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SPRING 2016

THE HEART OF EVERY CITY

THE ICONIC

Bob GRUEN

Ivana SOHO LIVING

MILIČEVIĆ

Michael

KIRCHMANN TALKS REAL ESTATE, DESIGN AND ART

Sailing the Hudson IN STYLE

Gabby+ Donna KARAN SHARING THE PASSION


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F LO W ER S , W EDDI N GS , EV EN T S I N T ER R I O R S & C US T O M A C C ES S OR I ES

WORSHIP LUXURY

CEO & PUBLISHER Grace A. Capobianco EXECUTIVE EDITOR Michael Kirchmann EDITOR-AT-LARGE Mike Hammer CREATIVE DIRECTOR Martin Danjue COPY EDITOR Jackie Grupe DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR Johanna Silver BEAUTY EDITOR Yasmine Rimawi DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EVENTS & PRODUCTION Terri-Lyn Costello CONTRIBUTING FAMILY & LIFESTYLE EDITOR Denise Courter CONTRIBUTING FOOD EDITOR Allison Hudson Stockamore CONTRIBUTORS: Tiffany Chong, Brian Duprey, Katie Garry, Jackie Hart, Jackie Marie, Nordia McIntosh, d.nicole, Julie Ring-Hansen Holt, Raquel Salazar, Tony Shi, Rachel Wirkus INTERNS: Samantha Rice, Kari Sonde, Rachel Veroff TECHNOLOGY: Bradley Kirkland, Nicu Lordachescu, Neal Marshad EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT John ‘Cap’ Capobianco BUSINESS CFO: Jeff Fields ADVISOR TO THE PUBLISHER: Andy Wheatcroft FINANCE & TAX CONSULTANT: Clifford Romain CIRCULATION DIRECTOR: Frank Rosner PRINTER CONSULTANT: Michael C. Morin, Diversified Global Graphics Group DOWNTOWN MAGAZINE NYC, INC. 380 Rector Place, 15F, New York, NY 10280 (212) 962-1916 downtownmagazinenyc.com

Copyright 2016 by DOWNTOWN Magazine NYC, Inc. All rights reserved.

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DOWNTOWN (ISSN2164-6198) is published six times per year in January, March, May, July, September and November for $20 per subscription by DOWNTOWN Magazine NYC, Inc., 380 Rector Place, 15F, New York, NY 10280. Application to mail at periodical postage rates is pending at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to DOWNTOWN, 380 Rector Place, 15F, New York, NY 10280. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editor are not responsible for unsolicited material. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. To order a subscription, please call (212) 962-1916 or visit downtownmagazinenyc.com. For customer service, please inquire at customer@downtownmagazinenyc.com. To distribute DOWNTOWN, please email distribution@downtownmagazinenyc.com.


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SPRING 2016

7 Publisher’s Letter 8 Advisory Board 10 Contributors NEWS

12 13 14 15

Style Culture Food Gear

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DOWNTOWN PERSPECTIVE 16 Lower Manhattan Skyline INSIGHT 18 Development | Duane Street Hotel 20 Design | GDSNY’s Michael Kirchmann 24 Shelter | Should I Stay or Should I Go? COVER STORY 28 Gabby + Donna Karan

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| Sharing the Passion

FEATURE 34 Bob Gruen | Rock Photographer

| Downtown Heart

STYLE VAULT 40 Editorial | Sailing the Hudson in Style 50 Beauty | Her Look | Spring Beauty 52 Grooming | His Look | Manscaping 54 Procedures | New Beauty LITTLE APPLE 57 Léman | Arts in Education 58 Travel | Luxury Travel with Kids in Tow 61 Spring Forward | Essentials 62 Downtown Mom | Amy Robach 64 Pawblisher Barclay | Barclay’s Spot PROFILE 59 Robert Guimento FEATURE 66 Ivana Miličević CITY BITES 70 Chef Profile

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| New Head of NYP/LMH

| SoHo Living

| Louise Vongerichten | Chefs Club

FITNESS 74 Training | The DOGPOUND finds its new home 76 Yoga | Symmetry of the Mind, Body & Spirit PASSPORT 78 Travel

| Sparkling Bubbles in the Hills of Veneto

REWIND 80 Dying Breed | Heart & Sole 82 History | The Rise of a Titan 84 Hidden Gem | Unexpected Residents

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nyp.org/lowermanhattan

lower manhattan has many landmarks. but only one hospital.

NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. Just two blocks southeast of City Hall at 170 William Street.


Springtime Brings Transition and Evolution! I’ve already dusted off my bike, dropped it off for its yearly maintenance, and once again, I am ready to explore the NYC streets and bike paths. Each season brings a new wonder and admiration for my downtown. This spring there is more to see and experience in Lower Manhattan. Get out your bikes, rollerblades and skateboards, and let’s explore together. Spring also brings a big change: After six wonderful years at 64 Fulton St., Downtown Magazine is looking for a new home. During our transition, please be sure to stay in touch!  With our passion and love for all things downtown and the luxury lifestyle that this area offers—it is more luminous than ever before—the time is now and Downtown has it all right here and right now.  Since our beginning, we have boasted about the new downtown and what is to come, look around and see all the great changes Lower Manhattan has experienced. From new residential buildings like the Four Seasons Hotel private residence and 111 Murray’s new retail shops and restaurants, to entirely modern neighborhoods in Battery Park, FiDi, Flatiron and the Seaport District, to name a few. Once a fish market and quiet neighborhood, Battery Park has become a city within a city and is still growing—as are we. We are thrilled to unwrap a fresh and clean look for 2016. Inside this issue, you’ll find an icon from the fashion world, Donna Karan, and her daughter, Gabby Karan De Felice, as she sinks her roots in TriBeCa with Tutto Il Giorno and takes philanthropy and her love of downtown to heart. Let us introduce you to our newest advisory board member, Louise Phillips Forbes of Halstead Property and the newly appointed Rob Guimento, Senior Vice President/Chief Operating Officer for NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. For our Downtown Mom, meet Amy Robach of Good Morning America. A busy mom, juggling life in the city, Amy recently finished her New York Times best-seller, Better, about her extraordinary journey with cancer.  Decisions, decisions: Should I stay or should I go? The brilliant women of Douglas Elliman aid us in making the all-important decision—city life or suburbia? Rock photographer Bob Gruen talks downtown living and reflects on a one-of-a-kind career. Léman Manhattan educates our readers in the arts of education, while Ivana Miličević provides insight on living in SoHo and the HBO cult hit, Banshee.  Let us introduce you to the new home of the hottest fitness trainers at The Dogpound, right here in downtown. Enjoy the first in a new sequence on dying breeds—centurial professions that transcend time—in “Heart & Sole.” In “Symmetry of the Mind, Body & Spirit,” the Chin twins demonstrate that yoga is an essential element of a busy downtown lifestyle. Explore the beautiful landscape and home of Italian Prosecco with Julie RingHansen Holt.  Yet another downtowner—and daughter of Chef Jean-Georges—Louise Vongerichten offers a platform for talented chefs at the Chefs Club.  Art, architecture, and real estate meet in Michael Kirchmann of GDSNY. He is a South African transplant and now a true downtowner with a flair for creative energy. Be sure to mark your calendars: April 11 is the date of the first of many exciting wellness programs being presented by some of our partners. Whole Foods Market TriBeCa and NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital pair up for this inaugural event. Check out delicious healthy recipes from Allison Stockamore, and be sure to stop by Whole Foods Market for sampling.  As the magazine for all of Lower Manhattan, we’re listening and appreciate the extraordinary feedback, as we keep you up to date with stunning visuals and in-depth editorials on the progress of our neighborhoods.  Last but not least, thanks as always to our incredible team!

Grace A. Capobianco CEO & Publisher


ADVISORY BOARD ADVISORY BOARD

ADVISORY BOARD CATHERINE MCVAY HUGHES

Chair, Manhattan Community Board 1 Catherine McVay Hughes was unanimously elected Chair, Manhattan Community Board 1 in June 2012. She previously served six years as the Vice DREW ALEXANDER Chair and seven years as the Chair of CB1 World Head of School, Léman Manhattan Trade Center Redevelopment Committee. Preparatory School Following Superstorm Sandy, Hughes worked with Alexander came to Léman after heading interofficials and agencies at the city, state and federal national schools in Moscow and Cairo, and has levels. She made recommendations for both the guided the school to a new level of community public and private sectors in a report called service. An Arkansas native, he has become not “Emergency Preparedness: Lessons Learned from only part of the fabric of Lower Manhattan, but Superstorm Sandy,” which was released in January one of its influential voices. Alexander is married 2013. to a speech language pathologist, and they have three children and four grandchildren.

General Manager, Cipriani Club Residences A mother of three boys, Marijana Herceg was born and raised in Croatia. She holds a ALBERT M. LEFKOVITS, Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design and has been in the hospitality industry for M.D., over 20 P.C. Associate years. Marijana has lived in China for three Clinical Professor ofHong Dermatology, years with her husband, a chef a Cipriani Mount Sinai School of Medicine Kong. Marijana worked at the original Cipriani The co-director of the Cosmetic location on Fifth Avenue before coming to Post-Graduate Surgical Cipriani Wall Street. She lovesDermatology people, downtown and her Wall StreetProgram locale. at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Lefkovits is listed in Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare, and Science and Engineering. He sits on the scientific advisory boards of the JEFF SIMMONS DREW NIEPORENT Skin Cancer Foundation and the Executive Vice President, Founder and Chairperson, Foundation Society of Greater New Anat Gerstein, Inc. Myriad Restaurant Group York, and is known for his work with C. accomplished BRUCK, and Every time relatives and friends visit NYC, OneMICHAEL of New York’s most skin cancer detection and treatment. M.D., FACS “The Mayor of Wall Lower Manhattan is one of the key places renowned restaurateurs, Plastic Surgeon Simmons recommends. Within one square mile, Street,” opened his first downtown restaurant in Dr. Bruck is adevoted memberhisofefforts the American Society of it has everything from history to ingenuity. He’s the ‘80s. He has to growing Plasticthe Surgeons is a Fellow of thewhich American lived in NYC for nearly two decades, working his brand, Myriadand Restaurant Group, NEAL College of Surgeons. beenwhile featured on with the Downtown Alliance and now The MARSHAD includes the TriBeCa GrillHe andhas Nobu, Founder, Good Morning America,toThe Channel, Rink at Brookfield Place. He has discovered maintaining his connection theLearning community, Marshad CBS and ABC News. He and is a senior a cozy Technology Group which he News supported through 9/11, in his attending that it’s only a short brisk walk to find in the Department of Surgery Surgery) at eatery, exquisite gift items or a wateringEmmy hole toAward winner Neal Marshad is efforts to launch the TriBeCa Film(Plastic Festival. founder of Marshad Technology St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York. celebrate withthe friends. Group, a Google Partner digital agency that develops next generation marketing services for its clients worldwide. Prior MICHAEL BRUCK, M.D., LOUISE C. PHILLIPS FORBES LAURA FORESE,toM.D. starting his agency, Neal is credited Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker, Group Senior VP, COO & CMO with producing and shooting films for FACS Halstead Property for New York-Presbyterian/ NBC Saturday Night Live over a 30 year Plastic Surgeon For more than 27 years, Louise Phillips Forbes Weill Cornell Medicalperiod. Center Neal is a resident of TriBeCa and Dr. Bruck is a member of the American has been an industry leader in the NYC real Dr. Forese is responsible for programs, lives and works in the neighborhood Society of Plastic Surgeons and is a Fellow of estate market. A multi-time winner of Halstead’s operations and strategic direction ofwith medical, his family and their Borzoi hounds the American College of Surgeons. He has esteemed Broker of the Year award with career surgical and psychiatric beds on two campuses. since 1974. been featured on Good Morning America, The sales in excess of $2.5 billion, she is considered Dr. Forese graduated from Princeton University Learning Channel, CBS News and ABC News. one of the elite power brokers representing buyers and Columbia University College of Physicians He is a senior attending in the Department of and sellers worldwide. Luxury developers have and Surgeons. She is a board-certified orthopedic Surgery (Plastic Surgery) at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt relied on Louise as both an advisor and onsite surgeon and holds a degree in healthKIRK servicesMYERS Hospital in New York. sales director, and to date she has successfully management. She is a Trustee of Princeton CEO, The DOGPOUND completed over 30 development projects. University and active in charitable organizations. Growing up, Kirk was a shy kid from Kansas City who fed his personal insecurities with candy bars and junk food, ballooning to more than 300 ALBERT M. LEFKOVITS, MICHELLE GIERST M.D. LAURA FORESE, M.D.,pounds P.C.on a 5’7” frame. He struggled Fitness Contributor Executive Vice President to keep up socially and athletically. Associate Clinical Professor Michelle Gierst Operating has been stand up paddle and Chief Officer, His poor dietary habits had finally made of Dermatology at Mount boarding, surfing and practicing yoga and pilates NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/ his health hit rock bottom. His doctors Sinai School of Medicine for many After getting pilates and yoga Weill years. Cornell Medical Center placed him on a diet of green vegetables, certified, she decided to advance her skills with Dr. Forese is responsible for programs, operations The co-director of the Cosmetic Dermatology and after completely changing his Post-Graduate Surgical Program at Mount SUPand (Stand Up Paddleboard) yoga training in and strategic direction of medical, surgical lifestyle and focusing on fitness, Myers Sinai Medical Center, Dr. Lefkovits is listed in 2011. Adding tobeds the on adventure, she has Dr. been psychiatric two campuses. Forese lost 125 pounds and built an impressive and teaching her love of “floating all over graduated from Princetonyoga” University andthe Columbia Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare, body of work. Kirk is a top trainer to Science and Engineering. He sits on the globeUniversity for the last few years, includingand Costa College of Physicians Surgeons. She celebrities, athletes and professionals. scientific advisory boards of the Skin Cancer Rica,isMexico and Canada. Michelle’s love for a board-certified orthopedic surgeon and holds Foundation and the Foundation Society of sharing these adventures has ledmanagement. her to freelance a degree in health services She Greater New York, and is known for his work writing Downtown. is a for Trustee of Princeton University and active in with skin cancer detection and treatment. charitable organizations.

CATHERINE CATHERINEMCVAY MCVAYHUGHES HUGHES

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MARIJANA HERCEG

MARIJANA MARIJANAHERCEG HERCEG

ChaiChair, Manhattan r, ManhattanCommuni Community tBoard y Board1 1 General GeneralManager, Manager,CiCipripariniani Catheri Catherine McVay ne McVayHughes Hugheswaswasunaniunanimouslmously elyected elected ClClububResiResidences dences ChaiChair, Manhattan r, ManhattanCommuni Community Board ty Board1 in1 June in June A mother A motherof ofthreethreeboys,boys,MariMarijanajanaHerceg Hercegwaswas 2012.2012.SheSheprevipreviousloyuslserved y servedsix siyears x yearsas theas theVicVie ce bornbornandandrairaisedsedin iCroati n Croatia. She a. Sheholholdsdas a ChaiChair andr andsevensevenyearsyearsas theas theChaiChair ofr CB1 of CB1WorlWorld d Bachel Bachelor oofr ofArtsArtsin iInteri n Interior oDesi r Designgandn andhashas TradeTradeCenter CenterRedevel Redevelopment opmentCommi Committee.ttee. beenbeenin ithen thehospihospitalitalyitinydustry industryforforoverover2020 FolFollowilonwig nSuperstorm g SuperstormSandy, Sandy,Hughes Hughesworked workedwitwih th years.years.MariMarijanajanahashaslivedlivedin iChin Chinanfora forthreethree offiofficialcsiaandls andagenciagencies atestheat thecity,citstate y, stateandandfederal federal yearsyearswitwih therh herhusband, husband,a chefa chefa Cia CipriparinianiHong Hong levellesvel. Shes. Shemademaderecommendati recommendationsoforns forbothboththethe Kong. Kong.MariMarijanajanaworked workedat atthetheoriorigingalinCial Cipripariniani publpublic andic andprivpriatevatesectors sectorsin ainreport a reportcallcaledled locatilocationoonn onFifFithfthAvenue Avenuebefore beforecomicomingntog to “Emergency “EmergencyPreparedness: Preparedness:Lessons LessonsLearned Learnedfromfrom CipCiriparinianiWalWall Street. l Street.SheSheloveslovespeoplpeople, e, Superstorm SuperstormSandy,Sandy,” whi” which cwash wasrelerelasedeasedin January in January downtown downtownandandherherWalWall Street l Streetlocallocale. e. 2013.2013.

DREW DREWNIEPORENT NIEPORENT

JEFF JEFFSIMMONS SIMMONS

Executi ExecutiveveViVicecPresi e PresidDREW ent, dent, NIEPORENT Founder FounderandandChaiChairperson, rperson, Anat AnatGerstei Gerstein,nInc., Inc. MyriMyri adaRestaurant d Restaurant Group Group DREW ALEXANDER BENOIT LAGARDE CATHERINE EveryEverytimtiemrele areltivatiesvesandandfriefrindsendsvisviitsNYC, it NYC, OneOneof New of NewYork’York’s most s mostaccompl accomplishedishedandand MCVAY HUGHES Lower LowerManhattan Manhattanis oneis oneof ofthethekeykeyplaplcesaces renowned renownedrestaurateurs, restaurateurs,“The“TheMayor Mayorof Wal of Wall l mmonsrecommends. recommends.WiWithitnhionen onesquare squaremimile,le, Street,Street,” opened ” openedhishifirsstfirdowntown st downtownrestaurant restaurantin in SimSimons everythingnfrom g fromhishitorystoryto toingenui ingenuity.ty.He’He’s s thethe‘80s.‘80s.HeHehashasdevoted devotedhishiefforts s effortsto growi to growing ng it hasit haseverythi n NYCforfornearlnearly twoy twodecades, decades,workiworkingng his hibrand, s brand,thetheMyriMyriad aRestaurant d RestaurantGroup, Group,whiwhich ch livedlivedin iNYC witwih ttheh theDowntown DowntownAllAliancelianceandandnownowJEFF TheThe SIMMONS incliKIRK undescludesthetheTriMYERS BTrieCaBeCaGriGril andl andNobu, Nobu,whiwhile le at BrookfieldelPldaPlce.ace.HeHehashasdisdicovered scovered maimaintainnBENOIT taiinnginhigshiconnecti s connecti on oton theto thecommuni community, ty, RinRiknatk Brookfi LAGARDE thatthatit’sitonl’s only ayshort a shortbribrisk swalk walk tok tofinfidnadcozy a cozy whiwhich hech supported he supportedthrough through9/11,9/11,andandin hiinshis eatery, eatery,exquiexquisitesigitefgit iftemsitemsor ora wateri a wateringnholg hole toe to effortseffortsto ltoaunch launchthetheTriBTrieCaBeCaFilmFilFesti m Festivalv. al. celcelebrate ebratewitwih tfrih efrinds.ends. Head of School, Léman Manhattan Preparatory School Alexander came to Léman after heading international schools inCommunity Moscow andBoard Cairo,1and Chair, Manhattan has guided the school to aChair new level of 2012. She Unanimously elected in June community service. native, previously servedAn sixArkansas years as the Vicehe Chair and has become not only of the fabric of lower seven years as thepart Chair of CB1 World Trade Manhattan, but one of its influential voices. Center Redevelopment Committee. Following Alexander is married to Hughes a speechworked language Superstorm Sandy, with officials pathologist, and they have three and levels. and agencies at the city, statechildren and federal four She grandchildren. made recommendations for both the public and private sectors in a report called “Emergency Preparedness: Lessons Learned from Superstorm Sandy,” which was released in January 2013.

CEO, Dogpound Growing up, Kirk was a shy kid from Kansas City who fed his personal insecurities with candy Co-Founder, Splashlight bars and junk food, ballooning to more than 300 Benoit Lagarde is the founder of Splashlight, pounds on a 5’7” frame. He struggled to keep up a visual content studio based in New York City, socially and athletically. His poor dietary habits Miami and Montreal. Splashlight offers creative had finally made his health hit rock bottom. His development, production, digital and studio doctors placed him on a diet of green vegetables, services for top fashion brands and retailers. His and after completely changing his lifestyle and creative vision has been integral to Splashlight’s focusing on fitness, Myers lost 125 pounds and growth into a multi-million-dollar corporation over built an impressive body of work. Kirk is a top the years. Trained as a professional photographer, trainer to celebrities, athletes and professionals. Benoit studied at the International Center for Photography in New York, where he is now a member of the President’s Council.

Founder and Chairperson, Myriad Restaurant Group One of New York’s most accomplished Co-Founder, Splashlight and renowned restaurateurs, “The Benoit Lagarde is the founder of Splashlight, a Mayor visual content studio based in New York City,of Wall Street,” opened his first Miami and Montreal. Splashlight offers downtown creative restaurant in the ‘80s. He has development, production, digital anddevoted studio his efforts to growing his brand, the Myriad Restaurant Group, which services for top fashion brands and retailers.His includes the TriBeCa Grill and Nobu, creative vision has been integral to Splashlight’s while maintaining his connection to the growth into a multi-million-dollar corporation community, which he supported through over the years. Trained as a professional 9/11, and in his efforts to launch the photographer, Benoit studied at the International Center for PhotographyTriBeCa in New Film Festival. York, where he is now a member of the President’s Council.

Executive Vice President, Anat Gerstein, Inc. Every time relatives and friends visit NYC, Lower Manhattan is one of the key places Simmons recommends. Within one square mile, it has everything from history to ingenuity. He’s lived in NYC for nearly two decades, working with the Downtown Alliance and now The Rink at Brookfield Place. He has discovered that it’s only a short brisk walk to find a cozy eatery, exquisite gift items or a watering hole to celebrate with friends.


CONTRIBUTORS MARINA BARLAGE

Originally from Brazil, Marina is a well-respected creative director. She is the founder of creative22, a boutique design studio based in Manhattan, which serves international fashion, beauty and design clients. The launch of two fragrance campaigns for Oscar de la Renta is among her recent work. Marina is also a jewelry designer with a self-titled collection.

NIGEL BARKER

The internationally renowned photographer opened his New York studio in 1996 and has never looked back. Barker is highly regarded for his 17 seasons as photographer and judge on America’s Next Top Model, which airs in over 140 countries and has 100 million viewers each week. He also hosted Oxygen Network’s The Face, starring alongside Naomi Campbell. Barker’s presence in fashion and entertainment has resulted in his own show on VH1—The Shot. He also directs and produces films, documentaries and commercials for clients and international charitable organizations.

SAMUEL A. SOUTHWORTH

Samuel was born and raised in Manhattan and attended The Episcopal and Buckley School when he was also a member of the famed Knickerbocker Greys cadets corps. Today, he is a poet and songwriter, as well as a military and espionage historian, completing his fifth book on the subject.

MELISSA BESADA

In 2005, Melissa received her Masters in Physical Therapy from CUNY Hunter College. She began her 10-year career as a PT at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell as a treating therapist in orthopedics, neurology and burns services. She was a clinical specialist in the outpatient clinic, servicing clients with orthopedic, vestibular, spine and neurologic needs. Currently, Melissa is supervisor of Physical Therapy for both the outpatient clinic and acute care bedside rehab department of New York Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital servicing the downtown area.

FREDDIE LEIBA

A native of Washington, D.C., Brian has worked in newspapers, advertising and PR businesses and in the early ‘90s, he set up shop in Stockholm as a copywriter and marketing communications consultant. As a passionate skier, he often pens pieces about adventures in colder climes. Consequently, he’s an adherent to the obvious but practical Swedish axiom, which roughly translated claims: “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.”

RUSSELL JAMES

Australian born photographer Russell James’ images have become synonymous with provocative, unique perspectives of many of the most prominent people in entertainment, fashion and beauty. His works have appeared in leading publications such as Vogue, W, Marie Claire, GQ, Sports Illustrated, international journals, ten fine art books and five solo books. Russell is a Hasselblad Masters Award recipient and resident artist of Camera Work, the world’s leading gallery for contemporary photography and vintage master works.

DARREN PALTROWITZ

With over 15 years of entertainment industry experience, Darren began working around the music business as a teenager—interning for the manager of his favorite band Superdrag. He has worked with a wide array of artists including OK Go, They Might Be Giants, Mike Viola, Tracy Bonham, Loudness, and Amanda Palmer. His writing has appeared in dozens of outlets including the All Music Guide, hMAG, Inside Pulse, TheStreet.com, and The Improper Magazine.

DAVID COTTEBLANCHE

This talented Parisian hairstylist to the stars launched the concept of late-night pampering when he opened the Red Market Salon in Miami and New York in 2005. His work has been seen in high-end fashion shows and in top titles such as Marie Claire, Allure and ELLE. His talents are called on often at Splashlight Studios.

Freddie Leiba has been a fashion authority, beginning his career in London and moving to New York in the 1970s. During his career, Leiba has styled some of the world’s most iconic photographs, including Madonna with the gold suit, Diana Ross with a tank top, and 16-year-old Brooke Shield for INTERVIEW Magazine. He has also styled campaigns for notable brands like Clinique, Cover Girl and L’Oreal, as well as being a creative director for Harper’s Bazaar and Allure magazines.

PHILIPPE REYNAUD

HAROLD JULIAN

PETE THOMPSON

Harold is a self-taught photographer from Oahu, Hawaii. He started his career assisting photographers which fostered his creative knowledge and visual aesthetics. Harold’s photographs depict passion by exploring soulful, classic, portrait photography combined with elements from photojournalism. Harold is currently based in New York City and represented by ETC Creative, Inc.

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BRIAN OWENS

SPRI N G 201 6 | DOWNTOWN MAGA ZI N EN YC .CO M

Discovered by famed photographer, Mario Testino in Paris, Philippe has modeled for top global brands including Louis Vuitton, Ralph Lauren, Rolex, Calvin Klein. He has become a top photographer learning from such luminaries as Bruce Weber, Peter Beard and Patrick Demarchelier. He has shot several features and covers for Downtown.

As a NYC-based lifestyle, travel, portrait and fashion photographer, Thompson says his main goal is to be constantly challenged with new projects that his clients can be excited about. Pete’s enthusiasm shows in his images. When it comes to photography, he feels that if there is something visual, he can make virtually anything interesting. For 9 years, he traveled worldwide photographing athletes for articles, interviews and ads for Time Warner’s Transworld Publications.


SAFE, FAST RADIATIOn THERAPY. now in lower manhattan. Introducing NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Cancer Center. Staffed by Weill Cornell radiation oncologists, offering precision radiotherapy and fewer treatments. To make an appointment, call (212) 746-6600 or visit nyp.org/lmcc

2 1 W E ST B R O A D WAY


news

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gear

STYLE

Etienne Aigner Zelica open toe platform clog in black and white leather on a wood heel (left) $325.00 Sand suede fringe Moda Hobo bag (below) $395.00 Smith feed bag in Navy nappa leather (below right) $195.00

Urban Zen Urban Zen is a philosophy of living by Donna Karan. It is the calm in the chaos of life. A way of giving. An effortless dance of emotion, personality and lifestyle. Timeless. Seasonless. Endlessly expressive. A connection of mind, body and spirit. Touched and inspired by cultures and craftsmen from around the world. With stores in the West Village, Sag Harbor and Aspen, they offer a unique collection of luxurious women and men’s apparel, one-of-a-kind jewelry, handcrafted leather pieces, artisan furniture and home decor, as well as other soulful objects of desire. Urban Zen’s products are developed in partnership with artisans who align with their soulful economy mission. Sleeveless fitted racer back dress with built-in stretch tube in viscose/elastane (left) $795.00 Heavenly oversized comfort sweater in cashmere (bottom left) $1,695.00

Repetto Repetto fans rejoice: The French luxury brand that embraces the beauty and elegance of dance opens the doors to its first U.S. store. Offering an unprecedented selection of the company’s iconic ballet flats, the 2,350-squarefoot store at 400 West Broadway showcases the “World of Repetto,” which includes authentic dancewear such as pointe shoes, leotards and tulle skirts; footwear (above) in a wide variety of styles, including classic ballet flats in dozens of colors; a collection of high heels with haute couture details expressed through pointy studs and ostrich feathers; leather goods such as bags, clutches and wallets, and ready-to-wear with a feminine spirit inspired by dance; and girls’ dancewear.

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LA PEAU skincare LA PEAU skincare is the latest sensation to hit the beauty industry, with its headquarters located in Geneva, Switzerland. Founded by sisters Irma and Carla Khanjian, the 3-product skincare line was developed by scientists at Stanford University, and the line’s main active ingredient, BeCell, offers massive antioxidant properties resulting in one’s skin looking dramatically firmer and smoother. The products—night, day and eye contour— boast lightweight and fast absorbing gel-cream formulas that refresh the skin, leaving the skin looking more hydrated than ever. One part cream and two parts gel, the products instantly penetrate the skin, and is recommended for all skin types. Each of the products has the same fast absorbing, non-greasy texture that restores elasticity to the skin while delaying its aging process. According to several testimonials, after a few days of use, the skin is left soft, supple and nourished, with a dramatic difference in the change of appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. The products can be purchased individually, or as a set. LA PEAU skincare is a must-have to keep skin feeling refreshed and hydrated for the winter season. For more information on the line and the sister duo behind the revolution, please visit lapeauskincare.com. LA PEAU Skincare Trio $235


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CULTURE by Johanna Silver

Governor’s Ball Music Festival The multi-day music festival on Randall’s Island promises to be even bigger and more dynamic than last year. With headliners like The Strokes, The Killers and Kanye West, the Ball is already boasting an incredible lineup. Festival goers can also look forward to food and drink vendors, art installations, lawn games and VIP lounges. Get you tickets now for this urban celebration, taking place at the beginning of June.

23 Wall St. is Turning into “The 14th Factory” Familiar FiDi landmark, 23 Wall St., at the corner of Wall and Broad streets, has remained mostly abandoned for several years. However, Hong Kongbased artist, Simon Birch is transforming the space into a true spectacular, housing artists ranging from photographers to fashion designers. “The 14th Factory,” projected to open on April 14, will be free to the public and will feature classes and programming for many different audience ages along with the art installations. The exhibition is also working with the Center for Arts Education and New York City schools to develop an accessible art curriculum for children.

Tribeca Film Festival The Festival, created in 2002 in response to the September 11, 2001, attacks, has since grown into an immense celebration of filmmaking in NYC. The 2016 Festival promises to continue its legacy of showcasing groundbreaking storytelling along with exciting new programming involving gaming and virtual reality.

American Psycho the Musical

A musical adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’ thriller novel that inspired an equally gripping film, this Broadway production began its run on March 24. Its setting is Manhattan in the 1980s, where Wall Street’s excess is a prominent motif. Banker Patrick Bateman is the show’s creepy-yet-compelling lead. The show began previews in London but made its way to the city that inspired the franchise to be enjoyed by Broadway buffs.

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FOOD by Kari Sonde

Stick With Me Sweets Candy Shop Stick With Me Sweets, located on Mott Street in NoLIta offers, beautiful bonbons in many decadent and exotic flavors. In addition to the bonbons, they also make soft caramels, truffles and elegant mini cakes. The shop’s packaging looks like storybooks, so customers can decide in which “story” they would like to pack their sweets.

Condiments Specialty condiments have become increasingly popular over the past few years, and that doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon. Ranging from spicy to just a little bit fancy, here are a couple of awesome products to try: Victoria Amory Champagne Ketchup www.victoriaamory.com

Bees Knees Spicy Honey www.mixedmade.com

François Payard’s New Cookie Book Renowned French pastry chef François Payard released a cookbook of delectable recipes. Payard Cookies instructs on everything from casual cookies to the techniques behind French pastries through recipes for cookies ranging from the financier to sables. Not only that, but all the cookies fromPay ard Patisserie’s “Calendar of Cookies” are broken down inside so fans can replicate his signature bites.

Bakery On Main Happy Oats Heart-healthy, simple and classic, a bowl of cooked oats has a way of making you feel happy and comforted. When it comes to feeding your family healthy meals, there’s nothing as tried and true as pure oats. Bakery On Main’s new lineup provides a good source of protein and fiber and is low in saturated fat and free of cholesterol. Certified Gluten Free, Non-GMO Project Verified, vegan, and OU Kosher, Happy Oats are made in the USA at Bakery On Main’s dedicated gluten-free facility and are monitored by a third party-certifier from farm to fork. Three inviting varieties include Happy Rolled Oats, Happy Quick Oats, and Happy Steelcut Oats. www.bakeryonmain.com

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GEAR by Rachel Veroff

GDSNY Skateboard Collection This limited edition collection of three custom designed skate decks are created by Michael Kirchmann of GDSNY, an international multi-disciplinary design agency based in New York City. Kirchmann created the collection consisting of “Tank,” “Beast” and “Kong” for the launch event of The Frontside Agency, a New York talent management company working with skateboarders and street-artists. Available for purchase online at www.frontsideshop.com.

Four Seasons Jet The Four Seasons private jet allows guests to travel to legendary destinations in every part of the world at the hands of the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. Guests can choose from specially designed itineraries, ranging from U.S. destinations like Los Angeles and Hawaii, to more exotic locales like Bora Bora, Bali and Mumbai. Guests will also have the ability to experience distinctive services and amenities to enhance their trip. The jet itself is a Boeing 757 customized with only 52 seats, allowing passengers more space to relax and enjoy their trip.

Gogobot

Infiniti Q70

Whether it’s a week’s vacation, a business trip or a weekend getaway, planning a trip should be almost as fun as the trip itself. Gogobot believes the best advice comes from people you trust—people like you—and not from anonymous strangers on the Internet. The app allows users to share where they’ve been with their friends and keeps users in the know about events going on around their location. Gogobot is available on Google Play and in the App Store.

The Infiniti Q70 combines all things Infiniti: style, performance, state-of-the-art technology and craftsmanship. The revised exterior includes new front and rear facades, grille design, Infiniti signature headlights, taillights, LED fog lights and side rearview mirrors with integrated LED signals. In addition, the new design gives the sedan a more upscale image, creating an efficient, aerodynamic shape while also providing a roomy cabin. The Q70 is available in eight exterior colors, and Infiniti offers many different packages for its high-end buyer.

Muse Muse is a new brain-sensing device that helps guide you through your meditation practice. The sleek headband measures your brain activity and sends feedback on your meditation to your smartphone. Because the headband measures brain activity while simultaneously soothing you with nature sounds, it has the ability to recognize when you’ve reached a truly deep meditative state. It rewards you by adding peaceful bird chirps to the soundtrack.

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PERSPECTIVE

Photography by Tony Shi

Taken from the Dumbo Clock Tower at One Main St., this perspective combines the old and the new of the iconic lower Manhattan skyline with the Brooklyn Bridge and the Freedom Tower, both symbolizing resurrection, strength and unity.


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Luxury BOUTIQUE

IN TRIBECA

The Duane Street Hotel offers the same, if not better, accommodations and services than large hotel chains for those staying in Lower Manhattan. by Johanna Silver Photography by Independent Collection

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ou don’t have to be in midtown to experience some of New York’s most exciting sites. Furthermore, straying away from large-scale chains for accommodation can offer an entirely different, more enjoyable angle of the city. The Duane Street Hotel, located at the corner of Church and Duane Street in TriBeCa, offers many refined amenities on a very personable scale. Staying in their guestrooms and suites is more reminiscent of lodging in a trendy, perfectly coordinated home. The cozy rooms echo the ambiance of one of New York’s most stylish

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subsections, while hotel staff members are eager to offer services and city advice or to pick up on yesterday’s conversation. Rather than separating guests from local NYC culture in favor of more conventional commercial experiences, Duane Street puts them right in the middle of Lower Manhattan’s streets, filled with urbanites strolling towards boutiques, brunches, parks and museums. The hotel features cuisine by Jehangir Mehta, executive chef and owner of Graffiti Restaurant in the East Village. Mehta’s food showcases many familiar dishes, accented with Asian ingredients and techniques. This cuisine is very representative of the many cultural influences in the city, especially in Lower Manhattan. Immediately available outside of the hotel are TriBeCa’s many boutiques, eateries and galleries within beautifully restored industrial buildings. Strolling along with the many families and hip city stompers that inhabit the area will definitely make vacationers feel at home in the city, and will incite them to partake in the same shopping, dining and nightlife that Manhattanites do. The entire Lower Manhattan area also offers a perspective of the city that is comparably exciting to its uptown counterparts. Within walking distance of TriBeCa are many other areas, each with their own distinct history and identities. A short trip north is SoHo, where New Yorkers rocking striking street style weave in and out of shops and chic bistros. East of SoHo is the Lower East Side, with grungy sidewalks artistically splattered with street art, secondhand shops and countless cool bars. Even closer than these neighborhoods is the Financial District, which is rapidly developing into NYC’s prime location for fun and families. A quick stroll from Duane Street will bring guests to the historic Freedom Tower. Not only is it a visual treat at any distance; it also offers trips up to its observatory with breathtaking views of the island. Around the tower are shopping destinations like Brookfield Place and the prospective Westfield Mall as well as Battery Park City right near the water. So for those who would like to explore the many neighborhoods that characterize New York just as much as its well-known midtown landmarks, Duane Street is a great option to live luxuriously among local culture for the duration of the stay.

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“Downtown is the most vibrant creative hub in the world. The art, music, architecture, people, fashion—everything about the culture is so diverse and authentic.” 20

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GDSNY’s

Michael

KIRCHMANN TALKS REAL ESTATE, DESIGN AND ART

by Darren Paltrowitz Photography by Harold Julian

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he rare agency that can design, develop and brand a real estate project, Global Design Strategies was founded by Michael Kirchmann in 2007 after he’d spent more than a decade with Skidmore Owings & Merrill. Global Design Strategies(GDSNY) has been responsible for the design of a variety of high-profile projects around the world, including luxury condominiums in Manhattan, a private jet in London, a Porsche GT3 in Qatar, an office building in Stockholm and art installations on the Highline Park. One of GDS’ current projects is 25 Mercer Street, a luxury condo building in SoHo, which features a history of original artwork from prominent New York artists. Michael took the time to speak with Downtown about growing up in South Africa, studying architecture and becoming one of New York’s most innovative developers. Michael’s path included creative pursuits beyond architecture, and he was active as both a musician and voiceover artist. While maintaining his artistic roots, Michael has led GDSNY in developing thousands of units for lower-income residents in addition to its high-end projects. Aside from his GDSNY responsibilities, Michael has also lectured over the years at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the Architectural Association in London, giving back to students interested in real estate. DARREN PALTROWITZ: I understand that you worked in architecture before moving into real estate. Was there an architect who especially inspired you?

MICHAEL KIRCHMANN: I grew up in a real estate and design family, so architecture was always part of my world from a young age. Architecture is such a big part of real estate, so I never really considered it a transition. And of course, our firm continues to provide design and architecture services to public and private clients. I was inspired by the remarkable work of Rex [Distin] Martienssen, a mid-20th century South African modernist. Actually, I named my band after him. When I first moved to New York in the ‘90s, I was the lead singer of a band called Rex Martini. We played all the great venues downtown for many years. DP: If you weren’t working in and around real estate, is there another field you likely would have pursued? MK: Film and advertising. I’ve always been interested in the creative side of advertising, broadcasting and, of course, film. I worked for several years as a voiceover artist in the early ‘90s, doing work for the advertising industry on some household names, and doing documentaries for the BBC. It’s a very cool industry—so many interesting people with a passion for ideas. DP: Having done your undergraduate studies in Cape Town, how did you wind up in New York? MK: Since I was a young kid, I was always fascinated with New York and imagined living there. I had never actually visited, but I loved the New York films from the ‘80s, like Beat Street, Ghostbusters, Escape From New York, After Hours,

and I knew it was for me. As soon as I graduated university, I hopped on a plane from Cape Town with my backpack, and the next day found myself living in a woodworking shop on Renwick Street. That was 20 years ago. DP: You later studied at NYU. Do you still have any ties to the university? MK: Yes, I really love NYU. New York City is your campus—that’s hard to beat. I have lectured there several times on the impact of good design on the development process. I also lectured design for many years at Columbia University in the Master of Science in Real Estate Development. It’s always fun to explore new ideas to bring design to the business world. DP: A lot of your properties are in downtown Manhattan. What draws you most to that area? MK: Downtown is the most vibrant creative hub in the world. The art, music, architecture, people, fashion—everything about the culture is so diverse and authentic. I love the uniqueness of each neighborhood from Chelsea to Soho to the Lower East Side. There’s always something new and creative happening. Our current project at 25 Mercer Street in SoHo is a true synthesis of our collective interests. We are developing the project and have had the opportunity to include collaborators from the architecture, art, performance and fashion worlds, all within the context of SoHo. What more could you ask for?

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DP: What has inspired you to open your unfinished properties to the arts and photographers? MK: These projects happen organically; it’s symbolic of the creative energy of the downtown community. We love having opportunities to use our platform to collaborate and produce great work. Anytime we can showcase interesting ideas and work with creative people in the downtown area, we welcome it. At 25 Mercer, for example, we were lucky enough to have artist Shantell Martin install an incredible series of drawings on two floors of the building. The building also saw the awesome collaboration of light artist Matthew Schreiber, Katie Boren from the American Ballet Theatre, and fashion photographer Nigel Barker. That collaboration was a perfect representation of the downtown ethos, with artists, performers, designers, developers, suppliers all working together to create something supercool, as a collective creative community. DP: Manhattan is one of the world’s tougher real estate markets. What is it that keeps you and your work based here? MK: There is no other place for me other than New York. It’s the most exciting place to live and work. The projects are interesting; the people are interesting. It’s exciting and dynamic all at once. We are living in the creative center of the world, and I feel very lucky to be apart of it. DP: When people talk about New York City getting more and more expensive to live in, how does that make you feel? MK: New York is largely defined and enriched by its diversity, and we are big advocates of providing a range of different types of housing. In fact, a lot of our design work is in low-income and subsidized housing. We have about 2,200 low-income residential units currently under construction in the five boroughs [of New York City], with public and private clients. DP: In your eyes, what’s the best way that an everyday New Yorker can help keep this city great? MK: Get involved. New Yorkers collectively are what makes this city great. There are a lot of great ideas and voices to be heard, both emerging and established, and providing a platform for those ideas is a crucial part of New York life. Continuing to contribute to that energy is a crucial part of the ongoing growth of the city. Everyone pitches in to help each other out where we can and advance what we are all trying to do. DP: Do you have a project you’re most proud of or look at as your top accomplishment? MK: Over the years, I’ve been very fortunate to complete many projects around the world— highrise towers, airports, museums, luxury hotels, even a private jet—but in recent years, our work in low-income housing has been the most personally

“It takes a partnership of people all moving in the same direction to make something great.” — Michael Kirchmann rewarding. Averne View [formerly Ocean Village], a community in the Rockaways that had been rocked by Hurricane Sandy, is a project I am really proud of. The dramatic uplift that came in living conditions after the project was complete is really something remarkable and makes our job very rewarding. The design helped to transform this property dramatically, but the real kudos go to the owners, L+M Development and Architects OCV, who had the vision to execute on our design. It takes a partnership of people all moving in the same direction to make something great. DP: Is there something you haven’t yet accomplished, professionally speaking, that you still have your eye on? MK: Next on my list is the restaurant world... stay tuned! DP: What’s ahead for GDSNY? MK: Our main focus is of course architecture and development. But we also love to design across different platforms. In the past, we have designed private jets, sports cars, motorcycles, and we just

designed and released a collection of skateboards that were inspired by iconic movies that I loved growing up. DP: When you’re not busy with work, how do you like to spend your free time? MK: It’s pretty simple for me—I love spending time with my wife and kids. We really enjoy just hanging out downtown, going to the parks and museums and exploring the city. DP: Do you have a favorite restaurant? A place that’s your go-to spot for meetings? MK: Mr. Chow TriBeCa has long been my favorite place for date night with my wife—I love the food and the staff are the best! Great lychee martinis! For meetings I love Bubby’s; our offices are around the corner and the food and vibe can’t be beat. DP: Finally, Michael, any last words for the kids? MK: Get involved. Today. New York City has endless possibilities.

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SHOULD I STAY The ups and downs of staying in or leaving the city. by Jackie Hart Downtown photo by Bilyana Dimitrova Suburb photo by Douglas Elliman Real Estate

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hough packed with convenience and endless amenities, the cost of living in New York City is expensive. While many people sacrifice space for everything New York has to offer, more people are looking to move out of the city and into the surrounding suburbs. When you’re ready to make the leap from the city to the ‘burbs, you’ll know that it is time to just do it. That’s according to Amy Falder, a landscape designer in Brooklyn who, along with her family, recently made the enormous change of leaving the West Village neighborhood where they’d lived for 15 years and headed for the roomier suburbs. “I think we were really just so ready [to make the move]…if you know it’s time to go, then you’ll just do it,” Falder says. However, the decision to leave the city behind was not easy. Falder and her partner had lived in the same apartment, in the same neighborhood for 15 years; a 450-square-foot, one-bedroom apartment that was eventually converted into a two-bedroom once the pair had their first child. According to Falder,

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she and her partner absolutely loved their neighborhood, but once they learned that they were pregnant with their second child, there was simply not enough space. It was time to make a change. “We just needed a new adventure. And then looking around in the city, we didn’t want to be renters anymore. I think in the 15 years we spent in that apartment, we spent around $350,000 on rent. So we didn’t want to do that anymore,” Falder explains. “But in looking at sales, we absolutely knew that we could not afford the neighborhood that we made a home in. We had to leave it.” This trend has become far too common among people living in the city. Because of increasing home prices and demand, many people—especially


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OR SHOULD I GO “...if you know it’s time to go, then you’ll just do it.” families looking for more space—are getting priced out of the city. Add to that the feeling that the city no longer offers the things they were once looking for (or maybe now they’re looking for different things). In a 2013 study conducted by the Economic Policy Institute, the average two-parent, two-child family would need to make—$98,722 annually— around $8,227 per month, in order to live modestly in the city, the second most expensive in the U.S. just behind Washington D.C. Within these figures, almost half of the monthly expenses are sunk into housing and childcare. It’s no wonder that many people, especially families and those looking to add to their brood, are moving out of the metro area in order to cut costs. “Most people who are looking to leave the city are usually about to make a big life change,” says Nancy Strong, a licensed real estate agent in Westchester, New York, with Douglas Elliman Real Estate. “A majority of them are people who are just married, about to be married, or families with one kid and another on the way.” In the case of Falder and her family, the high price of a bigger space in

their West Village neighborhood and the competitiveness of the market were significant factors that lead them to move to their current home in the small river town of Hastings-on-Hudson in Westchester. “We had a very specific place we wanted to live [outside the city]; we were really only looking in two river towns. It took us a year not only to find the place where we wanted to live, but in the end find a place we could actually live, because there’s a lot of competition, here too,” Falder says. As for their decision to make the leap to move out of the city, Falder says they were definitely ready. “People ask me all the time what I miss about the city, and I say nothing. Absolutely nothing. Actually, you know what, I do miss the kid parks in the West Village and TriBeCa, they were awesome,” Falder says. “…And my significant other would say he misses the food, but truth be told, we don’t really eat out much anymore; we really like to cook.” Though it may be a lifestyle adjustment at first, most people are happy with their decision to leave the city, Strong says. (continued on the next page) DOWNTOWN MAGA ZI N EN YC .CO M | SPRI N G 201 6

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However, according to the third quarter Douglas Elliman market sales reports, the average sales price in Westchester is much less than in Manhattan, and even in Brooklyn. The average sales price of a home in Westchester is $696,654, while in comparison, the average in Manhattan is just over $1.7 million. Brooklyn rounded out with average sales being just over $850,000. Interestingly, as home prices in Manhattan have continued to rise with figures reaching the second highest level on record since 2008, the number of sales is up almost 10 percent from this quarter last year. Even though the prices are rising, the demand for homes in the city is more prevalent than ever. Just ask Michele Denby, a Douglas Elliman licensed real estate agent who works with clients both wanting to stay and looking to leave the city. “The market has been increasing over the last three years; we’ve seen it increase year after year. We’re starting to see it level off right now, but what’s happening is, there’s just not enough…the inventory isn’t reaching the demand, and buyers are getting priced out of NYC,” Denby says. Because of this, more people are beginning to leave, but it has also led to an increase in rentals, Denby says. Though a significant factor, it is not enough to dissuade people moving away from the city’s appeal.

“... living in the city and being able to walk out my door and have everything within minutes.”

THE KUNZ FAMILY

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ity resident Nicole Kunz and her husband were looking to move out of the city, but ultimately decided to keep their family there after finding a space at the newly converted River & Warren building that fit their needs and budget. Kunz says that they loved the city and had looked in the suburbs in surrounding New York, New Jersey and Connecticut areas, but couldn’t find anything. Additionally, Kunz’s husband didn’t want a long commute, and the school system and sports also factored into their decision to remain in the city. She and her family will move into River & Warren in March. “School is definitely our first priority, so we wanted to make sure we were happy with the school system downtown. Our son recently just started kindergarten at P.S. 89 last year and we loved it, we loved the school, we loved the faculty,” Kunz says. “And then also sports, both of us were pretty active in sports when we were younger, and we wanted to make sure it was an outlet [the kids] with baseball, football and soccer, and gymnastics and ballet for the girls, so we were happy with everything going on, and we knew about all the parks and everything they have access to in the city.” Kunz says some of her favorite parts about living in the city are its liveliness, “and being able to walk out my door and have everything within minutes.” The parks and the waterfront of Lower Manhattan would also have been missed. Though people may decide now to stay or to leave, that doesn’t necessarily mean they won’t reconsider later.

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“I’ve had clients, as well as many other people that I know, move out of the city, raise their kids, and then are looking to move back into the city once their kids are gone,” Strong says. “It’s smaller, and they’re going back to that convenience of having everything in one location like they had before moving out of the city with their family.” Falder says that she’s thought about it and does, in a way, miss the simplicity of her old life in the city. “I do sort of miss not having the maintenance of the home that you own, and it’s all on you; it’s very easy in some regards to live in the city, but very hard as well… and you have such a small space, and it doesn’t have many things [materially], and that’s nice,” Falder says. “And granted, we were renters, and because we were renters we didn’t have these crazy taxes, or these maintenance charges; it was just very simple and streamlined.” Kunz says she and her husband are still undecided if they will ever make the jump out of the city. “It’s definitely appealing to us; we both like the idea of having a big house with more space and a backyard,” Kunz says. “At this point, the city life is what we’re happy with. But we would definitely look at something in the future, potentially if we weren’t happy with the school systems anymore, or we decided that we need more space than what we have, but we would probably do something based on what the children’s needs are.”

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By designing her husband’s Italian restaurant to be a neighborhood spot for local TriBeCa families, Gabby Karan shares her mother’s motto about addressing people. by Johanna Silver Photography by Russell James

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abby Karan De Felice has been attuned with a sense of good design, business understanding and the power of giving from her childhood travelling and watching her mother, fashion tycoon Donna Karan, in action. But Gabby Karan De Felice has found her own path, which can be seen at her and her husband’s southern Italian eatery, Tutto il Giorno. Located on Franklin Street in TriBeCa, it has all the attributes of a happening downtown destination. With an open dining area and opulent accouterments, from dynamic light fixtures to floral arrangements in elegant vases, the space reflects the expert aesthetic of its designer. But her vision for the restaurant reaches beyond making another trendy urban haunt. “We moved to TriBeCa because of our close friends who lived here, and it’s such an interesting venue for us,” explains Karan de Felice, ”Because it’s so culturally driven, it’s all about residents, and becoming a local spot is what we’re placing all of our energy in right now.” Now that Tutto il Giorno (or “Tutto,” as Karan De Felice and husband Gianpaolo call it) has been open for about a year and a half, Karan De Felice is abuzz with ideas on how to connect with the community they have joined. She is even formulating a prospective Sunday brunch for families, complete with Italian board games, scopa (an Italian card game) and projections of classic films on the wall. “A restaurant is about multi generations, and we’ve extended our home to a place we’ve done in New York City.” she explains. Having grown up in New York, Karan De Felice and her mother celebrate the city frequently within their various ventures. It is even the namesake of Donna Karan’s foremost fashion brand, DKNY.

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Gabby+ Donna KARAN SHARING THE PASSION

Tutto il Giorno, in TriBeCa, has all the attributes of a happening downtown destination.

Hair: Joyce Cohen for Pierre Michel Salon Makeup: Berta Camal at Jed Root Donna Karan and Gabby Karan De Felice clothing by Urban Zen


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“It was very important for me to kind of carve out my own path...something different from what I grew up with.”

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Growing up so close to her mother, Gabby inherited an eye for design.

“New York is my hometown; it’s where I was born and raised. But far more that, it’s the world in one place. There’s an energy and spirit that calls us all there, the best and the brightest of every field—innovators, artists, entrepreneurs,” explains Donna Karan, “New York fuels the creative spirit. You only have to walk down the street to feel the excitement, the buzz—it can be exhausting at times, but it’s always inspiring.” Family has been a primary motif in Karan De Felice’s Italian experience. Traveling frequently with her mother growing up, she would go back and forth from Italy, aiding in the purchase of fabrics for prospective clothing lines. She also met her husband in Southern Italy and became immersed in its culture—culinary and otherwise—through him. “There’s nothing like seeing New York through a New Yorker and Italy through an Italian.” Gianpaolo and his close David Mayer dreamed up a plan that would satisfy there desire for

authentic cuisine in the Hamptons. Together, they opened their first Tutto Il Giorno in Sag Harbor. Gabby Karan De Felice, along with being its designer, opened an Urban Zen lifestyle store, a retail and lifestyle venture of her mother’s, next to the restaurant, creating an experience for customers that was cumulative of the family’s many backgrounds and talents. They later opened Tutto Southampton and followed with their TriBeCa location in 2014. She has helped shaped the atmosphere with both her mother’s chic aesthetic and her mother-in-law’s Southern Italian traditions in mind, while the Belgian architect Francis D’Haene has helped executed the architectural dream. The cuisine is impeccably representative of their Neapolitan roots, with dishes like Spaghetti Pomodoro and Cioppino that are fresh and light and celebrate the Mediterranean elements that comprise them. “We know our food is consistent, delicious and authentically Italian. It’s about building off of that,

not making it too trendy, too overpopulated…just being a place where people are comfortable and where they want to come a lot,” she explains. Her relationship with her mother is one of mutual support, whether or not they are collaborating directly. Growing up so close to her mother and her work, Gabby Karan De Felice inherited an eye for design that is eminent in her bloodline, though she chose not to utilize it in fashion. “It was very important for me to kind of carve out my own path, and that’s why we went into this hospitality world,” she explains. “I wanted to do something unique and different from what I grew up with.” The two weave in and out of each other’s endeavors, offering both support and creative insight. Donna Karan’s fashion events have been hosted at her daughter’s restaurants, and she is Tutto’s “best customer,” frequenting the restaurant regularly. (continued on the next page)

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gabby and donna karan

The two weave in and out of each other’s endeavors, offering both support and creative insight.

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gabby and donna karan

Another trait shared by the mother-daughter duo is charity and philanthropy. Karan De Felice can attest to the prevalence of her mother’s sense of giving. From the time Karan De Felice was born, “she has taught me that we are fortunate and we are lucky and the more you give, the more you get. Her motto is, ’It’s not about dressing people, it’s about addressing them.’” One collaborative philanthropic endeavor is Super Saturday, which is a celebratory event and sale of reduced-price luxury retail. Hosted by Kelly Ripa and Karan herself, the sale’s funds go toward ovarian cancer research. “It’s a nice mother and daughter cause that she started that I could also help carry though.” Karan De Felice has also recently been involved with Solving Kids Cancer, which focuses on aggressive childhood cancers with low survival rates. Donna Karan has involved herself in many charitable enterprises throughout her career. Her most recent endeavor has been her lifestyle conglomerate Urban Zen. Baring the soulful ethos of its creator, Urban Zen stores offer luxury women’s apparel that is characterized by a mindful artisanal essence. The brand is also supplemented by a foundation, which helps to promote awareness and aid for cultural preservation, healthcare and education. “I’ve always seen Urban Zen as a marriage of commerce and philanthropy, a business model for a soulful economy. The more desirable we make the product, the more it will sell and benefit others, whether it’s the artisans that make the product or…our UZIT [Urban Zen Integrative Therapy] program,” she states. “Conscious consumerism is definitely the future—people care about the intention behind what they buy.” With Urban Zen expanding into the wholesale business and having stores in several different cities, Donna’s business acumen is just as pertinent to Urban Zen as it is to all of her endeavors. Both mother and daughter emanate an unmistakable excitement for their businesses and what they stand for, resulting in the infectious success they have seen in their various enterprises. Along with the growth of Tutto, Karan De Felice has even broader hospitality aspirations that include a boutique hotel and a lifestyle line. Though it is clear that she has the same designer’s aesthetic, business savvy and charitable tendencies that her iconic mother possesses, she is keen on translating them into her own market. Though a hospitality takeover could be in her future, she is content at present to grow her current business. “Right now I’m on the path to making this place the best neighborhood place it can be.”

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cover story

“It’s not about dressing people, it’s about addressing them.” — Donna Karan

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f e at u r e

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bob gruen

If you’ve seen a photo of John Lennon wearing a New York City t-shirt, well, Bob took it.


bob gruen

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f e at u r e

Led Zeppelin, NYC – 1973. © Bob Gruen/www.bobgruen.com

Downtown HEART Rock photographer Bob Gruen talks downtown living and reflects on a one-of-a-kind career.

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ob Gruen is not only one of the most famous rock photographers, but one of its most prolific as well. If you’ve seen a photo of John Lennon wearing a “New York City” t-shirt, Bob took it. If you’ve seen a photo of Led Zeppelin standing in front of an airplane with their logo on it, Bob took that one, too. He has captured countless iconic

by Darren Paltrowitz

Photography by Philippe Reynaud Collage by Martin Danjue

images over the past five decades that we’ve grown accustomed to seeing on posters, shirts and the pages of books. A New York native, Bob Gruen’s name is practically synonymous with downtown New York. Thanks to Carol Klenfner’s connection, I had the opportunity to conduct a Q&A with Gruen about his past, present and future,

garnering a rare look at the man behind the lens. His work ethic is to be admired, and his “last words” are inspiring to all, not just to photographers. Much of Gruen’s classic work has recently been reissued, and there is a permanent display at Edition Hotel at 5 Madison Ave. (continued on the next page)

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f e at u r e

KISS, NYC – 1974. © Bob Gruen/www.bobgruen.com

Darren Paltrowitz: What was your first paying gig as a photographer? Bob Gruen: I lived with a rock band [Glitterhouse] in the ’60s, and when they got a deal at Atlantic Records, they used my photos for their publicity. Atlantic then hired me to shoot Tommy James and the Shondells, when they were opening at a presidential rally for Hubert Humphrey. DP: What is it that you like most about living downtown? BG: There is less traffic, and it’s quieter, because most of the streets are shorter and smaller than uptown, and the buildings are lower, so there’s more sky. But we’re close to everything going on in the city. DP: When did you first move downtown?

BG: I moved to Sullivan Street in June 1965, and I thought the Feast of St. Anthony was a great welcome. I’ve lived in the West Village since 1970. DP: What is it that keeps you living in Manhattan, as opposed to moving to L.A.? BG: I’m not moving to L.A., because I’d only last a few days there! The sun is nice, but it’s way too spread out, and there is so much traffic it takes hours to get anywhere, and when you meet someone in L.A., they say, “How are you doing?” In New York they say, “What are you doing?” I like to be doing things. DP: Is your neighborhood on the verge of becoming another SoHo? BG: I think the West Village is becoming another SoHo with high-priced shops and luxury condos, but I’m not ready to move.

DP: Do you have a favorite venue in Manhattan for photo shoots? Or at least a favorite for concerts? BG: I don’t really have favorite venues where I take photos, but I always like to see shows at the Beacon [Theatre], because it’s such a beautiful theater, and the sound is good. Past favorites were Max’s [Kansas City], The Bottom Line, CBGB’s and Don Hill’s, all now gone. But now I think, for a club, I like Bowery Electric. DP: To you, is music good these days? Or are the best days of pop and rock behind us? BG: I usually think the best day is today. You can’t go back, and I find good music all over town. DP: In October, your book on John Lennon was re-released. How does it compare to the original release? (continued on the next page)

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BG: The new edition of John Lennon: The New York Years has a new cover and 16 new pages with 24 photos not published before. DP: Do you feel that there are any misconceptions about John? Or is there something you wish more people knew about him? BG: John was very open about his life; I don’t think there are misconceptions. If people really want to know about John Lennon, they should read the last two interviews he gave—the BBC interview by John Peebles and the Playboy interview by David Sheff—both available as books. John expressed himself very clearly and had learned a lot from his five years of raising Sean. DP: Do you have any exhibits in the works? Or any other books? BG: There is a new permanent installation of 45 of my photos in the Billiard Room, [in the Clocktower Restaurant] at the new Edition Hotel on 24th Street. This year, I released a new book of photos of Yoko Ono, See Hear Yoko, and there was a reissue of…The Clash. Photographs by Bob Gruen…My large 500-photo mono-graph, Rock Seen, is now in its 4th printing. I’m currently working on an autobiography. DP: Is there anyone you haven’t yet photographed but still hope to? BG: I’ve met many very interesting people and I can’t say there is anyone special I can think of I’d like to photograph. But I go out all the time and I’m always happy to meet new people. DP: If a person were thinking of getting into photography as a proper hobby, is there a particular camera you’d recommend to start with? BG: The camera doesn’t matter as long as you’re comfortable with it; they all do mostly the same things. It’s what you do with it that matters. DP: Is there a photograph or a particular shoot that you’re most proud of? Or see as your biggest accomplishment? BG: I don’t like to list “favorites,” but certainly my photo of Tina Turner. Catching multiple images in one shot is a good one, and the world’s favorites—my John Lennon in the New York t-shirt or Led Zeppelin in front of the airplane— are pretty good, too. DP: When you’re not busy with your career, how do you like to spend your free time? BG: I’m busy with my career most of the time, but I like to travel and visit with my family and grandchildren now. DP: Finally, Bob, any last words for the kids? BG: I always tell people that if you take a lot of pictures, you’re bound to get a good one, and if you only show the good ones, people will think you’re good. Other than that, learn from the past, look to the future but live in the present.

John Lennon, NYC – 1974 Ramones, NYC – 1975 Debbie Harry, Max’s Kansas City – 1976 © Bob Gruen/www.bobgruen.com

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Sailing the Hudson IN STYLE

Photography by Philippe Reynaud

Location: Classic Harbor Line Chelsea Piers Vessel: Schooner America 2.0, New York, NY

Dress: Rita Vinieris Cuffs: Kenneth Jay Lane Shoes: Christian Louboutin Suit and shoes: Armani Watch: David Yurman

Art Direction: Marina Barlage Stylist: Freddie Leiba Hair: David Cotteblanche Makeup: Brian Duprey Video: Jackie Marie Model: Alina Baikova Model: Alex Lundqvist


Dress: Sonia by Sonia Rykiel Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane Handbag: Rebecca Mosas Pumps: Manolo Blahnik

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Dress: Missoni Jewelry: Jose and Maria Barrera


Swimsuit: Gottex Gold cuffs: Kenneth Jay Lane Earrings: Kenneth Jay Lane Rings: Her own


Bikini: Norma Kamali Jewelry: David Yurman Trousers: Paul Smith


Outfit: Ralph Lauren Jewelry: Ivanka Trump

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Gown: Rita Vinieris Jewelry: David Yurman Pants and shirt: Paul Smith Watch: David Yurman


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Dress: Bagley Mischka Jewelry: Monica Rich Kossan Suit and shirt: Paul Smith


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beauty

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Beauty by Johanna Silver

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pring symbolizes rebirth and the urge emerge from the winter, eager to flourish in the sun like the plants do. However, it can be hard to ring in the spring when you are still recovering from winter’s skincare roughness. Harsh winds have been whipping through skyscraper-laden streets, drying out our lips and the erratic shifts in temperature make it hard for skin to balance its moisture levels. It is more likely that we will enter spring with course, confused skin, eager for April showers. Spring brings along its own uncertain weather with rough warm days popping up in between the light jacket weather. In these uncertain conditions, leading up to the eventual warm, consistent weather we crave, it is important to invest in products that gave skin the moisture balance it needs. Moisturizers not only add a splash of hydration to your skin, they also act as a protective barrier against cold that tends to sneak in otherwise, and natural oil remedies for hair are imperative. Filled with essential vitamins and nutrients, oil’s potency can restore the most brittle of strands and the driest of scalps.

NATURA BISSÉ BARCELONA DIAMOND EXTREME A luxuriously rich cream that fights the signs of aging and boosts skin’s natural repair and defense mechanisms. Its protective and hydrating formula—which strengthens the lipid barrier and prevents loss of moisture, provides skin with energy, regenerates, fights wrinkles, provides elasticity, firmness and maintains an optimal state of hydration. It is perfect for frequent flyers or skin exposed to extreme weather or pollution. $345

All products available at Cos Bar in Brookfield Place

RÉVIVE INTENSITÉ CRÈME LUSTRE DAY FIRMING MOISTURE CREAM BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 30 SUNSCREEN Increase skin elasticity, firm and reduce sagging with this intensive daily moisturizer. $385

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CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ LA CRÈME An exquisite high-performance multi-benefit cream for the ultimate age-defiance and correction. Helps visibly firm and tighten skin while also brightening and addressing the appearance of wrinkles, texture, and pores for a youthful and radiant look. $535 SISLEY PARIS SUPREMŸA BAUME THE SUPREME ANTI-AGING CREAM An exceptional night treatment tailored to dry skin or skin lacking comfort, which targets the visible signs of the skin’s programmed aging process to offer visible rejuvenation. $795

NATURA BISSÉ BARCELONA ESSENTIAL SHOCK INTENSE RETINOL FLUID A silky, ultra-hydrating, antiaging fluid with retinol for daily use that renews and smoothes the surface of the skin, visibly softening expression lines and wrinkles, leaving the skin revitalized, supple and even-toned. $105


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s t y l e va u lt

Editor’s Tips

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Best time to moisturize? After you get out of the shower. You have a threeminute window to lock in the moisture before the water dissipates.

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For hands and feet, moisturize right before bed to allow target areas to absorb your product of choice. Use socks and gloves for maximum absorption.

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Natural, non-genetically modified oils are a must for hair and body. Rule of thumb: oils that can be used for cooking—and therefore can be consumed internally— are essential and safe for external use. Plus, it hasn’t been diluted with other chemicals or fragrances. The purer, the better.

Retoucher: Mori Lynn; Model: Jenna Kelly / Next Management

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When applying moisturizer or oil to your face, the best method is to begin at the sides of your nose and brush the moisturizer outward and upward towards your temples. Repetition of this method will reduce your skins inclination to sag downward as you age.

Photography by Laura Rose Creative/makeup, hair and manicure: d.nicole

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grooming

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Manscaping by Yasmine Rimawi

Photography by Raquel Salazar

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THE ART OF SHAVING Black Mach 3 Razor, Black Badger Brush and Contemporary Stand $280.00

hen it comes to body hair removal, men are now on an even playing field with women. From electric trimmers, scissors, state-of-the-art blades and razors to oils, wax, creams and lotions, men’s grooming arsenals are full of choices—sometimes mind-bogglingly so—so whether you want to go completely hairless or just trim the excess, we’ve broken it down for you. WAXING: If you’re keen on stripping the hair from areas such as the back and shoulders, waxing is your best bet. Waxed areas generally remain free of hair for a few weeks, but as anyone who’s seen The 40-YearOld Virgin knows, this is definitely high on the scale of painful removal. The best luxury locale? The spa at The Ritz-Carlton New York, Battery Park. Check their website for pricing and the accompanying amenities. TRIMMING: Scissors and electric trimmers are commonly used for chests and the underarms. Body grooming certainly doesn’t require hairless armpits, unless you’re a swimmer, but it doesn’t hurt to snip the hair down slightly. RAZORS: A good razor with sleek blades will always get the job done, but remember the results are shortlived. Shaven hair will return in a couple of days, and you risk razor burn.

THE GREGORY BEAUTY TRAVEL KIT Exclusively at MENAJI $64.00

THE ART OF SHAVING Shaving Cream Ocean Kelp $25.00 KIEHL’S Razor Bump Relief $27.50

SHAVING CREAM, OIL AND LOTION: These products are imperative to keep itching, bumps and burns at bay. Shaving cream is self-spoken, but oil provides a sleek and butter-like removal, all while protecting and hydrating your skin. Lotion application after any method of hair removal soothes potential irritation. Plus, it’s always helpful to moisturize, especially this season. REMEMBER: The amount of removal is subjective; one man’s scruffy aesthetic is another man’s hairy situation. And balance is key. You don’t want to be hairless on your body if you’re sporting a thick beard. It’s all about symmetry and knowing when to put down the trimmers.

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PACIFIC SHAVING COMPANY All Natural Shaving Oil $25.99

JACK BLACK Cool Moisture Body Lotion $28.00

TWEEZERMAN Scissors $17.00 PANASONIC Precision Hair and Beard Trimmer $59.99

PETER THOMAS ROTH Modern Classic Shaving Cream $26.00


Location: The Ritz-Carlton New York, Battery Park; Makeup: d.nicole; Hair: Nordia McIntosh; Model: Nicholas Appice

grooming

THE SPA AT THE RITZ-CARLTON NEW YORK, BATTERY PARK For all waxing needs (prices vary) www.ritzcarlton.com

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Model: Marina B; Lingerie: Agent Provocateur; Location: Cumuruxatiba, Bahia, Brazil

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HOW TO MAKE YOUR SKIN SPARKLE THIS SPRING Fade brown spots / Tighten / Glow by Dr. Albert Lefkovits

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s the spring season turns towards early summer, a lot of concern centers on maintaining that “fresh from a brisk walk” glow. A major step toward this goal is fading brown spots and patches on the skin, otherwise known as chloasma or melisma, or “the mask of pregnancy.” As the name implies, the discoloration often occurs following pregnancy and when on oral contraceptives, although some people who have never been pregnant or on birth control pills will also experience this problem. Treating melasma

can be difficult, but there are many options available. These can include depigmenting creams containing kojic acid, hydroquinone and retinoic acid, alone or in combination, and sometimes paired together with a mild steroid cream. When creams alone bring insufficient results, microdermabrasion and a variety of chemical peels from very mild to quite strong may be helpful. Sometimes, photodynamic therapy, which is also used to treat a variety of other conditions such as acne rosacea, acne vulgaris, and sun-damaged skin, can be very beneficial. Various lasers and intense light devices can also be useful. However, prevention is always better than cure, and people who are subject to developing these spots should be very careful to diligently and frequently apply sunscreen, often supplemented by a pill called Heliocare, which works synergistically with the sunscreens.

While fading these spots does require patience, there are ancillary benefits to these treatment procedures. Chemical peels, microdermabrasion and certain lasers also serve to freshen and clarify skin texture and tone. Acne scarring can also be dramatically improved with the use of microdermabrasion, lasers and a variety of skin peels. The Refirme laser tightens the skin, giving it a firm, youthful appearance. This works by stimulating the skin to produce more collagen in the deeper layer, thereby plumping it up. No skin care regimen would be complete without topical application of retinoids and antioxidants, which will promote additional collagen production and the skin a youthful glow. Follow with an enriched moisturizer, and you will be on your way to having a bright and sparkling spring complexion.

newBEAUTY Photography by Philippe Reynaud

BRIGHTEN UP THAT SMILE by Jackie Hart

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eeth whitening has taken the cosmetic dentistry industry by storm, with many seeking ways to perfect their smile. Luckily, with the help of modern technology and knowledgeable professionals, making your teeth appear whiter is now more easily achieved than ever before. We spoke to cosmetic dentist, Dr. Brian Kantor, of Lowenberg, Lituchy and Kantor, on the different ways to get those teeth looking brighter and better than ever. According to Dr. Kantor, the largest misconception about teeth whitening is that the results will be pristine. “Most people come in and they think they’re going to come out with these perfectly white, celebrity-looking teeth,” Kantor says. However, this is not the case, because teeth whitening or bleaching gives the teeth a more natural-looking appearance. People can choose between an over-the-counter treatment or visiting

the dentist. The difference between the two is the amount of hydrogen peroxide that is concentrated into the tooth. Over-the-counter solutions are typically not as strong, whereas in-office hydrogen peroxide treatments can reach concentration levels of up to 40 percent. Typically, in-office treatments involve a high concentration of hydrogen peroxide, which is then activated by a high powered LED light. The whole process usually takes about an hour, from start to finish. “The results also depend on the person,” says Kantor. “Usually, the bleaching works best on people who have yellow-stained teeth. And it also depends on how they react to the process, how long the bleach stays on the teeth, how concentrated the bleach is…everyone will have different results.” For those who have heavy decay, dental work or gray-stained teeth, bleaching may not be the best option. However, investing in porcelain veneers is an alternative. The veneers will give someone the

perfectly white, celebrity smile that people are often looking for, says Kantor. To help maintain the appearance of your newly whitened teeth, Dr. Kantor says that customized kits are available to patients to take home after their visit. “We give our patients custom trays for maintenance that we put together, and they can keep up with their teeth from home and come back to us either annually or every couple of years for a fresh bleaching procedure.” Dr. Kantor also recommends staying away from darker foods and liquids, such as coffee, red wine and carbonated beverages. “After the process, the pores on your teeth actually remain open for a couple of days, making staining even more susceptible during this period,” he says. “If you can’t go without your coffee, you can actually take some Vaseline and rub it across your teeth, drink your coffee, and then rinse your mouth out with water and your teeth will still look brand new.”

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léman

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little apple

Arts inEducation

at Léman Manhattan Preparatory School by Lisa Nowicki

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isa Nowicki, Director of Fine Arts at Léman, has transformed her love of music into an innovative educational program that instills key academic skills through musical thinking. Nothing is more thrilling for me than witnessing the moment when a student falls in love with music, just as I did. Although I have spent the last five years as an administrator at Léman Manhattan Preparatory School, overseeing the music, theatre, and visual arts programs, I still teach high school band—the best part of every day. I have long believed in music’s power to transform, leading me to earn my B.S. in Music Education and an M. Ed. in Educational Psychology, where I focused on the effects of music education in child development. At Léman, I found myself surrounded by faculty who share my belief in the arts as an integral part of a successful education. In addition to playing an important role in creating a well-rounded education, a strong music curriculum can enhance academic performance in other subjects. An extensive body of research shows that the study of music correlates with academic achievement throughout a student’s career. Music study exercises the brain and affects the way the brain functions. When a student performs music, she engages all major functional systems of the brain simultaneously, stimulating and enhancing learning. For example, while playing an instrument, a musician mathematically calculates rhythms, deciphers code in reading musical notation and coordinates physical actions, while expressing creativity.

The benefits of starting a musical education in early childhood cannot be overstated. In their formative years, young children can learn music similar to the way in which they naturally learn language, by processing auditory patterns and inflections. As such, starting music early on can lead to a higher level of academic success later in a student’s career. Studies have shown that these cognitive benefits are relative to higher SAT scores, stronger language and reasoning skills and critical thinking. In addition, there are social, emotional and physical benefits, including self-discipline, self-confidence, hand-eye coordination and concentration. I have often seen how music helps improve students’ understanding of other concepts, particularly math, as they must “do math” when playing rhythms. At Léman, we teach music through 12th grade, because we appreciate its importance, not only academically, but also in greater society. Our music begins early with our Pre-K students, and instrumental music instruction, via our unique violin program, begins in the first grade. Other musical opportunities for our students include band, chorus, private lessons and a global orchestra program. It is incredibly rewarding to watch my students grow, knowing that their appreciation for music goes beyond entertainment. They are my daily reminder of what is most important in education. I am blessed to be able to take part in nurturing well-rounded students and instilling in young people that same love of music that changed my life long ago.

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Cacique Peninsula Costa Rica

LuxuryTravel WITH KIDS IN TOW

by Denise Courter

Photography by Inspirato®

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acation travel with kids in tow can be a blessing and a curse. On one hand, parents are excited to plan a trip out of town and enjoy time away from the bright lights and big city atmosphere, but at the same time, those same parents may dread the potential planning that is involved when considering family travel. However, more and more families are making the decision to visit exotic locations and travel in style. The ability to leave the planning to a travel concierge is becoming increasingly appealing to families that don’t have extra time to become experts on their destination, and most don’t have the local knowledge of a property that the new crop of travel clubs and concierges can offer. One travel experience that has been making a splash since it launched four years ago is Inspirato®, which has partnered with American Express. Inspirato is known for its hand-selected luxury residences and more than 400 curated luxury vacation destinations. The members-only travel club recently added a global collection of hotel and resort partners, which has increased their

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visibility in the travel sector, and boasts more than 10,000 families in its database. Once an initiation fee and an annual fee are paid, the member pays only for travel nights, so there is no long-term commitment. Their new collection includes wellregarded brands such as the Fairmont, St. Regis, Waldorf Astoria and Andaz.

“Families want to travel in style.” An Inspirato personal advisor is assigned to learn more about the family, their travel preferences and food likes as well as dislikes, helping to create the experience of a lifetime. The advisor then curates a robust travel plan, accommodating everyone’s preferences. Families are greeted at their residence with a personal tour of the property, a welcome by the advisor and options to have meals prepared and drinks served at every turn. It’s a new kind of travel that allows the family to book a trip, and

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all of the planning and itinerary building that the family typically handles become the responsibility of the personal advisor. The vacation experience is enhanced by the ability of the advisor to manage the planning and booking of excursions, eliminating the guesswork so that the family can truly connect and simply enjoy some of the most exquisite locales around the globe. Jacada Travel is the premiere travel company for families interested in luxury travel combined with adventure travel such as safaris. They curate incredible trips to the Galapagos, South Africa, Bali and a host of other exotic and amazing locales. Australian family traveler and author of On the Road…with Kids, John Ahern, believes family travel is a must. In a recent interview with Jacada Travel, he stated, “I think they see the world as their oyster now. They’re not scared to travel. They don’t have any limitations in that sense, whereas for a lot of kids, travel is a foreign idea to them.” As more luxury brands recognize that families want to travel in style, the more these types of travel resources will evolve to accommodate highend travel needs for even the littlest of travelers.


robert guimento

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profile

Robert GUIMENTO The new head of NewYork-Presbyterian/ Lower Manhattan Hospital. by Jackie Hart Photography by Raquel Salazar

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n late 2015, Robert Guimento, M.H.A., took over as Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian/ Lower Manhattan Hospital. Rob brings years of experience in finance and community healthcare to Lower Manhattan, as he has been a part of NewYork-Presbyterian for 10 years. Most recently, he has been serving as Vice President for Ambulatory Care, responsible for NewYork-Presbyterian’s ambulatory care operations, focusing on projects such as improving community health and initiating alternative delivery models.

JH: What have been some of the challenges you have encountered so far?

A longtime resident of Lower Manhattan—he calls Chelsea home—we spoke with Rob about his transition to NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital and his plans for the community.

JH: What is your favorite part about Lower Manhattan?

JACKIE HART: How do you plan to continue NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan’s influence on the downtown community? ROBERT GUIMENTO: We are committed to pursuing clinical excellence and providing outstanding care to the many communities throughout Lower Manhattan and beyond. With our partners at Weill Cornell Medicine, our goal is to deliver high-quality care to those who call Lower Manhattan their home or place of work. We are striving to provide services that are accessible to all, including our adult and pediatric emergency services. JH: How do you think the hospital has impacted downtown thus far?  RG: We continue to redevelop NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital and build upon our strong historical traditions.  For example, the hospital’s roots go back to its founding by Elizabeth Blackwell as one of the first fully equipped hospitals for women and children, dating from the mid-1800s. Today, we offer mothers the opportunity to give birth in a natural, home-like setting, in a completely refurbished and modernized birth center immediately adjacent to the hospital-based obstetrical service. The tradition continues and grows.

RG: The challenge is keeping up with the many innovative ideas coming from our staff and clinical leadership. We have a passionate team; in turn, they create an endless number of opportunities to provide both clinical care and community outreach and education. I’m just trying to keep up! JH: What do you think is the most rewarding part about your job? RG: I enjoy watching people run with an idea and see it through.  RG: The energy and sense of renewal are by far the characteristics that I most enjoy about Lower Manhattan. Having lived in Chelsea for many years—in fact long before 9/11—I, like the rest of New York, have seen this part of Manhattan redevelop into something that no one could have imagined. Take the new Fulton Street subway station. It proves that we can do important projects that improve a community. We are excited to be part of this journey and be the healthcare partner to the community as it continues to grow. JH: Most recently, the new inpatient unit and the birth center have opened at the hospital. How has the reception of these new projects been so far? Are there any upcoming projects you can share with us at this time?  RG: The reception to the many capital improvements to NewYork-Presbyterian/ Lower Manhattan has been very strong, from our new lobby on William Street to a renovated inpatient unit with all single rooms to the birth center. Each of these projects look to expand the clinical care we provide as well as create more inviting and modern public spaces. Additionally, significant amount of work continues behind the walls of the hospital to upgrade our IT and electrical distribution systems. We also continue to plan on how to introduce integrative medicine into our delivery system.

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Dyan Hes MD, FAAP Board Certified in Pediatrics Director, American Board of Obesity Medicine GRAMERCY PARK 67 Irving Place 3rd Floor South New York, NY 10003 CHELSEA 420 W. 23rd St. New York, NY 10011 T: 212-473-4200 F: 212-473-5696 E: staff@gramercypediatrics.com W: www.gramercypediatrics.com


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downtown mom

Little Apple Asks Downtown Mom

Amy ROBACH Editor Denise Courter had a chance to catch up with this inspirational mom to chat about raising kids, working full-time and enjoying life. by Denise Courter Photography by Raquel Salazar

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my Robach is a mom to five children, in a blended family with actor and philanthropist Andrew Shue. The busy working mom is juggling life in the city, shuttling her kids to afterschool programs and extracurricular activities, all the while anchoring the morning news show Good Morning America five days a week. Robach recently penned her The New York Times best-selling memoir, Better, which chronicles her experience of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis, after participating in a 2013 Good Morning America segment, in which she received a mammogram on live television. She underwent a bilateral mastectomy during which doctors found a second malignant tumor in her other breast and discovered that the cancer had spread to her lymph nodes. After eight rounds of chemotherapy, radiation and reconstruction surgery, Robach took to writing about her journey with the hope of letting other survivors and newly diagnosed cancer patients know they are not alone in their struggles. DC: You are a mom, an anchor on Good Morning America and now a bestselling author, with the publication of Better. What is next on your to-do list? AR: To figure out how to sleep more and how to relax more. I constantly am struggling with work-life balance and I haven’t figured it out yet! DC: Did you grow up as a city kid or a suburban kid?

AR: I grew up in a suburb outside of St. Louis, Mo. It was the quintessential suburbia neighborhood, known as St. Charles‌And, even though I grew up in the suburbs, I used to tell my family that I was moving to NYC one day and when I did eventually move to NYC, I felt like I was at home and instantly felt a connection. I love the hustle and bustle of New York. I love the people

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DC: What do you hope for readers to take away after reading Better ?

and how much New Yorkers give. I love that my kids are exposed to so many different experiences and we have great conversations because of it.

AR: I want people to know that everyone’s cancer is different and the way that each patient handles it is different. But the moral of the story is that the gift that comes with getting a cancer diagnosis or knowing someone that has a cancer diagnosis is a powerful reminder that we are lucky to be here. Early in motherhood, I thought my goal was to raise bright, smart, kind and disciplined kids and that remains true. However, I forgot an important one: to enjoy my children. Because time is precious and it moves in lightning warp speed and you don’t know what the next day’s news will bring. So I have learned to enjoy my kids and I don’t think I let myself do that before. I think all of my relationships with family and friends have flourished because I have realized how important they all are. I hope my story sheds some light on the importance of being aware and that they are not alone and that you can learn a lot on the other side of this disease.

DC: What is the best parenting tip you can share with Downtown ? AR: I schedule “me time” and hit the gym or go for a run because it gives me a chance to let out some steam, [and] get out stress and I know it’s helping me physically and emotionally. I feel better about myself, and therefore, I’m a better mom. Whether it is the gym, a pampering visit for a massage or a manicure, those are important indulgences that help me take care of myself and ultimately help me be a better person and…a better mom. DC: What are your favorite things about being an NYC Mom? AR: My kids go to school very close to our apartment, and on any given day there are kids from school…dropping by and hanging out. I love that the parents chat at drop-off and we all pitch in during drop-off and pick-up. The sense of community.

DC: There are many charities that do incredible things for families. What are some of your favorite charities that you think deserve readers’ attention?

DC: What are the challenges of being a working mom in the city?

AR: I support BCRF, as Evelyn Lauder created the Pink Ribbon campaign, breast cancer awareness month and the fact that I had a baseline mammogram at 40, which saved my life.

AR: Trying to figure out work-life balance and the stroller! It was awful trying to figure out how to navigate the city with a stroller in cabs and on subways. Though I did witness kindness in other moms, as they would be nice enough to help me with my stroller struggles. DC: Do you have any rules at home that make your kids roll their eyes?

“Nothing makes you feel better than giving.”

AR: Our kids are expected to make their beds and have their rooms cleaned. So, if that isn’t done, I will take away a portion of their allowance, which doesn’t make them happy, and they definitely can roll their eyes when that happens. DC: What was the biggest surprise about writing your memoir, Better ? AR: I tried to make it a collaborative effort, but it was really hard. It was like writing a diary and then asking my family to read and comment, and I realized that the story that I was telling wasn’t necessarily the same story that they had experienced. I didn’t want to offend anyone, but I also wanted to share what I felt was my experience. So, I didn’t really anticipate how much the book was a delicate dance of my story, my family and our experiences.

— Amy Robach

AR: I support BCRF, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (founded in 1993 by Evelyn Lauder). They dedicate all of their funding to finding a cure. It’s about raising the money, spending the money to encourage the best and the brightest scientists and researchers, and incentivizing them to collaborate. These scientists are directly responsible for a… maintenance drug that I take every day, Tamoxifen Citrate, that will hopefully slow down or prevent a future recurrence of cancer.

FAVORITE DOWNTOWN PLAYGROUND

is Madison Square Park with its music concerts, art sculptures throughout the year. Plus you can find the original Shake Shack!

AR: Do Something Foundation (co-founded in 1993 by Andrew Shue and childhood friend Michael Sanchez) is an organization that encourages young people to get involved in their community by volunteering and activism. It’s an organization that encourages young people to participate through internships and other philanthropic endeavors.

FAVORITE DOWNTOWN COCKTAIL SPOT is with my husband at any Irish pub in NY! FAVORITE DOWNTOWN DATE SPOT is Da Silvano, in Greenwich Village, which is also where my husband and I had our first date and still frequent for date night. FAVORITE FAMILY TRADITION is going to upstate New York for family time. We all look forward to our time together, out of the city and in nature.

BREAST CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION www.bcrfcure.org DO SOMETHING FOUNDATION www.dosomething.org

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b a r c l ay

Barclay’s Spot What activity are you most looking forward to this spring? What’s your favorite part of the city?

Rocky

MINIATURE PINSCHER —JEANETTE ZINNO Montauk morning beach runs. Tompkins Square Park in the East Village. I love the French...especially Bulldogs.

Frank

FRENCH BULLDOG —JEFF MCGREGOR I have a really tight crew in my building, so I’m planning on throwing a few parties on the roof deck for my friends.

I typically cruise up the west side to Battery Park dog run so that I can stretch the legs and relieve some stress on the weekends. I only have room in my life for one woman, my mom!

Wallace

SCOTTISH TERRIER —ROBIN GIBBS These little legs love running around the park chasing my favorite whistle ball around. I love to bear down in the Battery and head across the bridge to Prospect Park. There’s a certain uptown poodle that has always caught my eye and we love taking long naps together.

Winston YELLOW LAB

—ADRIENNE STARR

I can’t wait to fetch ‘til I fall over and go swimming! I haven’t gotten to play much in the city, but I’m hoping that I’ll get my first visit to Central Park! I’m new in town, so no one’s put paw prints on my heart yet.

SPRI N G 201 6 | DOWNTOWN MAGA ZI N EN YC .CO M

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miličević Jumpsuit: Behno Jewelry: Dana Rebecca

“I have always regarded SoHo as a special place since I was 18 and came to New York for the first time. To me, it was the epitome of ‘downtown’— THE downtown.” — Ivana Miličević

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i va n a Sequin top: TIBI Jewelry: Graziela

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Ivana MILIČEVIĆ SoHo Living

talks downtown, the final season of Banshee, her upcoming work on Power and more. by Darren Paltrowitz Photography by Pete Thompson Hair: Naomi Porto Makeup: Joanne Gair

A

sk 10 people to name a role played by Ivana Miličević, and you’re likely to get 10 different answers. To many, she is Anastasia Rabitov and Carrie Hopewell from the Cinemax series Banshee; the fourth season which premieres on April 1. To others, she was first noticed as Julia from the critically-acclaimed show CBS show, Love Monkey. I first came to know Ivana while she played Missy on HBO’s cult hit The Mind of the Married Man. All these are just the television roles. Ivana has appeared in numerous big screen hits, including Casino Royale, Love Actually, Vanilla Sky, Jerry Maguire and Enemy of the State. Prior to Ivana’s success as an actress, she was a steadily working model. The Michigander was born in Sarajevo and first came to New York in her late teens for modeling. Currently, Ivana is bi-coastal, keeping homes in both SoHo and Los Angeles. She spoke to Downtown about what’s ahead for her once Banshee wraps. DARREN PALTROWITZ: At what point did you realize that you were a working actress and not just a model? Was it being cast in Vanilla Sky? IVANA MILIČEVIĆ: It was very “ombre,” actually. I was modeling into my 20’s, and somewhere along the way I had less and less time for modeling jobs, because I was getting more acting jobs. It was quite lucky and very seamless. I don’t remember the tipping point, though. It was definitely around the time we were shooting Vanilla Sky. Plus, Vanilla Sky was so fun, because there were so many people cast in it for that super-fancy party scene, including

my friend and co-star from Head Over Heels, Shalom Harlow. DP: Your show Banshee started filming in Pennsylvania this season. Had you spent much time there prior to this season? IM: This was my first time in Pennsylvania. The other years I was just pretending to be in Pennsylvania, because the show was previously shot in North Carolina! It was interesting to be in the actual state where our show takes place. I was sorry that I didn’t go to Amish areas, though. I think I would have enjoyed that very much. DP: How would you describe Banshee for someone who hasn’t yet seen the show? IM: Oh, man, that is always such a hard question. It’s an over-the-top roller coaster ride. It’s violent, it’s pulpy, and it explores passionate love for family, passionate love of…well, passionate love, revenge, friendship and how many ways you can skin a cat. Plus, it’s a show where we have an ex-con posing as a cop, a gangster’s daughter posing as a soccer mom, an old Cadillac dealership posing as a police station. Nothing is as it seems. DP: Do a lot of people confuse you, Ivana, for your character Anastasia? IM: (laughs) Um, no? But if I’m not smiling and I have a certain look on my face, I think people can be intimidated by me. I’m a tall lady. DP: I understand that you are bi-coastal and keep a place in SoHo. What is it that drew you to SoHo in the first place? IM: I have always regarded SoHo as a special place since I was 18 and came to New York for the first

time. To me, it was the epitome of “downtown”— THE downtown. DP: Where in New York did you live when you first had a place here? IM: When I was 19, I lived in a model’s apartment on 54th and Broadway with four other girls. People were always talking about Studio 54, which was a block away. I used to fantasize that maybe in a very recent past life I had died there. Perhaps trying to get in through a vent or maybe I just passed out one night on my rollerskates. DP: What do you like about New York that you feel you don’t get from living in Los Angeles? IM: I have been shooting a recurring arc on the Starz show Power, which has kept me in New York for much of the winter. I have seen so many great plays! I wrote a kid’s poem. I don’t do things like that normally. I also wrote an essay for New York-based start-up PYPO.com. I took an acting intensive with my Banshee babe, Trieste Dunn, with her teacher from the North Carolina School of the Arts. All of these different ways to be creative have been filling my days when I have time off from the show! I am not saying that L.A. doesn’t have its own creative energy; it’s just different. DP: You did theater in L.A., appearing in Greedy. Do you have any New York theatrical aspirations? IM: After spending this past fall and winter in New York, I did get a bit of the stage bug. I participated in a John Patrick Shanley reading of Women of Manhattan, at the Circle in the Square Theater, on Broadway.

(continued on the next page)

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IM: I kept calling it my Broadway debut! So I would love to, if the right thing came along at the right time and, most importantly, if New York theater would have me! DP: Is there a Croatian restaurant in New York that you can recommend to our readers? IM: It’s called Kafana, and it’s on Avenue C. Have the cevaps, lepinje, avjar…The branzino is served whole with just olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Divine! Have it with the potatoes and the Swiss chard. Heaven! Oh, and grow a pair and have a shot of slivovic, but just kind of sip it. Like little kisses. That’s how you get used to it. Let it wash over your tongue and the roof of your mouth like gasoline! DP: I remember reading your name in Mary Weiland’s memoir about life with her ex-husband Scott. How did you two first meet? IM: Wow, what a wonderful question! To this day, Mary is one of my best friends. The first time we laid eyes on each other was at a casting in Los Angeles. We bonded over notoriously always “forgetting” our bathing suits when the audition might call for that. Then we lived together many many times, including in New York.

“I think people can be intimidated by me. I’m a tall lady.” — Ivana Miličević

DP: Also on the surprising connection end, your brother plays in 30 Seconds to Mars. Did you yourself have musical aspirations growing up? IM: (laughs) No, not really. Well, I always wanted to play the harp. My second choice was playing the drums—my rhythm has always been better than my tone—but a harp was too expensive and impractical. Drums were too loud. So my parents made me play piano, which I didn’t like. DP: Banshee aside, what can you tell me about your work on Power? IM: It’s a great show starring Omari Hardwick and 50 Cent. I play a hotel heiress who needs a club man like James St. Patrick to help her open clubs in her new eco-luxe boutique hotels. And then shenanigans ensue. DP: When you’re not busy with your career, how do you ideally spend your free time? IM: With family and friends. I have a very close relationship with my parents and brothers. We cook a lot. We laugh a lot. It is very cozy. I also really love to travel. I was just in Tokyo for the first time and was floored by how much I love it there. In lieu of taking selfies, I made a trailer starring my friend’s sock as a sock puppet. You can see it on my Facebook page if you’re interested. No pressure, of course! You can follow Ivana on Twitter @ivanamilicevic.

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Dress: Jill Stuart Shoes: Zimmerman


SALES

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RENTALS

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RELOCATION

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NEW DEVELOPMENTS

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

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TITLE INSURANCE

EXPERIENCE, INSIGHT AND TALENT—PUT THE POWER OF ELLIMAN TO WORK FOR YOU The Strong Oestreich team is one of the top teams in Westchester. Nancy Strong (standing on the right) and Stacey Oestrich (on the left) are both former New York City residents who have made the migration to Westchester County. Nancy has been the top agent in her office for the last two years. Having lived in CT, CA, TX and NYC along with her background in interior design, sales and marketing, Nancy brings to the team an acute understanding of their clients’ needs and desires and the ultimate expertise when preparing a property for sale.

Susanne’s expertise is Queens, specializing in first-time home buyers, sellers, and up or downgrading. A co-founder of The Gutermuth Copersino Team, she loves the dining scene and gets a thrill discovering restaurants while out showing properties. Finding the right property is like being a detective—there are many things to consider and to point out, and the team doesn’t rest until they have found the perfect place.

Stacey’s 18-year career in real estate enables her to be a top negotiator. Her personal experience of living in NYC gives her an extra edge and added perspective to deliver results.

NANCY STRONG

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson nancy.strong@elliman.com Office: 914.273.1001 Mobile: 914.671.5784

Armanda “Squad“ has been a top producer in Manhattan for 19 years. She has been part of the Top 7 agents for closed transactions company-wide from 2010–14. Dedicated to dog rescue, she often brings her 3-legged dog Friday along. Growing up overseas, she is fluent in English, French, Italian and Spanish. Trading in her motorcycle, Squad cruises around in her ‘71 Fiat 500L, the iconic Italian car of that era.

ARMANDA SQUADRILLI

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker asquadrilli@elliman.com Mobile: 646.824.8379 http://bit.ly/1B3Nsdc

Photography by Melani Lust

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson mhadjidemetriou@elliman.com Email: mhadjidemetriou@elliman.com Office: 212.645.4040 Mobile: 917.623.2931

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson stacey.oestreich@elliman.com Office: 914.273.1001 Mobile: 917.797.6266

SUSANNE GUTERMUTH

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker www.susannegutermuth.com susanne.gutermuth@elliman.com Office: 718.631.8900 Mobile: 917.225.5196

Maggie is Douglas Elliman’s #1 producer on Long Island and is ranked #86 in NY by Real Trends Magazine. Her substantive knowledge of real estate as a business coupled with keen market insight allows her to provide unparalleled service to her customers and clients and to continually perform in the top echelon of brokers. She is motivated by the challenges of her business and by putting together creative deals.

MAGGIE KEATS

Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker maggie.keats@elliman.com Office: 516.944.2879 Mobile: 516.449.7598

Maria has been a downtown resident for nearly two decades. Dealing right in her backyard, her diligence, passion and strong negotiating are never a sales pitch, but from her heart and mind. In addition, she writes architectural and real estate articles. She has been on the Board of Directors of Cooley’s Anemia Foundation (Thalassemia Organization) since 1998 and on its Executive Committee since 2013.

MARIA HADJIDEMETRIOU

STACEY OESTREICH

Michele is a creative dealmaker and problemsolver committed to developing relationships of trust with her clients. With lifelong knowledge of the city, she eases the search process through honest guidance, educating her clients on what each community brings. She is dedicated to finding the right neighborhood and apartment to suit her clients’ needs.

MICHELE DENBY

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson michele.denby@elliman.com Office: 212.965.6000 Mobile: 917.833.3310

Specializing in Nassau County, Laurie has been selling real estate in Long Island for 12 years. A lifelong resident of New York, she lived in the city for 20 years before making the difficult decision to leave Manhattan for the suburbs to raise her three children. Her clientele range from first-time buyers and sellers to owners of multi-million dollar properties. She enjoys connecting buyers and sellers and making deals happen!

LAURIE FROMME

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson laurie.fromme@elliman.com Office: 516.921.2262 Mobile: 516.680.1391

A Brooklyn native, Rita prides herself on her local expertise. Her focus is in brownstone neighborhoods like Brooklyn Heights, BoCoCa and Park Slope. Brooklyn is a wonderful, unique place that offers city energy and suburban sky; it is truly the best of both worlds.

RITA VAN STRATEN

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson rita.vanstraten@elliman.com Office: 718.780.8153 Mobile: 718.744.7944 elliman.com/rvs

As the largest regional and global network of real estate experts, Douglas Elliman has a way of understanding your home and what makes it unique. From buying and selling to appraisals, mortgage financing and rentals, top experts in New York offer timely answers to today’s questions about all things real estate. With a powerful combination of talent and technology, we have the experience, insight and access to guide you skillfully from beginning to end. Put the power of Elliman to work for you.

21 NEW YORK CITY OFFICES | ELLIMAN.COM


city bites

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chef profile

A relaxing, yet exploratory experience for both the visiting chefs and the guests.

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Perfect

PAIRING

As the head of development at Chefs Club, Louise Vongerichten incorporates a community feeling into a unique, one-of-a-kind dining experience. by Johanna Silver Photography by Philippe Reynaud

L

ouise Vongerichten has clear expertise when it comes to the restaurant business. The daughter of world-renowned chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten has had food as a constant forefront in her family (her brother, Cedric, is also a chef). But her aptitude for succeeding in the restaurant business is apparent in her past endeavors as well as in her lineage. After college, she began working as a hostess at The Mercer Kitchen and worked her way up to general manager, demonstrating her savvy for the fast-paced, erratic operations side of restaurant life. After four years there, Vongerichten moved back overseas to France and began working for Starwood Hotels, which brought her to Dubai and Hong Kong. It was there that she connected with an investor who explained to her the concept of the prospective Chefs Club, where she would end up as the head of development. She was immediately enamored with the idea of the restaurant, which aimed to be a platform for talented chefs to showcase their creativity to a hungry audience. “We wanted to create an environment where guests can come eat and experience something different every time they come,” Vongerichten explains. The team opened the first Chefs Club in Aspen in 2012 to test the viability of a restaurant with rotating chef staff. A positive response prompted Vongerichten to move back to New York in 2014 and open a flagship location in NoLIta with president Stephane De Baets. Like in Aspen, the Chefs Club by Food & Wine includes a relaxed yet sophisticated dining area with a rotating menu curated by some of the best culinary minds. But there are some aspects to the flagship space that differ dynamically from its Colorado counterpart: the restaurant features a small studio with a full kitchen so that visiting chefs can host exclusive and intimate affairs. Absent the necessity to service the full dining room, they have more freedom when constructing their dishes. “In that room what is happening is very exclusive, very unique. When we close the door, it’s the 24 guests, the chef, a tasting menu and wine pairing happening. We wanted to create that unique and very intimate experience of them cooking in front of you,” Vongerichten says. “We wanted to create that feeling of being part of the dining room of the chef.”

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The studio/dining room combination makes for a relaxing, yet exploratory experience for both the visiting chefs and the guests. Chefs can look forward to an atmosphere that celebrates their background and talents, while guests can expect a nearly one-of-a-kind experience with each visit. There are many factors that come into play when selecting the rotating chefs for the space. Food & Wine notes many as being the best new chefs, hailing from all over the country. Others are chosen based on the many places Vongerichten, De Baets and culinary director Didier Elena have eaten while traveling. She attributes what she learned on her travels as a strong influence on the development of Chefs Club. “I wanted to live in the different countries to experience culture, to experience different food, to experience different languages, to experience different techniques of cuisine as well. So instead of still living there, I actually brought my experiences [and] my vision to New York,” she explains. “And when the chefs come here from different parts of the world, we really try to create his or her experience.” Though Chefs Club is in the business of showcasing world-class cuisine, it also aims to be a dining destination for NoLIta residents. Opening inside the Puck Building connected it to the well-known Lower Manhattan landmark. When the space first opened, Vongerichten emphasized the importance of inviting the community— even more so than industry icons—to try the unique dining experience,allowing the atmosphere to cultivate opulence without alienation.

“We wanted to create that unique and very intimate experience of them [visiting chefs] cooking in front of you.” — Louise Vongerichten “It’s not fine dining; it’s not casual…it’s in the middle. It’s a place where you can go with a date; it’s a place where you can go with friends or on just a Sunday night if you choose to relax. It’s very laid back as well. So I think people like the fact that they can use the space as a different entertainment location for them,” Vongerichten says. Vongerichten’s leadership has helped to create a brand that expertly incorporates different chefs and cuisines into one cumulative identity. She has also expertly fostered a dining experience that appeals to the inherently curious nature of the New York populace. “It’s perfect because people like to spend time outside…they like to spend time in restaurants… they like to try new things,” she says. Upon the success of the New York location, Vongerichten and company are looking to extend the brand to other locations in the near future. Whatever the future holds, it is clear that Vongerichten, who has succeeded in her many ventures all before the age of 30, is only just beginning to impact the culinary world.

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PRODUCTION, MEET CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHER: ANTOINE VERGLAS MODEL: SPENCER [ONE.1] MAKEUP: DONNA F [CHANEL] HAIR: DAVID COTTEBLANCHE [RED MARKET] STYLIST: BRANDY [NEXT]

SPLASH LI GHT.COM


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THE DOGPOUND FINDS ITS NEW HOME by Jackie Hart Photography by Nigel Barker Gym design by Fabien Baron

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fter bringing its intense, machine gun workouts to Gotham Gym and David Barton Gym in the West Village, The DOGPOUND now beckons you to take those 5:45 a.m. wake-up calls at its new home at 1 Renwick St. (corner of Canal). “This whole thing has happened organically,” says founder and CEO, Kirk Myers. “And how it happened… we’ve had people tell us that we’re living the American dream.” Myers, along with co-founder Brey Pena and Dawin Pena, is bringing The DOGPOUND to the next level in an already successful, almost cult-like training program. While boasting high-profile clientele like award-winning film director Steve McQueen, actress Alison Brie, photographer Nigel Barker and NYSE president Thomas Farley, The DOGPOUND looks to continue to expand its footprint. The new space is 3,800 square feet, and the interior was designed by a client, Fabien Baron, and his team. In collaboration with Baron, architects Michael Kirchmann of GDSNY and Andrew Reyniak of ARAPC also worked on bringing the new space to life. According to Myers and Brey Pena, picking the right space was crucial, because most of their clients reside in the West Village and TriBeCa. In total, they looked at more than 20 possibilities, but Pena says they had “a gut feeling” about the Canal Street location. The site will boast state-of-the-art training equipment and a boxing ring they’ve dubbed “The Pit.” The new facility is now open to the public. “My background…I was very heavyset as a young adult, and I realized I had to change my lifestyle. By changing my habits, I was able to lose a bunch of weight and turn my life around,” Myers says. “I realized that my passion was fitness, and that I loved helping people; part of the reason I got into training was to give other people confidence and create positivity. It’s all about connecting your mind and body [when it comes to fitness.]” For the new gym’s design, Myers says they really wanted their personality to shine through, showcasing their “rough around the edges style, while having the space look sleek and raw.” “Fabien [Baron], who also designed our logo, brought together The Dogpound’s vision for the gym space. He had been training with us, knew us well and was able to combine everything we wanted perfectly,” Pena adds.

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Though Myers and Pena have been personal trainers for a number of years, and have worked with their team to build The DOGPOUND to where it is today, they both say that the gym opening is like “we’re still in pre-season.” “This whole experience has been completely out of my comfort zone, but when I moved to New York [from Kansas City], I took a leap of faith. [Brey] and his brothers took a leap of faith, when they decided to join me on this journey,” Myers says. “So what I’ve learned is that I have an entire team that has my back…every single one of them. And we all have the same goal in mind, and we all love what we do. We’re all in it to win it.”

“It doesn’t matter how big or small; every person has been a crucial part in the growth of the business,” Pena explains. “When it comes to the core of it, we’re just trainers learning how to grow a company from the ground up. But we learned that there were a lot of talents we didn’t know we had that have emerged through this whole process.” Even when The DOGPOUND was prepping for the big stage, with the gym opening being the first step, the team was looking ahead to the future. When asked about future plans after the gym opened, Pena said, “World domination.” “When I say domination, we want to bring the product that we have, which, in my opinion,


Gym Design: Fabien Baron, Baron & Baron, Inc.; Michael Kirchmann, Global Design Strategies (GDSNY); Architect of Record: Andrew Reyniak (ARAPC)

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is one of the best products out there all the way globally,” Pena adds. “As far as one gym goes, you can only reach so many people. So we want to scale it, and organically expand it with the same recipe, just cooking in a different restaurant, and then everyone can have a piece of it.” Though they do have plans to expand, Myers says their main focus now is just making the gym successful. However, The DOGPOUND is heavily involved in charitable work that they plan to incorporate into the new space. Their own organization, Unleashed, focuses on working with special needs kids to help them build confidence in both fitness and life. “Our goal with the youth program is to help

“The DOGPOUND is more than just a gym: it’s a lifestyle.” kids believe in themselves and become strong, both physically and mentally,” Myers explains. “If they feel better about who they are and what they can accomplish, it helps them in all aspects of their life. It worked with me, and I know it works with the kids, too.”

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Additionally, The DOGPOUND does work with the Global Poverty Project, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Kids for Kids, and many more. Through their work with the community and developing lifelong relationships with their clients, The DOGPOUND has become much more than just your ordinary gym. “It’s a team; we’re a family [at The DOGPOUND]” Pena says. “You can go to any gym and lift free weights, have music and sweat. But just the way we go about it and implement it…that’s why I feel like we have a special product, it’s not just go to the gym, workout and leave. We’ve formed a community.” And there is no denying that The DOGPOUND is more than just a gym: it’s a lifestyle.

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S Y M M E T R Y

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MIND, BODY & SPIRIT The Chin Twins are ideal yoginis.

by Yasmine Rimawi Photography by Nigel Barker


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Y R T E M M Y S

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t’s no coincidence that many of the qualities that Kimberly Hise and Cristen Barker encapsulate as twin sisters translate seamlessly into the qualities innate to yoga practitioners: a unification with another soul, symmetry of the external body and the internal mind, an intense spiritual connection and a love that radiates pure light. Yoga practice beckons interconnectedness with life, much like twin sisters—equal parts, but when combined, an even greater whole.

BEING YOGINIS IS AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING LIFESTYLE. “Yoga is a connection of mind, body and spirit, but as we go through our daily lives, we become very disconnected. You lose the ability to hear your inner voice, your intuition, and you’re not in the flow. If you just take an hour a day on your mat, you can reconnect with your inner self,” Hise says. Besides the spiritual connection, yoga practice enriches the physical self as well. “Physically you’re opening up all of these energy channels,” Hise says, while Barker echoes similar sentiments stating, “Certain twists and positions can help detoxify yourself. Obviously, you’ll build muscles and have a nice six-pack for summer, but internally you’re actually helping your digestive system.” MILES APART, BUT REUNITED ONE UPLOAD AT A TIME. Though they live more than 1,050 miles apart, distance is no adversary to the Chin Twins’ bond. Barker resides in urban, fast-paced New York, while Hise calls rural Alabama home. She lives in the twins’ hometown. Though geographically separated, the sisters have taken up virtual residency on their joint Instagram platform (@ChinTwins), where they’ve been publicly sharing their art for the past year and a half, amassing more than 39,000 awe-inspired followers. Despite the miles between them, both Hise and Barker use the social media site to mirror poses of one another. Distinguishing their posts with #Kimmy and #Crissy hashtags, they create synchronous reflections to showcase they aren’t affected by physical distance. Beyond being self-therapeutic, sharing their photos publicly has been rewarding. They find joy in being able to connect with another human, regardless of anonymity. “Some days it’s very lighthearted, and then other days it’s very introspective. But I think…we can somehow relate an image to our words, offer a bit of enlightenment just to give that person a digital hug throughout the day,” Barker says. Which is exactly what they’ve done: their captivating photos are paired with inspirational idioms, offering their followers a visual and verbal reassurance. When they aren’t filling our Instafeed with anjaneyasana and powerful standing poses, the twins practice yoga by other means. While Cristen has her husband, fashion photographer Nigel Barker, to capture her daily poses, she also attends a slew of classes on offer in the city.

“There’s something very strong about being in a room full of people doing [yoga]. To be in a room filled with 20 other people doing the same pose and breathing in unison…it’s very empowering,” says Barker, describing the class atmosphere. Travel southward and you’ll find Hise living a holistic yogi lifestyle, instructing yoga at Kula Community Yoga and teaching preschoolers’ ballet at Mobile Ballet. The older twin by three minutes says that she practices at home while teaching workshops on the weekend and classes during the week. When they find the time, the twins set aside time to practice yoga together. Planning photo shoots for Instagram purposes, the twins work with Nigel Barker as a trio: Nigel directs from behind the lens, while Kimmy and Crissy choose the locale and clothing and plan every last detail. While Hise expresses her love of backbends as an exposure of the heart and release tender emotions, Barker says of them, “I find that there’s a certain sense of flight that you feel and a sense of freedom where you’re almost suspended in air. It’s a bit of rush.” Hise interjected mid-thought with an overwhelming amount of admiration for Barker’s response. Throughout our conversation, there was no shortage of support between the two. As sisters, they’ve mirrored one another throughout epochal phases, from ballet classes in their youth to rocking a “Boy George” sartorial aesthetic in high school, then later pursuing modeling careers in their early 20s. Long before yoga, birth initiated their bond; the practice simply solidifies it. “We kind of compliment each other, like when I’m holding back, Crissy will step in and just take over; it’s like a yin and a yang relationship,” Hise says. “We’re always morphing,” Barker adds, with Hise echoing the sentiment. Each stage of their lives has contributed to their contemporary yoga forms. While dance transitioned into modeling, and modeling begat yoga, the sisters have perfected the art of movement. They’ve achieved self-awareness readily evident in each Instagram upload. With an eye for intricate detail, the twins have mastered the point of toe, the arch of back and the precise tilt of head, which not only strengthens their performance, but also makes for some ethereal photography.

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SPARKLING BUBBLES in the HILLS of VENETO Explore the beautiful landscape of the famous home of Italian prosecco this spring. by Julie Ring-Hansen Holt Photographs courtesy of Julie Ring-Hansen Holt, Duca di Dolle, Conegliano Valdobbiadene Consortium

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n the undulating hills between the cities of Valdobbiadene and Conegliano in Northern Italy, vineyard after vineyard link up to create a patchwork quilt in shades of green that most of all resemble colorful waves rolling down the slopes towards picturesque villages and farms in the valleys or on the hillsides. Farmers in this particular corner of the planet almost exclusively grow the glera grape. And with good reason. We are in Italy’s DOCG (the highest classification for Italian wines) area of the delectable prosecco sparkling wine. In the middle of May each year, the area of Conegliano Valdobbiadene celebrates itself with a festival, Vino in Villa, at the beautiful Castillo di San Salvatore castle, where visitors can sample prosecco from many of the region’s

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more than 180 producers. Vineyards surround the castle, creating a stunning backdrop for the tasting of the local produce under big, white parasols spread out below the castle walls during the festival. Apart from prosecco, local specialties like cured ham, dried cheese, mozzarella and honey are on offer. For 250 years, the prosecco sparkling wine grape has been grown here, but it wasn’t until the ‘70s that local farmers became full-time winemakers in their own right. Up until then, they had solely grown the grapes and sold them either to winemakers outside the area or to locals who made their own still or sparkling wine. Today there are 183 prosecco winemakers in the DOCG area. All the grapes are handpicked, and every year the winemakers produce 75 million bottles of prosecco, which are sold to 80 countries. The winemakers’ vineyards and fields are spread throughout the landscape along the wine route, Strada del Prosecco. A handful of them offer farm stays, letting you take in the full beautiful, rural charm and warm, food-passionate people that define the Italian countryside.

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At vineyards offering “agriturismo,” you will stay with the family behind a prosecco brand, and enjoy long, warm afternoons on boulder-paved terraces, snacking on homemade local delights and enjoying a glass of the prosecco made right there on the premises.

VINO IN VILLA The festival is held the third weekend of May. The entrance fee is €20 (around $22), and it will supply you with a glass you can use to try out up to 60 different proseccos. The beautiful view is free of charge. www.prosecco.it


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WHERE TO STAY Stay with one of the local winemakers who offer “agriturismo,”—bed and breakfast. We can recommend the following: Duca di Dolle: Live in modern rural comfort with swimming pool and breakfast in green surroundings. The house dates back to the 16th century, but the 13-room bed and breakfast underwent an award-winning renovation in 2011. www.ducadidolle.it Borgoluce: Situated on the grounds of Castel di San Salvatore, which houses the Vino in Villa festival, Borgoluce offers its own charcuterie, buffalo meat, mozzarella, honey, extra virgin olive oil and walnuts, which can be enjoyed in their farm shop. www.borgoluce.it Le Colture: A charming family-driven place, which offers bike and horse rentals for exploring the area. It’s also possible to taste some of the winemakers’ own vintage. www.lecolture.it

One particular treat in Conegliano Valdobbiadene is standing on Ristorante Salis’ beautiful terrace overlooking the surrounding area. From here, it’s plain to see that this is an area of small-scale wine production. The restaurant lies in the middle of the most coveted area of fields, called Cartizze. These 107 acres of land with steep slopes of porous, sandy earth are known to produce the region’s most exquisite grapes. The nearby Dolomite mountain range ensures that Conegliano Valdobbiadene doesn’t get too hot in the summer or too cold during the winter, and the salty breeze from the Adriatic Sea adds to the grapes’ character. Prosecco’s flavor is immediately recognizable in every sip, as is the special tongue-tickling sensation of this very refreshing drink. The region is only an hour by train or car from the always-romantic Venice and offers the perfect chance to combine rural experiences with a city vacation. So if the three days of Vino in Villa were not enough, you can prolong your stay in Italy by visiting the world famous art biennale in Venice—held next in 2017—or simply walk around the historic capital of the Veneto region that is built on stilts. The Grand Canal snakes through the city made up of 118 small islands crisscrossed by innumerable narrow, mazelike alleys and small squares. The best way to explore the narrow canals, which are lit up by small lights hanging on the stonewalls of sand-colored houses, is by gondola. Find your ride by the water outside the main square of Piazza San Marco. When the buzz in beautiful but touristy and crowded Venice gets too much, take the $7 train ride back to rural surroundings in Conegliano Valdobbiadene to enjoy the rest of your spring vacation in Europe.

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by Rachel Veroff Photography by Raquel Salazar

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With the way the world continually shifts as we welcome each emerging decade, there are still few professions that persist regardless of contemporary demands. These professions are centurial pillars that have transcended time. An authentic cobbler on Wall Street has remained true to his perennial occupation. 80

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ake a stroll to the heart of the Financial District at 63 Wall St., where Minas Polychronakis’ shoe repair shop offers a one-of-a-kind service for a one-of-akind clientele. After more than 40 years in Lower Manhattan, Minas’ shop has stuck it out through all the ups and downs of the financial sector, as well as 9/11. Between 1976 and 2001, his main location was in the World Trade Center, and in 2003 he reopened for business on Wall Street. A true vestige of the neighborhood, business is brisk for this cobbler. Minas has many regular customers who come in for conversation, and they miss him when he’s not there. The place has a community feeling. Wall Street guys skim the newspaper headlines and talk shop while getting their shoes shined, and beautiful models pop in to get their Pradas and Jimmy Choos resoled. Minas sits behind the counter, inspecting the workmanship of his employees, doling out advice on shoe care, collecting money and measuring sizes. “I haven’t seen you in a while!” Minas greets a customer who walks into the shop to drop off a pair of black leather shoes.

“I moved to Chicago,” the customer shrugs apologetically. “But people don’t know how to fix shoes in Chicago!” From all over the country, discerning folks send Minas their shoes. He was trained in the craft of shoemaking in the traditional, artisan’s style of shoemaking while growing up on the Greek island of Crete. He moved to the United States 46 years ago, in 1969, and he is probably one of the last true cobblers still working in New York. “Crete is a beautiful island,” he says. “Everything is amazing over there—the food, the people, the climate.” Minas’ daughter, Asimenia Polychronakis, works with him in the shop, and she is also a trained shoe craftsman. “She can mix any color of dye,” Minas explains. “She can make the bags, the shoes.” Asimenia is in line to take over the business when her father retires. Minas orders his materials, like leathers and dyes, from various masters across Europe, in Spain, France, England and all over. “Look at this leather. It’s made in Greece. My nephew did this,” he explains, opening a booklet of extraordinarily soft and varied leather samples. “That’s the new fashion edition,” he winks, pointing to a particularly lavish

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sample with gold leafing. While Minas runs a lucrative business in one of the most elite sectors of Manhattan, he comes from humble origins. He trained for 10 years without pay before he was able to open his own shoe store. “Custom-made shoes take a while. It’s not that easy. Everything has to be a specific form. I take the measurements. I make everything by hand,” Minas explains. “This is art.” He laments that the cultural value of his work is disappearing in the United States. “The craftsman is disappearing,” he shrugs. “Maybe the oldtimers still know how to do this. But in the new generation, everything is factory made.” Thankfully, at least for now, the community that surrounds Minas’ shoe repair values his work greatly. “I have the best customers,” says Minas. “They know what they want. If you know what you want, you can have it.” While the perils of the contemporary loom, they can’t hold a candle to the authenticity provided by Minas’ cobbler shop. The profession will remain deep-seated in the heart of this city.

&sole “Custom-made shoes take a while. It’s not that easy. I take the measurements. I make everything by hand. This is art.” — Minas Polychronakis

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The Rise of A

TITAN Lower Manhattan in the early 1900s. by Samuel A. Southworth

Photos courtesy of the Museum of American Finance, NYC Wall Street photo by Martin Danjue

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ation-wide arguments, terrorist bombings, overseas military action, a sense of entitlement with large corporations and rich folks, and disagreements about the nature of the American Dream might be a typical news roundup for today’s news. But such a list of headlines could also apply to the beginning of the 20th Century, when the United States of America turned a corner and ascended to being a world power, and Lower Manhattan began to glow like a diamond, or the crystal on one of Mr. Edison’s new phonographs. Two major factors go into making the Lower Manhattan we see today, one being the relentless northern march of building in Manhattan, and the other being the fruits of the Gilded Age in the 1890s, when fortunes were accumulated by legendary businessmen whose names we remember to this day. Mr. J. P. Morgan and Mr. John D. Rockefeller had put together companies that stretched not just across our own country, but were beginning to encircle the very globe itself, serving notice that “the business of America is business.” This was popular with the boys at the Stock Exchange, if less so with many of their workers and those who were crushed by business, such as the father of Ida Tarbell, the woman who wrote such a ferocious attack upon Mr. Rockefeller that she was largely responsible for igniting the wave of anti-trust laws passed in those years. The young and impetuous Theodore Roosevelt had sent the “Great White Fleet” around the world, and the U.S. had fought in Cuba and the Philippines during the Spanish-American War. The war cemented Roosevelt’s reputation as a “Rough Rider”—which he was indeed, while also being the first president to have been born on the island of Manhattan, and whose family was entwined with New York City as well as New York State. Now that Roosevelt was president, he was moved to become a “traitor to his class,” and help pass a series of financial reforms that would prevent the formation of immense business trusts that crushed everything around them. Portrait of J.P. Morgan

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Background image: New York Curb Exchange 1915-1920

There was still no agreement on how much interest to charge, and when that interest slipped into usury, but at least there was a nationwide feeling that big business could not be trusted, and that the “gilded” celebrities of New York and Newport were perhaps not the ideal role models for the youth of America. Sound familiar? The Down Town Association (a legendary private social club that still does business at 60 Pine St.) had been open for almost 50 years by the early 1900s, and suddenly Manhattan was transforming itself into a city the likes of which had never been imagined in London, Rome, Paris or Berlin. The Flatiron Building had taken root up at 23rd Street, following the example of the Chicago skyscrapers, and an amazing subway system was opened after much construction in 1904. It was now possible to move millions of people in and out of the Financial District every day, allowing them to get on and off of the island of Manhattan in a very short time. It freed up the dense and overcrowded streets with their reckless pedestrians, horse-drawn carriages, relentless streetcars and that deadly new toy, the automobile. The subway was the result of a man named Augustus Belmont, one of the great visionary financiers of his day. There were also men like Bernard Baruch who were giving the old Dutch

stock market, as well as immigrants like Andrew Carnegie from Scotland, who had sold U.S. Steel to Mr. Morgan for a tidy $400 million—and then proceeded to build hundreds of free libraries and establish the first pension fund for teachers in the United States, among other educational works. Indeed, along with men like Mr. Baruch and Mr. Otto Kahn, it came to seem that the immigrants had a somewhat higher ideal about the use of their millions that went far beyond the yachts they raced and their fantastic palaces that seemed to march right up Fifth Avenue. For the first time during the early 1900s, more than a third of Americans were from another country. Arguments about the numbers arriving from Ireland and then Eastern Europe sounded many of the same echoes that we hear in discussion of immigrants today. Would they assimilate? Could they be “real” Americans? Would their native culture and religion make them disloyal or somehow displace the Americans they joined after passing through Ellis Island? The answers were Yes, yes, no and maybe, respectively. In time, the immigrants would be seen as a shot in the arm that raised our country into a true democracy of pluralities, a “melting pot” that produced steel as hard as any using the Bessemer Process that Mr. Carnegie had spearheaded at U.S. Steel.

The wing-nut terrorists of their time were called Anarchists, and although today they may seem quaint, their bombings were deeply unsettling to the Lower Manhattanites who lived through them. They attacked Mr. Morgan’s headquarters at 23 Wall St. with a wagon of explosives that left marks you can still see today, perhaps earning Morgan the only sympathy of his later career. But interestingly, Morgan had almost single-handedly fixed the Panic of 1907 when he supposedly locked the top men in his office and announced that no one was leaving until the financial panic was beaten back by their efforts and money—that very evening.

Remnants from the Sept. 16, 1920 explosion that killed 38 people can still be seen at 23 Wall St.

Tellingly, the scene of that summit was at Morgan’s mansion up on 36th Street and Madison Avenue, as he had moved up town along with the Vanderbilts and all the other well-to-do families. But when they wanted to do business, they all headed downtown to the tip of the island where the goods of the world continued to flow into the warehouses around South Street, and where the spirit of the Financial District was invented. Today, we have seen Lower Manhattan double its population in the 14 years since 9/11, and that same spirit of business is still afloat among the old streets, as well as new generations of people with concerns for the rest of the world. For the discerning eye and the remembering brain we are never without context, and as new towers arise to take the place of the old, we can echo the enthusiasm of the early 1900s, when Manhattan lead the country in charging into a new century filled with peril, profit and potential.

and English families a run for their money in the New York Curb Exchange, 1915

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UNEXPECTED RESIDENTS IN A FIDI OFFICE BUILDING by Katie Garry Photo courtesy of the management at 55 Water St.

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ut of Lower Manhattan’s many perks and distinctions, its unfrequented locations are often the most remarkable. In the case of 55 Water St., a 54-story office building in the Financial District, its 14th floor is home to one of the neighborhood’s best kept secrets. A family of peregrine falcons resides in a nesting box appended to a setback on the building’s 14th floor. The falcons have inhabited the setback since 1999, when the first pair of birds, nicknamed Jack and Diane, moved in. Jack and Diane were named by building management, who kept a close watch over the birds. Shortly after they landed on the setback, they arranged for staff to build a nesting box, hoping to make their residency at 55 Water St. permanent. Over the course of their relationship, Jack and Diane birthed 19 chicks. Habitually, peregrine falcons mate for life, but in 2001, Diane was diagnosed with an arthritic wing and was moved to Cornell University for treatment. Since, Jack has found a new mate, subsequently dubbed Jill.

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Today, both falcons live on the 14th floor setback and follow normal migration patterns. They leave before winter and return in the spring to lay eggs in the nesting box. While they’re away, staff at 55 Water St. prepare for their return. “Each year, the site is cleaned in preparation for the falcons to return. Each year, the falcons have a new batch of chicks that leave the nest each year,” said Bruce Hodges, Director of Tenant Relations Management and Leasing. Over the past two years, eight chicks have left the nesting box to migrate with their parents. Though the falcons nest at 55 Water St., the building doesn’t supply the chicks or parents with food. “The falcons hunt for smaller birds to feed their young. We do not feed or interact with them,” Hodges said. The building’s commitment to housing the birds, while simultaneously urging them to hunt and migrate, as they would if they were living entirely in the wild, is one of this story’s most unique attributes. In fact, the only time building management interfere with the falcons’ routines is when they band new chicks.

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“Each year, the Department of Environmental Protection places identification bands on the new chicks’ legs. This is the only time people are allowed to see the chicks in person. We take them from the nest and band inside the building, allowing guests to watch,” Hodges said. Banding is the process of placing a metal identification tag on an animal’s leg. According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conversation’s website, the procedure is helpful in identifying peregrine falcons later on, particularly if they are injured. During the banding process, the birds also receive health examinations. Although the banding procedure is the only opportunity for New Yorkers to visit the falcons in person, the building has installed a “falcon camera” that live-streams their nesting box. Barbara Cohen, an Engineering Administrative Assistant at 55 Water St., has also created a blog to accompany the falcon camera. Cohen posts detailed information about Jack, Jill and their offspring. Both the falcon camera and blog can be accessed on 55 Water St.’s website at 55water.com/falcons/ .


Chef Raffaele Ronca—2016 Chopped Champions winner on Food Network


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Recipes and photography by Allison Hudson Stockamore From the Athlete’s Kitchen fromtheathleteskitchen.com Introduction by Jackie Hart

Spring Smoothie with Avocado, Beet & Blood Orange (recipe next page)

K

eeping your body in shape by exercising and eating well can be a challenge throughout the seasons, however, with the right discipline and guidance, staying healthy can become routine. Nutritionists and healthcare professionals from NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital recommend maintaining a healthy lifestyle by balancing your diet and exercising frequently. This spring, pick up some of the freshest produce and seasonal products from Whole Foods Market, and try these recipes that are both tasty and good for you!


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SPRING SMOOTHIE WITH AVOCADO, BEET & BLOOD ORANGE (Shown on the previous page)

It’s citrus season, which means that right now we get to enjoy the best tasting oranges, grapefruits, limes and lemons of the year. Not only that, but also the best variety. Enter Blood Oranges, which almost taste like a raspberry crossed with an orange. They can look a little striking when sliced! In this recipe, their sweetness balances the earthy raw-beet flavor. Avocado creates creaminess and serious satiating power with its healthy monounsaturated fat. Lastly, honey and a little vanilla tie the trio together. Servings: 2 Time: 10 minutes Hands-on time: 10 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 medium ripe avocado Small- to medium-sized beet, washed and trimmed 3 medium blood oranges 1 tbsp honey 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 cup water

STEPS

1. Peel the avocado and scoop out the flesh straight into the blender. 2. Peel the oranges, removing the pith to the greatest extent possible. (I sliced the pith completely off two of the three, plus spend a little more time removing the extra from the third one.) Add to the blender. 3. Chop the beet into smallish pieces, add to blender. 4. Add the cup of water to the blender. 5. Blend on a low speed, then higher, until a smooth consistency is achieved

PASTA WITH TUNA, CAPERS, FENNEL & LEMON This weeknight home run provides lean protein via tuna, which is mild enough to allow the fresh fennel and lemon flavors to really shine. These seasonal flavors go exceptionally well together, while capers bring tempered brininess into the fold. Aside from the flavor and lean protein, the beauty of this dish is that it’s ready in twenty minutes and transports you to the Adriatic Coast, even from lower Manhattan! Servings: 3 Time: 20 minutes Hands-on time: 18–20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

1 6 oz can good quality tuna in olive oil 1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced 1 large garlic clove, smashed and minced ¼ tsp red pepper flakes 1 15 oz can low-sodium tomatoes 2 tbsp white wine or vermouth zest from one lemon juice from ½ lemon ½ tbsp capers ¼ cup toasted breadcrumbs and coarsely chopped fennel fronds, for finishing up to ¼ cup Parmesan cheese, for finishing ½ box (8 oz) of spaghetti or linguine

STEPS

1. Assemble all measured and prepared ingredients and tools within arms reach of the stovetop. 2. Set pasta water to boil in large pot. 3. Drain about 1 tbsp oil from the tuna into the frying pan, over medium heat. 4. Add the thinly sliced fennel and sauté until golden, about five minutes. 5. Add the garlic and continue to sauté, three to five minutes more 6. Add the red pepper flakes and stir until fragrant, about one minute

7. Add the tomatoes, juice and sauce included, plus the fish, leaving the fish in large chunks. (The chunks will reduce down as you stir normally and continue through the steps—breaking them down at this phase will create a mushy sauce.) Cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced. 8. Add the wine, again stirring occasionally until liquid is reduced. 9. Add the capers, lemon zest and juice, stir once more to incorporate and cover to keep warm. 10. Drop pasta into boiling water and cook per the package instructions. 11. Add ⅔ of the sauce to the cooked & drained pasta, and toss with almost all the breadcrumbs and fennel fronds. 12. Place the mixed pasta and sauce in a serving bowl, and top with remaining sauce, crumbs, fronds and cheese. All of the recipes shown here are considered NYPBeHealthy dishes as they meet the following NewYork-Presbyterian BeHealthy Nutritional Criteria for an entree: Calories—less than or equal to 500 calories per serving; Sodium—480mg or less per serving; Total fat—less than or equal to 35% calories; Saturated fat— less than or equal to 7% total calories; Fiber—2g or more per serving. Consume a dietary pattern that emphasizes intake of a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, includes low fat dairy products, poultry without skin, fish, legumes, non-tropical vegetable oils, nuts, and limits intake of red meats, egg yolks to four per week, salt (sodium) and sugar from foods and beverages. Adapt this pattern to appropriate caloric requirements for weight management.

RECIPES


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—Using kitchen shears, snip the tops of the leaves off to remove the sharp ends, cutting off the top quarter of each leaf. —Pull out the center leaves by the handful. They will get smaller as you go. —Use the ice-cream scooper to remove the fibers remaining below the leaves.

5. Place the cored artichoke in the lemon-water and swish around to coat. 6. Peel and then finely dice the reserved artichoke stems, add to mixing bowl. 7. Add in the chopped parsley, mint, garlic and breadcrumbs. Grate in Parmesan cheese to taste. 8. Slowly drizzle in olive oil and toss to throughly incorporate. Continue until mixture holds together loosely, but no more. 9. Remove and stuff artichokes by evenly distributing the stuffing mixture. 10. Add the wine to the lemon-water and return the stuffed artichokes to the pot. 11. Bring liquid to a fast boil, then cover and simmer for 15–30 minutes. Outer leaves will remove with little resistance when ready. 12. Let cool 5–10 minutes, then enjoy! Scoop stuffing with leaves, removing the bottom portion of each leaf by biting down/scraping with your teeth. 13. Once all the leaves are removed, remember that the base (heart) of the artichoke is the best part. Eat with a knife and fork, or just pick up and take a bite!

AROMATICS-STUFFED ARTICHOKES

Artichokes are delicious, plus are a top source of anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals, folate and dietary fiber. And, they are easy to prepare and fun to eat! Servings: 4 (1 artichoke per serving) Time: 1 hour Hands-on time: 15–20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 large artichokes, with stems 3–4 Meyer lemons 2 cups breadcrumbs 6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced 1 cup each of parsley and mint, chopped 3 tbsp Parmesan cheese up to 2 tbsp olive oil 2 cups white wine, preferably Chardonnay

STEPS

1. Zest two of the lemons, place zest in mixing bowl. 2. Juice all of the lemons into a heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven. 3. Add ¼ cup of water to the lemon juice. 4. Next, prep the artichokes. —Cut off the stems so that the artichoke can sit upright when placed on counter. Set stems aside.

SPRING CARROT CAKE This wholesome quick bread is a family favorite. The loaf can be sliced and toasted for breakfast or brunch and can also be serve as a dessert. Servings: 24 (2 loaves, 12 slices per loaf)

INGREDIENTS

2½ cups flour ½ cup ground flax seed 1 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons cinnamon ¾ cup liquid egg substitute ½ cup canola oil 2 cups grated carrots 1½ cups crushed pineapple in juice 1½ teaspoons vanilla extract Non-stick cooking spray

STEPS

1. Pre-heat oven to 350° F. 2. Start with all ingredients at room temperature. Sift all dry ingredients together. Add liquid and grated carrots and mix until well incorporated. 3. Pour mixture into 2 loaf pans sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Bake in oven for 60 minutes. 4. Let loaves cool in pans for 10 minutes before removing. Enjoy!


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COME TASTE THESE FOUR SEASONAL RECIPES AT OUR COMPLIMENTARY WELLNESS EVENT

Join Downtown Magazine, NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital and Whole Foods Market

Monday, April 11th • 3–5pm Whole Foods Market TriBeCa

270 Greenwich St. at Warren St., New York, NY

|

212.349.6555

Meet your local hospital to learn about the benefits of a healthy lifestyle Complimentary Health Screening Delicious and nutritional recipes Kids Zone with fun, arts and crafts Downtown Magazine raffle for: – A Day of Beauty – Full-year Subscription to Downtown Magazine

Let’s start spring armed with important wellness information and nutritional foods.

Rob Guimento Senior Vice President/ Chief Operating Officer NewYork-Presbyterian/ Lower Manhattan Hospital NewYork-Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital is the only acute care hospital serving lower Manhattan, and is vital to meeting the health care needs of the approximately one million residents, workers and tourists in our area. We take pride in being an active member of the lower Manhattan community, and offer a number of health and wellness programs throughout the year, including this exciting event with Downtown Magazine and Whole Foods. We hope you enjoy these amazing, seasonal and healthy recipes, and look forward to meeting you at Whole Foods on April 11th!


018 Downtown Magazine NYC Spring 2016 Gabby Karan De Felice + Donna Karan  

Restaurateur and daughter Gabby Karan De Felice and fashion icon Donna Karan

018 Downtown Magazine NYC Spring 2016 Gabby Karan De Felice + Donna Karan  

Restaurateur and daughter Gabby Karan De Felice and fashion icon Donna Karan

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