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Serving Tribeca, Battery Park City, the Seaport and the Financial District VOLUME 30, NUMBER 11

JUNE 15 – JUNE 28, 2017

s ’ y b s s t e a i G p u o gr Jazz Age party takes Governors Island back to the Roaring ‘20! Page 6 Photo by Tony Falcone

Really retro, or fashion forward? A few fun-loving, futuristic flappers make the scene at the Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island over the weekend.

SHOP.EAT. DRINK. PLAY.

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1 M E T R O T E C H • N YC 112 0 1 • C O P Y R I G H T © 2 0 17 N YC C O M M U N I T Y M E D I A , L L C


Museum of Jewish Heritage celebrating 20 years in BPC BY JACKSON CHEN He’s only been at the helm of the Museum of Jewish Heritage for nine months, but Michael Glickman is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Battery Park City institution. Since his start as museum president last September, Glickman, 39, has been pushing the museum at 36 Battery Place to expand its reach into the community. At the same time, he has had to focus on prepping the museum infrastructure and staff for the 20th anniversary. Glickman came prepared with 13 years spent at the Center of Jewish History — the last 10 of which he spent leading the organization. Following his time at the center, he moved on to a vice president role at Long Island University for two years. Once the board of MJH offered him the opportunity to head the museum, Glickman said he was eager to jump back into leading a cultural institution with such a strong and historically vital mission. “This is, in my opinion, one of the most important cultural institutions in the city,” Glickman said. “And I would say certainly one of the most significant and most meaningful in the Jewish community anywhere in this country.” Developer Bruce Ratner, the museum’s chairman, said Glickman was the ideal candidate due to his experience, but also his fundamental understanding of the institution’s mission to educate

Photo by John Halpern

The Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, has been located in Battery Park City for 20 years, but Glickman’s priority is to make sure that it’s not simply a point on a map, but part of the fabric of the local community.

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

Photo by John Halpern

Michael Glickman joined the Museum of Jewish Heritage as its new president last September, and less than a year into his tenure, he is organizing dramatic, landmark exhibits to commemorate the institution’s 20th anniversary.

and memorialize. “Especially in this historical moment, where we have to redouble our efforts to answer ignorance with knowledge and education, Michael’s interest in broadening the museum’s reach and expanding opportunities for public engagement is increasingly important,” Ratner said in a statement. In a bid to engage locals and solidify the museum’s role in the neighborhood, Glickman is offering free museum memberships until June 2018 to Battery Park City residents. “Battery Park City is this amazing community, there’s just so many things that are happening down here,” Glickman said. “And I wasn’t satisfied with the role we were playing as an institution. I don’t think we were doing enough for our neighbors quite honestly.” The museum announced in May that it is offering free museum memberships to residents who live in the neighborhood’s 10280, 10281, and 10282 zip codes. After completing a quick applica-

tion and providing proof of residence, the new members will receive free general admission, access to member-only programming and events, discounts to the museum shop, café, and some programs, and two guest passes. “This is us making an investment in the community,” Glickman said of the free membership. “We’re not looking at it from a revenue perspective, but really being sure those who live around Battery Park City have the opportunity to take advantage of what we have to offer.” The museum president said he’s already seen dozens of residents claim their free membership, but will continue to monitor the numbers and see if it’s something the museum wants to extend beyond next year’s deadline. Beyond helming the communityengagement strategy and handling the museum’s day-to-day operations, Glickman is also focusing on the launch of the 20th-anniversary exhibits, beginning on July 16. The institution’s full name is the “Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust,” and Glickman holds that second role as just as important as the first. Glickman is particularly proud of the blockbuster exhibition “Operation Finale,” which will explore the capture and trial of Adolf Eichmann, one of the major figures responsible for the Holocaust — and one of the last highranking Nazis to be brought to justice. The exhibit delves into the riveting final chapters of Eichmann’s story, in which he is tracked down in Argentina by the Israeli Secret Service, extradited back to Tel Aviv, put on trial, and found guilty of crimes against humanity in 1961, Glickman explained. And providing a more personal side of the story, the museum will also feature “New Dimensions in Testimony,” an exhibit that allows visitors to have virtual conversations with Holocaust survivors. Possible through holographic imagery, voice recognition, and a digital library with more than 2,000 hours of survivor testimony, museumgoers can have nearly instantaneous back-and-forth conversations with those who lived through the Holocaust, Glickman said. “There’s something quite interesting about having these really powerful

Photo by John Halpern

In addition to innovative temporary exhibitions and programing, the MJH displays an extensive permanent collection of artifacts and documents connecting visitors to the dark years of the Showa, to assure we never forget.

survivors on one side of the building having a conversation, and on the other side watching Eichmann get captured and tried,” Glickman said. The museum also plans to introduce a publically accessible destination for survivor testimony where visitors will be able to walk through a library that contains tens of thousands of testimonies from around the world. “I want to make sure that this museum continues to offer our neighbors a point of destination,” Glickman said. “It’s about community, it’s about education, it’s about just being that resource.”

Image via the Museum of Jewish Heritage

The upcoming exhibition “Operation Finale” explores the gripping capture and trial of Adolf Eichmann, one of the major figures responsible for the Holocaust — and one of the last highranking Nazis ever to be brought to justice.

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

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June 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 28, 2017

City agrees to establish official policy on when to tell schools about nearby gunfire BY COLIN MIXSON The city has finally established written protocols specifying how and when schools should be notified of emergencies in response to public outrage after a shooting that occurred near numerous Downtown schools that police never warned. The new rules will help parents make better decisions in the event of a crisis, and give local lawmakers an idea of whether the city is doing enough to keep kids safe, according to a spokesman for Councilwoman Margaret Chin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to get that procedure in writing so parents know the best course of action,â&#x20AC;? said Paul Leonard. The new rules on school emergency notification were codified at a June 1 meeting of representatives from the NYPD, Department of Education, Office of Emergency Management, and Community Board 1, along with Councilwoman Margaret Chin and Assemblywoman You-Line Niou. The agencies came together following revelations that school security officers at PS 276 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; located two blocks away from the April 24 shooting on Washington Street â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were unaware of the nearby gunplay until a parent told them about it the following day. The shooting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which left two people injured, including a bystander â&#x20AC;&#x201D; occurred shortly after 3 pm, just when the bell rang at PS 276 to send kids home for the day. Because the police never notified the school, the students were sent on their way, despite the fact that the gunman was still on the loose in nearby streets. Chin expressed grave concern that keeping the school in the dark could have lead to kids crossing paths with the gunman, Leonard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Timing was incredibly crucial here, because it was just as schools were being let out,â&#x20AC;? Leonard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why we need to see this stuff in writing, so we know if things like time of day are considered when it comes to informing schools of an event like this.â&#x20AC;? At the time, there was no standard protocol for when or whether to notify schools of nearby gunplay â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and even seemed to be confusion about who was responsible for making that decision. Shortly after the shooting, a spokesman for the police department told this

After the Apirl shooting near several Downtown schools, Councilwoman Margaret Chin lead early calls for the city to establish a clear protocol for swiftly informing schools about nearby gunplay.

paper that the decision to notify schools was handled on a case-by-case basis, with the highest ranking officer at the scene of the crime making the call. At the June 1 meeting, however, the second in command of the NYPDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School Safety Division, Deputy Chief Charles Rubin, said the decision ultimately falls to his unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commanding officer, Assistant Chief Brian Conroy, according to Paul Hovitz, Community Board 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice chairman and representative at the meeting. Rubin went on to explain that the department did notify a Universal Pre-K located on Washington Street directly adjacent to the shooting, but that the kids had already left before the shooting occurred, Hovitz said. And Rubin said the decision not to inform other schools, including PS 276, was made because the shooter was known to have already fled into the subway, and away from area schools, according to Hovitz. SHOOTING Continued on page 17

DowntownExpress.com


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Cops busted a man for allegedly stealing a $3,200 jacket from a Greene Street fashion boutique on June 7. An employee told police that the suspect was inside the retailer between Canal and Grand streets at 3:30 pm, when he was spotted slipping the ritzy coat off the rack and breezing past the register without paying. Police stopped the alleged thief later that day, and say they found him in possession of hypodermic needles following his arrest.

Cops arrested a 46-year-old man for allegedly looting the cab of a garbage truck parked on Fulton Street on June 3. The victim told police he parked the commercial garbage truck between Nassau Street and Broadway to chat with some other construction guys at 10:15 am, and returned to the vehicle to grab some cigarettes when he found the suspect rummaging around inside. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What the f--- are you doing in my truck,â&#x20AC;? the victim shouted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get the f--- out!â&#x20AC;? The man was able to shoo off the suspect, and told police he then discovered his cigarettes and wallet were missing from the cab. Fortunately, the suspect hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gone far, and the victim found him in a coffee shop across the street, where he was able to retake his cigarettes, he told police. But the alleged thief had allegedly managed to hide the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wallet somewhere in the store, he told police, and it was not recovered when the suspect was arrested, cops said.

CUT AND RUN A crook made off with a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coat containing $850 as he got his hair cut at a Fulton Street barber on June 6. The victim told police he was busy getting a trim at the stylist between Nassau and William streets at 1:20 pm, when the suspect nabbed his coat heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d left elsewhere in the shop.

BAD DELIVERY A thief rode off with a Grubhub delivery guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $1,450 bike that he had left chained up on Harrison Street on June 5. The victim told police he locked his bike between Greenwich and West streets at 1:15 pm, and after delivering some food, returned to find his bread and butter had been pinched.

CRIME OF OPPORTUNITY A bandit made off with a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purse that she left unattended in a Vesey Street restaurant on June 8. The victim told police she hung her bag on a hook inside the eatery between North End Avenue and West Street at 5:30 pm, and returned a few hours later to find that it was stolen, along with the Kindle reader, Blackberry phone, and designer shades it contained. All and all, the thief netted about $1,500 worth of the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unattended valuables, cops said.

THWARTED An burglar who plundered a Vestry Street construction site on June 4, was thwarted by a security guard who caught him fleeing with the stolen goods. The guard told police he spotted the suspect via surveillance footage enter the closed work site near Hudson Street at 3:30 pm, and grab a laptop before heading back towards the street. But the guard confronted him on his way out, and the suspect dropped the computer as he fled, cops said. DowntownExpress.com

FEEL THE BURN A thief stole more than $1,200 worth of acid-reflux medicine from a Broadway drug store on May 26. An employee told police she was reviewing surveillance footage of the store between Murray Street and Park Place when she spotted the thief nab around about 40 boxes of Nexium and Prilosec at around 11 am.

SWEET SMELLING CROOKS A band of thieves nabbed nearly $5,500 worth of perfume from a Water Street clothing store on May 31. An employee told police the crooks started ransacking the fragrance aisle of the store between John and Fulton streets at 2:35 pm, before dashing out with about 20 bottles of ritzy Abercrombie & Fitch perfumes.

SUBWAY SLASHER Some wacko slashed a man in the Fulton Street subway station on June 1. The victim told police he was arguing with the nut job inside the station near Nassau Street at 1:20 pm, when the man suddenly slashed his left arm. The slasher fled, awhile paramedics rushed the victim to Presbyterian Hospital, cops said. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Colin Mixson

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Gatsby’s groupies Jazz Age party takes Governors Island to the Roaring ‘20 BY COLIN MIXSON Old sports and bearcats from throughout the city grabbed their straw boaters and belted on their Oxford bags for the city’s finest prohibition-era sockdollager since the end of Prohibition! The two day Jazz Age Lawn Party saw Governors Island filled with horntootin’ orchestras and Peabody dance routines ripped straight from the 1920s, and while the sights and sounds of yesteryear were in and of themselves intoxicating, it was the 21st century characters that made the event one of the hottest tickets in town, according to one Kings County sheba. “It’s the absolutely best people watching of the whole city of the whole year,” said Stacey Greenberger, who traveled from Brooklyn to jazz it up on Governors Island. The 12-year-running, weekendlong, island soiree helped spearhead the national “retro nouveau” jazz scene when it debuted in 2005. But where other era-inspired events focus mainly on the music and dance, the Jazz Age Lawn Party remains one

Photo by Tony Falcone

Folks were living large in gilded-age style — though one suspects that Prohibition was not rigorously enforced.

of the major events encapsulating the fashion of the roaring ’20s — Gatsbyera cosplay. “I think the fashion is definitely one of the most important parts of the Jazz Age Lawn Party,” said Queens tomato Ashley Campana. “It’s a huge fashion event.” And the imersion among cheek flappers and straw-hatted fops making whoopee with cocktails in hand

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and jazz in the air feels like a vision ripped straight out of time, according to Greenberger. “You feel like you’re walking onto a movie set,” she said. The event featured performances from jazz ensembles and period dance troupes, including Michael Arenella and his Dreamland Orchestra, Drew Nugent and the Midnight Society, Roddy Caravella and the Canarsie Wobblers, Queen Esther, Peter Mintun, Gelber and Manning, and the Dreamland Follies. Saturday, the more crowded and boisterous of the two-day affair, was dedicated to the Charleston style of dance, while Sunday was reserved for the Peabody, with instructions given at the beginning of both days intended to transform the crowd of contemporary dewdroppers into regular old Oliver twists. And, throughout the event, there wasn’t a wurp or bluenose in sight, according to Campana, who said the scene is practically communal with chipper, if zozzled music lovers. “I think just the energy is really awe-

Photo by Tony Falcone

It’s the people watching that draws Stacey Greenberger every year.

Photo by Tony Falcone

And just check out the big band’s state-of-the-art sound system!

some,” she said. “People picnic and share food with people they haven’t met, and take pictures with people they don’t know. It’s an opportunity to meet and connect with people you wouldn’t normally meet. Plus the music’s awesome.” If you missed last weekend’s dapper affair, fear not, for the Jazz Age Lawn Party is set to return the weekend of Aug. 26 for the razziest blow since the 21st Amendment.

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

DowntownExpress.com


Some perks of growing older M

any people are quick to think of growing older in a negative light. There certainly are some side effects of aging that one may wish to avoid, but people may find that the benefits of growing older outweigh the negatives. Seniors are a rapidly growing segment of the population. In the United States, the Administration on Aging states that the older population — persons 65 years or older — numbered 46.2 million in 2014 (the latest year for which data is available). With so many people living longer, it’s time to celebrate the perks of getting older rather than the drawbacks. Here are some great benefits to growing old:

Higher self-esteem: The insecurities of youth give way as one ages, and older people have less negativity and higher self-esteem. A University of Basel study of people ranging in ages from 18 to 89 found that regardless of demographic and social status, the older one gets the higher self-esteem climbs. Qualities like self-control and altruism can contribute to happiness. Financial perks: Seniors are entitled to discounts on meals, museum entry fees, movies, and other entertainment if they’re willing to disclose their ages. Seniors also can enjoy travel perks, with slashed prices on resorts, plane tickets, and more. The U.S. National Park SerSeniors may feel less stress than younger people.

vice offers citizens age 62 and older lifetime passes to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites for just $10 in person ($20 online or via mail). Reasoning and problem-solving skills: Brain scans reveal that older adults are more likely to use both hemispheres of their brans simultaneously — something called bilateralization. This can sharpen reasoning skills. For example, in a University of Illinois study, older air traffic controllers excelled at their cognitively taxing jobs, despite some losses in short-term memory and visual spatial processing. Older controllers proved to

be experts at navigating, juggling multiple aircrafts simultaneously, and avoiding collisions. Less stress: As people grow older, they are able to differentiate their needs from wants and focus on more important goals. This can alleviate worry over things that are beyond one’s control. Seniors may realize how little the opinions of others truly mean in the larger picture, thereby feeling less stress about what others think of them. Growing older may involve gray hair or wrinkling skin, but there are many positive things associated with aging.

Feel your best by eating right The following are a few ways those over 50 can alter their diets so their bodies are getting what they need to live long and healthy lives well into their golden years: When changing your diet, be sure to include plenty of protein and carbohydrates. Protein maintains and rebuilds muscles, which is especially important for those who might find themselves unable to keep up with the physical demands of everyday life as well as they used to. Including ample low-fat protein, which can be found in fish, eggs, and low-fat dairy, DowntownExpress.com

will aid in muscle recovery, benefitting aging athletes as well as those men and women over 50 who recently started exercising as a means to regaining their physical fitness. Carbohydrates are also an important part of a balanced diet, as they are a great source of energy that can help you stay active well past the age of 50. Carbohydrates found in fruits, grains, and vegetables are the most beneficial, as these contain valuable vitamins, minerals and nutrients. June 15 – June 28, 2017

7


Activities

THURS, JUNE 15

FRI, JUNE 16

CROSS-STITCH CIRCLE: NewYork Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at 77th Street; (212) 873– 3400; nyhistory.org; 3:30 pm; Free with museum admission of $19 adults, $6 children ages 5-12. Beginning cross stitchers and younger children will learn the basic stitch and create a bookmark. More seasoned stitchers and older children and adults make a handcrafted gift for someone.

LITTLE NEW-YORKERS: NewYork Historical Society, 170 Central Park West at 77th Street; (212) 873– 3400; nyhistory.org; 3:30 pm; Free with museum admission. Held in the cozy Barbara K. Lipman Children’s History Library, this program introduces New York and American history to the littlest New Yorkers with ageappropriate readings and engaging handson activities. Ages 3 to 5 years old.

“SWEETEE:” The Ford Studio at the Pershing Square Signature Theatre Center, 480 W. 42nd St. between Ninth and Tenth avenues; (212) 279–4200; www.ticketcentral.com; 8 pm; $65. The musical is the story of an outcast minister, a young street singer, and a band of orphans in the depression-era South. As they struggle to make music and find their place in a world amid bigotry and poverty, a tale emerges of spiritual triumph in the face of and racism.

SAT, JUNE 17 FLY FISHING: Orvis, 489 Fifth Ave. at E. 40th Street; (212) 369–0300; www.orvis.com/newyorkcity; 10 am to noon; Free. Join expert instructors from Orvis for lessons on fly casting and outfit rigging, equipment will be provided; registration is required. For older teens. H ISTORY DET EC T I V E BRIEFCASE FOR FAMILIES: New-

York Historical Society DiMenna Children’s History Museum, 170 Central Park West at West 77th Street; (212) 873–3400; nyhistory.org; 11 am to 5 pm; Free with Museum Admission. Calling all history detectives! Check out a History Detective briefcase on our fourth floor to accompany you on your visit, and start exploring our expansive new Luce Center. Each free briefcase provides a variety of fun, interactive family centered challenges. At the end of your visit, simply return it! “THE SPACE PIRATE PUPPY MUSICAL:” The Kraine Theater, 85 East Fourth St. and Second Avenue; (212) 460–0982; www.horsetrade.info/ the-kraine-theater; Noon; $15. Earth has gone to the dogs, the humans have disappeared, and the Space Pirates are about to invade. Join the Dogstar Fleet on an intergalactic musical mission to seek the knowledge of the Oracle and save the planet Earth!

SUN, JUNE 18 FRESHWATER FISHING: Dana Discovery Center Central Park, 110th St. between Fifth and Lenox Avenues; (212) 628–2345; 2 pm to 4 pm; Free. Catch-and-release fishing is a great way

to get outdoors and discover nature just a few blocks from home. Our experienced Rangers teach the ethics of fishing and the ecology of our waterways. Recommended for ages 8 years and older.

MON, JUNE 19 WEE STUDIO : Children’s Museum of the Arts, 103 Charlton St. at Hudson Street; (212) 274–0986; www.cmany.org; 10:45 am to noon; $25 per family up to 5 ($15 per family for members). Music time! Story time! Art time! Teaching artists for an art-filled drop-in session when the museum is closed for general hours.

TUES, JUNE 20 SUMMER GARDEN CONCERT: Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden, 421 E. 61st Street; (212) 838– 6878; 6 pm to 7:30 pm; $15 ($5 children under 12; free to children under 1). Family friendly live music in the garden. Toma Iliev, a graduate of the Juilliard School, will enchant with a historically informed performance on Baroque and classical violin. Historic wooden toys will be placed in the garden after the concert for children to play with. Museum tour and complimentary beverages included.

COMING IN SEPTEMBER OF 2017

Manhattan. 2 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10011 A new day care center for children ages two to five will open its door for 2017/2018 school year. The 8

June 15 – June 28, 2017

center will be offering enhanced academic programs, dance/ movement, languages, sports, and art classes. The specific disciplines will be finalized based on the enrollment and the selection made

by the parents. For information and application please contact our Main office at 212-938-1223 ext. 112 vborsen@lifeadjustmentcenter.com

DowntownExpress.com


Maritime menus New youth sailing camp at Pier 25 aims to motivate kids with lunch

BY COLIN MIXSON A new adventure sailing camp will kick off its first season at Pier 25 next week, empowering kids to plot windpowered forays to destinations up and down the Hudson — usually with an aim of getting lunch, according to the camp’s director “We’ve found that lunch is usually the first question we get in the morning,” said Logan Rowell. “We’ll say, ‘Guess what? We’ve got 17 sailing lessons about how you’re getting to Chipotle today.’” The new sailing camp, Atlantic Yachting, will debut with four twin-sail, 24-foot boats for a season lasting until the beginning of September. Unlike other sailing camps, which feature smaller, more nimble boats and focus on racing techniques, Atlantic Yachting places a greater emphasis on navigation, plotting, and teamwork. “Ours is not a racing camp, it’s more of an adventure camp,” Rowell said. Instructors will give each four-mem-

I

ber crew clues about their destination, and leave the kids figure out not only where they’re going, but the best way to get there, based on the wind, current, tide — and nearby dining destinations. “They’re given a good base in terms of sailing skills and knowledge, but then we have them plan the day based on the current, and where they want to eat lunch.” The crews themselves are comprised of sailors of various ages 8–15-years-old, forcing the young and the even younger to work together to achieve a fine midday meal. And they end up learning more than just how to trim a sail. “We started doing clue-based stuff in the last few years that force kids to bring in other outside knowledge, decision making, and teamwork skills with kids of other ages,” said Rowell. And the kids will alternate taking the lead on their nautical adventures, forcing the kids to share the burden of command — and the ultimate, fateful decision on where to grab a bite.

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I CITY DowntownExpress.com

Image via Atlantic Yachting

Kids at Pier 25’s Atlantic Yachting summer sailing camp must work together to use navigational clues to reach their destination — lunch.

“The leaders of the crew are deciding ‘are we going to buy our lunch,’ and ‘is it realistic that we can walk somewhere and get food, or should we bring a cooler?’” said Rowell. Atlantic Yachting won the contract from Hudson River Parks to operate the pier’s first sailing camp in March. Their contract runs through to

October, and the camp will also offer adult sailing lessons, in addition to after-school sailing for kids until the end of September, beyond which the sea becomes untenable for junior sailors. If all goes well, the company hopes to renew its contract and expand the program for the next season, with more boats serving yet more budding sailors.

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Landmarks blasts Canal St. design Proposal called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;big mess of brickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fails to win Landmark commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approval BY JACKSON CHEN A proposed nine-story development on Canal Street was hit with waves of criticism and complaints during a Landmarks Preservation Commission meeting on June 6. Several neighbors voiced their disapproval of the project, which would create a ninestory residential building with ground-floor commercial space to replace the row of empty two-story buildings at 312-322 Canal Street. Testimony from the residents was followed by a fierce review from the commissioners, who felt it was inappropriate for the block â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the Tribeca East Historic District the site resides in. The proposed building, designed by the firm Paul A. Castrucci Architect, features a red-brick exterior with glass

panels stretching across the ground floor. According to the website listing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the project enters into a critical dialogue with its surrounding contextâ&#x20AC;? drawing inspiration from the historic district and the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. Andy Vann, the architect handling the project, said the choice of red brick was deliberate effort to fit in with the historic district. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our proposal for a ... mixeduse residential-commercial building on the site keys into references from the district to produce a contemporary building both aesthetically and technically,â&#x20AC;? Vann said at the meeting. But the residents and commissioners werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t convinced, and concluded that a nine-story development was way out of context for the neighborhood. Ingo Maurer, a lighting designer and resident of Lispernard

Street, said during the LPC meeting that the proposed buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rhythm, materials, and overpowering scale were horrible for the neighborhood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not architecture. This is another scar of the face of the city, glued-together bits of brick to create a pretend New York. What we need is more real,â&#x20AC;? Maurer said. James Sanders, an architect and neighbor to the site, said the fact that the development would tower two stories over the blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other buildings was just part of then problem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond that, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just a question of height,â&#x20AC;? Sanders said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very wide site because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five houses. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about a building thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s both tall and wide. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a big mess of brick and is really going to tip the balance.â&#x20AC;? After discovering the ren-

Rendering via Paul A. Castrucci Architect

Described by one local architect as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a big mess of brick,â&#x20AC;? the mixed-use development proposed for 312-322 Canal Street went down in flames at a June 6 meeting of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

derings a couple months ago, Sanders and several like-minded tenants of a Lispernard Street building began organizing their opposition. The tenants have been working to garner more attention and support for their cause, while also retaining a structural engineer

to study the expected impact on their building, Sanders said. Community Board 1 is in full agreement with the neighbors, as it passed a scathing resolution during its May full board meeting, urging rejection by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

 

 





         

  

  

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Bigger space and a broader mission 9/11 Tribute Museum debuts new facility, hopeful message BY JACKSON CHEN The 9/11 Tribute Museum reopens its doors this week at a new, expanded space befitting its broadened, enduring mission. Founded more than a decade ago to provide a place where the survivors and families of victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks could share their grief, and where the droves of out-oftowners making pilgrimages to Ground Zero could hear their stories, the center opened in a small space at 120 Liberty Street in 2006. Even after the official National September 11 Memorial and Museum opened in 2014, interest in the personal stories celebrated at the Tribute Museum didn’t diminish, but in fact grew, and last year the founders announced plans to move to a much larger space at 92 Greenwich St.

Photo by Jackson Chen

A dimly lit room features photos of thousands of 9/11 victims that were submitted by their families, but leads into a brighter portion of the museum that celebrates the tens of thousands of survivors, first responders, and volunteers who rallied to clean up and remake Lower Manhattan in the weeks and months that followed.

Photo by Jackson Chen

Tribute Museum co-founder Lee Ielpi stands next to a portrait of himself holding a photo of his firefighter son — whose death on 9/11 inspired him to help create the original tribute center with a mission to promote global understanding — as part of an exhibit on the “ripples” that spread out from those affected by the 9/11 attacks.

Visitors to the new museum are greeted with a quote from the Dalai Lama: “Just as ripples spread out when a single pebble is dropped into the water, the actions of individuals can have far-reaching effects.” But the quote does not refer to the sprawling War of Terror unleashed by the 19 hijackers, explains Lee Ielpi, the co-founder and board president of the museum, but rather the ongoing outpouring of charity, volunteerism, and patriotism America experienced when they saw thousands of first responders as well as ordinary citizens rush to

Ground Zero form all over the country to help, and then often returned home with a new sense of civic mindedness. “As you go through, you’re going to start seeing the ripples, and how they’re going to spread out and make a positive out of a negative,” Ielpi said. With triple the space of its former location, the Greenwich Street location allows the museum to present a much broader vision of the World Trade center attack and its aftermath, for the neighborhood, the nation, and the world TRIBUTE MUSEUM Continued on page 17

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Honor overdue 15 years later, National 9/11 Memorial finally includes Ground Zero workers BY JACKSON CHEN The thousands of rescue and recovery workers who risked their lives at Ground Zero â&#x20AC;&#x201D; often called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;forgotten heroesâ&#x20AC;? of the 9/11 attacks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will fi nally be remembered with a permanent monument at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, according to Gov, Andrew Cuomo. On May 30, Cuomo, joined by former mayor Michael Bloomberg, and former â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daily Showâ&#x20AC;? host Jon Stewart announced plans to honor the effort and sacrifice of recovery workers with a commemorative space and walkway located on the Memorial Glade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thousands of people converged at the World Trade Center site immediately after the attacks to show the world that our city and our country were not defeated,â&#x20AC;? said Bloomberg, who is chairman of the Memorial and Museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We owe these men and women of the recovery a great debt of gratitude, and they deserve a fitting

tribute for their courage, sacrifice and bravery.â&#x20AC;? The memorialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement fell on the 15th anniversary of the formal end of the 9/11 recovery operations where workers spent nearly nine months sifting through nearly two million tons of toxic rubble and debris, searching first for survivors, then for remains â&#x20AC;&#x201D; unwittingly turning themselves in to casualties as well. As evidence built that their deaths and illnesses were linked to the exposure of working at Ground Zero, the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act to look after those affected fi nally passed Congress, but only after a long, bitter, partisan fight. The act belatedly funded health care and screening for those exposed to the toxic dust and fumes that spewed for months from the smoldering wreckage at Ground Zero. The destruction of the twin towers directly killed 2,996 people and

Photo by Milo Hess

Ground Zero recovery worker and former Lindenhurst Fire Department Capt. George Oates attended a Memorial Day ceremony with wife Valerie held at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum to honor the thousands of first responders and civilian volunteers who labored for weeks atop the smoldering, toxic pile of debris searching first for survivors, and then for sacred remains, all the while sacrifi cing their health for the cause.

injured more than 6,000 others in just a few terrifying moments, but over the 15 years since then, the toxins released by the collapse have killed at least 322

recovery workers and volunteers as of 2011, and sickened 17,439, according to GROUND ZERO Continued on page 15

 

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June 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 28, 2017

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TOURISTY SECURITY Downtown Alliance wants ways to make NYSE security zone more â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;welcomingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY COLIN MIXSON A Downtown business advocacy group is looking for ways to reinvigorate the area around the New York Stock Exchange in spite of the imposing security cordon surrounding the historic financial institution. The Downtown Alliance has contracted consulting firm WXY architecture plus urban design to conduct a study of the NYSE Security Zone and work with a committee of local tenants and building owners to formulate a plan that would preserve safety, but also be more inviting to visitors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It should be welcoming â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and be safe,â&#x20AC;? said Jessica Lapin, President of the Downtown Alliance. The formidable security zone, which runs along Wall Street between Broadway and William Street and up Broad Street between Beaver and Wall streets, was put in place immediately following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, but the barriers and interdiction devices

were hastily erected, and little thought was given to accommodating pedestrians and drivers who must continue to travel through the area, Lapin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were things put in place very hastily after 9/11, then there were additional security layers added on top over time, so while any one element on its own might be okay, you have this visual and physical jumble of lots of different things that werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t installed in a cohesive manner,â&#x20AC;? she said. The result is that an area steeped in history and cultural value intrinsic to the character of New York City is receiving far less attention than it deserves, according to Lapin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The stock exchange has a very rich history, and could, and should be one of the premier corners and areas in New York, and yet it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look, feel or function the way it deserves to,â&#x20AC;? she said. The Alliance doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any solutions yet for making one of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Photo by Bill Egbert

The Downtown Alliance argues that the security barriers protecting the area around the New York Stock Exchange can seem less than inviting to visitors.

most iconic instructions more welcoming again, and is placing its trust in WXY to field proposals that the business group can bring to local stakeholders, and to the city once a plan is formulated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is really the beginning of a process,â&#x20AC;? said Lapin â&#x20AC;&#x153;We understand that the security perimeter itself is not going to change, so looking at whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there now, we want to have a discussion into what can be added and removed to make it easier for people, on foot and in cars, or making deliveries to get around.â&#x20AC;? Lapinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group is also mindful of numerous development projects in the area, including construction at 20 and

45 Broad Street, and 23 Wall Street, and aims to have a plan in place in 2018, before those project wrap up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea is, as people start putting things back together, lets put them together in a better way, and lets have a plan in place,â&#x20AC;? Lapin said. Once that happens, the alliance plans on acting as a liaison, bringing government agencies and local building owners together in order to see the plan implemented. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re spearheading the study, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re neither the city nor the owners, so we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t implement the plan,â&#x20AC;? said Lapin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea is to get the city and private ownership together.â&#x20AC;?

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advocates for 9/11 recovery workers see the dedicated memorial as a positive step that was long overdue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sorely needed, considering the work that these people did,â&#x20AC;? said Lee Ielpi, the co-founder of the 9/11 Tribute Museum, who lost his son in the attack and spend time on the pile searching for his body. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if anyone really understood the stress they had to go through.â&#x20AC;?

GROUND ZERO Continued from page 13

the World Trade Center General Responders Data as of 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and many of those illnesses are in reality slow-motion death sentences. Of course those are just the victims we know about â&#x20AC;&#x201D; those who have come forward, suspecting that their illnesses might be related to Ground Zero and registering for the Zadroga Act health screenings. According to Dr. Roberto Lucchini, the director of the World Trade Center Data Center, any particular recovery worker could also be affected by multiple conditions following their work at Ground Zero, and may not even realize it if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get screened. Ground Zero recovery worker and former Lindenhurst Fire Department Capt. George Oates was diagnosed with 9/11-related cancer in 2007, but the former firefighter took pains to point out that it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just those in the uniformed services who risked their health at Ground Zeron, by plenty of civilian volunteers as well. He recalled those days before the dust had even settled, with his friends and fellow volunteers giving out water, washing dirt off people, and clearing rubble. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just the first responders that get sick. I had other friends down there that are sick today and they were recovery workers,â&#x20AC;? Oates said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got to remember them too and they were recognized, and I thought that was fantastic.â&#x20AC;? Passage of the Zadroga act came nearly ten years after 9/11, after many rescue and recovery workers had already succumbed, and likewise, the move last

Associated Press / Stan Honda

Fore weeks after the 9/11 attacks, the stillsmoldering wreckage at Ground Zero spewed noxious smoke and toxins into the air as dedicated recovery workers struggled to find survivors, or their remains.

month to commemorate them as part of the National September 11 Memorial could seem to come too late. Cuomoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement also came two days after the death of Ray Pfeifer, a firefighter who worked at Ground Zero for weeks following 9/11. A dedicated advocate for passage of the Zadroga Act and enhancing healthcare for his fellow recovery workers, Pfeifer died on May 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; eight years after being diagnosed with Ground Zero-related cancer. As with the belated passage of the Zadroga Act,

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15


E D ITO R IAL

The true story of a ‘bad’ student PUBLISHER

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

and I wanted to be successful.” He decided that the fi rst thing he’d do was try to lose some weight. If he could do that… Well, fi rst things fi rst. Dominck started watching exercise videos, and kind of “lying” to himself. He told himself he was just going to “stretch a little bit.’” He didn’t want to aim for anything harder in case he backed down. He had disappointed himself enough already. But instead of just stretching, he added a little more exercise each day — some push-ups, some squats. He started walking in the park, which turned into power-walking, which turned into jogging. At the same time, he changed his diet. Now he ate mostly oatmeal, apples, carrots, and water. This from the kid who had no selfdiscipline. In seven months Dominick lost 80 pounds. He applied to a GED program in Elmhurst, passed the test and applied to his dream school, Hunter College. He didn’t get in. So he enrolled at Borough of Manhattan Community College — and promptly failed every class. But by now, Dominick knew all about starting over. So he did, and this time he took a course in “Classics.” He thought it was going to be about classical music. Instead, it was about the history of Western Civilization, starting with the ancient Greeks and Romans, taught by the tough-but fair Professor Gerald Clock. “He’d teach the class as if he was telling a story,” Dominick recalled.

When Prof. Clock told the class about how the Athenians needed help fighting the Persians, so they sent their fastest runner to the ask Sparta for help, Dominic was hooked. After all, he was a runner now, too. As Dominick excelled, Clock took an interest in this motivated student, advising him in academic matters, and encouraging him, too. When he found out Dominick’s educational past, he was shocked. He thought Dominic had always been an A student. For his part, Dominick started writing papers on things like the Code of Hammurabi. He liked Prof. Clock so much, he took his class on American history, too. But it was classics that really turned Dominic on. Upon graduating, Dominick was finally accepted at Hunter, where there was no stopping him. He studied Greek and Latin. He got a scholarship to study in Athens, a scholarship to study in Rome, a scholarship to present his paper at Harvard University. And last week, along with dozens of other exceptional graduates, Dominick stood on the stage at Hunter commencement at Radio City Music Hall as the college president, Jennifer Raab, announced his grade point average: 3.96. Then she also announced a surprise guest. Out onto the stage strode Prof. Gerald Clock, to wild applause. Dominick will return to Hunter this fall to earn his master’s in classical literature. His goal is to become a Latin teacher and inspire students like he had been. You know the brilliant ones — who just don’t know it yet. Lenore Skenazy is founder of FreeRange Kids, a contributor to Reason. com, and author of “Has the World Gone Skenazy?”

DESTABILIZED! LANDLORD BEATS LAWSUIT FROM TENANTS SEEKING RENT-STABILIZATION PROTECTIONS UNDER 421-G (MAY 22)

problem is it appears that REBNY is financing Albany to keep our community short-term. Tom Goodkind

greedy, greedy!! No wonder working people can’t find affordable apartments in NYC!!! maryanne braverman

Without stabilization, long term tenancy in a community is nearly impossible due to unaffordable rent increases at lease end. These apartments in question are luxury rentals: the landlord is earning plenty! Stabilization should be legislated by our elected officials …

This is so twisted!! FiDi buildings needed renewal and renovating, and landlords got a tax break to do so. Now, the landlords own improved properties that are filled with tenants. They do not need more rental income over and above stabilized rates. Greedy,

Not everyone can afford to live in a luxury apartment in NYC but enough people can so that the buildings are basically full. If you don’t want to pay the price of luxury apartment then

BY LENORE SKENAZY This is for all the parents worried that their kids are cutting class, falling through the cracks, overeating, underachieving, or spending all day playing video games — and for all the kids doing just that. Dominick Vandenberge was raised in the Bronx — Pelham Bay — and no one would call him a star student. He was forced to repeat the first grade, and already felt like a failure at age 6. He became the oldest kid in the class. He hated everything to do with school. And then his weight started to balloon. By high school, Dominck weighed 220 pounds and he struggled to make friends. He started skipping class. And then things got even worse. His dad died of a heart attack, at home. That same night, the family moved into his aunt’s basement in Queens. Dominick transferred to Francis Lewis High School and when he arrived that first day, his new teacher mocked his weight in front of the whole class. She asked him if he was on drugs. Everyone laughed. Except Dominick. He’d played hooky before, but now he became a serious truant. Sometimes he didn’t show up for an entire month. The principal called him in and said if he missed one more day, he’d be out. So out he was. At that point in his life, Dominick recalls, “I can remember me wanting to change.” But how? He was fat, friendless, fatherless. “I had nothing to show for the past 17 years other than that I had completed some video games.” He remembers lying down on his bed, “and, cliché as it was, I was looking up into the sky at night and I was just hoping that one day I could find someone, because I don’t want to be alone,

Posted To

POSTED Continued on page 17

DowntownExpress.com


Letters To the Editor, Congratulations to Katz’s Delicatessen on your 129th Anniversary! Eating at Katz’s Delicatessen is a religious experience for those who enjoy great deli. Forget the fancy tablecloths, waiters and sparkling bottled water in other restaurants. Go to the Manhattan Lower Eastside of our ancestors to enjoy authentic New York food eaten by generations of Big Apple residents.

POSTED Continued from page 16

don’t pay it but to think that a private citizen should subsidize you is rather self serving. JOT The Kibel company knows their buildings are supposed to be rent stabilized – 85 John St. and 90 West St. They are already charging all tenants market rent. But when people’s lease ends they are forcing rent increases of 30 percent and higher which is forcing tenants to move out. I think this is disgusting. They are exploiting tenants, many of which are families with school age children in the public schools. Once again greedy landlords are left to self regulate themselves and we all know that is never good. In this case they sued the tenant and forced them to pay rent and foot legal bills. Tenants sued Kibel at 90 West St. and the deci-

TRIBUTE Continued from page 12

The museum begins with a short walkthrough of the World Trade Center’s history and leads directly into halls that offer harrowing videos and news reports of the towers’ collapse, and personal accounts of those who witnessed it or escaped. “Every time I see this one spot, I say ‘Oh my gosh, look at that, it’s like an animal,’ ” Ielpi said of the video that showed how the vast, opaque, otherworldly cloud of dust billowed out and consumed the city streets as the towers came down. The museum also features an open room where visitors can stop and listen to live talks from volunteers who were impacted by 9/11. Ray Birge, a survivor who lived at 50 Battery Place at the time, for example, shares how DowntownExpress.com

Your bubbee would be proud. Take a day free from worrying about cholesterol and your weight to enjoy life! When out-of-town friends or family come to visit, they always insist we go to Katz’s for a great lunch. There is no equivalent to Katz’s deli-style good grub. Don’t forget to stuff a dollar in the tip cup for the counterman who serves you. Your reward will be a great sample of what’s to come. In front of your eyes while you salivate in anticipation, he

will build a sandwich requiring two hands to eat. The restaurant is a trip down memory lane, with photographs of celebrities from different eras. You can learn more about our past history at Katz’s than visiting any local museum. The list of all the famous customers who have visited Katz’s over the many decades is amazing. Look closely at the back of some chairs. Perhaps a former president or

two or some other famous individual used the same seat. Every winning politician in decades has made a campaign stop at Katz’s! The portions and quality continue to be one of the best buys in New York today. Anyone still hungry after dining there must have a tapeworm! Let’s hope the continuing redevelopment of this neighborhood doesn’t also overrun Katz’s as well! Larry Penner

sion is not in yet. Hopefully the judge will not be in the pocket of the landlords like this judge appeared to be. Cary Freedman

A generous donation to the South Street Seaport Museum is the least these developers can do to give back to the community that is already overrun with new construction. Diane Harris Brown

ments. I like it.

This is great. The landlord argument is exactly right — it’s basic economics that imposing price caps leads to shortages, and in the same way there is broad evidence nationally that rent controls result in underinvestment in housing and development and upkeep. The best way to combat the affordability crisis is to allow supply to rise freely to meet demand, not to try and squeeze the market through the brute force of legislation. Anonymous

SEAPORT SUPERTALL PROJECT MOVES FORWARD (MAY 26) Where are the infrastructure, transportation, services, etc. to support this monster?

It is immorally outrageous to steal the sunshine from children and the Historic South Street Seaport district! Ishmael We know that birds don’t poop in their own nests and I don’t think they would let someone (developers) poop there either. It’s time for “we the people” fight for our neighborhoods! Crista Grauer It will look ridiculous on that part of the skyline. Mermaid D So much negativity in these com-

John Smith More development? For wealthy transient? There is already no room on the 2/3 Fulton Street subway platform – folks will be falling into the tracks. The garbage is already piled high on the narrow sidewalks of the area, making it impossible to walk on the sidewalks and resulting in rat parties at night. In less than 5 years, increased development has resulted in incredible traffic (culprits include Uber, package delivery, service vehicles) congestion; weekday traffic (particularly on Fulton and William) is already at a standstill much of the time – fire trucks and ambulance unable to get through. Construction vehicles will be blocking traffic for the duration of the construction. js

SHOOTING Continued from page 4

he was able to escape the chaos that tore though his neighborhood that morning — but also how he decided not to escape the toxin-covered remnants of his neighborhood, itself, but rather stay and help rebuild. Birge and many others affected by the incident serve as volunteer docents for the museum. “This is a way of remembering and paying tribute,” Birge said of the new museum. “This is a place of healing and remembering, and I think it’s a treasure for Lower Manhattan.” Most importantly, the museum offers a pathway from grief to hope. One of its most poignant spaces is a somberly lit memorial room filled with family-provided photos of the thousands of innocent people who died in the towers’ collapse — smiling fam-

ily photos, graduation portraits, vacation snapshots all hinting at a happier times tragically cut short by an act of unspeakable evil. But that dark tunnel of sorrow then opens to an airy, well-lit hall filled with exhibits highlighting the myriad good works throughout the country and the world that are now being carried out by people affected, directly of indirectly, by that same act. According to museum co-founder and CEO Jennifer Adams-Webb, the positivity that has come out of 9/11 is an important part of the museum’s story. “[We’re] able to say you can be that droplet that ripples out to touch other people around the world by being inspired to do something in your community,” Adams-Webb said.

“The perp, as they say, went into the subway and got on a train, so, unless he was going to get off and come back, there was no danger,” Hovitz said. Hovitz said he was overall pleased with the department’s decision making, and said that any faith lost following the shooting was restored during the meeting. “I believe we ended the meeting feeling that there is trust, that they’re handling these situations properly and they’re making notifications when the police deem it to be necessary,” Hovitz said. But Chin won’t be signing off on the department’s policy until she sees it spelled out clearly, Leonard said. “She still has concerns about it,” Leonard said. “We want it in writing.” June 15 – June 28, 2017

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Desperately Seeking a Definitive Trump Doctrine What the world needs now, we just don’t have BY MAX BURBANK I’ve been trying to write a column about America’s foreign policy and our place in the world for months. I’d be almost done and then, just before deadline, there’d be a massive explosion of inanity and I’d have no choice but to trash everything I’d written and cover it: President Donald Trump fires FBI Director James Comey; Trump blabs classified intelligence to the Russians; Trump tweets a pic of his tragically malformed wiener. Okay, I mean, not literally. I’m saying a lot of Trump’s tweets are the metaphorical equivalent of a tragically malformed wiener pic. And just last week, we had the national Rorschach test of the Comey testimony, where everyone saw what they wanted to see, even though the ink blot clearly read “Obstruction of Justice” in Times New Roman 24-point font. You get what I’m saying. As a pundit (shh, I told my mom I’m a pundit), I’ve made a sincere effort to look at the global picture — but Trump’s shenanigans keep pulling me off focus. It happens so often I’d say it was deliberate, but in a previous column I already committed to the theory that Trump lacks the mental capacity to do anything more deliberate than golf. While it’s true Trump’s homeland buffoonery will likely cause a great deal of suffering and perhaps damage our democracy in incalculable ways, it probably won’t result in a post-apocalyptic-Syfy-channeltype scenario where a plucky gang of misfit survivors watch each other slowly die of radiation poisoning. So let’s examine our role on the world stage — while we still can. In some ways it’s very easy to write about our foreign policy, as we have none. The Trump Doctrine is basically, “If lucid, check with Russia, otherwise obey immediate random impulses.” For evidence, look no further than Trump’s bizarre, unasked-for self-insertion (supply your own rude joke here) into the latest Middle East dustup. Long-simmering tensions in the gulf exploded as Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain cut diplomatic ties with Qatar. Trump basically took credit, tweeting: “So good to see the Saudi Arabia visit with the King and 50 countries already paying off. They said they would take a hard line on funding…” and “...extremism, and all

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reference was pointing to Qatar. Perhaps this will be the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism!” Grammatical butchery aside, Trump saw global instability and, as he once assured Billy Bush, “moved” on it “like a bitch.”

Illustration by Max Burbank

One has to assume that he didn’t know the Al Udeid Air Base — home to thousands of US troops — is located IN QATAR, which means he tweeted without bothering to find out which Middle Eastern country Qatar IS! If pissing off a country critical to our military presence in the region surprises you, I gotta say that you haven’t been paying attention. It’s just the latest embarrassing, dangerous screwup from the leader who decided to drop the largest non-nuclear weapon we have

on Syria while eating the most beautiful slice of chocolate cake you’ve ever seen, leaked classified Israeli intelligence to the Russians, told Philippine president and extrajudicial serial killer Rodrigo Duterte the location of two of our nuclear submarines, refused to shake hands with a longtime ally (Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany) but offered personal congratulations to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey for solidifying dictatorial powers in a highly suspect referendum, shoved Dusko Markovic (the prime minister of Montenegro) aside so he could preen Mussolinistyle at the front of a photo op, and singlehandedly c r e a ted a

worldwide climate of hysteria in which terrible runon sentences like this one get written on a regular basis! Determined to show that “America First” means “America Totally Alone,” Trump has now pulled us out of the Paris agreement. “I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris” said our president of the climate accord, revealing his belief the accord has “Paris” in its name because it’s French — as opposed to, you know, having simply BEEN SIGNED THERE by France, yes, and also almost EVERY

NATION ON EARTH except Syria and Nicaragua! As of press time, we still don’t know if Trump has canceled his state visit to the UK over fears everyone there hates his guts. The Guardian says it’s off, Sean Spicer says it’s SO on, and CNN weighed in with, “God, our heads hurts real bad, leave us alone.” I’m paraphrasing, but only a little. Trump’s revised travel “ban” got kicked to the curb by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, because no matter how hard Justice Department lawyers work to assure judges that the “ban” isn’t a “ban,” Trump can’t go three tweets without saying it sure as hell is a “ban.” In Sworn testimony on June 13, America’s top racist garden gnome, Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III, admitted he now accepts Russia interfered with our elections, but doesn’t recall ever getting briefed on the subject or Trump ever mentioning it. Imagine the rest of the world trying to decide if that’s perjury or just criminal dereliction of duty. The President of the United States has long been recognized as the leader of the free world. That’s not the case anymore. Worse yet, the great dealmaker gave the title away for nothing. Is America first? Trump will do anything shirtless equestrian enthusiast Vladimir Putin requires. All King Salman of Saudi Arabia had to do was give Trump a gold necklace and let him touch a little ball, and he’s swoony enough to destabilize the entire region on their behalf. Leadership of the free world is now shared by a Frenchman who married his high school teacher; a buff, outdoorsy Canadian; and a German grandmother with a degree in physics. It’s like the start of a locker room joke Trump would tell Billy Bush to impress him, but a lot funnier and kind of hopeful instead of smelling faintly of desperation and sweatstained tube socks. We stand on the world stage, exposed beneath a flickering spotlight, pants around our ankles — and the free world laughs at us. It’s not a comfortable laugh. It’s high-pitched through clenched teeth, the kind of laugh you surrender to when you realize the TV show you stumbled on in the middle of the night isn’t “The Man in the High Castle” or “Red Dawn” or even some dark, edgy reboot of “Hee Haw.” It’s the news. DowntownExpress.com


Courtesy Cinelicious Pics

Prototype for the “Clockwork” droogs? An artfully framed gay boy gang zips down and charges up for confrontation.

The Bloom is Back on ‘Roses’ Restored ‘Parade’ reclaims rightful place in queer cinema pantheon BY SCOTT STIFFLER From protester/police clashes in the streets to hipster-packed groping sessions in darkened apartments to bitter rivalries that topple the power structure of a “gay boys bar,” simmering unrest is the spark that ignites explosive acts of lust and violence in writer and director Toshio Matsumoto’s gorgeous, gripping, sexually assertive feature film debut. Subtitled in the original 1969 English language version press kit as “Aesthetics of cruelty and perversion” — a description that’s both accurate and understated — “Funeral Parade of Roses” is set in and around the off-grid pleasure dome Genet, where intoxicating hostesses (womanly ways, male plumbing) mix and mingle with Tokyo businessmen and American soldiers just back from Vietnam. “Mamma” DowntownExpress.com

Leda presides, but rising star Eddie is a threat to her professional and romantic relationship with bar manager Gonda. Up to his neck in intrigue from the accounting burdens of narcotics brokering and secret, limb-twisting liaisons with Eddie, Gonda’s discovery of a telling photo from the forbidden couple’s dark past sets in motion a final reel whose blood, betrayal, death, and destruction do graphic justice to the Greek tragedy upon which the plot is not-so-loosely based. Rarely seen on North American screens since its brief and limited initial release — and, as result, largely absent from the roll call of watershed LGBTQ cinema — “Funeral Parade of Roses” is given richly deserved new life in the form of a 4K digital restoration that will screen locally at, appropriately, the Quad Cinema (hav-

ing reopened in April after a two-year renovation process of its own; slightly less time than it took to secure, scrub, and prep the film). Aspiring to a state of cosmetic perfection befitting its alluringly feminine gay boy protagonist, Hollywood-based distribution company Cinelicious Pics embarked on the restoration of “Parade” by sending its director of acquisitions, Ei Toshinari, overseas to consult with Hirofumi Sakamoto, of the Postwar Japan Moving Image Archive (PJMIA). Sakamoto acted as an intermediary for director Matsumoto — who, despite declining health, gave extensive notes throughout the process, and passed away just a few weeks ago. PJMIA authorized the release of the film’s original 35mm camera negative and sound ele-

ments (stored at Tokyo’s National Film Center, within the National Museum of Modern Art) for scanning by Japanese post-production facility IMAGICA, which then sent the files to Cinelicious’ team for digital restoration. Stripped of dirt, debris, scratches, and splices while leaving the natural grain untouched “as much as possible,” the restored film’s crisp palette justifies a boast in the press material that puts Tatsuo Suzuki’s “breathtaking” black and white cinematography in league with the erotic messaging and artful framing of photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. The visual aesthetic of “Parade” certainly captivates — but so too will its emotional impact, sure to stun those unprepared for the nonROSES continued on p. 20 June 15 – June 28, 2017

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ROSES continued from p. 19

linear narrative’s flurry of intense sexual encounters, traumatic memories, art gallery visitations, “gay boy” lifestyle contemplations, gang violence, flashes of potent imagery, and popping word balloons. All of these elements build upon 1932born Matsumoto’s previous work as a post-war essayist and theoretician seeking to absorb journalistic and experimental techniques into his own work. “Parade” not only achieves this, but also breaks new ground for the filmmaker, in a manner both mischievously selfaware and culturally candid (such as a recurring glimpse of the titular floral element clenched between a standing male’s exquisite ass — a cheeky reference to, among other things, “rosebud,” although not the kind you know from “Citizen Kane”). David Marriott, a co-supervisor of the restoration project and VP of acquisitions and distribution at Cinelicious, noted in a recent interview with this publication that Matsumoto’s interest in “exploring the tension between documentary and avantgarde” were “dual concerns evidenced in early shorts,” including 1961’s “Nishijin.” Elements of reality-based investigation are seen throughout “Parade,” Marriott said, particularly in “Suzuki’s cinematography and, for example, during the interview segments, many of which were real documentary interviews with people in and around the Tokyo underground scene, and during the exterior city scenes, most of which were were shot on location in heavily trafficked areas.” A pair of Matsumoto’s avant-garde short films are even given screen time in “Parade” — 1969’s “Ecstasis” unspools during a party scene, and shots from 1968’s “For My Crushed Right Eye” are, Marriott noted, “recycled into the narrative. The drugfueled apartment dance scenes also echo similar sequences in ‘Crushed Right Eye,’ both in framing and lighting.” Marriott hailed the film’s melting pot of influences as “everything but the kitchen sink filmmaking, in the best possible way,” noting that alongside an evolved take on the director’s use of documentary and avant-garde is an exploration of “new stylistic techniques which seem to have grown organically from his earlier work, including the film’s construction/deconstruction of linear time and the varied film-within-a-film meta dimensions.” Matsumoto’s use of sped-up motion has been cited as the source of that technique in 1971’s “A Clockwork Orange” (in particular, the scene where Eddie’s trio boasts of their appeal to men as a prelude to battling it out with a biological girl gang). One might also be tempted to trace Malcolm McDowell’s droog drag to

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

Courtesy Cinelicious Pics

Pîtâ, Peter, Pîtâ! A then-unknown club dancer’s star turn gives “Funeral Parade of Roses” its enduring queer appeal.

Courtesy Cinelicious Pics

Smoke ’em if you got forgot ’em? A cigarette burn eradicates the face of an absent father.

Eddie’s pronounced eyelashes and effective use of black mascara. Such linkage long ago embedded itself in cinematic lore — but Marriott recalled the effort to verify “is something we spent many months trying to track down,” and concluded that although still “anecdotal at this point, it’s become de facto authoritative. The way the droogs in ‘Clockwork Orange’ are framed and move, you can see a clear influence.” No matter. Whether or not others have been inspired to admirable imitation or outright thievery takes nothing away from

the experience of virgin eyes watching this “Parade” pass by for the first time. Its black and white film stock and distinct 1960s fashion statements notwithstanding, the defiant confidence and erotic potency of its lead character makes the film seem utterly contemporary, even progressive. Plucked from Tokyo’s nightlife scene — where the androgynous pixie’s Peter Panlike dance moves and manner of dress earned the fluid monikers “Peter” and “Pîtâ” — 1952-born Shinnosuke Ikehata’s Eddie shares memorably smoldering love

scenes with 1927-born Yoshio Tsuchiya’s Gonda. Already an established actor who appeared in Akira Kurosawa’s seminal 1954 film “Seven Samurai” (talk about flicks people pilfered from!), Tsuchiya was notably paired with another formidable screen presence one year before “Parade,” in the 1968 Godzilla flick “Destroy All Monsters.” Ikehata, who, Marriott said, has long been “a huge celebrity in Japan” and enjoys contemporary notoriety as “a talking head on a lot of TV programs,” also claims a place in the Kurosawa canon, having played the jester Kyoami in 1985’s “Ran.” As for “Parade,” Marriott predicted its “incredibly subversive and transgressive” core will play “almost as well, if not better, today than I imagine it did at the time.” No matter which way you swing or how hard you land, this is one time when a trip to the cinema is a safe bet for those seeking reasonably priced, mind-expanding thrills that are anything but cheap. At Quad Cinema (34 W. 13th St., btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves.). Screenings (schedule varies daily) at 1:45pm, 4:50pm, 6:50pm and 8pm. Runtime: 105 minutes. Black and white. Japanese with English subtitles. Cinelicious Pics will release “Funeral Parade of Roses” on Blu-ray in the late fall, with bonus content including a commentary track and remasterings of seven avant-garde shorts by Matsumoto. Visit quadcinema.com and cineliciouspics.com. DowntownExpress.com


Buhmann on Art Florine Stettheimer at the Jewish Museum BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN Marking the first major solo exhibition for the artist in over 20 years, “Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry” promises to help re-evaluate this great modernist’s importance. No less than 50 paintings, drawings, costume and theater designs, photographs, and ephemera will offer thorough insight into Stettheimer’s impressively eclectic output, which she delivered with an unusual mélange of whimsy and sharp satirical wit. Born into a wealthy Jewish family in Rochester, New York, Stettheimer (18711944) studied at the Art Students League in New York City before heading to Europe. While there, she encountered perhaps her most significant influences: the Symbolist painters and poets, as well as the Ballets Russes. When Stettheimer returned to New York at the beginning of World War I in 1914, she was already in her mid-40s. Though Stettheimer regularly accepted invitations to show her paintings at Whitney Annuals and Courtesy MoMA/SCALA/Art Resource, NY Carnegie Internationals, she only agreed Florine Stettheimer: “Euridice and her Snake,” a costume deCourtesy Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven to one commercial solo show at Knoedler sign for the artist’s ballet “Orphée of the Quat-z-arts ” (1912. Oil, Florine Stettheimer: “Christmas” (1930-1940. Oil on canvas, 60 1/16 x 40 in.). beads, metal lace on canvas. 18 5/8 x 15 1⁄8 in.). Gallery in 1916. When the latter proved unsuccessful, her sisters and mother offered an alternative by establishing an elite salon that attracted many of the leading avant-garde artists of the time, including Marcel Duchamp and Georgia O’Keeffe. In the following years, Stettheimer would continue to depict aspects of her social and intellectual environment but refused any other gallery shows. Instead, she preferred to unveil new paintings to select friends in her studio overlooking Bryant Park. Painting life between the Gilded Age and the Jazz Age, Stettheimer’s work reflects a fastchanging world, in which the emancipation of women was one major achievement. Luckily, her family ignored Stettheimer’s final wish, which stipulated that her art should be destroyed after her death. Through Sept. 24 at the Jewish Museum (1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St.). Gallery Hours: Sun.–Tues. and Fri.– Sat., 11am–5:45pm; Thurs., 11am– 8pm. Admission: Adults, $15; seniors 65+, $12; students, $7.50; free for ages 18 and under. Thurs., 5–8pm, pay-whatCourtesy collection of Halley K. Harrisburg and Michael Rosenfeld, New York you-wish. Call 212-423-3271 or visit thejewishmuseum.org. Florine Stettheimer: “Asbury Park South” (1920. Oil on canvas. 50 x 60 in.). DowntownExpress.com

June 15 – June 28, 2017

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Just Do Art BY SCOTT STIFFLER

R2R: RIVER TO RIVER FESTIVAL As reliable as the tide but considerably less predictable, a deep dive into the sheer volume of events scheduled for the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s River to River Festival will leave your head swimming with ways to soak in this annual genre-blurring, boundary-bursting celebration of dance, music, theater, and visual art. Offering 100+ performances and events at 31 indoor and outdoor sites spread across Lower Manhattan and Governors Island, this year’s R2R artists have a hunger for exploring uncharted waters that befits the festival’s waterfront setting. Here’s a modest sampling of what the schedule boasts. Choreographing events that meld the “social nature of dance, the charge of a party, and the sharpness of a music video” to create a “fresh dance vocabulary that any Joe can get down with” is the promising premise of immersive events hosted by The Dance Cartel. With guest DJs in tow and audience participation on tap, they’ll take over Pier A’s Harbor House twice, on June 21 and 25. The Winter Garden at Brookfield Place is the site-specific setting for “Harbored” (June 22-25). Dramatizing the ups and downs of the American dream as experienced by immigrants during a two-century span, En Garde Arts’ return to “civic spectacle” is an epic mix of oral histories, dance, poetry, and music. Brooklyn-based visual artist Kamau Ware’s “Black Gotham Experience” has the Seaport District’s 192 Front Street as its central hub throughout the festival, with satellite programs and projects featuring art, music, performance, walking tours, and a graphic novel. From 4-8pm on June 20, Night at the Museums happens at 15 of Downtown’s most culturally significant destinations. You’ll get access to special programming, tours, and all of the stunning stuff you normally find by visiting the likes of Poets House, China Institute, The Skyscraper Museum, the Museum of Jewish Heritage, South Street Seaport Museum, the National Museum of the American Indian, and more (nine more, in fact). All events are free. Through June 25 at sites across Lower Manhattan and Governors Island. Visit rivertorivernyc.com.

“POWER TO THE MULLET!” Her love of the ladies matched only by her capacity for cluelessness, compassion,

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Photo by Jenny Rubin

No bull: Molly “Equality” Dykeman brings her brand of mullet-powered comedy to the QueerCom fest on June 17.

Photo courtesy the artists

In a smooth move groove: The Dance Cartel floors it at Harbor House, June 21 and 25, as part of the River to River Festival.

$14 organic smoothies, while occasionally favoring us with her earnest if not exactly chapbook-worthy poetry. Like the nachos Molly consumes with reckless abandon, you’ll soon find yourself acquiring a taste for that poetry, and going all bullish on this daffy and defiant dyke. “Mullet” shares the evening with the improv troupe “It’s A Good Thing You’re Pretty” and solo comedy from double minority (gay, Mohawk) T. Leclaire. Sat., June 17, 7pm at the Peoples Improv Theater (aka PIT; 123 E. 24 St., btw. Park & Lexington Aves.). Tickets ($10) at the door or via thepit-nyc.com. Contact the PIT at 212-563-7488.

WEST CHELSEA ARTISTS OPEN STUDIOS

Courtesy Barbara Rachko Studio

Get the inside scoop on their creative process, and scoop up some of their work, during your June 17 and 18 West Chelsea Artists Open Studios self-guided tour.

and anything-goes substance abuse, we last saw Molly “Equality” Dykeman in the 2016 FringeNYC show “A Microwaved Burrito Filled With E. coli” — in which she and an equally irrepressible trans waitress commiserated when Molly was booted out of a lesbian wedding reception for rowdy behavior. Now, the ballsy and occasionally bitter bestie of under-

dogs everywhere (seven hours sober and counting!) returns for one hell of a night only, on a triple bill that’s part of the QueerCom festival. “Power to the Mullet!” finds Molly (an improv-curious sketch comedy creation of the voraciously versatile Andrea Alton) tackling abominations like our “big orange Cheeto head” president and

Step into their minds by walking through their doors, by taking this selfguided tour that gives you access to over 30 artists located in buildings throughout the West Chelsea area. More than just an opportunity to browse, this annual event provides a rare chance to engage artists in conversation and, as a result, learn about what sets their chosen medium apart, and why they chose that particular style of expression. Haggling might even be part of that dialogue — but be gentle, kind patron of the arts, because the very fact you’re on their home turf means the price you pay to walk away with a oneof-a-kind creation won’t include a gallery markup fee (which can be 50 percent or more). Free. 12-6pm Sat., June 17 and Sun., June 18. The self-guided tour starts at the West Chelsea Arts building lobbies (508526 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.), where visitors can pick up tour maps. Maps are also available at co-sponsor Blick Art Materials locations (among them, 237 W. 23rd St., btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.) and 650 Sixth Ave., at W. 20th St.). Visit westchelseaartists.com for a list of participating artists. DowntownExpress.com


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June 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 28, 2017

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Leading the list of the top distractions behind the wheel are mobile phones. Phones now do more than just place calls, and drivers often cannot pull away from their phones, even when driving. According to the California Department of Motor Vehicles, studies have shown that driving performance is lowered and the level of distraction is higher for drivers who are heavily engaged in cell

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June 15 – June 28, 2017

phone conversations. The use of a hands-free device does not lower distraction levels. The percentage of vehicle crashes and nearcrashes attributed to dialing is nearly identical to the number associated with talking or listening.

Daydreaming

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Eating

Those who haven’t quite mastered walking and

chewing gum at the same time may want to avoid eating while driving. The majority of foods require a person’s hands to be taken off of the wheel and their eyes to be diverted from the road. Reaching in the back seat to share some French fries with the kids is also distracting. Try to eat meals before getting in the car. For those who must snack while en route, take a moment to pull over at

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Reading

Glancing at an advertisement, updating a Facebook status or reading a book are all activities that should be avoided when driving. Even pouring over a traffic map or consulting the digital display of a GPS system can be distracting.

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