality. The entire area has been proudly rebuilt into a monument of triumph over terrorism and populated with a diverse new array of businesses, including media giants Condé Nast and Time Inc. In short, Larry’s efforts and commitment to the community, the city and the spirit of Lower Manhattan cannot be confined to just any 16 acres in Lower Manhattan—he is responsible for redeveloping what is arguably the most important piece of real estate on Earth. According to Daniel Libeskind, the master planner for the new World Trade Center, “Larry is the quintessential New York developer. He’s a tough person, but also a person with a true

commitment to doing things.” “I came to realize that Larry is the real thing: A believer, somebody who delivers,” Libeskind added with enthusiasm. “He’s been one of the foremost collaborators on the [World Trade Center] master plan. There’ve been so many forces pulling it in various directions, but Larry’s great virtue is that, even with the Port Authority, the governor, the mayor and all these other massive stakeholders, he’s still been able to navigate through this labyrinth. He’s been able to develop exactly what he promised.” What would you expect from a kid from Brooklyn who built a pre-eminent reputation among New York developers that stands as tall as any of the magnificent buildings associated with his respected name? “Do I think of myself as a savior?” Silverstein said. “No, I just knew there was a job to be done and got to it.” But he also says he knew he couldn’t do it alone. “I’ve worked with Larry on the 30 Park Place project, the new Four Seasons Downtown,” Libeskind said. “To put it straightforwardly, it’s been a breeze, and that’s because of Larry,” said Robert A.M. Stern, Architect of 30 Park Place. And Silverstein understands the value of pulling together the right people to execute his vision. “We put together a special team of outstanding people who committed to get this job done and be prepared to spend the next 15 years to do it,” he said. His sense of commitment was contagious, and he inspired his crew to dive in with the same kind

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of purpose that radiates from every pore of this native New Yorker. “It was a massive effort by an outstanding group of young, dedicated people who felt it was not just an obligation to this community, but a privilege to serve their neighbors who had suffered so much.” That kind of sacrifice has been evident in many aspects of Silverstein’s life, as he has also devoted a significant portion of it by giving his time, effort and money to charitable causes that have special meaning to him—and provide immeasurable

support to the people who need it. He is deeply proud of his Jewish heritage and considers his time spent as the Chairman of the United Jewish Appeal Federation in New York as not only a privilege, but also a responsibility. “Because we are Jewish, my wife suggested we get involved in this incredible organization, which raises funds for more than 100 social service beneficiary agencies that benefit the lives of twoand-a-half million New Yorkers every year,” he said with pride. “We raise more than $200 million dollars every year for humanitarian services.”

From left Lisa, Klara, Roger and Larry Silverstein in his office on the 38th floor of 7 World Trade Center. Photo by Joe Woolhead, 2014.

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“And the aid goes to all kinds of people—not just Jews,” he said. “This is a humanitarian endeavor. It doesn’t matter who you are…we will take care of you. It’s the largest local charity in the world.” Charitable work runs through Silverstein’s blood and, in fact, it’s his other family business. Two of his children, Roger and Lisa, work with him at the Federation, and he promises that his grandchildren will join them in doing so someday. “It’s a wonderful thing to give back,” he insisted. “It’s a very important part of my life.” His good works extend all the way to Denver, where he serves as Treasurer of the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, with which he has an especially close connection. “My son, Roger, is an asthmatic, and as a kid, I suffered with the same condition,” he said. “So I found myself spending a lot of time at the Center. It’s probably the leading respiratory center in the world.” “Roger was treated there, and so it’s got a very special closeness to my family.” He’s also been a major supporter of Downtown’s Museum of Jewish Heritage in Battery Park City, where it fittingly rests right around the corner from his gleaming towers. Created as a living memorial to those who perished in The Holocaust, the museum “honors those who died by celebrating their lives— cherishing the traditions that they embraced, examining their achievements and faith, and affirming the vibrant worldwide Jewish community that is their legacy today. New generations are taught how to recognize and fight contemporary instances of injustice and oppression,” as its mission statement reads. This is a mission that draws full support from the entire Silverstein family. “It’s the only museum that focuses on The Holocaust and how the Jewish community pulled itself together after the war,” he began. “We felt it had a critical mission, so a group of us got there and started getting a design together [to] raise the money for it to be there today.” He also proudly gives back to NYU, his alma mater, where he is the Founder and Chairman Emeritus of the school’s Real Estate Institute and a trustee of the Medical Center and Health System. “It’s been an important part of [my] and my wife Klara’s lives since the early 1970s,” he said. “I initially focused on the real estate issues and later expanded my focus to the real estate issues of the Medical Center. We have established some programs there that are very important to us.” He talks proudly of the scholarship programs he has helped establish, which provide full boarding and education, allowing medical students to focus on their studies without having to be concerned about paying New York rents. He has been aware of New York rents his entire life—which date back to the days when

his dad would move his family around the city to avoid them. “The reason we moved every year is because by so doing you picked up a free rent—a free month’s rent and a paint job,” he laughed. “And if you didn’t need the paint job, you could negotiate a rent reduction for another month…It was not a luxurious existence.” But it was a loving one. His father Harry brought him into his real estate business at an early age and taught him everything he knew…introducing him to the neighborhood to which he would be indelibly linked for the rest of his life. “I was going to NYU, and my father was learning the ropes of the real estate business, himself, when he became a broker,” he remembered. “His specialty was leasing loft space in the rag and woolen district in Lower Manhattan.” “I told him, ‘I think I’d like to go to law school —not because I want to become a lawyer,’ but I thought that becoming a lawyer [would] help me be a better broker.” “So I went to law school in the morning, and in the afternoons I went to work with him.” It was only then he was able to scrape together enough cash to buy an engagement ring for the love of his life—a girl he met in summer camp named Klara. “It was $1,000, and it was all the money I had,” he recalled with amusement. The two met at the summer camp when they were both in college and, he acknowledges, she is the only person in his life he actually calls “boss.” “They sent me to the kitchen, and she was my boss in the kitchen in 1951…and nothing has changed today,” he said. “Only today, she isn't just my boss just in the kitchen, she is my boss in everything!” Family has always struck a chord with Larry Silverstein. His father had been a classical pianist and put Larry and his sister, Annette, to bed each night with classical music playing to lull them to sleep, inspiring his son’s own love of music. “It was fantastic,” he fondly mentioned. “He taught me and my sister how to play the piano and I loved it.” Classical music has been the soundtrack to Silverstein’s astounding life. His father’s influence remains with him to this day. “I would say it is one of the most important parts of my life,” he said. “It is the first thing we listen to when we wake up in the morning, and it plays in our home all day long—and sometimes through the night. My wife and I always go to sleep just listening to classical music.” It inspired him to attend the High School of the Performing Arts, where he refined his playing skills while attaining a superior education. “It had scholastic studies, but you added an hour and a half, or two hours a day at the end of the day, music or art, depending on what your specialty was. And wow! The kids—they were terrific.” And while his future would appropriately land

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Larry Silverstein in his office. Photo courtesy of Silverstein Properties.

Larry Silverstein introduces the New York Philharmonic the evening before the opening of 4 World Trade Center, November 12, 2013. Photo by Joe Woolhead.

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him in real estate, he cherishes the memories of that experience. “Leonard Bernstein came to the high school and conducted us,” he gushed. “What an opportunity that was! He was young and vital and a very dynamic guy, and being conducted by him was really neat—a neat experience that gave me a love for classical music that I never lost.” He went into business with his father and then brother-in-law Bernard H. Mendik in 1957, establishing Silverstein Properties—then known as Harry G. Silverstein & Sons—and buying their first building in Manhattan in 1957. “We worked and worked and worked,” he said. “Whatever we could to do to make the building look better. And as a result of working our tails off, we found that we were able to lease the vacant floors in the building for a rental higher than we originally thought we would get. Based upon those rentals, we were able to finally go back to the mortgagee and say, 'Hey can you give us more?'” And that’s how it all started. In the years since, he’s gone on to become the most recognized name in real estate in New York…and possibly the United States. By 1980, he made the winning bid to the Port Authority to construct the original 7 World Trade Center, and as the leaseholder for buildings 1, 2, 4 and 5, Silverstein was the natural choice for the city to turn to oversee the rebuilding of the iconic site. “There ain’t nothing out there like what we’re building,” he said when he got the nod. “Millions of people can access this location. Thirteen mass transit lines! Thirty-two bus lines! Nothing like this!” Silverstein tackled the project with his usual passion—and with a little more added because of the horrific circumstances that hit so close to home for all of us. On the morning of 9/11, he had miraculously deviated from his normally scheduled meeting with tenants at Windows on The World, the restaurant atop one of the towers struck on that horrific morning—and sidestepped death due to a life-saving appointment at the dermatologist that his wife had made. “My wife had made an appointment for me,” he said. “That morning, I said to my wife, ‘You know, I’ve got so much to do, I’ve got to go down to the Trade Center—cancel my appointment.’ She said, ‘You canceled last time! You can’t miss it!’ She got really angry and upset at me, and when you’re married to the same woman for almost 50 years, and when she gets upset, and she gets angry, you say ‘okay.’ ” “Now, that saved my life on 9/11, because instead of going to the Trade Center, I was going to the dermatologist. Ever since then, every time my wife says, ‘This is what we are going to do,' I say, ‘yes, yes dear.’ ” Sadly, the firm lost four people, who had a total of six children, but many more were spared.

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“A great amount of effort was spent on designing the appropriate memorial,” he said. And the same level of attention was paid in selecting the architects for the redevelopment of the site. “Each of the buildings is designed by a different architect,” he said. “On 7, I had David Childs, an architect for Skidmore. He did a superb job. So good a job, that I said, ‘David, please design the Freedom Tower for us as well.’ ” Silverstein continued: “We then went out to Sir Norman Foster to design Tower 2, to Sir Richard Rogers to design Tower 3, Fumihiko Maki to design Tower 4. All world-class architects.” World-class architects were also utilized for other landmarks. “We had Spanish architect, Santiago Calatrava, do the PATH terminal, a magnificent structure, an absolutely spectacular building!” he said. “Then we had Snohetta do the museum, and then we had Michael Arad, an Israeli architect, who in collaboration with Peter Walker, the tree man, develop a beautiful design for the Memorial Park.” The end results still make Silverstein proud, of course. “Now you look downstairs and you see these trees planted, you see the waterfalls falling into the footprints of the original Twin Towers, and it’s exquisitely done,” he said. “You have diverse architecture from different architects. You have

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different styles, different interests, but each architectural gem had to relate to the creation next to it and had to relate to the memorial park right across the street. “There are many different kinds of taste, and the results are…spectacular and appropriate for the memory of those we lost, as well as exciting for the people who will be using the site today.” Ultimately, Silverstein views this as contributing to the revitalization of not just the city, but also the young century. It is a spectacular monument to the tragedy of the past, while it is also an incredible testament to the fortitude and resolve of this local community. As Larry Silverstein’s greatest accomplishment in a long line of many, it comes from a man who has been the architect of our city’s hope for the future. The new World Trade Center is a thriving, working hub of business and humanity. These 16 acres are our Promised Land… delivered to all New Yorkers by a visionary who came from simple beginnings and has traveled a spectacular path to become the ultimate rebuilder of our city. “It’s been an incredible 15 years,” he said in reflection. “The trials, the issues, the effort, the enormity of commitment that it has taken to accomplish—most people will never have a clue. But it’s been the challenge of my lifetime and I hope to hang around another five years to see it completed.”

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TOW ER ING T R I B U T E S Whether it’s rebuilding the structures, beauty and prestige of Lower Manhattan; enriching the lives of the many business associates or employees he deals with every day— or even the people he has never even met through his charitable endeavors— Larry Silverstein has constructed a large bank of good will throughout the city and beyond! Here are some moving and heartfelt words of appreciation from just some of the many people he has touched along his amazing and creative path through life.  

Norman Sturner

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MHP REAL ESTATE SERVICES It took thousands of people to bring back downtown but without Larry…All the king’s horses and all the king’s men couldn’t have put it together again.

Leonard Boxer

CO-CHAIRMAN REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT STROOCK & STROOCK & LAVAN In January 2001, I received a call from my good friend and client, Larry Silverstein, who had just received word that the Port Authority was preparing to accept proposals to purchase the leasehold interests of One and Two World Trade Center. I asked Larry if he was serious because it would take a monumental effort not only to prepare himself to make a legitimate proposal, but he would be up against some of the biggest major real estate players in the U.S. who would be after this enormous prize.    His answer was that he was dead serious about getting up to speed to make a formidable proposal and that he needed me and my firm to get him ready.  It was this sheer tenacity, intelligence, and real estate and financial ability that enabled him to both acquire the site, and then, after the devastating tragedy, regroup and become the catalyst in the enormously painful and complicated rebuilding task. His patriotic resilience carried the day, and we now see the results of his herculean leadership and effort.

Bruce Mosler

CHAIRMAN OF GLOBAL BROKERAGE CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD INC. The devastating attack that occurred on September 11th will forever be ingrained in the minds of Americans and people all over the globe. During this trying time, we vowed to stand united in the face of terror and rebuild the area affected by that horrific attack. To that end, Larry Silverstein will always be remembered as the chief architect responsible for New York City’s recovery post-9/11; his role not only uplifted New York City, but an entire country.   Larry’s tenacity and vision played a significant role in the rebuilding efforts that took place over the hallowed ground where the Twin Towers once stood. His determination and leadership, along with the vital participation and efforts of the Port Authority, Mayor Bloomberg and Governors Pataki, Spitzer, Paterson and Cuomo, ensured that New York City would rise from this tragedy to show the world its resolve.   Today, the fact that two of Larry’s buildings— 7 World Trade Center and 4 World Trade Center—

are fully operational 15 years after the attack, only serves as a testament to his vision of rebuilding and revitalizing the area decimated by the events on September 11th.   Larry Silverstein truly embodies the spirit of all New Yorkers.

Bruce Ratner

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN FOREST CITY RATNER COMPANIES Development is about confidence. Certainly, that includes confidence in self. But more, it requires confidence in the city and its people. Larry never doubted that downtown Manhattan would rebound. I think, like others, he looked in horror at what happened on 9/11. But he never lost faith in the city and its vitality. It inspired him to push on, even when others were fleeing. Thanks to his resolve, Lower Manhattan was able to rise and come back like never before. We all worked together to rebuild, but there is no question that without Larry’s leadership, it would have been harder and taken longer. Larry is a true hero.

Michael Stoler

MANAGING DIRECTOR, MADISON REALTY CAPITAL & HOST OF THE STOLER REPORT — NEW YORK’S BUSINESS REPORT I have had the honor to know Larry Silverstein for more than a quarter of a century. After acquiring the lease with the Port Authority on July 24, 2001, he and his team began work on their prized new asset. On the morning of 9/11, Larry was fortunate that his wonderful wife Klara reminded him to go directly to see his dermatologist instead of having breakfast at the Windows of the World restaurant.   He is the one-and-only Larry Silverstein, builder, developer, philanthropist, community leader, father, husband, grandpa, and most important, mensch. Larry personifies the acronym of TAL—an unbelievable tenacity, the ability to adapt to one’s life and crisis, and last but not least, a little bit of luck.

Catherine McVay Hughes

FORMER CHAIR MANHATTAN COMMUNITY BOARD #1 In the past 15 years, the Lower Manhattan skyline has been restored, and the World Trade Center has been reintegrated into the urban fabric of our community. Everyone worked together in a public process that engaged the community and both public and private sectors. It has not been easy, but Larry Silverstein and his team added the creative energy and business-savvy needed to build skyscrapers designed by starchitects, incorporating world-class environmental features and attracting top-tier tenants from around the world. Larry’s optimism and drive to restore this sacred site was critical to the success we have today, the creation of a thriving 24/7 mixed-used neighborhood.

William R. Berkley

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, W.R. BERKLEY CORPORATION AND CHAIRMAN, NYU BOARD OF TRUSTEES Larry Silverstein and I have been friends for more than 30 years. During that time, he has been consistently focused on being a successful real estate developer, maintaining a leadership role at New York University, and, most importantly, a loving husband, father and son. 9/11 changed all that. His life became centered on his obligation to New York City, to America and to the people who lost their lives in the tragedy that was the attacks on the World Trade Center. After the attacks, Larry became focused on rebuilding the World Trade Center. It wasn't a particular building—it was the conceptual framework of a center for business and commerce at that location. He believed he was morally responsible to all those people who lost their lives and our country to rebuild. He fought for the insurance proceeds to give him the capacity to rebuild, and he moved ahead with the understanding that, as he said to me, 'it isn't about the money, it is about doing what is clearly the right thing.' Larry is an optimist. We all are the beneficiaries of this attitude.

Terry Sears

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TUESDAY’S CHILDREN In New York’s commercial real estate industry, Larry Silverstein is an icon—respected and admired for his astute business acumen. To Tuesday’s Children and those we serve, Mr. Silverstein epitomizes the resilience and strength that has come to define the 9/11 community. Tuesday’s Children was incredibly proud to honor Mr. Silverstein at our 15th Anniversary Roots of Resilience Gala this September. We are so grateful for the generosity and long-term commitment he has bestowed upon our organization and those we serve. He has graciously hosted 9/11 family members over the years on Take Our Children to Work Day. In doing so, Mr. Silverstein has allowed our young men and women to experience a day inside the exciting and fast-paced world of commercial real estate— something that may not have otherwise been afforded to them.

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William Hecht 1 1 F U LT O N S T

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OF WESTFIELD US The World Trade Center is a symbol of hope, opportunity, progress and perseverance. Westfield is profoundly proud to be a part of this project and to introduce new experiences and energy to Lower Manhattan. We are incredibly excited to open our doors to our neighbors, New York and tri-state area families, visitors and all of our community partners.

John Barker

Lower Manhattan is the mercantile center of New York City. It’s the lifeblood. You can feel the pulse of commerce here—not just of the financial industry, but also advertising, technology and media. This is both the oldest hub and now the newest as well. It's vibrant and young and exciting. We can't imagine being anyplace else.

Larry and Klara Silverstein’s strong sense of humanity is demonstrated by an extraordinary commitment to philanthropy in education, health care and a thriving Jewish communal life, including their long-term involvement with the Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.

Lower Manhattan has undergone a dramatic transformation over the last 15 years, becoming an ever-evolving hub for professionals in the media, creative, technology and financial services sectors. Through the revitalization of the Seaport District into a leading destination with unique experiences across fashion, food, entertainment and culture, we are proud to play a part in downtown’s resurgence as we reinvent New York’s original commercial hub for a new generation of New Yorkers.

RULES AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY

SEAPORTDISTRICT.NYC SUBMISSION DEADLINE 10.31.16

Joe Ripp

EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN TIME INC. We are pleased to be part of the rejuvenation of Lower Manhattan, now a destination for creative businesses.

Robert Guimento SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, NEWYORK-PRESBYTERIAN/ LOWER MANHATTAN HOSPITAL

As the only hospital servicing Lower Manhattan, we have seen the positive impact that Mr. Silverstein has had on this community, which has experienced tremendous growth in the number of businesses, residents and tourists. It has been exciting to see the Lower Manhattan community engage with the expanded medical services now available to them. We have observed an increased focus on wellness as residents and people who work in the area are attending more events and workshops to learn about wellness and how to maintain their health. We are proud to work with the community to stay active and healthy and ensure that they do not need to travel too far to see an outstanding physician.

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The Alliance for Downtown New York Salutes

LARRY SILVERSTEIN A visionary, a tenacious champion and a pillar of our community.

Nick Allard

DEAN, BROOKLYN LAW SCHOOL Larry Silverstein is one of Brooklyn Law School’s most distinguished graduates. Our students and graduates look at Larry with a great deal of awe and respect—and as a tremendous example of what they, too, might aspire to and accomplish with their Brooklyn Law School degrees. Brooklyn Law School takes great pride in Larry’s many impressive achievements, especially his vision and leadership to rebuild and revitalize Lower Manhattan after Sept. 11. He is a prime example of the Brooklyn Law School tradition of helping to make this city the greatest in the world. At 85 years young, Larry remains passionate about his work, and he is still in the office on a regular basis.

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GEORGE KLEIN MUSEUM TRUSTEE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER THE HOWARD HUGHES CORPORATION

#SEAPORTSOCIALCINEMA

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Museum of Jewish Heritage

(below)

CEO, BARKER ADVERTISING & INTERACTIVE

David R. Weinreb

ONLINE + ON INSTAGRAM

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Joshua Prince-Ramus PRINCIPAL, REX

Mr. Silverstein has been a great help to us on The Perelman Center. He and his team at Silverstein Properties have been very generous with their time and advice, and the building is much better for it.

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Larry Silverstein has been a legend in the real estate business since my earliest days. I have received many compliments about 50 West Street, but perhaps the most important were from Larry, who twice went out of his way to congratulate me and tell me how beautiful he thought the building was. I admire what Larry has accomplished at the World Trade Center enormously. The redevelopment of the site and Lower Manhattan is perhaps the most impressive example of public and private partnerships I have ever seen. The transformation from hot ashes to one of the most extraordinary, beautiful and livable urban centers in the world is nothing short of miraculous. Larry is not only one of the best developers in New York City, but also the most tenacious.

By virtually every measure, Lower Manhattan has surpassed even the most optimistic of expectations over the past 15 years. Many people contributed to Lower Manhattan’s rebuilding and growth, but Larry’s impact stands out and will be a lasting part of his legacy. All of us downtowners have benefited mightily from Larry’s tremendous commitment and boundless energy.

SENIOR MANAGING PARTNER, BROOKFIELD ASSET MANAGEMENT, AND CEO, BROOKFIELD PROPERTIES

Jessica Lappin PRESIDENT, ALLIANCE FOR DOWNTOWN NEW YORK

CHAIRMAN OF THE RETAIL GROUP DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE

Larry’s commitment to Lower Manhattan extends far beyond the doors of his properties. His unwavering vision for what was possible downtown helped shape the neighborhood into what you see today, and his influence here will be felt forever.

I was there with Larry Silverstein a year following 9/11. The beautiful words he spoke moved the masses, and we cried together. But then the bigger picture was at hand—rebuild. And that is just what Larry did. Having Larry at the helm of this project, I knew it would be a success. Larry is one of the true icons in the business, one of the giants of New York real estate. Downtown has always been a special destination. Larry’s vision was about a different downtown, bringing together the best architects, the best designers, the best tenants, everything that makes it work so beautifully today. It was his belief that downtown was going to be a draw to the international marketplace, and that was the game changer.   What we have with Westfield, the 9/11 Memorial, Brookfield Place and the Towers is millions of square feet of retail connected to a transportation hub extraordinaire. Where there was nothing, today downtown is a new land of opportunity. 

Daniel Squadron

Jim Moran

Lower Manhattan is growing by leaps and bounds and continues to serve as a major engine of economic growth in our city, and as one of the greatest neighborhoods to live and work in the world. The vibrancy of our neighborhood is thanks in large part to the strong partnerships that have been forged between community members, Community Board 1, government, the downtown Alliance and the private sector, where rebuilding was spurred by Larry Silverstein at 7 WTC and beyond. Without these partnerships, Lower Manhattan would not be the community it is today.

We made the decision to move downtown after 12 years in Union Square as we believed Lower Manhattan would transform into a creative and innovative hub post the 9/11 rebuild by Mr. Silverstein. In the fall of 2012, downtown was still in its early transformation period. We knew this area had all the ingredients of success—along with leaders like Mr. Silverstein and Mayor Bloomberg—who had vision and capital to push this forward, and companies like CO OP, which would be the early adopters and come when things still were not in place.

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Ric Clark

Faith Hope Consolo

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Francis Greenburger

FOUNDER, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, TIME EQUITIES, INC.

NEW YORK STATE SENATOR

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FOUNDING PARTNER AND CEO, CO OP

CONGRATULATIONS

Larry Silverstein A Distinguished Graduate of Brooklyn Law School A Champion of New York City We salute his vision and leadership to transform Lower Manhattan

Adam Saper

CFO AND PARTNER, EATALY As a born-and-raised New Yorker, opening Eataly NYC Downtown was not only emotional but also extremely gratifying. Without Mr. Silverstein’s vision and sheer perseverance, none of these businesses would be open today. At Eataly NYC Downtown (and in every Eataly worldwide), we invite people from all parts of the world to eat, shop and learn. It is much more than just authentic Italian food; it is a space that unites in the same way food unites us all.  The Oculus is a great focal point and a huge contribution to rebuilding this neighborhood. I feel that this is only the beginning for the revitalization of this district and look forward to see what the upcoming months will bring. 

brookl aw.edu

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Fashion stylist: Freddie Leiba Makeup: Brian Duprey Hair stylist: David Cotteblanche Model: Hana Nitsche, Apmmodels Dress: Tadashi Shoji Jewelry: EllaGem Bag: Judith Leiber Shoes: Stuart Weitzman

Photography by Philippe Reynaud Art Director: Marina Barlage Location: Ladurée SoHo, NYC

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Model: Kasia Lysikowska, Wilhelmina Dress: Reem Acra Jewelry: EllaGem

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editorial Model: Kasia Lysikowska, Wilhelmina Dress: Maggie Norris Couture Jewelry: EllaGem

Model: Hana Nitsche, Apmmodels Dress: Tadashi Shoji Diamond Bracelets: EllaGem Shoes: Stuart Weitzman


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Models: Hana Nitsche, Apmmodels Kasia Lysikowska, Wilhelmina Dresses: Pamela Roland Jewelry: EllaGem

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Models: Hana Nitsche, Apmmodels Kasia Lysikowska, Wilhelmina Dresses: Theia Jewelry: David Yurman

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TheGirl with the Suitcase With La Petite Robe, designer Chiara Boni created a timeless look, combining elegance and comfort designed to flatter a woman's figure. by Eva Maria Troester Photography by Raquel Salazar

Chiara Boni La Petite Robe presents Spring/Summer 2017 collection at NYFW. Photography by Sophie Kietzmann.

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fter spending more than 30 years traveling the globe for her career as a high fashion designer, in early 2005 Chiara Boni grew tired trying to maintain her fabulous sense of style while on the road. “I was called ‘La ragazza con la valigia’—‘the girl with the suitcase,’ ” the Italian native told Downtown. But Boni used the travails of living out of her luggage as an inspiration to design an outfit to fit the needs of today’s modern New York City woman: something easy to travel with yet also versatile. “I wanted a dress that you could wear during the day and at night,” she explained. “It’s the same dress, but paired with heels, you’re ready to go out!” Boni got to work, experimenting with the materials and styles she knew would perfectly complement the female body. Once she had the design she had dreamed of in hand, she went to la Rinascente, a famous department store in Milan. “I said, ‘I have an idea. I have a little dress that comes in a small envelope. Why don’t we try and sell it?’ And that’s what they did,” she said. Her first collection of eight dresses, all in black, came out in Italy in 2007 and was an immediate success. Part of the secret of her designs is that they are ready-to-wear for a wide range of female body types. And the key to that versatility is found in the material. By using eco-friendly stretch fabrics, which Boni carefully helped develop herself, the dresses flatter women of all shapes and sizes. “It’s more difficult to do a dress that makes you feel like a woman,” Boni explained about creating a silhouette that makes women feel both confident and beautiful. RENAISSANCE WOMAN Growing up in Florence, Boni was raised in an atmosphere of elegance. At an early age, her mother brought Boni along whenever she would go to the tailor to get her clothes fitted, and Boni grew up watching designers at work. “I was seeing Givenchy and Balenciaga when I was a young girl,” she remembers. “It was wonderful to watch everybody pinning things, molding it to fit perfectly—and everything was done by hand.” While Boni has always loved seeing people who knew how to work with their hands, she admits that this was never her strong suit.

What she did have was a sense of design and a strong will. In 1968, at the young age of 20, Boni along with two of her girlfriends opened—for that time—a very modern clothing store: an artisanal boutique called “You Tarzan, Me Jane,” where the girls did everything from cutting to sewing to selling. As the brand expanded and they opened up more shops in Italy, Boni’s career took off. In 1971, Boni joined famed Italian design company Gruppo Finanziario Tessile, which also housed luminaries Armani, Valentino and Ungaro. Boni worked there for several years and even got her own namesake brand. However, in the late 1990s, the company went under and her brand name was entangled in legal difficulties. She spent a number of frustrating years battling to get her name back, working to restart her own brand and then ingratiate herself back into the fashion world. As she explains, “When I finally got my name back, I knew I had to do something.” SIMPLE BY DESIGN Fast-forward to 2010, when the La Petite Robe collection by Chiara Boni launched in the U.S. and quickly became a big seller at both Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus. Boni’s designs are often seen in magazines and on television, and very importantly, on celebrities representing a wide spectrum of body types. In turn, stars as diversely proportioned as Oprah Winfrey and Mischa Barton became some of her biggest fans, enjoying the easy care, variation and fit of Boni's dresses. “I always try to find a way [for the dresses] to fit more people,” she explained, “but to fit them in the way I like, which is tailored fits.” Despite her success, Boni stays humble. Though she enjoys the fast pace of Downtown New York City and Brooklyn, she relishes the quietness of Tuscan life even more. It is really the small pleasures of walking her dogs and appreciating well-made fresh Italian food. Simplicity, comfort and good quality are key aspects to Boni, not only in her designs but also in her Tuscan home life.

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Fashion stylist: Laurean Ossorio. Makeup: dnicole. Hair stylist: Kendall Dorsey using Oribe. Manicure: Nails by Clive. Creative assistant: Aaron Burdge. Model: Vanessa Greca/Wilhelmina Models. Jacket and necklace: Urban Zen.

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his fall, cozy up in your softest knitwear and prepare to relax. Vacationing, long nights on the beach and hours in the sun may take a toll on your skin, but with the right products and their powerful potent ingredients, you can help your skin recover and ready up for the cooler temperatures, rainy days and rougher winds the new season brings. Seasonal weather changes often pose a few skin care challenges, but with a little help, you can leave your skin and mind refreshed, renewed and revitalized—and ready to tackle the new season without leaving you stressed. Focusing on breakthrough science and coupled with recent innovations in natural skincare, these products benefit your skin without any stress or harmful additives. As fall also means shorter days and less sunlight, getting in your beauty sleep is essential—and silk will help you do just this. Not only does this incredible marvel come from a creature of nature, it provides us with many beauty benefits. Because of its natural protein structure, silk is the most hypoallergenic of all fabrics. Its natural temperature-regulating properties even make it an ideal choice for the changing weather fall brings.

LA PRAIRIE CELLULAR SWISS ICE CRYSTAL SERUM $320 laprairie.com

EVE LOM THE RESTORATIVE RITUAL $280 evelom.com

DHC GERMANIUM CREAM & LOTION $89/$83 dhc.com

BRANCHE BEAUTY SLEEP CHARMEUSE CASE & BELLE DE NUIT EYE MASQUE $115 / $42 branchebeautysleep.com

MOROCCAN ELIXIR REJUVENATE ENERGIZING BODY OIL 4 OZ $40 moroccanelixir.com

ESTEE LAUDER ADVANCED NIGHT REPAIR INTENSIVE RECOVERY AMPOULES 60 CAPSULES $110 esteelauder.com

EVE LOM KISS MIX $22 evelom.com

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Fashion stylist: Laurean Ossorio. Makeup: dnicole. Hair stylist: Kendall Dorsey using Oribe. Manicure: Nails by Clive. Creative assistant: Aaron Burdge. Model: Alessandro Mele/Wilhelmina Models. Sweater: Caruso. Pants: Theory. Shoes: Sergio Rossi.

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Model photo by Raquel Salazar Location: Hotel on Rivington PANKHURST LONDON RAZOR & SHAVE BRUSH SET $415 pankhurstlondon.com

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nowing your routine and what keeps you looking sleek and well-groomed can help you go a long way. Whether it’s making sure your skin is ready for whatever weather the fall throws at you, or just shaving a few minutes off your morning ritual, a small array of quality basics is a must. With the new season comes a time to make some changes. Now’s the time to gather together a good grooming kit with everything from shampoo and shaving sets to skin care and fragrances. While many remember to wash before shaving, how you handle your skin after the shower should be a top priority. Hot water, face wash and then shaving opens up pores and can leave razor burns. Find the right razor and don’t underestimate the importance of shaving cream and aftershave. Adding a good moisturizer will get you and your skin looking smooth throughout the day, and with a few dashes of the right fragrance—as your finishing touches before walking out the door— you’ll be ready to face the new season and the new day. Learn the difference between night and day moisturizers. While the variation isn’t night and day itself, it’s good to know why there are two types. Day moisturizers are lighter in weight and absorb faster into the skin, leaving you with a light and airy feeling. Be sure to choose one with ingredients to block environmental elements like free radicals and the sun. Nighttime moisturizers can seem intimidating, but they shouldn’t be. They offer up a super dose of hydration and benefit your skin needs. The best night creams have different ingredients from regular creams because there is no danger of UV radiation destroying active ingredients that are helpful to the skin. However, they may quickly become useless if they are exposed to sunlight.

MAISON FRANCIS KURKDJIAN PETIT MATIN / GRAND SOIR 2.4 FL. OZ. $215 Saks Fifth Avenue at Brookfield Place franciskurkdjian.com DR JACKSON 02 NIGHT SKIN CREAM $120 drjackson.co.uk BLIND BARBER WILD WATERMINT GIN AFTERSHAVE SOOTHER $26 blindbarber.com MALIN+GOETZ SHAVING CREAM $22 malinandgoetz.com

111SKIN SPACE ANTI AGE DAY EMULSION NAC Y2 $240 barneys.com

MARTIAL VIVOT CONDITIONER & SHAMPOO $48/$43 martialvivot.com

SHAVE TIPS After shaving, a cold towel is a face’s best friend. Wet a clean towel with cold water, ring out slightly and apply the towel to the shaved areas of your face and neck. A cold towel minimizes redness and reduces the chance of irritation as it closes the pores that have been opened by the steam and razor.

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before the first batch of a new formulation was produced and tested. As exciting as this is, the real advance and the key to the modern facelift is the art of the assessment. This is the artistic eye of the aesthetic physician who no longer chases lines and wrinkles or fills holes, but instead understands your unique beauty and how to celebrate and enhance it. It often means starting younger and doing just a little at a time, and it’s as far removed as possible from the early and sadly too often still present days of pushing each patient to their limit—think frozen look, big lips and big cheeks, where each product or device is used with little understanding, coordination or thought of the actual final aesthetics. The modern facelift is a study of both science and art, the science of aging and of each product and device used, knowing in which plane it belongs in the skin, knowing the best placement and amount needed, but also looking at you and your face as a global aesthetic and creating balance and harmony and making sure you always look like the best, most beautiful version of yourself. That’s the art of the science, and it’s the true definition of the modern facelift.

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MAKING SENSE OF SKIN FITNESS

THE MODERN FACELIFT etting older is inevitable, but now aging is optional. The modern facelift doesn’t involve a knife or anesthesia, and it doesn’t require you to grow old and sink, sag and wrinkle before you begin the process. It’s a whole different philosophy of a relatively new concept called “age prophylaxis,” and it’s the new way to truly age gracefully rather than helplessly. As recently as 15 years ago, the FDA’s approval of Botox Cosmetic and, shortly thereafter hyaluronic acid fillers, marked the beginning of a new age of rejuvenation treatments. It gave aesthetic physicians specific tools that didn’t involve surgery and that were safe and reliable—it was no longer a facelift or nothing. Since then there has been an exponential addition of FDA-approved fillers, devices and neuromodulators that have expanded our rejuvenation armamentarium, and we can now address all areas of the face and even the neck, chest and body to help not just fill lines but also contour and reflate the skin. And along with this, skincare options have also exponentially-improved as we understood the process of aging down to a molecular level and gene chips helped test products and improve them even

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Photography by Raquel Salazar Location: Hotel on Rivington Fashion stylist: Laurean Ossorio Makeup: dnicole Hair stylist: Kendall Dorsey using Oribe Manicure: Nails by Clive Creative assistant: Aaron Burdge Model: Anastasia Klaffert/Wilhelmina Models Bolero: Harrison Morgan

spent the first half of my professional career as a cosmetic Plastic Surgeon performing only surgical rejuvenation. 25 years ago there really were not any non/minimally invasive options, so most patients sought a face-lift or eyelid lift only after they really needed it. Fast-forward to today, and most patients are proactive about how they are aging by trying to forestall the eventuality of an invasive procedure. I’ve always been into fitness, and like most of us today, I understand that a healthy and youthful body requires a certain dedication to regular fitness and proper nutrition. Well, the interesting thing is that Beauty For Life™ requires a very similar paradigm. It is a concept that I call the SkinGym™, and I have come to embrace it in my clinics. Through a commitment to excellent skin nutraceuticals and a sophisticated regimen of laser and energy-based devices aimed at various levels of the skin, patients are achieving perpetually younger, tighter, healthier and more vibrant exteriors. To understand how this works requires a review of skin anatomy. There is the dermis or structural foundation layer of the skin. The dermis is a complex woven “fabric” of collagen and elastic fibers that give skin important physical characteristics, not the least of which is elasticity. Overlying this foundation is a thin veneer of layered cells called the epidermis. Like a veneer, the appearance of this layer is what gives skin its visual color, clarity and beauty. The third layer is a deeper structure of anchoring fibers that attach the skin and subcutaneous fat to the muscles and connective tissue. Think wallpaper glue. Over time, and accelerated by sun exposure and oxidation, the physical structure of each of these three layers is diminished. With progressive loss of elastic quality in each of the deeper layers, our once-pristine Lycra techno-fabric behaves more like a baggy linen suit. And we all know that if you wear linen, you wear wrinkles. Anatomy and physiology thus defined, let’s hit the SkinGym™. Body-builders know that cycled exercise periods lead to injury and repair of the muscles and connective tissue. Proper nutrition accelerates the results by providing the building blocks for repair. Through a committed regimen of nutrition and cross-training exercises, bodies can be made stronger, healthier, more fit… essentially younger. The exact same thing holds true for skin, particularly facial skin. The beauty of this approach is that the rejuvenation is much more natural-looking than many other techniques that serve only to camouflage the signs of aging. Rebuilding the dermis is done using combinations of thermal lasers or infrared deep-heating devices. Very significant replacement of collagen and elastic structure has been shown to not only improve appearance and texture, but to actually restore structure at the microscopic level. Improvement of the epidermis may be achieved with lasers, ablatively or nonablatively, depending on expectations and tolerance for downtime. When done ablatively (with some tissue injury), the majority of sun-damaged and genetically altered cells are removed and replaced with a new epidermal layer derived from deeper and more pristine progenitor cells. Using non-ablative IPL (Intense Pulsed Light) devices, we can selectively correct abnormal pigment or redness, giving the skin better color and clarity. The most recent devices available today allow us to target deeper layers below the skin where anchoring ligaments reside. Treatments using focused ultrasound or radiofrequency devices allow targeted micro-injuries to the collagen anchors of the skin, essentially shrink-wrapping the skin envelope back to its more youthful dimensions, making the skin look and feel tighter. Of course, all these exercise stimulations require a very detailed medical-grade skincare regimen to back them up. Putting it all together, a proper skin rejuvenation clinic requires a very advanced array of powerful equipment, operated with an advanced degree of professional skill. Having practiced these concepts for well over a decade now, we have shown that this programming works quite effectively to slow down and even reverse skin aging. Once understood, the “SkinGym™” concept is simple and familiar. As we like to say in our SkinGym™: “Make Your Skin Fit!” D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M | FA L L 2 0 1 6

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ON THE JOY OF SAKS With her expert focus on emerging designers and upcoming trends, the new Fashion Director is to guide Saks into downtown and the future. Photography by Philippe Reynaud Art Direction by Marina Barlage

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arly last Fall, Roopal Patel was named the new Fashion Director of Saks Fifth Avenue. Between the new Saks Downtown location and moving their corporate offices to Brookfield Place, it’s been a year with a strong focus on Lower Manhattan. “There is a great energy taking place downtown at the moment,” said Patel when she met with Downtown. “It is such a dynamic time for Saks’ history, and I am proud to be a key part of the process.” Though Saks may be new to the lower Manhattan area, the new Fashion Director knows it well. “I have been a downtown girl for the past 24 years. I recently moved to TriBeCa and love the community here,” she noted. With Saks’ new corporate office location, she gets to walk to work every day— a walk she particularly accredits to her learning says helps her learn more about the downtown customer, as well as the area in itself, and which serves as a flowing source of inspiration. “I always look to the streets and the downtown environment to inspire me. There is such creative synergy downtown, especially now. This always influences the creative space of art, music, food, pop culture and fashion,” explained Patel. Saks Downtown is not just a mirrored version of their flagship on Fifth Avenue. Instead, they’ve created their downtown location to be its own concept store with a more advanced designer roster and a slightly-different feel—yet it still stays true to the same Saks style and service. “We are looking to move the Saks brand into the future, and Saks Downtown allows us to showcase our visionary concept,” the fashion expert pointed out. Since stepping into her new role, Patel has (and continues to) bring new names to Saks’ already impressive list of designers. She is especially excited about Saks’ edit—their curated designer lineup—within the new downtown location. “We are showcasing so many advanced and emerging designers,” she said,

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mentioning names such as Vêtements, Dries Van Noten, Monse and Simone Roch from their opening line. The Fashion Director is well-known for her work with emerging fashionistas, and is also a part of the Council of Fashion Designers of America’s Fashion Incubator program, where she mentors upcoming designers. “It is a great way to support and nurture the future generation of American Fashion,” she told Downtown. Growing up, Patel didn’t know she would end up in the fashion industry, but admits to having loved fashion and trends from an early age. “I would wake up on Saturday mornings to watch Style with Elsa Klensch and read the pages of Vogue,” the savvy businesswoman remembered. She started undergraduate studies at NYU thinking she would be a lawyer, but after learning more about the fashion industry, there was no doubt that this was what she wanted to do. Throughout her career, Patel has found mentors in the people she works with. From her time at Bergdorf Goodman, she credits Ron Frasch, Robert Burke and Linda Fargo in particular for teaching her how fashion and retail come together, and at Saks, Patel is thankful for the support and openness she has been met with. “I am really honored to work with our President Marc Metrick and our Chief Merchant Tracy Margolies. They both are at the heart of leading Saks into the future,” she said. Much of Saks’ future looks to be within the downtown area. The revitalization happening is a great buzz to be in, both financially and creatively. They are wellaware of the potential and the new clientele they can reach downtown and are constantly thinking of new ways to grow the brand. “We have a saying at Saks Fifth Avenue—‘Men are the new Women,’” Patel said. “We believe so strongly in the opportunity to service the downtown male community that we are opening a designated Men’s store in 2017,” she revealed.

Fashion stylist: Rachel Wirkus, Hair stylist: David Cotteblanche, Makeup: dnicole, Dress: Proenza Schouler

by Eva Maria Troester

“We are looking to move the Saks brand into the future, and Saks Downtown allows us to showcase our visionary concept.” D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M | FA L L 2 0 1 6

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léman

CULTIVATING MASTERY in Young Learners Why today’s preschoolers need to explore and take risks. by Kate Sylvain

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EXPLORE Children are natural explorers. How many times have you witnessed a child pick up an object for the first time and stare at it in wonder, studying every characteristic and using every sense to figure out exactly what to do with that “thing?” At Léman, children are given many different materials throughout the year to do just this. The instructors use a myriad of STEAM materials, some traditional (Legos, Tinker Toys and Lincoln

Logs) and others that are new to the Early Childhood scene, such as Xylobas and the Codea-pillar—an electronic caterpillar that teaches the fundamentals of coding. PLAN Children are encouraged to think about what they could make with the materials before them, to build upon one another’s thoughts and ideas, and to question each other’s thinking. Maybe it is a building, maybe a bus, maybe a train or a spaceship. Whatever it may be, where are they going to start? What pieces will they need? Does it make sense to use the square pieces for wheels? How big should the creation be, how small? What might happen if you stack the heavy pieces on top? Students work together and encourage conversations in which they have to communicate and build upon each other’s ideas so they can begin to understand that negotiation is key to being open-minded, caring members of a community.

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CREATE Children in the Center consistently create using many different materials—across separate languages and disciplines. Whether they attempt to stick to their first plan or plan to adapt their strategies as they create, the children often find their original plans need to be completely redesigned. In the end, the final product is not as important as the process, and that shines through. The ability to explain one’s thinking, to be flexible in one’s thinking, and to figure out what worked and what did not—and the ability to work through frustration and find success—are just a few of the life skills that children in Léman’s Early Childhood program are able to develop: all the important characteristics of a global learner and engaged citizen of the world. Kate Sylvain is Head of the Center for Early Childhood Education at Léman Manhattan Preparatory School, located in the Financial District.

Photos: Courtesy of Léman Manhattan Preparatory School

esearch shows that the more hands-on experiences children are offered, the more confident and secure they be come in their learning. And the earlier that can occur, the better. At the Center for Early Childhood Education at Léman Manhattan, we help children become independent lifelong learners who are not afraid to take risks. Through an inquiry-based curriculum and STEAM WonderLab—our innovative maker-space— we provide children ages three through five with their first opportunities to:

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little apple

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essentials

Essentials

EOS Berry Blossom Body Lotion 11.8 fl. oz. $6.49 evolutionofsmooth.com

OBAGI Obagi360 System $144.50 obagi.com

DOWNTOWN’S aQUaTIC HUB

DRUNK ELEPHANT T.L.C. Framboos Glycolic Night Serum: $90 C-Firma Day Serum: $80 Virgin Marula Luxury Facial Oil: $72 drunkelephant.com

TOMS SHOES Navy Twill Micro Stripe Men’s Valdez Sneakers $64 toms.com

TOMS GLASSES Fitzpatrick Shiny Black Polarized $179 toms.com TAUN SKIN CARE Small Batch Men’s Skin Care 2 oz. $59 taunskincareformen.com

JEFFERSON LANE SHEETS Satin Hem Sheet Set (White Stitch on Grey) California King size: $200 jeffersonlanehome.com

PARFUMS DE MARLY Oajan 125 ml $275 pmarly.com

SKINCEUTICALS Advanced Pigment Corrector $90 skinceuticals.com

HELIX SLEEP MATTRESS California King $995 helixsleep.com

SKANDINAVISK SCENTED CANDLE København Urban Bliss $48 skandinavisk-usa.com

L E S S O N S

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C L A S S E S

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L A P

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212 North end avenue


downtown mom

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little apple

Little Apple Asks Downtown Mom “They [the twins] think getting on the subway is a treat, because we typically walk to [wherever] we need [to]— because Downtown has everything we need!” –

Contessa Brewer

TWICE IS NICE by Denise Courter

Photography by Raquel Salazar

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ontessa Brewer has been covering the news from California to the East Coast—and many points in between, for close to 20 years. She’s a contributing correspondent and anchor for CBS News and the host of MSNBC’s Caught On Camera, where she was also a news anchor for nine years. The fastpaced world of news reporting may have prepared her for the equally fast-paced world of twins and motherhood. Brewer and her husband are the parents of twin boys, Axel and Beckett, and they call Downtown Manhattan home. Her busy life with twin boys seems to have not slowed her down at all. Contributing Editor Denise Courter had a chance to find out what it’s like to raise twins in the historic neighborhood of the Seaport District while working in journalism and finding time for family. Denise Courter: What led you to a career in journalism? Contessa Brewer: I had planned to be a psychologist, but a high school teacher predicted I’d be miserable telling patients what was wrong with them and having them ignore my advice. He said I was too goal-oriented for psychotherapy. I thought he might be right. I was already in my first semester at Syracuse University, which has an incredible broadcast journalism program. And I thought, “Yeah, still people telling you their

CB: I love that my children hear foreign languages every day, eat foods from around the world and are exposed to more culture, diversity and experiences than I was, in spite of my own nomadic childhood. I love that play dates happen without leaving our building. And they think getting on the subway is a treat, because we typically walk to [wherever] we need [to]—because Downtown has everything we need!

problems, but you tell their story and start fresh the next day.” I was hooked from the beginning. DC: Journalism is a tough world. Did you feel prepared for it? CB: Television journalism is an industry in transition—and that makes it even more competitive than it traditionally has been. But regardless of how it’s delivered in the future, curiosity, persistence and great storytelling will always be in demand.

DC: Has working and raising kids in the city been easy or hard? Anything that you would have done differently, if given the chance?

DC: What inspired you to live in Lower Manhattan? CB: Lower Manhattan itself! I moved here when the Fulton Fish Market was still operating on South Street in the wee hours of the morning. I’d have to squeeze out my front door because the fish trucks were parked on the sidewalk next to my building. Now, the fish market’s gone, but the school kids have come—so many families! It’s like a village, where the neighbors all know you, your kids, your dog. And that’s a good thing, because rearing twins really does take a village. DC: What’s your favorite Downtown local gem: CB: The Salty Paw—good for dogs, great for toddlers!

CB: City-living is hands-down easier! I just walk out of the door. No car seats, strapping them in and out while running errands. In the “old days,” my mom just left us in the car when she ran into the grocery, bank or post office. That would be frowned upon these days—[it’s] easier to wheel them through a tight doorway in a double-wide stroller. DC: What lessons have your children taught you that you wish you had known, pre-kids? CB: That parents don’t have all the answers.

DC: What is the best parenting advice/phrase you were given?

DC: What are your favorite things about being a City Mom?

CB: “Don’t make me stop this car,” from my dad. It worked.

D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M | FA L L 2 0 1 6

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Barclay’s Spot What would your owner catch you doing if they came home unexpectedly? Interested in settling down with another dog? If so, who? Guilty Pleasures? What are you dressing up as for Halloween?

Lady Bella

Barclay PAWBLISHER

Sponsored by Le Pet Spa and Citipups Photography by Rafael Rautha

SAMOYED —LYNN & MARK PICCOLO Sometimes I snuggle into the basket of clean towels. Shhh! The neighbor’s Golden Doodle is pretty cute, but he’s known for being a bit of a heartbreaker. BACON! BACON! BACON! My sister Caroline is going as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz so maybe I’ll be her Toto.

Myka

BEAGLE —LEON & IRENE FROHLICH I like to creep into the bedroom, open my dad’s drawer, grab socks and hide them elsewhere! Unless Snoopy comes sniffing through my door, I’m happy and content with my dog BFF’s. Bachelor Nation! It started off with Juan Pablo. Now, I just can’t stop! Rocket Raccoon from Guardians of the Galaxy

Finley

MALTESE —ANDY & RINA COLLINS Where my treats are kept—they really should find a better hiding place. There’s this cute Maltipoo that hangs out in DeWitt Park. I just love giving myself a good rub on any towel I can find lying around the apartment! This year I’ll dress up as a “rufferee” and organize my own game with all my doggie friends.

COCKALIER —RAFAEL MAIA

PERSONALIZED PET CARE AT LE PET SPA Le Pet Spa offers a personalized approach to pet grooming. Every pet has its individual needs, and Le Pet Spa's groomers not only take care of these needs, but they also go out of their way to ensure that all visiting pets receive the personal attention they deserve. “The place is small … but that makes it great,” owner Phil Castiglia said about the company's individualistic take on pet care. “Because every pet that comes in visits with you, you see them. You know they’re not just walking around aisles and all over the place.” At Le Pet Spa, they make every reasonable effort to accommodate all pets. Located at 300 Rector Place in Lower Manhattan (entrance on South End Avenue). Stop by for love and cookies!

Rearranging the furniture, man, is that funny! My Golden Doodle friend, Cooper, from Chelsea. Ice cubes, peanut butter and power cords. This year I really want to dress up as Simba! You know what they say: dress to impress!

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PRODUCTION, MEET CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHER: ANTOINE VERGLAS MODEL: SPENCER [ONE.1] MAKEUP: DONNA F [CHANEL] HAIR: DAVID COTTEBLANCHE [RED MARKET] STYLIST: BRANDY [NEXT]

Le Pet Spa Visit www.lepetspabpc.com for more info. SPLASH LI GHT.COM

FA L L 2 0 1 6 | D OW N TOW N M AG A Z I N E N YC . C O M


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Magical MAHEKAL GET LOST IN PARADISE If you desire relaxation with the option for adventure, Mexico’s Mahekal Beach Resort is a “must add” for your travel list this year. By Grace Capobianco & Jennifer Agress

staff, is there to ensure that from the start of your stay to the very last minute, you will receive a superb, relaxing and adventurous stay. After a short 40-minute car ride from the airport, you will arrive at a quaint resort located on the beautiful Playa Del Carmen beach. A former fishing town, set on a flawless stretch of beach with turquoise waters, the resort in the Riviera Maya jungle has four pools. My favorite was the infinity pool, set a few feet back from the ocean. The resort offers 196 palapa-styled one- or twostory bungalows, with hammocks on your terrace, just a few feet from the beach itself. Inspired by the book GypSet Style by Julia Chaplin, Mahekal Beach Resort’s interior design scheme is the meeting point of playful Mexican hues and bohemian-gypsy chic. Eclectic, brilliant accents like Missoni-esque fabrics adorn the hotel lobby, including fireplace seating areas. Boli’s bright-orange ping-pong tables and cobalt

blue billiards offer guests just a taste of the fanciful things yet to come. Wind your way to your bungalow and watch as this subtle eccentricity takes on a whole new level. From its thatched, Tiki hut-style roof—found nowhere else in the area—to its artisan-stenciled floors, the inside of each bungalow boasts chic white walls and neutral furniture, which come to life with brightly colored throw pillows, striped fabrics, whimsical ceramics and local, Mayan art dotted throughout. Boasting a tranquil ambiance reflective of the Ancient Mayans’ simple appreciation for nature and the fibers it produces, these vibrant textiles, often handmade by generations of Mayans still living in the area, add subtle style in a way that’s truly Mahekal. Plan a day of snorkeling at Mahakal’s Vida Aquatica Dive Center. On one of my many favorite day trips, we swam through and around the world’s second-largest coral reef while taking in the sites of the many beautiful colored fish—

Each bungalow boasts brightly colored throw pillows, striped fabrics, whimsical ceramics and Mayan art dotted throughout.

Photos: Courtesy of Mahekal Beach Resort

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fter an early morning flight out of New York City, I was greeted at the airport by a private car and one of the resort’s signature margaritas, a refreshing start to my trip. Instantly, you will experience its namesake, “Mahekal,” which in Mayan means “magical.” Situated on Playa del Carmen’s largest stretch of beach and spanning 920 pristine feet of shoreline beauty, Mahekal Beach Resort was the very first property in Playa del Carmen, and it is still known today for its unique ability to combine Mexico’s sandy shores and tropical verdure. Though large, the resort’s many sections—from its seaside infinity pool to its tucked-away jungle—add a small, intimate feel, creating a Swiss Family Robinson-style setting with lush vegetation, colorful bougainvillea and hidden stone pathways winding throughout. Every employee under General Manager Julian Smaldoni’s direction, from the maids to dining

and one very special rather large turtle who seemed to love the attention. Be sure to book a day trip to the Mayan Ruins to walk through and around the original natural architecture from the Mayans. Take the time to visit the private beach down the cliff from the ruins. The views are spectacular. Standing at the top of the cliff and looking down into the crystal clear ocean, you almost feel how the Mayans must have felt in this breathtaking paradise. For a taste of true culture, take a ceramic painting class on-site with Juliana, a master of her craft, or walk to the famed Fifth Avenue or Quinta Avenida, a bustling pedestrian walkway located just one block from the property, lined with hundreds of well-known shops, bars/lounges and multinational cuisine. On an early evening stroll to Fifth Avenue, you will find a version of “New York’s Fifth Avenue meets South Beach” with trendy shopping and

nightlife options. Shop, dance with the locals and sip your way through Fifth Avenue into the wee hours of the morning. Take time from your adventure and sightseeing to indulge in a treatment or two at the resort’s new Mayan-inspired Revive Spa, featuring a line of organic, locally-made Kinich products. You will be hooked on the massage oils and the massage with aromatherapy, helping you relax mind, body and soul with Mayan-inspired treatments. Dine on-site in one of its three restaurants. My favorite was Fuego, which serves authentic Tulum-style cuisine, made in a brick oven by Executive Chef Crescenciano Nerey. While deep in Mayan culture, book a private cooking class and dinner with an authentic Mayan chef. Experience the ancient cooking and how the Mayans cooked each meal by going into the cooking hut as the chef from the Mayan Culinary Casita buries the prepared dish to cook

in the earth. Feel like staying in for a romantic dinner and evening without leaving your bungalow? Dine on your open-air terrace with the pristine ocean practically at your feet. Swim in your personal plunge pool and shower afterward in your own private rain shower. Leave your sound machine at home. Let the ocean lull you to sleep each night. Other than wi-fi, there are no electronic devices, insuring you’ll have a relaxing getaway—exactly as the Mayans would do it! If you are looking for nature at its best, plus bohemian ambiance with a good bit of luxury, Mahekal Beach Resort has it all!

For more information about Mahekal Beach Resort, visit www.mahekalbeachresort.com.

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EATALY Breaks Bread in Downtown

by Caisse Davis

Interviewed by Grace A. Capobianco

For its second New York location, Eataly couldn’t have chosen a better one—it is lavish, modern and signifies everything about New York’s eclectic downtown culture.

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oodies, it is time to rejoice. New York’s Financial District welcomed its very own Eataly location in early August on the third floor of 4 World Trade Center. Each Eataly location is dedicated to its own new mantra, a new philosophy specific to its area. The downtown food mecca, with views of the 9/11 Memorial and reflecting pools, presents its new theme of bread. Much more than a piece of pane, it is a symbol of community, culture and connectivity in both New York and across the globe. According to Eataly CEO Nicola Farinetti— who partners with culinary experts Mario Batali, Lidia Bastianich and Joseph Bastianich—the bread theme resembles a reason to talk about cultures in the melting pot of New York City. The choice to open a new Eataly in FiDi was no random decision. Adam and Alex Saper, the developers of Eataly NYC Downtown, took great pride in this project. “When we were presented with the ability to be involved in a project like this, with the emotional aspect around it...and to be able to provide amazing high-quality food. That just got us,” Adam Saper said.

As born and raised New York locals, the Saper brothers recognized just how important a downtown Eataly would be. At a time when the city’s devotion to rebuild downtown Manhattan is crucial, the brothers hope Eataly will become a “linchpin” in the redevelopment of the area. Eataly partner and restaurateur Joseph Bastianich believes this new location will benefit Eataly as a whole. “Eataly Flatiron changed the Flatiron [district], and it changed New York in a real way, and that’s a really important thing when you can change how New York behaves,” Bastianich pointed out. “I think this will be completely the opposite, putting Eataly in a place that’s so important that this location will change Eataly.” For Oscar Farinetti, founder of Eataly and father of CEO Nicola Farinetti, coming to the World Trade Center location was an easy decision. His passion for sharing Italy with the world has proved successful; this downtown location will be the thirty-third in the world. “I remember I was in Italy [when 9/11 occurred],” Farinetti said. “When I looked at this [location], for me…it’s the center of the

Photo by Nisran Azouaghe

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world, the possibility to open an Eataly for a new era. For me, it’s very proud, very important,” he added with heartfelt emotion. In an area the founder believes to be “the center of the world,” it is easy to imagine how Eataly will flourish and make a positive impact on downtown New York. Italy, a country arguably known for the world’s best food and wine, has a passionate culture when it comes to sharing food and drink. Farinetti believed the beauty of Italian food should not simply stay in its origins. As an artisanal Italian marketplace, Eataly offers the freshest of food that tastes as if you have stepped onto the streets of Rome. There is something to find and indulge in for everyone at Eataly: homemade pastas, paninis, flatbreads, local fish and of course, a rather large assortment of meats and cheeses to satisfy any Italian craving. According to Eataly’s official website, this new marketplace offers some “delicious twists” exclusive to its new downtown location. Restaurants by the name of Orto e Mare, a vegetable and seafood restaurant, and Osteria della Pace, specializing in southern Italian cuisine, are some of the new and

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Chef Raffaele Ronca—2016 Chopped Champions winner on Food Network

Photo by Philippe Reynaud

delicious additions. If you’re looking for something on the go, five new counter-service eateries have been added to the location including a juice and salad bar. If you are interested in learning the secrets behind the taste of Eataly, free classes and demonstrations are offered at its Foodiversità, which is located in the marketplace. Eataly believes “good eating is all about engagement and education,” so stopping by for a class is highly encouraged. Mario Batali, the famous chef and an Eataly partner, ensures the mission of the marketplace is wholesome. “What we’re really about is sharing the Italian culture of gastronomy, wine and happiness, and all of the things Italians want to export and share,” Batali said. Eataly NYC Downtown truly embodies a triple-threat: high-quality food with the freshest ingredients; a passion for cooking and cultural awareness; and a location in an area that is genuinely at the center of every New Yorker’s heart.

Bikini: Cynthia Rowley Jewelry: Kenneth Jay Lane Shoes: Guess


city bites

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chef profile

chef

The Gluten-Free

city bites

INGREDIENTS

Chef Jemiko L. Solo makes everyone’s dining experience perfect and safe by guaranteeing 100 percent gluten-free cuisine at Senza Gluten. by Eva Maria Troester Photography by Raquel Salazar

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onestly, being a chef, and especially a chef at Senza Gluten, is challenging,” Jemiko L. Solo said when Downtown met with him in his charming Greenwich Village restaurant. “But I love challenges. That’s what keeps me going. It makes me want to do more—and better.” From a very early age, Solo knew he wanted to be a chef. “Probably when I was 10 or 11 years old,” he said. His inspiration came from his father, whom he calls “the great chef,” His father worked as an executive chef for 40 years before he died. When his mother then started working at the Marco Polo Hotel in Tbilisi, Georgia—where Solo and his family are from—he began working in the kitchen and gradually moved up, eventually walking in his father’s footsteps and becoming a great chef himself. “I had the honor to work with many great chefs from all over the world,” he said about working at the Marco Polo Hotel. “That’s when I experienced the great pleasure of cooking.” After eight years at the Hotel’s restaurant, Solo went on to work at other restaurants in Tbilisi. Later, when he moved to the States, he started working at Italian restaurants and fell head-over-heels in love with how, despite its simplicity of ingredients, the cuisine is fresh and bursting with flavor. But he also became aware of how Italian menus are characterized by foods like pasta and pizza, dishes that are often a no-go for people with Celiac Disease or gluten-intolerance. While Solo is not gluten-intolerant himself, he has a number of friends who are sensitive to gluten. “They have been diagnosed for years,” he said. “At the time, it was very difficult for them to find safe places to dine out.” So he took it upon himself to open a restaurant where people did not have to worry about gluten. “I wanted my friends and everyone who suffered from gluten allergies to feel safe while eating out

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GLUTEN-FREE CAULIFLOWER PARMESAN

GOURMAND “

profile

1

Small to medium size of cauliflower, trimmed and broken into chunks. Wash and dry on a paper towel so it’s still a little wet.

3

Large eggs lightly beaten (for rice flour, use 2 eggs and 1 egg yolk)

¾

Cup corn or rice flour, or any gluten-free flour or mix you have

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Cups of gluten-free bread crumbs (you can also toast gluten-free bread slices and make crumbs, or use polenta), coarsely-ground cornmeal, salt and black pepper as needed

2

Cups 100% canola oil for frying

2

Cups tomato sauce

½

Cup grated Parmesan cheese

½

Ball of fresh buffalo mozzarella or plain fresh mozzarella (sliced or small chunks)

3–4 Leaves of fresh basil 2–3 Tbs. of extra virgin olive oil PREPARATION Preheat oven to 400°F In 3 bowls, place flour, eggs and bread crumbs.

and not miss out on flavor. To have choices to choose from.” At Senza Gluten—“senza” means “without” in Italian—the extensive menu offers gluten-free takes on Italian classics such as lasagna, penne al pomodoro and bruschetta. With his recipes, Solo proves that a gluten-free Italian menu does not have to be devoid of flavor, texture or delicious options. “Most of the dishes that I make are the ones that my customers ask for. I like to go into the dining room and speak with them when I can,” Solo said about how he comes up with the menu. “They love to share their stories and experience ... and most of them have a dish or two that they would love to enjoy. The ones they didn't have for years.” In addition to savory Italian foods, the restaurant also offers a long list of delightful desserts. An array of the gluten-free baked goods

is displayed at the restaurant, making it hard not to order a slice of pie or a muffin. While glutenfree baking can be a daunting task, the certified gluten-free chef manages to whip up dreamy concoctions similar to—if not better than— their gluten-full counterparts. There is an art to it, but there’s no one better to take on this task than Solo. Before opening up his own restaurant, he attended the Art Institute of New York City, where he studied pastry art and got to explore and advance his passion for baking. Now, running Senza Gluten, he has dreams to expand. “I am planning to open a small bakery,” he said. “First of all, to supply Senza Gluten. Our kitchen is very small and I would love to have bigger space to be able to bake more and a [wider] variety of baked goods. Make our own pasta.”

In the flour, add dashes of salt and pepper and chunks of cauliflower. Mix until all the chunks are coated well in flour, then slowly transfer the chunks to lightly-beaten eggs and coat well again. Make sure all of the chunks are well-coated into the eggs, then transfer to the bread crumbs. Coat well until all chunks are coated in bread crumbs. Heat oil in a deep-fryer to 365°F or in a dip pot preheat oil over medium heat. When oil is hot start frying breaded cauliflower in 2–3 batches until they become golden in color and crispy. When ready, remove and drain on paper towels. On a skillet pan, spoon half of the tomato sauce. Next, apply pieces of fried cauliflower, top with slices of mozzarella, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese, spoon the other half of the tomato sauce, cover with rest of the mozzarella, sprinkle Parmesan cheese again. Bake for about 12–14 minutes until the cheese is melted and the top is crispy golden brown. Drizzle with basil oil, sprinkle with Parmesan and serve!

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yoga

yoga

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fitness

THE ART of BALANCE by Cristen and Kimberly @Chintwins

Photography by Nigel Barker

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eeking balance of mind, body and soul has been an ancient quest the world over. In New York City, we don’t have the luxury of escaping to a mountaintop to find enlightenment, but we still must find ways to create harmony to focus on our family, career, health, fitness and ultimately peace of mind. But “balance” is hard, nitty-gritty work. Which is why New Yorkers are actually perfectly equipped to attain the art of balance. We are expected to always give 100 percent in this city, but if we gave 70 and reinvested the remaining 30 into ourselves, the benefits would be exponential! While we’re hardwired to expend every ounce of energy living in such an amazing and stimulating environment, we need to practice self-preservation to take part in the act of balance. Look closely at a tightrope-walker as he moves across a wire, and you’ll see that he is in constant motion, making minor adjustments as he moves. We must stay nimble and be willing to adjust to each new challenge we face. Focus on the act of balance rather than the end goal. PUT YOURSELF FIRST Start by prioritizing self-care. Caring for our bodies through fitness, our health through nutrition, and our minds through meditation. Don’t feel guilty when taking time away from work and family to invest in your well-being. Selfcare is a necessity! We have a tendency to take the whole world on our shoulders without asking for help. We need to allow others to take some of the burden. Make those around you aware that you are stepping back to restore balance to be a better person for them. Each individual needs to find an activity to feed the body and enrich the soul. It is not the exercise class you take, but the intention you set and how you bring your mind into the practice of exercise. A healthy body can look many different ways, and the path for each person to wholeness is just as varied. New Yorkers often seek out high-impact, powerpacked routines to blow off steam. You may want to consider the opposite. Try out a restorative yoga class to counteract the stress after a long, hard day. It might just be the medicine your body is

looking for. Staying in tune with your body during any activity and modifying when it sends you a message is key. Each morning we wake up as a new instrument, so be mindful, seek balance, listen to your body and react to the cues it gives you. We need to nourish our bodies with a balanced diet. Not necessarily a juice fast or gluten-free. Nourish your body, don’t punish it. There’s no use skimping at lunch if it leads to a starved feedingfrenzy at dinner. A balanced diet comes from really listening to your cravings, not from depriving yourself. We are very lucky to have farmers’ markets, gourmet grocery stores and online shopping. Take advantage of these conveniences and plan out your meals. It is more work, but balance is an action, not a passive state. Be realistic about your eating goals, creative with your food choices and educated in your nutritional needs. When your nutrition is balanced, you will have more energy and be better able to care for yourself and those around you. CLEAR YOUR MIND We cannot truly find balance unless we have mental clarity, the lack of which is like staring out a foggy window without being able to enjoy the view. We must strive to calm the self-doubt, selfcriticism and worry that swirl in our minds, which make it impossible to be present in the moment and difficult to make rational decisions. Bring balance to your mind by calming your thoughts through meditation. Maybe it is a long jog while listening to a special playlist, a podcast that offers guided meditations or one of the new hip meditation studios Downtown. Whatever it may be, set aside time in your day to find stillness within. Nothing miraculous has to happen, and all your problems do not need to be solved. However, meditating will bring more patience and perspective. You realize it’s easier to accept obstacles and go with the flow, rather than fighting against it. When your mind is quiet, you can finally hear your own voice. We exist in a world filled with dualities, so it is up to us to find the balance between them. Focus on self-care and fortify yourself so you can approach challenges with a clear mind and a calm body. When we practice the act of balance in all areas of our life, we can face each new day with a fearless strength and know that we can adjust to whatever comes our way.

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SWIMMING for a Better You After a summer spent lounging by the pool and watching the U.S. dominate the Olympics, we can’t help but be inspired to jump into a swimming pool. Here are by Darren Paltrowitz some tips to by maintain Photography Don Floodyour swimming skills in the cooler seasons. by Jennifer Coccia, Asphalt Green Photography by Poby 1. THE MANY BENEFITS OF SWIMMING Many people don’t realize how serious a workout the sport of swimming actually can be. Swimming is the only sport that continually works every muscle in the body and is a low-impact workout on the body’s joints! It is the perfect exercise for people—from individuals with arthritis to the physically robust—looking for a serious workout. 2. SWIMMING MAKES YOU HAPPY Swimming is a full-body workout that can really get your heart rate up and metabolism going. Being able to burn calories and produce all those endorphins is hugely beneficial to improving your overall mood. When you start your morning with a swim, you ensure you start your day off right, and it’s proven to enhance focus throughout the workday—there is no way to not be happy! There is also something to be said about the quietness and escape from the loud and demanding day when entering the water; it’s a beautiful, therapeutic way to escape and work out in quietness and feel weightless in the pool.

running

3. GETTING STARTED No time is better than the present for lessons to learn how to swim or refine your strokes, whether they’re for your child or yourself. While it can be a little daunting to learn to swim at an older age, we can help make it a smoother process. The best advice might be to put aside your fears and give your instructor your complete trust. They know what they are doing! As a survival mechanism, it is innately in us to fight certain things that we may fear, such as being submerged in a pool, floating on your back or even just getting into a pool. Be vocal about your fears and weaknesses to your instructors, let them guide you through the process, even if it may entail holding your hand or having your head on their shoulder while you learn to float. You will never be able to learn if you fight the process. 4. TRANSITIONING FROM SUMMER POOLSIDE TO INDOOR SWIMMING Swimming outdoors and being able to take in all the Vitamin D throughout the summer months cannot be beat. However, transitioning back indoors can provide some added benefits to your swimming and health. Swimming the backstroke outdoors can be difficult for some people if they do not have the ceiling or spatial references to keep them swimming in a straight line; switching to indoors can offer those reference points to help ensure a smoother swim. Also, the most arduous part about the summer months is having to constantly apply sunscreen when swimming in an outdoor pool. With skin cancer on the rise, it can only be an added benefit of being able to get out of the sun for your swim! 5. STAYING MOTIVATED Swimming is a sport that takes patience and dedication, as the results are not visible overnight. However, results will be seen when a person sets tiny goals that build up to bigger ones. It can be hard to stay motivated, but simply adding an extra 100 yards—or four lengths—to your swim each day can add 1,000 yards to your workout in just two weeks. Hold yourself accountable for progress and motivation, write down your goals, track them, take pride in what you have done and tell people about it. No matter how little a goal may be, a goal earned is a sign of success. Be proud! Asphalt Green is a non-profit organization with a variety of sports and fitness programs. Its Battery Park City campus is located on 212 North End Avenue, New York, NY 10282.

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fitness

Run Often, Run Fast, Run Smart Mile High Run Club's Deborah Warner gives tips on treadmill workouts and preparing for a marathon.

by Eva Maria Troester Photography by Don Flood

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ven though day-to-day life in New York City may be filled with running around, it hardly compares to running a full marathon. With fall sweeping through the city, it brings with it the New York City Marathon, but preparing for the big race while living in the city isn’t without hurdles. Air pollution, weather conditions, living far from running trails and traffic are just some of the challenges that New Yorkers face when training for the Marathon. While it is by no means recommended to train only indoors for the big course, running on a treadmill can be a helpful tool to get you over that finish line safe and sound. Downtown was able to talk to Mile High Run Club Founder and CEO Deborah Warner about how to prepare best. “The key efforts of marathon training are the two speed days per week, plus the long runs, and the total weekly mileage,” Warner said. While there's no significant difference physiologically between indoor and outdoor running, indoor running offers a controlled climate and a safe place to train without running into traffic. “Therefore, the treadmill can be easier, especially for speed passes, as it gives you complete control of incline, pace and time.” To stay motivated, Warner suggests running with a group. Groups of runners hold each other accountable and develop strong bonds over their

shared training experiences and common purpose. There are loads of groups to choose from in the city, including the New York Road Runners and Nike Run Club. Running a marathon is a big challenge, physically and mentally, and it’s not something anyone should do on a whim. Realize and accept that it takes time to build up mileage and stamina, and learn to listen to your body to best avoid injuries. “Anyone who trains for a marathon has to be willing to make compromises in order to prepare properly,” Warner said. “It’s also important to build in recovery time and services, such as sports massage or cold plunge.” “Strength training and foam rolling are helpful [for] recovery in preventing injury,” Warner said. “Gradual increases in mileage [of] no more than 10 percent per week are advised. Reduced mileage weeks every fourth week—[what’s known as] periodization—are also recommended.” Nutrition also plays a part, but it really depends on the runner. What works for one person might not work for another. But you know your body best, so you can educate yourself and then test out how your body responds. “It’s important for runners to test out a nutrition strategy on training runs prior to race day, and plan timing, storage and amount of necessary fuel,” she added. If the New York City Marathon is your marathon debut, refrain from putting too much pressure on yourself. Being realistic is key. Both over the course of training, and even more so on

the big day itself. “First-timers should just focus on getting to the starting line injury-free and enjoying the experience,” Warner said. “And my last tip is: The proof is in the training. Don’t expect performances on race day that weren't already replicated in the training.” Mile High Run Club is a modern fitness club revolving around treadmill workouts. The running lifestyle brand has two studio locations in New York City: 28 East 4th Street and 24 West 25th Street.

JILLIAN MICHAELS

ON MANHATTAN, MARATHONS AND MOTIVATION.

by Darren Paltrowitz Training for a marathon can be an overwhelming task —where does one even start? Downtown got a few tips from Jillian Michaels, former trainer on NBC's The Biggest Loser and one of the biggest fitness celebrities out there. Michaels has an ideal starting point. “First I tell people to establish their 'why’.” She continued: “Having a 'why' gives the work purpose and subsequently becomes passion. However, work without a 'why' or an intrinsic purpose just becomes punishing.” Training for a marathon is no simple task, but sometimes lacing up your running shoes and hitting the streets of the city is an adrenaline kick to start you off. The fitness expert is no stranger to running in New York City. "When I was younger, I used to stay with a friend along Canal. All I can say is you never get bored. The sights, the sounds, the near-death experiences… I love it." This coming spring, on May 21, 2017, you can catch some of Michaels’ motivation in An Evening With Jillian Michaels at New York City's PlayStation Theater—which may just be the last push you need to try out for a spot in The NYC Marathon.

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Nothing makes a man look and feel more like a handsome gentleman than an expertly tailored suit.

CLOTH Passion for the

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dying

breed

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by Eva Maria Troester Photography by Raquel Salazar

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rom JFK and Sean Connery to David Beckham and George Clooney, nothing makes a man look and feel more like a handsome gentleman than an expertly tailored suit. And if you’re a New York man who deeply cares about his appearance—and has the means to look his best—then you may find yourself a few steps from Rockefeller Center at Nino Corvato Designs. Nino Corvato is a traditional master Italian tailor famed throughout New York City and the world for his perfect-fitting and elegantly constructed custom-made suits. He greets the well-heeled customers himself, many of whom are personal friends after years of working together. He also does this because personal interaction and attention to detail are touchstones of this old-school and unfortunately fading profession. “I have the feeling this art is dying every day, and we’re almost at extinction,” Corvato told Downtown while pointing to himself. “I am 75 years old, and I’m one of the last ones left.” Corvato’s story and that of the dwindling occupation of master tailors is being told in a riveting new documentary by director/producer Vicki Vasilopoulos called Men of the Cloth. What started out as a film chronicling the disappearing trade quickly turned into an emotional drama about devotion and passion. “It’s really a film about seeking perfection over the course of a lifetime,” Vasilopoulos said. Not only does it capture the beauty of tailoring, it has also opened up people’s eyes to its looming extinction. A STITCH IN TIME Corvato learned the art of tailoring as an apprentice in a tailor shop in Milan. Above his desk hangs a photo of himself and his fellow apprentices as a reminder of where it all began and where he found his passion. In 1960, he came to the U.S. as a newly minted tailor with a love for his craft, and soon he made a name for himself in the industry by working with different designers. He later moved onto working with Brooks Brothers. In 1978, Corvato set up his namesake shop, which he still runs today, a place where he and his employees do everything themselves. “A real tailor should be able to make his own pattern, cut, sow, fit,” he explained. “But most importantly, you have to have the feeling to make a suit.” Custom-made suits remain in high demand, and Corvato’s alwaysbustling business is a testament to that. However, without a new generation of tailors to learn the traditional Italian craft, he often has to turn customers away. “You cannot teach the art to somebody who goes to school two hours once or twice a week,” Corvato said. To usher in young tailors and pass on his legacy, Corvato has a vision of opening a larger shop with 10 to 12 other great tailors to teach aspiring young artisans and revive the art of tailoring. He said, “In my mind, I have you come to the tailor shop from 8 to 5, and you have to learn every part of the garment—how you put it together, how you gonna cut, how you make a pattern.” To do that, Corvato has been talking to both the Fashion Institute of Technology and Parsons, as well as the President of the Custom Tailors and Designs Association, to figure out a way to keep the old traditions alive. “We need fresh minds and if I can teach them what I know, I believe they will be even better than me,” Corvato insisted. “What better way to give back to this craft and to this city that’s given me so many opportunities?”

Master Italian tailor Nino Corvato in his Madison Avenue shop, Nino Corvato Designs, near Rockefeller Center.

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D E C A D E

UNDER THE INFLUENCE by Samuel A. Southworth

Money, booze and busts ruled Downtown Manhattan during the Roaring Twenties.

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fter decades of growth and decline, boom and bust, Lower Manhattan had finally arrived to one wild, decade-long party during the 1920s. New York’s global business prominence was unmatched in financial history. There was so much money to be made, and were so many societal issues in flux, that we can forgive the people who lived through those 10 years for thinking that the rocket would keep rising like the Art Deco skyscrapers that were now casting shadows across the southern tip of Manhattan. Many of the seeds of the 1920s circus were planted in 1917, the year the U.S. entered The Great War. While the United States had mostly steered clear of European entanglements, a surge of nationalism swept the land that year and we were off “Over There,” as George M. Cohan wrote, fully enmeshed in World War I. A great deal of provincial isolation was cast aside, and our society started changing in ways that baffled the oldsters and thrilled the young. Sound familiar? After the war there was a brief recession and an influenza epidemic, both of which helped pave the way for the forces of temperance to pass the Volstead Act in 1919, making alcohol illegal from coast to coast. Perhaps both business setbacks and epidemic disease could be eradicated by making “demon rum” forbidden. But the populace was hardly disheartened by this move. As the saying went, “Then came Prohibition, and everybody drank.” The new “speakeasy” was a place for all sorts of people to gather and laugh at the “revenuers,” who were mostly on the take anyway, and booze of all sorts flowed into the city. Out beyond the 12-mile limit off the coast on any given night, there were as many as 60 vessels of all types holding position in the fog and waiting for the Coast Guard cutters to go home after their patrol—or accept their

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bribes—so that case after case of whiskey could be brought ashore and keep the party going. SPEAKEASY CENTRAL The concept of secret bars had been around in Manhattan for a while, but now the “blind tiger” was the norm by preference. Before pubs were strictly for men, now the sexes were drinking together for the first time and jazz musicians were being hired left and right. To stretch the precious alcohol, and hide the poor taste of homemade hooch, extra ingredients were mixed in creating the first-ever cocktails with the Sidecar, Brandy Alexander and Whiskey Sour being the most popular. And of course, mobsters gained extraordinary wealth and power, as did cops, politicians and businessmen as the party raged on. Adding to the allure of the speakeasy was that they weren’t quite easy to get to. They had no signs, so from the outside they looked like regular homes or businesses, and there was usually a special knock, or the old “Louie sent me”-type passwords. They also had lookouts and doormen who would watch for the inevitable raid by Johnny Law. That might be the Feds, or just the local precinct looking to shake the place down for more cash. In case they showed up for a raid, there were secret buzzers and lights to alert the bartender and patrons that “the jig is up!” Doors could be disabled, customers could be shunted out into a back alley to make their getaway, entire bars full of bottles could be dumped into the basement at the flip of a switch, and by the time the cops eventually got inside, everyone remaining might be sitting there with tea cups. At one point it was estimated that almost every three-story building between 46th and 52nd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues, had some sort of bar hidden somewhere inside it. Today there are a few remnants, such as the venerable 21

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Club (known for its maze-like interior and tight control of the interior and exterior), Sardi’s, Please Don’t Tell in the East Village (hidden inside a hot dog place, accessible through a phone booth

in the back), and the Campbell Apartment in Grand Central. Revered spots such as Chumley’s in the West Village (which had no sign, and two entrances on different streets) have gone the way of all things. ART AND MONEY It wasn’t just booze that flowed freely during the decade, the “Lost Generation” of American writers—including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Eliot, Lewis, O’Neill, Benet, Crane, Lowell and Millay—produced some of the finest literature ever written, many of which remain bestsellers to this day. The Bohemian scene in Greenwich Village was in full swing, ladies were wearing their hair short and dancing the “Charleston,” while showing a lot of leg and actually smoking in public. Can you imagine? New York also had the perfect mayor for those years in dapper little Jimmy Walker, a sometimessongwriter who dressed quite well and was about as dishonest a man as Tammany Hall ever placed in City Hall, which is saying something. Among the ideas he floated were a casino and airport in Central Park. Dragging himself into his mayor’s office one day with a fairly obvious hangover, he snarled at a group of reporters: “You’re lucky

I show up at all and give you bums something to write about.” He was much more gracious around midnight after a few belts near a roulette wheel, with some showgirls hanging on his arm, including one for whom he famously left his wife. The dirty secret circulating under all of the limitless money was that very few companies actually printed exact financial statements. They might make an announcement, if they felt like it, and the rest was a gentleman’s deal where you took the fellow at his word. You could ask to see the books, if you were ready to make a cash offer to purchase said company. Otherwise, what business was it of yours? There was no SEC or any such thing as “insider trading.” If you got a hot tip, you ran with it. New office buildings began sprouting up at every point of the compass around Wall Street, and some of the best of these Art Deco vertical palaces still stand today, such as the Cunard Building, and the headquarters of Standard Oil, where Broadway met the Battery Green by the old Custom House. Businesses took out loans secured by very little, and investors were allowed to buy “on margin,” meaning a great deal of stock could be bought for a fraction of its cost—which was fine as long as the market went up, as it did for most of the 1920s.

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The enthusiasm was wild, almost as wild as the amount of people who were overextended in their investments. The end could not be far off. CRASH LANDING Legendary businessman Joseph P. Kennedy famously said that he got out of the market when he started to get stock tips from his shoeshine boy. Years later, New York gangster Frank Costello would claim that he had a tidy racket with Mr. Kennedy importing oceans of booze into Manhattan. Costello had also been known to stray from the truth on occasion, being a professional mobster. Interestingly, there were quite a few larger financial firms, as well as insightful individuals, who sensed trouble coming on Wall Street and quietly stepped aside. But right up until the stock market famously crashed in 1929, President Warren G. Harding and millions of others enjoyed the ride as Babe Ruth was making history with the Yankees, and radios and automobiles became all the rage. The Financial District was right at the heart of it all, from Wall Street right down to the docks. We’re lucky to have the music, and the skyscrapers, and the movies to witness just how “new” it all seemed, and how in the end it was a bubble that couldn’t last. Samuel A. Southworth is a Manhattan native, the author of four nonfiction books, and works as a writer and musician in New Hampshire.

The infamous speakeasy 21 Club during Prohibition.


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hidden

gems

Downtown‛s

HIDDEN GEMS Lucy Woodward

SINGER/SONGWRITER—GROUNDUP RECORDS

The Dressing Room

Blair Goldberg

75A Orchard Street

BROADWAY ACTRESS, Kinky Boots

Crêpes Du Nord 17 South William Street “This is an incredible crêpe spot! Their breakfast crêpes are exceptional as well as their dessert crêpes. My personal favorite is a Nutella and Oreo crêpe. In the downtown area, no other spot holds a candle to it!”

Don Peavy

Photo by Michael Grimm

“There is nothing more dangerous than being lured into a cozily-lit bar with Fela Kuti pouring out of the speakers. The night can go anywhere with that. But before that first sip settles on your tongue, you notice the walls are completely lined with vintage sneakers, jewelry and contemporary clothing by local designers. On your quick trip to the toilet in the basement, you will get hooked into a vintage vault of getup and garb that will leave you forgetting your friends upstairs are waiting for you an hour later. The Dressing Room is a great late-night hang, and I’ve spent many post-gig evenings there.” Toughest decision: “Drink then shop, versus shop then drink the guilt away.”

SOUTHAMPTON VILLAGE | $59,000,000 | Web ID: 0056887 An opportunity to own a significant piece of the prestigious estate section with sensational water views minutes to ocean beaches and village. Sited on over 14 acres, this premier estate includes a modern 7 bedroom, 7.5 bath home and 3 additional building lots. A golfer’s paradise, the property is surrounded by beautiful landscaping and contains “bent grass lawn” sculptured to look like a golf fairway. The swimming pool and cabana pavilion are hidden away as is the tennis court to enjoy in the delightful seasons. This is an exceptional opportunity to own one of the largest contiguous estate parcels within the most prime “historic estate section” in the Hamptons. Subdivided into 4 lots and can be sold separately

CHEF & HOST OF Buggin' Out with ChefPV

Balthazar 80 Spring Street “Balthazar is my daytime hangout spot when I have time in the morning to have a coffee and some breakfast. The prices are reasonable, to me, and the service is impeccable. The place, though fancy in looks, is really like going to your rich aunt's house who loves you and is the best hostess in the world.”

Deborah Srb Senior Global Real Estate Advisor I Associate Broker d: 631.227.4926 c: 516.445.6828 deborah.srb@sothebyshomes.com SOUTHAMPTON BROKERAGE 50 Nugent Street I Southampton, NY 11968 I 631.283.0600

sothebyshomes.com/hamptons

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

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020 Downtown Magazine NYC Fall 2016  

Enjoy the Fall 2016 issue of Downtown Magazine. Architect of Lower Manhattan Larry Silverstein, Brook Baldwin CNN Top Story Saks 5th Moves...

020 Downtown Magazine NYC Fall 2016  

Enjoy the Fall 2016 issue of Downtown Magazine. Architect of Lower Manhattan Larry Silverstein, Brook Baldwin CNN Top Story Saks 5th Moves...

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