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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

September 25, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 84 • Number 17

City slaps stop-work order on E. 9th St. dorm, says leases are invalid BY LESLEY SUSSMAN

C

alling it “a major step in trying to reclaim the old P.S. 64,” Councilmember Rosie Mendez announced at Tuesday’s Community Board 3 meeting that the Department of Buildings has issued a stop-work order on the plan

to convert the building into a 529-bed, multi-institute college dormitory. The Cooper Union and the Joffrey Ballet School have signed contracts with developer Gregg Singer to use part of the existing the building as a college dorm. Singer bought the former OLD P.S. 64, continued on p. 5

BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC

T

he High Line’s third and final section officially opened last Sunday. The new segment is: A. exactly like the other two, B. nothing like the other two, or C. a distinct part that fits with the whole. If you chose C, you’ve won free admis-

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

High Line’s last section sports original foliage, play area, open vistas

He’s got the whole world in his hands — at Sunday’s People’s Climate March.

Confessions of a reluctant climate-change marcher

sion to the park! O.K., the park is always free — but the new half-milelong section, located between W. 30th and 34th Sts., dubbed the “High Line at the Rail Yards,” offers singular panoramas and features. For the first time, the High Line will have a feature spe-

BY SARAH FERGUSON

W

SECTION 3, continued on p. 27

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Fiorello says, ‘Drop the appeal!’....page 9

hat was the impact of Sunday’s  massive People’s Climate March? Was it, as 350.org  founder and march instigator Bill McKibben claimed, “the most important day” in the history of the climate movement? I confess when I first heard about the march, it seemed like another big protest parade to nowhere through the canyons of N.Y.C. With

slick subway ads pledging to unite “hipsters and bankers” and even a glossy promo video celebrating the organizers and their mission to “make history,” the march sounded more like Live Aid for the planet — with no central demands on world leaders or threats to corporate power to give it teeth. Having walked through the soles of my boots at marches to stop Bush’s Iraq War, I’ve experienced the limits of simply putting our bodies in the streets. 

But after marching with my six-year-old, and running around to various panels and plenaries hosted by climate groups all weekend, I’ve emerged energized, if overwhelmed, by the depth and urgency of the grassroots organizing here and around the world. While the media focused on the spectacle of 400,000plus bodies jammed along Central Park West as far as the eye could see, it was the CLIMATE, continued on p. 4

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BIRTH OF / BASH FOR AN ACTIVIST: As we mentioned in last week’s column, Doris Diether’s 50th anniversary celebration of being a member of Community Board 2 was quite the par-taay. It was hosted by her fellow board member Richard Stewart and his husband, Dr. David Ramsay, at their airy, art-filled One Fifth Ave. apartment overlooking Washington Square Park. Diether started things off by reading aloud a statement she gave back in 1969 at the old Board of Estimate, which she recalled was named something different at the time. Titled an “Open Letter To The People of New York,” Diether’s testimony concerned the New York Post’s report on a Parks Department plan for the free New York Shakespeare Festival at Wollman Rink to “charge $1 to $3.50 for seats and slightly more for boxes.” Diether testified, “I was rather surprised that no follow-up of this story appeared in any newspapers. It seems that every time Robert Moses [then Parks commissioner] gets a brainy idea, the public is ignored and special interests get

the best part of the deal. ...” As she read on at the party, Diether, 85, overcome by emotion, started to choke up and sniffle. “...When are the people of this city going to wake up and demand that parks are for the public — small “P” — and not for Moses to parcel out as he sees fit? ... Now is the time,” Diether’s statement concluded, “to let our public officials know that the people still own the city, and not one or two individuals.” Right on! The crowd at the party cheered. Diether handed us a copy of her speech. Scrawled at the top in script, she wrote, “Start of my civic career.” As she later explained to us, up until then she had been working closely with other Village legends, such as Jane Jacobs, Verna Small, Ruth Wittenberg and Shirley Hayes. Like lieutenants, they carved up the Village into sectors, each taking the lead in watching over her own area — calling the others when they needed help in their area. Diether’s sector included Patchin Place and Eighth St., among others. But this was the first time Diether basically stood on her own. After her testimony back in ’69, a knot of reporters rushed up to her and asked her “what group” she was with, to which she responded, “I’m not — just me.” The good feelings were flowing at the recent Fifth Ave. fete, which was attended by many C.B. 2 members, including board chairperson David Gruber, as well as Assemblymember Deborah Glick, state Senator Brad Hoylman, Borough President Gale Brewer, and Councilmembers Rosie Mendez, Margaret Chin and Corey Johnson. “To say I have learned a lot from the ‘Zoning Maven’ would be an understatement,” Mendez said of the C.B. 2 icon. Mendez piled her with an armful of gifts, including a book on cats — Diether loves books and cats, Mendez noted — and a mini pop-up old-school rooftop water tank. For her part, Glick recalled serving on the community board back in the 1980s with Diether — who she called a “forceful advocate” yet also “genteel.” “I’m here not just as an assemblymember but as a fan,” Glick stated. “As board members, we alSCOOPY’S, continued on p. 16

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September 25, 2014

At Doris Diether’s C.B. 2 50th anniversary party, from left, Deborah Glick, Rosie Mendez, Diether, Brad Hoylman and Margaret Chin. TheVillager.com


Johnson trash-talks, says Gansevoort plan is a go BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

A

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

lthough it’s been hard to get any confirmation from the de Blasio administration, word is that the solid-waste marine transfer plant planned for Gansevoort Peninsula is, in fact, going to happen. Councilmember Corey Johnson recently told The Villager, “It’s moving forward — but there’s a long timeline. They need to remove the trucks, which will happen this coming December or January. “I’ve spoken with Sanitation Commissioner Garcia,” he said. “They are moving ahead with this. But they want to talk to the community about it.” Under the scheme, up to 60 garbage trucks per day will haul recyclables to Gansevoort, where they will dump their loads into barges, which will then ferry the waste to a new recycling plant in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. About 1.36 acres of the 8-acre peninsula will be set aside for a 25-foot-wide road for the trucks that will ramp up to the new transfer station. The Gansevoort facility will also have an “educational component,” teaching about recycling. The trucks Johnson referred to are the Department of Sanitation garbage vehicles that currently park in an old garage on the peninsula, which is a remnant of landfilled shoreline between Gansevoort and Little W. 12th Sts. on the Hudson waterfront. These trucks will be relocated to the new three-Sanitation district garage as soon as it’s completed at Spring and Washington Sts. around the end of this year. There will then be a period of 18 months to two years during which the old garage on Gansevoort is demolished and the peninsula also undergoes remediation for toxic chemicals. The site used to be home to a city garbage incinerator sporting tall twin smokestacks, the latter which were razed at least a decade ago. “Then they need to build the facility,” Johnson said, referring to the marine waste-transfer station. Still to be worked out is a key memorandum of understanding, or M.O.U., between the city and state to allow the project to go forward. Basically, because part of Hudson River Park will need to be “alienated” — or removed — from public park use for the transfer station, it’s been agreed that the Hudson River Park Trust should be compensated for the loss. The figure cited is $50 million. However, Assemblymember Deborah Glick — whose district, like Johnson’s, includes the peninsula — said no M.O.U. is currently written, and none has ever physically existed. To hear her tell it, the major sticking

Once the new “mega-garage” at Spring and Washington Sts. is completed, the garbage trucks currently on Gansevoort Peninsula will relocate to it.

point is that the state feels the city should pay the entire amount of the money since it has always been the city — first under Mayor Bloomberg, who conceived the plan, and now under Mayor de Blasio — that has been pushing for the marine waste-transfer plant at Gansevoort. Johnson said it was his understanding that the city and state would each pay $25 million. Either way, it’s always been said that the resistance to signing the M.O.U. has come from the state. Hudson River Park is on land that was once partly state- and partly cityowned, and the Trust is a state-city authority. “This is a long way off,” Johnson said of the Gansevoort transfer station. “There’s going to be a lot of discussion over the next two years.” The Village waterfront facility is just a part of the larger citywide Solid Waste Management Plan, or “SWAMP,” conceived by Bloomberg. Of course, as part of the process, there must be planning of how the rest of Gansevoort apart from the garbage transfer station will be redeveloped into park as part of the 5-mile-long Hudson River Park. The Trust is only at the very beginning stages of that process — but again, there is time. Farther south, in Hudson Square, the community unsuccessfully fought to block the new “mega-garage” at Spring and Washington Sts. Phil Mouquinho, of P.J. Charlton restaurant, has been the community’s point person on that project. UPS will have the building’s ground floor, he noted, and there will

be trucks from Sanitation Districts 1, 2 and 5 on the upper floors. The District 1 and 5 trucks will both use West St. (the West Side Highway) when going to and from the garage and Com-

munity Boards 1 and 5, he said, while the District 2 trucks are supposed to go out along Spring St. and up Hudson St. and Sixth Ave. when servicing the Community Board 2 district.

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September 25, 2014

PHOTO BY SARAH FERGUSON

ARTS EDITOR

networking that took place between all these grassroots groups and the connections made at events leading up to the march that gave it its real power. Scores of workshops and gatherings were held in East Village community gardens and other parts of Lower Manhattan as part of the New York City Climate Convergence — which coincided with the annual Lower East Side Harvest festival — creating a synergy of art, music and activism that I haven’t experienced here for some time. There were people from Cochabamba, Bolivia, schooling Detroit activists on their succesful campaign to stop the privatization of public water, and Canadian tar sands activists mingling with bike advocates and African Green Belt activists on Avenue C.  “Like cramming for the apocalypse,” quipped one organizer. You couldn’t walk into a garden without hearing about some environmental crusade.  On Saturday, instead of morning tai chi, I raced to a talk about global water crises at the new St. John’s University campus on Astor Place, where the halls and classrooms were brimming with eco and lefty groups.  I dipped into “War and the Climate Crisis,” then headed back east to Grafitti Baptist Church on E. Seventh St., where the folks from the group Sane Energy Project were unveiling a new interactive map that documents the growing web of natural gas pipelines, compressor stations and waste facilities for storing toxic frack brine from Pennsylvania that is emerging across New York State, in spite of Governor Cuomo’s moratorium on hydrofrack drilling.  “We have to understand, the moratorium is temporary, it’s not a ban,” Sane Energy founder Claire Donahue told the audience. “What this map shows is, we are in effect being fracked in New York.”  (You can view the map at www. youareherenymap.org.)   Even places that aren’t getting drilled are being overrun by the gas industry in ways you wouldn’t expect. At a meetup of frack activists in Tompkins Square Park, I encountered Robert Nehman, a former house painter from Allamakee County, Iowa, who has spent the last 18 months crisscrossing the country to speak out about how mining for silica sand, which is used to open fissures in the rock during frack drilling, has transformed the rolling hills of northeast Iowa.  “In 2010, we had three sand mines within 100 miles of my house,” he said. “It’s now 140, and another 70 are proposed, each of them anywhere from 20 acres to 5000 acres apiece. It’s insane, it’s unbelievable. It’s clouding up the air. People can’t even hang their clothes

The author’s son, Christopher, at right, in a white “Solar Power” T-shirt specially made for the march.

out to dry anymore.” Later, I listened to Native American women tell powerful and heart-wrenching stories of resisting frack operations in tribal lands in Canada and the U.S. at a jam-packed symposium at the New School called #Frack Off. Kandi Mossett, an activist from the Fort Berthold Reservation in the Badlands of North Dakota, showed slides of natural gas being flared off oil rigs in the Bakken Shale Play. “Where I live, they’re fracking for oil,” Mossett explained. “The gas that’s on top of the oil is just a byproduct because the pipeline infrastructure to capture it currently does not exist.  “Every day more than 100 cubic feet of natural gas is flared away,” Mossett continued. “Just to put it into perspective, that’s enough gas to heat half a million homes.” It got me thinking, if the natural gas is just flared off out West, how then can it be worth tearing up our woods and streams and poisoning wells in New York, Pennsylvania and beyond?   “It’s a ponzi scheme,” Jill Wiener, a frack activist from Callicoon, N.Y., told me. “It just shows it’s more about fracking paper and capital than actual gas.”  If my weekend crash course in climate catastrophe left me with a bleak portrait of the world being plundered and colonized by “extreme energy” production, on the march I found hope.  I marched with my six-year-old, Christopher, and other community gardeners in the “We Have Solutions” bloc, intended to highlight things like renewable energy and organic farming.  At the front of the bloc, Will Allen, an organic farmer from Vermont, held up a recent study by the Rodale Institute showing that organically farmed soil can actually sequester more carbon than trees do.  “We’re seeing yield increases dramat-

ically going up in two to three years,” Allen declared before a field of people waving sunflower signs with the slogan “Cook organic, not the planet.” “It doesn’t take very long,” he said. “This isn’t rocket science. We can fix this. We can fix climate change!” Close by, an ad-hoc group of contractors was towing a float featuring a five-foot-wide planet Earth that was spinning on a rotisserie motor powered by solar panels. “I’m marching for a safe green economy,” said Erl Kimmich, an energy efficiency consultant from the Upper West Side. “New York State is ready for this. They’re already gearing up the power grid to switch to more intermittent energy coming off wind farms and solar. All the contractors I work with are busy. They want to buy more trucks and hire more people.”  Next to him, Cindy Kerr, a school administrator from the Lower East Side, marched while pushing her four-yearold in a stroller. “I feel like we don’t have enough marches anymore,” she said. “Right now, we have this whole build to war. Where are the marches? I personally don’t think bombing ISIS or arming one faction or another in Syria is going to solve anything. We need to be in the streets.” The awesome turnout made for a long slog. It took two hours for our section to move, and for every step forward we took, it seemed, the cops would hold us back to allow feeder marches to enter from the side streets.  By the time we got to 42nd St., many people gave up and dispersed.  Still, the excitement of the marchers was palpable. “I’m amazed at the sheer volume of people who chose to be here today,” reCLIMATE, continued on p. 25 TheVillager.com


Work stopped at E. 9th dorm OLD P.S. 64, continued from p. 1

school building, at 605 E. Ninth St., from the city in 1998 and evicted the Latino-run CHARAS / El Bohio Cultural and Community Center from it in 2001. Previous plans of his — including adding a high-rise tower on the site — were shot down by the city or otherwise proved unfeasible. In addition, the city landmarked the building even while Singer owned it, further restricting his options. Cooper Union has reserved about 169 beds at the proposed “University House” dorm. The dorm plan has been vehemently opposed by local activists and community groups who want the place restored as a community center. Tuesday, Mendez reported that after nearly a year of her complaining — including her writing two letters — to the Department of Buildings, arguing that the project flouted D.O.B.’s “Dorm Rule,” she finally received a response Mon., Sept. 22. “This is a victory for the community,” Mendez said, “and let’s celebrate it while we got it. Then we have to move on to the next phase of the battle to get our building back to the community.” Mendez said the leases with Cooper Union and Joffrey Ballet School failed

to comply with “what we know to be a lease or what the Department of Buildings requires as a lease for educational institutions. “There are no special rooms reserved for the Joffrey Ballet school for meetings, dance or music,” she explained. “There are no specific inhouse services for either institution, as required by the Department of Buildings. There will be just a cafeteria, recreational room and computer room. Nothing unique.” Mendez said, due to the stop-work order, Cooper Union and Joffrey Ballet School now “will have to start the process of filing leases for educational institutions all over again — and I don’t think they’re going to do that because of community protests.” The East Village Community Coalition has been circulating a petition — on which it has received hundreds of local residents’ signatures — urging the city to reject the dorm. Singer could not immediately be reached for comment. According to the letter sent to Mendez this Monday, Singer must now halt any construction that may have begun under a partial work permit that “was issued based on misinformation to the OLD P.S. 64, continued on p. 13

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5


Occupiers pour into Wall St. for sit-in protest BY ZACH WILLIAMS

I

6

September 25, 2014

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

n response to rising sea levels and climate change’s other effects, more than 100 activist groups converged in Lower Manhattan on Monday to promote environmental justice as part of Flood Wall Street. Police preemptively blocked streets leading to the New York Stock Exchange, but about 1,000 activists succeeded in blocking Broadway for about eight hours at its intersection with Morris St. before extending the demonstration to include the intersection with Wall St., as well. “People gonna rise like water. We’re gonna calm this crisis down,” went one prominent slogan from the march. “I hear the voice of my great granddaughter saying shut down Wall St. now.” In contrast to many past protests, police officers largely left the demonstrators alone while at the same time preventing them from penetrating further into the Financial District. Some demonstrators suspected that Mayor de Blasio was behind the surprisingly restrained police presence. “I think people seem happy and engaged. The police don’t seem to be too bossy,” said Joanna Burgess, a Battery Park City resident. She said she saw neighborhood residents that morning seemingly dressed for Flood Wall Street. About 100 arrests — including of an activist dressed as a polar bear — were made at about 7 p.m. after police moved in to clear the street. The event followed the People’s Climate March the day before, which drew hundreds of thousands of activists, political leaders and celebrities to Midtown. Most in Flood Wall Street took part in that demonstration, some remaining in town one more day in order to participate in direct action against the financial industry, which they charge, enables a global system of inequality, as well as global warming itself. “I’m very concerned about climate change, and Wall St. is part of the problem,” said Cara Jennings, a Florida resident who came to New York, her toddler in tow, for the protests. “This is where the financing comes from for oil extraction and pipelines, so we have to convince Wall St. to solve the climate problem.” The group assembled in the morning at Battery Park to the tunes of the Rude Mechanical Orchestra, the local activist marching band. Author / activist Naomi Klein told the crowd that climate change’s consequences must continue to inspire

Blue shirt-wearing Occupy Wall Street activists held a Flood Wall Street action on Monday.

activists who came together three years ago for Occupy Wall Street. “We are powered by the knowledge that the same system of short-term profit and deregulated greed that deepens inequality and forecloses on homes is the very same system that is foreclosing on our collective home,” Klein said. “We never went away. We were organizing in our communities and now we are back with the power of water behind us.” While activists originally planned to stage a sitin in front of the stock exchange, they did so on Broadway instead. Several vehicles were caught in the mass protest for at least an hour before being let through. “I didn’t plan on it, but it’s a good cause,” said Sean Vander from an automobile stalled at the intersection of Morris St. and Broadway just a few doors down from his destination at 25 Broadway. Residents trying to enter Wall St. were told by police to walk several blocks north in order to get home. As the sit-in continued, some activists grew weary with the tedium of occupation. The group’s numbers dwindled by half by late afternoon. Scuffles with police broke out when some protesters tried to swarm the police defense of Wall St. Police pushed back, smacked hands holding onto metal

crowd-control barriers and pepper-sprayed several protesters and a journalist before things settled down. Protesters bounced around a 25-foot-tall “carbon ball,” but police eventually deflated it. Demonstrators for the most part remained seated, discussing environmental issues among themselves. Later, some would draw chalk doodles on the street and play soccer. One demonstrator watching a game said such activities promote more free use of public space in a city known for its consumer culture. “This is a space in which we don’t see relaxation very often,” said Jason, who declined to give a last name. “That creates an energy that is helpful.” But some protesters, and onlookers, said hours of sitting on Broadway was not effective enough in inspiring more people to put pressure on Wall St. firms to confront global warming. “I thought it was supposed to be about economic inequality and laying some plans for some kind of coherent action that could be taken on a political level,” said Eric Rassi, a resident of E. 10th St. and a former squatter. “But there’s nothing being discussed here, as far as I can see, on a political level at all. So, obviously this is not a movement that is going to be a political force. It’s going to be playtime politics.”

TheVillager.com


POLICE BLOTTER Batty assault Police seized a baseball bat after a man, 32, allegedly connected with a strong swing to the left temple of another man, 37. The bat bash followed trash talk between the two in front of 130 W. Third St. at about 4 a.m. on Tues., Sept. 16. Police charged Stanley Sacarello with felony assault. The victim suffered a laceration, according to police.

Ain’t that the tooth According to police, a man examined several stores on Fifth Ave. between 18th and 14th Sts. last Thursday before lifting four electric toothbrushes from a Rite Aid at 501 Sixth Ave. At about 1:55 p.m. on Sept. 18, police stopped Michael Core, 49, and found he had no receipt for the toothbrushes but did have a box cutter in his right front pocket. He was charged with petty larceny, a misdemeanor, following the heist of $53 worth of dental merchandise.

Double-knife driver Police observed a car being driven recklessly at about 12:20 a.m. on Sat., Sept. 20. The car was driv-

ing against traffic, failing to yield at an intersection and passing on the left. As they were arresting the driver, at the southeast corner of W. 14th and Hudson Sts., police said, one officer spotted a large gravity knife in the man’s possession. The man said it was for self-protection. During a search, police went on to find a second gravity knife in the right pants pocket of Arneil Jones, 44. He was charged with criminal possession of a weapon, a felony.

McDonald, 30, grabbed the woman by the hair, lifting her from the ground. He then reportedly punched her in the face, after which she fell to the ground, suffering scrapes to a knee and swelling to her face. The victim, however, refused to have photos taken of the injuries or make a written statement about the assault. A police report did not indicate how the man and the woman knew each other. McDonald faces a misdemeanor assault charge.

Bleecker St. groping A man was charged with forcibly touching a 22-year-old woman in front of 158 Bleecker St., according to police. Police say David Coleman, 36, slapped and squeezed the victim’s buttocks with both hands at about 3:55 a.m. on Fri., Sept. 19. He was charged with forcible touching, a misdemeanor. Police said Coleman also had a quantity of cocaine in his possession at the time of his arrest, but he was not charged additionally for it.

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PHOTO BY ZACH WILLIAMS

ocal politicians, housing activists and tenants are urging landlord Jared Kushner to respect tenants’ rights through better communication and management of renovation work at 170-174 E. Second St. Ceiling collapses, unannounced utility stoppages, incessant pounding and construction-related dust demonstrate Kushner’s lack of concern for tenants’ safety and quality of life, critics charge. City Councilmember Rosie Mendez and Borough President Gale Brewer joined the tenants and Cooper Square Committee earlier this month outside the buildings, saying that they would hold Kushner accountable should the current situation continue. Speaking at the Sept. 4 press conference, Cypress Dubin, a resident of 174 E. Second St., said, “Their pattern of responding after the fact to critical issues which could have been anticipated shows a complete lack of concern to prevent emergencies, maintain services and protect the daily lives of the tenants.” A few weeks earlier, a ceiling had collapsed in an apartment occupied by Mark Fritsche at 170 E. Second St. That Aug. 13 incident followed a series of leaks in his apartment. The ceiling collapse could have been prevented had workers sent by building management been more careful, he said. According to a Westminster City Living representative, building management tried to address the situation as soon as possible, but Fritsche barred access to his apartment. Westminster oversees about 600 residential buildings throughout Manhattan on Kushner’s behalf. About 70 percent of residents moved out of 170174 E. Second St. in the months after Kushner purchased the buildings for about $17 million at the end of last year. Those that currently remain, the Westminster spokesperson said, are simply instigating trouble in order to boost buyout offers. Dubin is one of several tenants locked in ongoing legal battles with Westminster, which maintains the tenants are not rent-regulated and illegally occupy their longtime homes. Fritsche, president of a tenants association organized against Kushner, did receive a rent-stabilized lease after he proved that his apartment had been inappropriately deregulated by a previous landlord. Mendez said at the Sept. 4 press conference that the remaining tenants at 170-174 E. Second St. should be able to count on the local community and government to prevent both their eviction and

From left, at the Sept. 4 press conference outside 170-174 E. Second St., Councilmember Rosie Mendez, Cypress Dubin, Fredy Kaplan, Mary Ann Siwek and Borough President Gale Brewer.

damage to their property and quality of life. “You are not alone,” she told them. Patrick Crosetto, C.E.O. of Kushner Companies, reiterated assurances from July that the situation in the buildings will improve despite the tenants. The company remains “proud of its strong track record of providing quality service to its residents,” Kushner said through the spokesperson. The two East Village buildings were in disrepair upon their purchase in December, according to Westminster. A $3 million effort will update utilities and building amenities, Crosetto noted. Air filters installed in 170 E. Second St. to mitigate dust subsequently disappeared, the company spokesperson added. The lack of mailboxes for two weeks in 174 E. Second St. was because the replacement process required U.S. Postal Service inspections, the spokesperson said, adding that tenants could get their mail from a local post office branch during the interim. Building management has tried to make necessary repairs to the tenants’ apartments only to be denied entry, the spokesperson stated. Forty-eighthour notice is given to residents before nonemergency utility shutdowns, he said. The situation with tenants in the two buildings is an anomaly, Crosetto said. “As always, we will continue our ongoing communication with all of our residents to address any of their concerns, despite the actions of a handful of illegal tenants who continue to sabotage our efforts for their own personal gain,” he said. Tenant Julia Foote said her experience with the company has been fine at 201 E. Fourth St. However, other Westminster tenants in four other East Village buildings tell a different story. Ten of them said in interviews with The Villager that unannounced utility shutoffs, basement floods and sluggish responses to tenant complaints are part of the Westminster experience. At 201 E. Second St. residents said their hot water was turned off two weeks ago without warning. Management assured them the problem would be resolved within a day, but two more days passed before service resumed, said resident Alessandro Harabin. When he moved into the building in August,

there was no knob on the sink, the bathtub did not drain and a window would not shut, he added. “Basically, it’s really tough to get in touch with them,” another resident, Kate Curran, said of building management. “I wonder who is in charge of all this? Is anyone competent?” Luxury amenities attracted four young professionals to move in together at 199 E. Fourth St. in 2013, when the building was still in the real estate portfolio of Ben Shaoul. Similar problems that the four men experienced under Shaoul continued after Westminster took over the building last year, including no winter heating, more flooding, mold and a robbery two months ago thanks to an unprotected window. A promise to install protective bars within a week has yet to be fulfilled, they said. All told, the four men have lost about $12,000 worth of property to water damage and theft in their $6,100-permonth apartment, according to one of them, who requested anonymity since months remain on their lease. Westminster furthermore did not let them know beforehand when it did address an ongoing mold problem caused by the flooding, according to another one of the men. “We came home to a warning sign that said, ‘Don’t come in for 24 hours,’ ” he said. Another tenant in the building, though, said she has not had to fight to remain rent-regulated, a contrast to suggestions from Mendez and others that Westminster targets rent-protected tenants. However, that has not made it any easier to have leaks fixed in her apartment, as her landlord, all the while, continues to encourage her to move out, she said, on condition of anonymity. “[Westminster] doesn’t harass you,” she said. “Every few months they put a notice up for a buyout. They just don’t fix anything.” The spokesperson said on Sept. 16 that buildings inevitably need repairs, and echoed previous assurances. “Westminster management is always responsive,” he said, “and constantly works to improve the high-quality service it provides to its residents.” TheVillager.com


‘Drop the appeal!’ N.Y.U. project opponents cry BY TEQUILA MINSKY AND LINCOLN ANDERSON

U

nder the eyes of the Fiorello LaGuardia statue — which had “STOMP”-style garbage can-lid cymbals added to its clapping hands for the occasion — opponents of the N.Y.U. South Village expansion plan rallied on Wednesday. The community’s fight against the development scheme was poised to enter round two, at the Appellate Division, shortly afterward. Speakers included Mark Crispin Miller, of N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan; attorney Jim Walden, the opponents’ attorney; former Parks Commissioner Henry Stern; Public Advocate Letitia James; Assemblymember Deborah Glick; state Senators Brad Hoylman and Daniel Squadron; Congressmember Jerrold Nadler; Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and Broadway actress Kathleen Chalfant. More than one speaker indicated that Bill de Blasio — who is an N.Y.U. alumnus — should be there with them. “The mayor should not be on the wrong side of history,” James declared. “Drop the appeal!” the crowd chanted. N.Y.U., the city and the community opponents have all appealed Judge Donna Mills’s Jan. 7 decision, in which she ruled that three of the “strips” of open space along the eastern and western edges of N.Y.U.’s two South Village superblocks — Mercer Playground, LaGuardia Corner Gardens and LaGuardia Park —  are, in fact, parks, and thus can’t be used for the massive, planned four-building construction project unless they are first “alienated” from park use by the state Legislature.

However, the community coalition argues that the Mercer-Houston Dog Run — which N.Y.U. says it needs to create its new “Zipper Building” on the current Coles gym site — is also parkland. Stern previously submitted an affidavit for the court case, detailing how, he said, N.Y.U. repeatedly undermined the open-space strips’ ownership from being officially transferred from the Department of Transportation to the Parks Department. Members of the East Village show “STOMP” joined the crowd and performed following the speeches. University spokesperson John Beckman issued a statement slamming the community rally. “Protests like this make for a good photo-op, but N.Y.U. will remain focused on the court case,” he said. “As we did in the lower court — which ruled that we should be allowed to proceed with the initial and largest phase of the 2031 core plan [the Zipper Building] — we will make the case to the Appellate Division that on the one outstanding issue — the lower court’s holding that some of the D.O.T. strips should be treated as parkland — the court was in error.  “The need to create additional academic space is clear, and has only become more evident,” Beckman’s statement continued. “Since the lower court’s ruling, a faculty-led committee has affirmed the pressing need for additional academic space at N.Y.U. We intend to move forward in developing the space needed to ensure that N.Y.U. maintains its academic excellence and standards.” At Wednesday’s Appellate hearing, each side had 15 minutes to give oral testimony before a panel of judges, who then could ask questions. In such appeals, a decision can come at anytime afterward, but not on the day of the hearing.

“STOMP” cast members made some noise in support of the community.

How a child learns to learn will impact his or her life forever. Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House | City and Country

a child learns tolearn learnwill will HowHow a child learns to Please visit www.cityandcountry.org for information and application materials. impact his or her lifeTel:forever. impact his orNew her life 146 West 13th Street, York, NY 10011forever. 212.242.7802 Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House | City and Country

OpenWednesday, Housey|, City and Country W e d n e s d aNovember N o v e m13, b efrom r 1 96-8pm , 6-8pm Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

All for one! From left, Connie Masullo, of 505 LaGuardia Place; veteran activist Doris Diether and former Parks Commissioner Henry Stern at Wednesday’s “Save the Village” rally. TheVillager.com

Please visit www.cityandcountry.org for information materials. Please and visitapplication www.cityandcountry.org for information

146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802 and application materials.

146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802 September 25, 2014

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September 25, 2014

TheVillager.com


HealthPlex helps save a heartattack and three stroke victims BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

T

TheVillager.com

FILE PHOTO

he new Lenox Hill HealthPlex recently successfully helped treat a patient suffering a heart attack, two others with stroke symptoms and another with a dangerous, bleeding aneurysm in his brain. These are precisely the kind of life-threatening conditions critics said the new freestanding emergency department wouldn’t be able to help with. As of Mon., Sept. 22, the HealthPlex — at W. 12th St. and Sixth Ave., in St. Vincent’s Hospital’s former O’Toole Building — had been open 67 days and seen a total of 4,290 patients. According to Dr. Eric Cruzen, the facility’s director of emergency medicine, 31 percent of patients to date have been Category 1 or 2 on the HealthPlex’s five-point “emergency severity index.” “Generally, people who score 1 or 2 are very ill with things that are true emergencies and need immediate care,” he said. About 7.5 percent of those very ill patients have required hospitalization at the facility of their choice. Earlier this month, the HealthPlex saw a woman walk in off the street with a type of heart attack known as an “ST elevation myocardial infarction.” “That’s the type of heart attack that has to go immediately to the cardiac catheterization lab to have a balloon angioplasty and / or stent,” Cruz explained. “We were able to evaluate, stabilize her, begin her treatment and immediately transfer her directly to Beth Israel’s cardiac cath lab. All of this was done well within the goal time of 90 minutes from presentation to angioplasty. In fact, the patient was at our facility less than 20 minutes from door to door.  She did very well.  So, for those who asked, ‘What if I go to the HealthPlex and am having a heart attack?’ we now have an actual example to support the fact that the care is top-notch, fast and effective.” Two other patients who came to the HealthPlex with stroke symptoms were given the clot-busting medication TPA.  One of them, a woman, had walked in suffering sudden onset of weakness of one arm and one leg, plus difficulty speaking. Clots can cause brain tissue to die. “Both did well” after treatment, Cruzen said. In late August, a patient walked into the HealthPlex “with the worst headache in his life,” which had started just minutes before. It turned out to be a brain aneurysm

Dr. Eric Cruzen, HealthPlex.

of

Lenox

Hill

— the less-common type of stroke, when the wall of a vessel becomes weak and starts to balloon out, causing severe bleeding. This often can be fatal in a short amount of time. “He was seen immediately and had a CT angiogram that showed an aneurysm bleeding in his brain,” Cruz said. “He was rushed to the specialized neuro-intervent ional suite at Lenox Hill Hospital and underwent a complex coiling procedure that stopped the bleeding and saved his life.” As Cruz explained it, the coiling procedure involves inserting a very thin catheter into a blood vessel in the leg, then carefully threading it up to where the bleeding is in the brain. A small metal coil is then deployed from the catheter’s end that allows the neurosurgeon to stop the bleeding. The patient recovered at Lenox Hill Hospital and was discharged several days later. “With conditions like aneurysms, time from symptom onset to diagnosis is critically important,” Cruz said. “I am so happy that the HealthPlex was here for this gentleman. “We’ve really seen the whole spectrum of emergency medicine cases — heart attacks, strokes, aneurysms, pneumonia, broken bones and sepsis, as well as coughs, colds, twisted ankles, cuts, scrapes and bruises,” he said. “We’re seeing about 75 patients a day now, about half of which are coming to us via E.M.S. ambulances. We’ve transferred folks [for higher-level care] to Beth Israel, N.Y.U., Mt. Sinai, Cornell, Columbia and Lenox Hill.  “We’ve really enjoyed becoming a part of the Village and look forward to a long future of caring for our neighbors.”

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Come See the

on Crosby Street!

FILE PHOTO

In June 2013, workers removed material from the illegal seventh-floor penthouse at 514-516 E. Sixth St. The B.S.A. had ruled in fall 2012 that Ben Shaoul had to take the penthouse down. The developer is now facing nearly exactly the same situation with another building he owns at 515 E. Fifth St.

NYU and the Housing Works present

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September 25, 2014

Shaoul agrees he will remove seventh floor of E. 5th building BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

L

ast Tues., Sept. 16, the city’s Board of Standard and Appeals, reached an agreement with Ben Shaoul under which the developer conceded he would remove the seventh story that he added to 515 E. Fifth St. Shaoul was given 60 days to comply, and a week from the B.S.A. hearing date in which to obtain a Department of Buildings permit to remove the seventh story. If he was unable to do so, the B.S.A. would intervene. It’s not clear how the B.S.A. will rule on the building’s sixth story, which was also added by Shaoul. A follow-up B.S.A. hearing was scheduled for Nov. 25, at which time the issue will be further discussed. According to a representative of Councilmember Rosie Mendez, Shaoul is continuing to seek a variance for the sixth floor. However, one case involving the building’s rooftop additions under the Multiple Dwellings Law is on hold, while another involving the zoning resolution has been deferred. The B.S.A. won’t rule on the sixth floor until the one above it comes down, the Mendez aide said. However, it’s possible the developer will earn some “goodwill” with the board by removing the topmost floor, the aide indicated. Mendez meanwhile is withholding comment until the Nov. 25 hearing, her staffer said. Mendez and state Senator Brad Hoylman were at last week’s B.S.A. hearing.

The 515 E. Fifth St. rooftop addition has a long, complicated history. D.O.B. initially granted a waiver to allow it. But in 2008, the B.S.A. ruled D.O.B. lacked authority to grant the waiver. In 2012, Shaoul applied to the B.S.A. for a variance allowing the extra floors. Since 2008, the pair of additional stories have been rented to tenants. There are four duplexes, all spanning the two floors, which would have to be reconfigured to remove the seventh story. In a very similar case, in June 2013, Shaoul, based on a September 2012 B.S.A. ruling, finally removed the seventh-floor penthouse he added atop another building, 514-516 E. Sixth St. A sixth story he added was allowed to remain. At both the E. Fifth and Sixth St. buildings, tenants — working with the Urban Justice Center — challenged the rooftop additions under the 1929 Multiple Dwellings Law, charging they were illegal because neither building had an elevator or adequate fire escapes, as required by law. Tenants at the Fifth St. building also filed a lawsuit charging D.O.B. had issued Shaoul the permit for the rooftop additions in violation of the “Sliver Law,” which caps building heights on lots narrower than 45 feet. “This seems to be a tougher decision than on Sixth St.,” Alice Baldwin, a 515 E. Fifth St. tenant, said of the latest B.S.A. ruling. “This story has ramifications for the rest of the neighborhood.” TheVillager.com


Panel ponders saving buildings and affordability BY ALBERT AMATEAU

A

TheVillager.com

PHOTO COURTESY G.V.S.H.P.

panel of community activists and local politicians considered affordable housing and historic preservation as related issues at a forum the drew about 200 Village residents last week. The event — held at the New School, and sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and the Historic Districts Council —  was partly a response to the Real Estate Board of New York’s frequent assertions that the expansion of historic districts is partly to blame for the lack of affordable housing. “Affordability and preservation are not in conflict,” declared Andrew Berman, G.V.S.H.P. executive director and the moderator of the Sept. 16 roundtable discussion. Indeed, historic districts and Landmarks Preservation Commission designation often protect existing affordable housing, Berman said. Residents of two prominent affordable residential projects in the Village — the high-rise 505 LaGuardia Place and the West Village Houses between Bank and Morton Sts. — pushed hard for landmark designation, Berman recalled. Panel members included East Village City Councilmember Rosie Mendez; Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer; Harvey Epstein, community development project director at the Urban Justice Center; Nadine Maleh, a developer of supportive housing at the nonprofit Community Solutions; and Rachel Meltzer, assistant professor of urban policy at the New School. The panel focused mainly on the lack of affordable housing, on the threats to existing rent-stabilized apartments and on opportunities to create new affordable units. “The weakening of rent regulations, vacancy decontrol and decontrol of high-rent apartments [more than $2,500 per month] has taken countless apartments out of the price range of most people, especially in Manhattan,” Mendez said. “More than 100,000 apartments have lost rent regulation in recent years,” Brewer said, noting the increasing number of Mitchell-Lama landlords taking the option of buying out of the state program that moderated rents and capped sale prices. “There have been 20 years of government failure to support affordable housing,” Epstein said. “Now, even H.D.F.C.s [Housing Development Fund Corporations] can be sold for $1 million,” he added. H.D.F.C.’s are financed low-cost limited-equi-

At the Sept. 16 forum discussion, from left, Andrew Berman, of G.V.S.H.P.; Rachel Meltzer; Nadine Maleh; Harvey Epstein; Rosie Mendez; and Gale Brewer.

ty property. Epstein suggested that penalties should be imposed on landlords who elect to leave public affordability programs. Because there are fewer and fewer available sites for housing, nonprofit developers must bid against luxury developers, Maleh noted. She added that despite the loss of government funding, there are still opportunities. While government funding for housing has nearly evaporated and is gone for the foreseeable future, affordable housing can still be financed by merging private and public funds, Meltzer said. And government has the power to mandate affordable housing for those partnerships, she added. “We already gave 421A tax abatements to luxury housing developers in some parts of Manhattan,” Mendez observed, referring to a city program that was especially active a decade or so ago. Maleh noted that federal tax credits are available for redevelopers of properties on the National Register of Historic Places. Her nonprofit development group has developed supportive housing in preservation areas including Times Square; the Prince George, on E. 28th St.; The Christopher, on W. 24th St. (the former McBurney YMCA residential wing; and The Andrews, built in 1901, on Bowery at Spring St. In recent years, the voluntary 80/20 program (80 percent market rate and 20 percent stabilized rent) has been available for developers who receive a tax break — with the affordability part of such projects usually lasting 20 years. Epstein said the affordability percentage could be increased to 40 or 50 percent. Even more desirable, he said, would be to mandate contextual zoning throughout the city with

permanent rent restrictions. The goal is to encourage construction or redevelopment of new housing in scale with the neighborhood, he explained. Epstein suggested that any developer of a project with an F.A.R. (floor-area ratio) of 4 or more should be required to create affordable housing.

“It’s a tradeoff between density and affordability,” Meltzer said. “Affordability does require density.” What must not continue is the recent practice of using parking lots and green spaces in New York City Housing Authority developments to construct “infill” housing — high-rise, mostly market-rate buildings, Epstein said. A potential for affordable apartments lies in the “hundreds of vacant, warehoused apartments” in existing buildings, Brewer said. “We have to plan and figure out how to realize that potential,” she said. “Government has abdicated its responsibility to enforce its regulations,” said Epstein. The city policy in recent years has been to allow developers and landlords to “self-certify” their compliance with building regulations and housing rules, with only sporadic checking by city agencies, he noted. The lack of government investment in affordable housing is due to a lack of will, Epstein charged. “We spent public money to build a stadium in the Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn,” he said. “In Queens, we spent public money to build a mall. The question is, what are we investing in?”

Work stopped at E. 9th dorm OLD P.S. 64, continued from p. 5

department.” A subsequent media alert issued by Mendez’s office Wednesday, said, “On July 25, 2014, the Department of Buildings approved Singer’s application to have the Joffrey Ballet Center Concert Group Program (C.G.P.) considered a not-for-profit with housing accommodations, as opposed to a dormitory, and issued a partial work permit in August to convert the ground floor and 1st floor into dormitory rooms for C.G.P. “After reviewing the objections raised by Councilwoman Rosie Men-

dez in a letter dated September 3, 2014, D.O.B. determined that the lease agreements into which Singer and The Cooper Union and C.G.P. entered did not meet the agency’s criteria for a lease with an educational institution. “Moreover, D.O.B. determined that C.G.P. could not be considered a notfor-profit with housing accommodations since the application contained misinformation that disqualifies C.G.P. for this status.” Mendez will lead a press conference this Sun., Sept. 28, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., at the old P.S. 64 / CHARAS, on E. Ninth St. between Avenues B and C.

CALL TO SUBSCRIBE

646-452-2475 September 25, 2014

13


PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

The winds of change are a’blowing A man, who didn’t give his name, blew a shofar on 42nd St. at Sunday’s People’s Climate March in front of “There is no Planet B” umbrella. He had started out with a group of marchers all with shofars, but they got separated. “It was shofars that brought down the walls of Jericho,” he said, “and maybe it’ll be shofars that bring down the barriers to climate change and global inter-responsibility.” The ram horns will be sounded for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which began Wednesday at sundown.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Whoa! That’s offensive To The Editor: Re “In drag-out fight, neighbors say to give queens the boot” (news article, Sept. 18) and “Patrol gets booted” (Scoopy’s Notebook, Sept. 18): As a resident of the far West Village, I am shocked and offended by the comment from Dave Poster, head of the Christopher St Patrol: “We highly disapprove of Boots N Saddle reopening on 47 Seventh Ave. — or basically anywhere in the West Village.” Anywhere?

EVAN FORSCH

Boots N Saddle is an institution and the nabe should be trying to help it find an appropriate spot for relocation. Good for Pastor Mark Erson booting these vigilantes out of his church on Christopher St. Kate Walter

Patrol lacked backup To The Editor: “Patrol gets booted” (Scoopy’s Notebook, Sept. 18):

Fortunately, the church’s position on Boots N Saddle seems to be one of tolerance, and a search for compromise — unlike the patrol, which would have done well to sit down with its host church and compare notes before going into such a contentious meeting. In a perfect and gay/historically respectful Greenwich Village, the church would have had the opportunity to kick the patrol out in advance of the meeting. I wonder if the Greenhouse location would be a good fit for Boots N Saddle. Just thinkin’ out loud... . Or the space where the iHop was at Carmine and Varick Sts., currently the pop-up Halloween store. They should get it before someone else does. The cabaret could be downstairs, to mitigate show noise — like Cornelia Street Cafe — and bar and whatever else upstairs. Patrick Shields

Wind of change? Nope To The Editor: Re “Riding wind of discontent, Zephyr runs strong” (news article, Sept. 11): It depends on how you look at voter sentiment, but in my view 34 percent of the vote does not a winner make (especially since the turnout was so poor to begin with). LETTERS, continued on p. 16

14

September 25, 2014

TheVillager.com


In bike nirvana, trying to stay sane in the lane TALKING POINT BY MICHELE HERMAN

I

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY DOUGLAS GOWLAND

’ve been thinking about the ’80s lately. I’ve been remembering how mad I was then, and how I swore at strangers on the street. I was mad because I rode my bike in the city every day, and let me tell you — Manhattan in the ’80s may have been on the upswing, but those streets were mean. I should clarify: The streets themselves were fine. I loved the streets. I loved the rubber on the blacktop, sticking out an arm to signal and leaning in to take a turn. I loved being out there in all weather, going to all corners of the city, usually quicker than the subway. I loved the coasting-with-the-current feel of riding down the surprisingly steep hills of Fifth and Ninth Avenues I loved looking up and finding my little 10-speed self in the seamy razzle-dazzle of Times Square, the center of the universe. It was just the pedestrians, drivers, motor vehicles and the city’s cockeyed priorities that made me crazy. Pedestrians jaywalked in front of me while giving me dirty looks or yelling at me. Drivers told me I had no business being on their road, and sped up at puddles. Doors opened a crack, hands emerged and cigarette ash or cold coffee tumbled toward my feet. Worse, doors swung wide open without warning. Older men in sedans rolled down their windows to lecture me: The streets are not safe for a young lady like yourself. Cars were mostly small but they stank. Buses snorted out hot clouds of particulates as big and black as ground pepper. Bike racks were nearly nonexistent; theft was a fact of life. Bicyclists got ticketed all the time, but speeding drivers and jaywalkers — never. I got so mad that I got involved in the movement to improve cycling conditions. I wrote articles and essays about biking and bike design, all aimed at making the city a more bike-friendly place. In the early ’90s I co-wrote the Bicycle Blueprint, Transportation Alternative’s booklength master plan for bringing bicycling into the mainstream in New York City. It was a stirring document, full of hope and exhortation and sensible action plans. Life on the streets settled down for me in the years since. I learned to count my breaths and not engage. And, as drivers gradually resigned themselves to sharing the road, I experienced far less overt provocation. Cars got less noxious (though unfortunately much bigger). Bus breath

Michele Herman in 2002, back in the “bad old days” before the city’s current bicycle revolution.

switched from a solid to relatively odorless gaseous state. The Hudson River bike path, our very own Northwest Passage, provided a calm and much-needed route from the Lower to the Upper West Side. And now, with last year’s rollout of Citi Bikes and the ever-expanding network of bike lanes — two of the more revolutionary signatures of the Bloomberg years — the big change is a’coming, the one we cyclists marched for and dreamed of: a relative golden age for bicycling in New York City. The streets are starting to look like an architect’s rendering of a friendly, green city, complete with flowers in the traffic-calmed intersections and smiling couples riding side by side. (Note: Doing so is dangerous and inconsiderate.) It’s becoming possible to imagine the post-petroleum city we rhapsodized about in the Blueprint. So then why am I mad again? Why am I yelling at strangers? This time, weirdly, I’m rarely mad at the worst offenders — the actual drivers of motor vehicles — I’m just mad at the fact of them. What’s getting to me, I’m sad to say, is being relegated to, segregat-

ed in, stopped in my tracks by bike lanes that are great in theory but often a mess in practice. I’m mad at the pedestrians and my fellow cyclists who use them thoughtlessly, but I’m even more mad at the city for doing the biggest rijiggering of public space since one-way streets — while completely failing to prepare or educate the public. I have no beef with the painted lanes on the cross streets. They carve out a narrow safety zone, and lately I’ve been noticing that drivers are starting to respect it. Sometimes the protected lanes on avenues are O.K. — if traffic is light and I’m not venturing into Midtown and there’s no broken glass (and since the street sweepers can’t get in, the shards remain until they’re ground to sand), and there’s no truck unloading or cars parked or a work crew tearing up the lane. I didn’t include pedestrians in my list because there are always pedestrians — ears plugged, eyes down — blithely crossing the lane midblock. I defy anyone to ride a bike up through Midtown on the Eighth Avenue bike lane during rush hour and not emerge from the experience shaken and disgusted. The side-

walk is unusually narrow, and a chunk of it is taken up with subway grates. Between the Bolt Bus stops, the hotels, the Theater District, Port Authority and a major construction site, the western sidewalk is thick with luggage-toting tourists and weary commuters. The dike inevitably breaks and a sea of pedestrians fills the bike path. They trudge along as if they have no idea the bike path isn’t a courtesy lane designed for them. I don’t swear anymore. I just yell, “It’s a bike path, people!” shake my head and wait for them to scatter. I’ve read the statistics about bike lanes, all of which point to an impressive increase in safety. But I can tell you that on the ground the lanes require a kind of exhausting vigilance that I find far more enervating than riding with the traffic. Please understand that I am not minimizing the twin dangers posed by cars: the physical danger of being crushed and the chemical and geopolitical danger of petroleum. But cars have one thing going for them: They can’t go sideways. And when you ride with the cars you have a little flexibility to get around obstacles. I understand that we city cyclists stir up a lot of emotion. I have friends who admire me, friends who think I’m reckless or insane, and others who think I’m not militant enough in my denouncement of private cars. What I try to remember is that my life could easily have traveled a slightly different path. Instead of being a 30-year veteran of the streets, I could find myself wobbling for the first time on a Citi Bike, completely unaware that it would be polite for me to ride on the right side so that faster riders could pass me. I could be a driver complaining (quite legitimately) about cyclists who dart stealthily without signaling, angry at being expected to give up a chunk of what until recently had been considered my turf. I could even be one of those tourists in the Eighth Avenue crush who doesn’t see the harm of stepping onto the nearly empty strip of land just off the curb. I will now take a deep breath and count to 10. And I will say to the de Blasio administration while it’s still new and idealistic: Keep on slowly squeezing the cars until the tipping point arrives when it’s just not worth the aggravation of driving in Manhattan. Until that great day comes, bombard pedestrians, cab riders, drivers and bicyclists alike with signs and public-service announcements. And to all pedestrians and new cyclists, I say, Welcome. Exercise your muscles, but also your eyes and ears and common courtesy; I wish us all a long, safe and exhilarating life in the metropolis. September 25, 2014

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Mgr. Marinacci, 103, of Old St. Patrick’s

M

SCOOPY’S, continued from p. 2 ways followed Doris’s lead. Doris always takes the right position.” Hoylman, Gruber’s predecessor as C.B. 2 chairperson, fondly told the board veteran, “I have always taken your lessons to heart.” Chin gave Diether a City Council proclamation, Hoylman gave her one from the state Senate and Brewer gave her one of her own declaring it “Doris Diether Appreciation Day.” Gruber quipped, “Thank you for your years of service, even though you’re sometimes a bit of a pest — I mean, a contrarian.” Added Stewart of the octogenarian activist, “Doris does not miss a meeting. It doesn’t matter what kind of pain she’s in.” She must have some amazing painkillers, he joked. Not really — it’s called dedication! If they could only bottle that in a pill... .

BIG SHOTS AT CATS BASH: Gristedes magnate and former mayoral candidate John Catsimatidis celebrated his birthday earlier this month at

FILE PHOTO

onsignor Nicola Marinacci, of the Basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral, died on the evening of Sept. 13. He would have been 104 years old on Dec. 4. Marinacci was pastor of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral from 1970 to 1985. “The monsignor saved thousands of children in his lifetime, both in Italy during World War II and, since 1949, on the tough streets of Little Italy,” a message from the cathedral said. A viewing was held Tues., Sept. 16 at the Mary Manning Walsh Home, on the Upper East Side. The following day, a wake and Vigil Mass were held at the Little Italy cathedral. Timothy Cardinal Dolan led the Funeral Mass on Thurs., Sept. 18, at the Mulberry St. basilica. There will be a  Facebook  page —  “Monsignor Nicola Marinacci.”

In December 2010, then-Archbishop Timothy Dolan helped longtime former St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral pastor Monsignor Nicola Marinacci, then 100, to his seat, as the cathedral was officially designated the Catholic Archdiocese’s basilica church. To the left of them, Edward Cardinal Egan applauded along with other clergy.

Le Cirque, on E. 58th St. As he gave remarks, at one point, he quipped that everyone at the party was over age 50. However, there was one younger couple who looked like they were probably in their 30s. “Cats” then noted that he was proud to announce that among their midst was the very Navy SEAL who fatally shot Osama bin Laden. No doubt it was the same SEAL who, as Scoopy first reported back in June, Congressmember Carolyn Maloney told us would be giving the shirt that he wore on that fateful mission to the 9/11 Museum. One of the daily tabs recently reported that the shirt — with its blackedout American flag shoulder patch (well-suited for nighttime antiterrorist missions) — had, in fact, been donated to the museum’s collection. Other notables at the Catsimatidis confab included Joe Piscopo, Geraldo Rivera, cable TV news-show host Larry Kudlow and actor Gianni Russo (“Carlo,” from “The Godfather”), who sang at the affair.

SAFER HOUSTON AND SIXTH: Two years ago,

the death of Jessica Dworkin, a.k.a. Jessie Blue, 58, who was killed by a tractor-trailer while on her kick scooter at Houston and Sixth Ave., shocked and horrified her neighbors in Soho and elsewhere Downtown. After the tragic incident, Community Board 2 held at least three meetings — the first one mainly a massive outpouring of residents’ grief and rage at the intersection’s notoriously unsafe conditions. C.B. 2 member Jon Geballe, who lives nearby on W. Houston St., was recently pleased to report that the city’s Department of Transportation was, at last, putting in promised safety improvements at the chronically unsafe crossing, including sidewalk “neck-down” extensions and other traffic-calming measures. Shirley Secunda, the C.B. 2 Traffic and Transportation Committee chairperson, said the measures will help. “Oh, God yes,” she said. “I think it’s going to make a difference with the turning on Houston St. into Sixth Ave.” D.O.T., she said, was “very, very responsive” to what the community wanted to see done there.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR LETTERS, continued from p. 14

While some of our friends did vote for Zephyr and some clubs endorsed her, her coattails were much too short and her campaign issues weren’t enough for an overthrow of an incumbent. Let us hope, though, that Mr. Cuomo got the message about fracking, education and corruption (Hey, didn’t some of the indicted win office again? Ooops!) and move on. Sylvia Rackow

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September 25, 2014

‘Eyewitness’ pot shot To The Editor: While hosting “Up Close With Diana Williams,” Bill Ritter of Channel 7 “Eyewitness News” recently stated that New York State shouldn’t be like California and legalize medical marijuana, so that “anyone with a hangnail can smoke a joint.” Now I don’t want to rehash old and established facts like the economic advantages of industrial hemp, the ecological benefits of paper made with hemp hurds, or the fact that

marijuana is among the oldest and safest members of the pharmacopeia. I would, however, like to ask Mr. Ritter just what, exactly, is so terrible about a person with a hangnail smoking a joint? Jerry The Peddler

Doing great, keep it up! To The Editor: Re “There’s only one way to save our small businesses” (talking point,

by Sharon Woolums, Sept. 11): Ms. Woolums, I consistently appreciate your articles. You’ve done the Village a great service. Keep up the good work! Joseph Daquino E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 1 Metrotech North, 10th floor, Brooklyn, NY, NY 11201. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters. TheVillager.com


Buhmann on Art

BY BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN (stephaniebuhmann.com)

DRAWN TO LANGUAGE

On view in the Cynthia C. Wainwright Gallery, this exhibition brings together both emerging and established mid-career artists, such as Ed Ruscha, Jenny Holzer and Jack Pierson, whose works employ language as a structural and at times philosophical source of inspiration. TheVillager.com

Here, letters, words or phrases are transcribed, visualized, verbalized, symbolized, morphed into patterns, scrambled, and erased to create compositional content. While the works vary conceptually and aesthetically, ranging from humorous to political and lyrically abstract, for example, each makes use of words to create a unique image. Because of its eclectic and encompassing nature, the exhibition succeeds in paying homage to language in gener-

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST & FREIGHT + VOLUME GALLERY

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST & FREIGHT + VOLUME GALLERY

Michael Scoggins. “Explosion Drawing #5” (2014). Marker, prism color on paper.

Samuel Jablon. “The Poet Sculpture” (2013). Acrylic on wood.

al and as a timeless source of inspiration, which goes as far back as far as ancient calligraphy or illuminated manuscripts. Most importantly, this installation exemplifies the manifold ways in which artists can be drawn to this particular subject. Whether language is used for emphasis, to communicate specific meaning, draw out a narrative or simply to make a joke, it always proves to be a potent means of expression. By focusing on artists who

pursue their subject by using unusual materials, processes and techniques, “Drawn to Language” aims to encourage its audience to examine language in new ways. Through Jan. 11, 2015. At the Children’s Museum of the Arts (103 Charlton St., btw. Greenwich & Hudson Sts.). Hours: Mon./Wed., 12–5 p.m., Thurs./ Fri., 12–6 p.m., Sat./Sun., 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Call 212-274-0986 or visit cmany. org. September 25, 2014

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Sad and haunting, fascinating and painful THEATER WARM ENOUGH FOR SWIMMING Written by Maggie Cino Directed by Fred Backus Set by Daniel C. Soule Soundscape by Daniel McKleinfeld Runtime: 1hr 40min A FringeNYC Encore Series Presentation Sept. 25 & 27 at 9:30 p.m. | Oct. 2 at 8 p.m. At SoHo Playhouse 15 Vandam St. (btw. Varick & Ave. of the Americas) Tickets: $18 Reservations: 212-352-3101 or fringenyc-encoreseries.com

PHOTO BY HUNTER CANNING

BY MARTIN DENTON

T

he family I grew up in was the iconic nuclear kind: a father, a mother, two kids, living in the suburbs in a nice house. Whatever dangers lay beyond the doors of our house were faced together. Inside the doors was always and only safety, security, and certainty. In “Warm Enough for Swimming,” Maggie Cino introduces us to a family quite the opposite of mine. Eddie and Bridget are grown-up siblings who haven’t seen each other for a while. Eddie returns to the house near Atlantic City where they grew up when their grandmother — their only real relative at this point, and the woman who raised them — passes away. Also present are Alex, Bridget’s boyfriend who may or may not be in-

Alex (Derrick Peterson) pays a surprise visit to Bridget (Phoebe Silva), whose grandmother has just died.

Cino’s ‘quietly explosive’ family study has mythic dimensions volved in organized crime, and Viva (short for Genevieve), the privileged young woman whom Eddie has (literally) just married. (Inconveniently, to say the least, their wedding coin-

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

THE POWER OF LOVE: two operas Seymour Barab’s OUT and

THE WINDOW

RAPPACCINI’S DAUGHTER

Libretto by: Linsey Abrams Music by: Michael Cohen

September 18-28

Thursday- Saturday, 8pm Sunday, 3pm All Seats $18

NICO UNDERGROUND Directed by Michael Schiralli Starring: Tammy Faye

September 18-28

Thursday- Saturday, 8pm Sunday, 3pm All Seats $15

TEMPLE OF THE SOULS SIX PASSIONATE WOMEN Story by Anita Velez-Mitchell Music composed by Dean Landon and Anika Paris Book by Anita Velez-Mitchell, Lorca Peress, Anika Paris September 18-28 (previews on 09/16 + 09/17) Check for show times on our wesbite or Call us! Preview Tickets $15 General Tickets $18 Students/Seniors $12 Benefit Tickets $50 and $75 VIP

Written By: MARIO FRATTI

Directed By: STEPHAN MORROW

October 9 - October 26 Thursday - Saturday at 8pm Sunday at 3pm All Seats $12 Students & Seniors $10

cided with Grandma’s passing.) What transpires during this sad, haunting play is less an attempt at reconciliation between brother and sister than a series of dialogues and conversations where moments of understanding painfully push their way to the surface in hopes of, this time, not getting buried again. The style of the piece is naturalism, I guess, but there’s always something less substantial and more theatrical fomenting here. Time feels off-kilter, for one thing, even though ostensibly the story plays out in real time. And there’s an odd formalism to how Cino has structured the work — especially in how the characters so conveniently appear and disappear from the messy living room that is the play’s only set, and also in the recurring notion of characters trying to make coffee, never successfully — that brings

to mind a kind of magic reality circling these people, as if these fleeting chances they have in the confines of this piece of discovering important things about themselves and each other are mystical, even mythic in their dimension. What resonates most about “Warm Enough for Swimming” — which is directed by Fred Backus and features a terrifically evocative set by Daniel C. Soule and soundscape by Daniel McKleinfeld — are the characters, and the insights we gain into these very different, very troubled individuals. Lindsey Carter stands out as (and because she plays) outsider Viva. The contrast between the over-compensating woman we meet at the beginning, when she encounters her new sister-in-law for the very first time, and the complicated, caring, controlling, insecure woman we get to know as the play rolls on is stunning. Derrick Peterson plays Alex, who is also outside the family but belongs here in South Jersey. Though he has just as much at stake as the others in this story, there’s a weird grounding to his character that makes us more sure of his survival. As brother and sister, what Cino’s words and the actors David J. Goldberg and Phoebe Silva illuminate is how different their experiences growing up in the same household actually were. Eddie, the elder of the two, knew more about their mother (who died young) and struggled with balancing the need to protect with the need to escape. Bridget, who has never really done anything as an adult other than care for her grandmother, battles aloneness even while having known — in a way Eddie never has — unconditional love. The contrast is fascinating and painful, and really sits at the heart of this play. I’m a big fan of Maggie Cino’s work, and this is a very different direction for her as a playwright that makes me eager to see what comes next. Meanwhile, this is a quietly explosive family study that is certainly worth your time. Martin Denton is the founder and curator of Indie Theater Now, a digital library of more than 1,000 new play scripts from the world of indie theater that also houses commentary and features about contemporary American plays and playwrights. “Warm Enough for Swimming” is part of their 2014 FringeNYC Collection, which features 27 of the best new plays from this year’s NY International Fringe Festival. Visit indietheaternow. com/Subscribe/FringeNYC.

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

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September 25, 2014

TheVillager.com


Mirroring, but also magnifying FILM 52nd New York Film Festival Sept. 26–Oct. 12 At Various Lincoln Center Venues

COURTESY, FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER

Tickets & Info: filmlinc.com

BY STEVE ERICKSON

N

ow in its 52nd year, the New York Film Festival faces a delicate balancing act between its role as a source for premieres of Hollywood’s Oscar-bound prestige films — this year, that includes David Fincher’s “Gone Girl” and Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Inherent Vice,” both respectable choices judging from their directors — and as a showcase for filmmakers like Pedro Costa, Hong Sang-soo, and Lisandro Alonso, who’ve never found much of an audience in the US and have had trouble even getting distribution here. The main slate features 31 films, but the documentary and avant-garde sidebars double that. Perhaps wisely, “Projections,” formerly called “Views From the Avant-Garde,” has been halved; while it was great to see the festival devote so much space to non-narrative work, cramming 25 programs into a few days didn’t really work in practice. Titles of LGBT interest include Abel Ferrara’s “Pasolini” (Oct. 2, 6 p.m., Alice Tully Hall; Oct. 3, 9 p.m., Howard Gilman Theater), Bertrand Bonello’s “Saint Laurent” (Sept. 30, 8:30 p.m., Alice Tully Hall; Oct. 2, 8:30 p.m., Walter Reade Theater), and out gay Argentine director Matias Piñeiro’s “The Princess of France” (Oct. 5, noon, Walter Reade Theater; Oct. 6, 6 p.m., Francesca Beale Theater). The festival closes with Alejandro G. Iñarritu’s “Birdman.” We shall see if it reverses the aesthetic death spiral in which the director has been struggling since his strong debut, “Amores Perros.” Damien Chazelle’s “Whiplash” summons its inspiration for a dynamite finish, but it suffers from an overbearing sense of machismo that crosses over from character to film. Nineteen-year-old Andrew (Miles Teller) is an aspiring jazz drummer who studies at a New York music academy. One day, he gets the chance to work with the dictatorial Terence Fletcher (J.K. Simmons.) Their relationship quickly turns into emotional — and, occasionally, borderline physical — S&M. Chazelle’s sensibility draws on the profane, slur-laden dialogue of David Mamet and Quentin Tarantino. To say that Simmons’ performance is over-the-top would be putting it mildly; he evokes memories of his role as a neo-Nazi leader in the HBO prison drama “Oz.” While I doubt Chazelle approves of everything Fletcher says, the film is also extremely white and male. Andrew’s girlfriend barely appears as a TheVillager.com

Jack O’Connell in Yann Demange’s “ ‘71.”

Prestige films, directors little-known here, S&M drumsticks & Godard lives presence in it before he dumps her — though his treatment of her doesn’t exactly flatter him — and the many African-American musicians in the cast get no lines to speak. Despite these flaws, the film eventually manages to present Andrew and Fletcher as equals in an odd sort of gameplay. In its perversely thrilling finale, they match musical wits — the equivalent of a spaghetti Western gundown, played out with a drum kit rather than guns (Sept. 28, 9 p.m. & Sept. 29, 6 p.m., Alice Tully Hall). Yann Demange’s “ ‘71” is a flawed film that’s still powerful in unexpected ways. It puts its worst foot forward, opening in the middle of a boxing match depicted in vertigo-inducing shakycam and quick cutting. The film’s biggest weakness is the extent to which Demange’s direction borrows from Paul Greengrass, although “ ‘71” is generally more sedate than its first scene. Additionally, the plot is basically lifted from Carol Reed’s classic “Odd Man Out.” Sent to  Belfast in 1971, a British soldier (Jack O’Connell) is injured and very quickly gets in over his head. A number of locals help him, but he’s carted from danger to danger. What’s novel about this film is its physicality. CGI has made cinematic bloodshed increasingly antiseptic, but Demange restores grit and dirt to it. The soldier becomes objectified — not sexually, despite O’Connell’s youth and good looks — and turned into a body leaking from numerous wounds, as well as a thing to be exchanged. The film also has a fine ear for sound design, from the deafening racket created by women banging garbage can lids on the ground to protest the soldiers’ presence to the murky drones that accom-

pany the aftermath of a pub bombing. It may be set 43 years ago and inspired by an even earlier movie, but the depiction of imperial arrogance wandering into another culture’s sectarian warfare couldn’t be more current (Sept. 27, 6 p.m., Alice Tully Hall; Sept. 28, 6 p.m., Walter Reade Theater). The importance of Swiss-French director JeanLuc Godard’s work from 1959’s “Breathless” to 1967’s “Weekend” is rarely questioned by serious film critics and cinephiles, even if the films themselves aren’t to everyone’s taste. After “Weekend,” that consensus splinters. Films like “Goodbye To Language,” as good as they are, help explain why. It’s a nearly plotless collection of literary, philosophical, and cinematic references (“Frankenstein” looms large), political rumination, and abstract video experimentation, starring the director’s dog Roxy (as well as several human actors, who take their clothes off frequently). It will take more than one viewing to unpack its deeper meanings. Fortunately, it’s opening at the IFC Center and returning to Lincoln Center on October 29 — but even at a first glance, it’s apparent how inventive Godard’s use of 3D and color are. Generally, 3D sci-fi and animation don’t push the boundaries of the medium, remaining tied to some kind of naturalist aesthetic. Godard went wild with the possibilities of 3D and video technology to distort nature, not to depict the world as it is. (The list of cameras he used is included in the end credits.) Even if it amounts to nothing more than a collection of cool image textures (and I think there’s a lot more going on), “Goodbye to Language” would still be one of the year’s best films (Sept. 27 & Oct. 1, 9 p.m., Walter Reade Theater). September 25, 2014

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Just Do Art

PHOTO BY JEREMY X. HALPERN

PHOTO BY GERRY GOODSTEIN

© WILLIAM ELLIS

Duke is king, for Kenny Burrell.

L-R: Christine Verleny as Joyce and Laurie Schroeder as Judy, in “Daughters of the Sexual Revolution.”

Olivia Killingsworth and Quinlan Corbett, in the Metropolitan Playhouse production of “Icebound.”

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

while, a promising but unfocused college student is failing ethics, both in and outside of the classroom. Returning home from campus with a boyfriend in tow, her ruthless determination to go on The Pill forces her parents and the couple next door to confront several aspects of sexual liberation, and change course accordingly. Dana Leslie Goldstein’s new play has two generations asking, “Where does freedom end and responsibility begin?” It’s a question she isn’t concerned with answering definitively, but the script does take great pleasure in mulling over how the personal ethics of one person can both challenge and undercut the behavior of another. Through Oct. 11. Thurs. at 7 p.m. Fri. & Sat. at 8 p.m. Sun. at 3 p.m. Added show Mon., Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. At WorkShop Theater (312 W. 36th St., 4th Fl.). For tickets ($18, $15 for students/seniors), call 866-811-4111 or visit workshoptheater.org.

on-the-lam black sheep brother to help around the house. They clash as well, but also envision a better future. “But nature will out,” warns Playhouse artistic director Alex Roe, in “a play that asks whether our habits and fears will always defy our highest aspirations.” Sept. 26–Oct. 19. Thurs.–Sat. at 7:30 p.m. & Sun. at 3 p.m. (also Oct. 8, 11, 15 & 18 at 3 p.m.). At Metropolitan Playhouse (220 E. Fourth St., btw. Aves. A & B). For tickets ($25, $20 for students & seniors; $10 for those under 18), call 800-838-3006 or visit metropolitanplayhouse.org.tickets.

THE ONE LP PROJECT

From Graham Nash beaming with pride at the “Sgt. Pepper ’s” album to Al Jarreau giving Les Double Six a thumbs up, to Johnny Marr paying Iggy and the Stooges’ “Raw Power” some somber respect: The One LP Project reminds us that those we have on heavy rotation started out as humble, ravenous fans. Determined to provide “a compelling insight into how this music often sets out the course of their lives,” British photographer William Ellis spoke with 50 musicians about the deep connection they felt with a particular recording. This exhibit will have QR code links to the interviews, alongside its equally candid and revealing portraits. It’s the first such exhibit of this, or any, kind for the ARChive of Contemporary Music — a noble non-profit music library and industry research center that knows how to throw a party (contact them to attend, or become a member and snag an invite to their impending Holiday Record + CD Sale opening night shingdig). “The One LP Project” is a free exhibit, at the ARChive of Contemporary Music (54 White St., 3 blocks south of Canal St., btw. Broadway & Church Sts.). Through Oct. 3. Daily, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. For info, call 212-226-6967 or visit arcmusic.org. Also visit onelp.com.

DAUGHTERS OF THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION

It’s 1976 in suburban New York. While men fixate on the modern sensibilities of “that Bionic Man program” while praising the curative powers of Valium, women concern themselves with recreational pot and the impropriety of glorifying America’s Bicentennial. Mean-

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September 25, 2014

METROPOLITAN PLAYHOUSE PRESENTS “ICEBOUND”

Tirelessly devoted to presenting works from America’s theatrical heritage — and especially adept at choosing ones that are both revelatory and relevant — the East Village’s Metropolitan Playhouse opens their 23rd season (devoted to “Progress”) with “Icebound.” Seen only once on the New York stage since its 1923 premiere, this revival of Owen Davis’ Pulitzer Prize-winner for Drama marks only the second effort from the author, since choosing to abandon a string of highly lucrative westerns, sex comedies and melodramas in favor of more serious fare. Set in rural Maine (where Davis was born), “Icebound” concerns the chilly reception given to a shrewish second cousin who becomes heir to the estate of a stern matriarch. Denied any inheritance, the bitter children are also frozen out by the newly powerful cousin — who hires their

MR. LANDING TAKES A FALL

Chimney smoke rises from that charming little house on the hill, beckoning a young, just-married couple to bypass their honeymoon and put down roots — but first, they must dislodge the husband and wife who’ve barricaded themselves inside for 500 years, passing the time with booze, button-pushing and occasional concern for birds who flock together but can’t pull off a decent migration. It seems like all the world’s in an ominous holding pattern at the onset of “Mr. Landing Takes A Fall” — Sari Caine’s absurd, melancholy and unexpectedly violent drawing room comedy that full-throttles its four players through an evening filled with revelations from both couples, during which they consider the relative merits of stoking or extinguishing the spark that first drew them to one another. Both options come with their share of hope and dread. At 7 p.m. on Sept. 26, 27, 30 & Oct. 1–4 and at 3 p.m. on Sept. 28. At The Flea Theater (41 White St., btw. Church & Broadway). For tickets ($18), call 212-352-3101 or visit theflea.org. For artist info: slightlyaltered.org. JUST DO ART, continued on p. 21 TheVillager.com


Just Do Art

PHOTO BY ROBERT RIPPS

PHOTO BY ERIK CARTER

A house that may or may not be for sale isn’t the only thing up for grabs, in “Mr. Landing Takes A Fall.”

Gansevoort Plaza is the place for Tastes of NYC: Sun., Sept. 28.

JUST DO ART, continued from p. 20

TASTES OF NYC

TheVillager.com

ness and educate people about homelessness in New York City. In addition, the program includes “Earthly Love, Heavenly Spirits,” a pas de deux commemorating the death of Matthew Shepard (first danced in October 2001 and revived by the troupe in honor of, Mr. Morgan notes, “LGBT homeless youth who died on the streets, fighting to survive”). Proceeds will benefit Goddard Riverside, whose programs work to meet people’s basic food, shelter, and educational needs (the MorganBallet is their resident dance company). Fri. & Sat., Oct. 3 & 4 at 8 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. At the Church of the Holy Apostles (296 Ninth Ave. at 28th St.). Free admission. Reserved seating, $50. For reservations & info, call 212-5821941 or visit edwardmorganballet.org (from the Home page, click on “performances”).

RS of SERVING 50 Y E A THE BEST B IG G E S T &

ER B UI NRT G OWN

CO C OR RN NE ER R

*V O T E D **

B

V I L LE S T A B A RGE

B BIIS STTR RO O ******

Founder Edward Morgan, director Joseph Alexander and ensemble members from TheEdwardMorganBallet NYC — in collaboration with singers, actors and street dancers — will perform several dance pieces designed to raise aware-

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE EDWARD MORGAN BALLET

BALLET FOR THE HOMELESS

Edward Morgan, whose troupe performs Oct. 3-5 to raise awareness about homelessness and benefit Goddard Riverside’s community service programs.

* **

It’s an afternoon of nibbling among the cobblestones, when chefs from some of the best restaurants in Chelsea, the Meatpacking District and the West Village converge on Gansevoort Plaza for the 7th Annual Tastes of NYC. All proceeds ensure the continuation of arts and enrichment programs at The Lab School for Collaborative Studies (on W. 17th St.). A village of white tents will showcase small-plate offerings from Bakehouse, Serafina, Corsino, Fatty Crab, Zampa, Giovanni Rana, Fig & Olive, Spasso, The Quarter, Grape & Vine, Mighty Quinn’s BBQ, Tia Pol, Doppio, Sweet Corner Bakeshop, Heartwood, Crave.it,  16 Handles, Philip Marie, and The Chester. Raffle prizes include gift certificates and cookbooks. This Zero-Waste event aims to throw nothing away (even the servers’ gloves are made of compostable sugar cane!). Sun., Sept. 28, 1–4 p.m. at Gansevoort Plaza (at Little W. 12th St. & 9th Ave.). A six-taste ticket is $40 in advance (via TastesNYC.org), $50 day of. A Community Table (ticket for one at a community table with food runner service) is $100, and a Donor Circle Table (one table for six with seating and food runners) is $750. More info on Facebook at NYC Lab School Tastes or Instagram at @nyclabtastes or on Twitter at NYC LabTastes.

Corne r of Jane & West 4th St. (at 8th Ave.) 212-2 42-95 02

cornerbistrony.com September 25, 2014

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by Osteria Grano LLC d/b/a Taverna Di Bacco to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 175 Ludlow Street NY, NY 10002. Vil: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by Taqueria Saint Marks Place Inc. d/b/a Taqueria St. Marks to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 79 St. Marks Place NY, NY 10003. Vil: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a License, number 1280974 for an On Premises Liquor License has been applied for by Tres Amigos Corp., dba La Pulperia 84 NYC to sell alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1626 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10028 for On-Premises consumption. TRES AMIGOS CORP. - DBA LA PULPERIA 84 NYC Vil: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1281149 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 47-49 W 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 for on-premises consumption. NORTH 55TH LLC d/b/a LE TABAC VIL: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1281049 has been applied by the undersigned to sell wine at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 1393A 2nd Avenue, New York, NY 10021 for on-premises consumption. CHIA FOOD CORP d/b/a RONGOLI EXQUISITE INDIAN CUISINE Vil: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by 1 Ludlow LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at One Ludlow Street aka 141 Division Street aka 38 Canal Street NY, NY 10002. Vil: 09/18 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 388 BRIDGE SPONSOR LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/03/13.Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/15/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o The Stahl Organization, 277 Park Ave., 47th Fl., NY, NY 10172. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC,2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Real estate. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014

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NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 752 DEVELOPMENT FEE LLC, FILED UNDER THE ORIGINAL NAME OF 65 MADISON OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/15/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 7/14/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 149 GERARD HOTEL, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/5/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/27/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to 220 Fifth Ave., 19th Fl., NY, NY 10001. DE off. addr.: NCR, 615 S. Dupont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MUSCLE MATRIX SOLUTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/17/14.Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 228 Park Ave. South, #46893, NY, NY 10003-1502. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 21W20-3, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/2/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kriss & Feuerstein, Att: Matthew Klein, Esq., 360 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 DIRAN C AND SONS REALTY LLC Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/15/14. Office: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom proces against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 589 Fifth Avenue, Suite 703, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 201 ROCK ROAD, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Gilbert C. Hoover, IV, The Shubert Organization, Inc., 234 W. 44th St., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014

September 25, 2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF MQL DIVERSIFIED FUTURES PARTNERS L.P. Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/4/14. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 3/3/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Carlos Garcia, 215 Park Ave. S., NY, NY 10003. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 50 CLINTON MEZZ LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/14.Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/08/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process toc/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400,Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 148 WEST 142 HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group,225 Broadway, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HVPG WIH PRESERVATION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Hudson Valley Property Group, 394 Broadway, Ste. 405, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GUARD HILL PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/11/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Andrews Kurth LLP, 450 Lexington Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF IM NYC BROOME LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/4/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Abitbol & Cherry, LLP, 545 Fifth Avenue, Ste. 640, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GENERATIONS PRODUCTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/21/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 41 Great Jones St., 5th 10012. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AMERICAN IMMIGRATION GROUPNYRC, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/08/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 230 Park Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Real estate finance. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BLUEROOKIE11B LLC Arts. of Org filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/21/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Linda Plotnicki, Esq., Kaufman, Friedman, Plotnicki & Grun, LLP, 300 East 42nd St., NY, NY 10017, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE GOLDEN HINGE GROUP LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) 8/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: P.O.BOX 751132, NY NY 11375. Purpose: any lawful act.2335391. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF S & C REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Moses & Singer LLP, Attn: Daniel S. Rubin, Esq., 405 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10174-1299. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF J R JEWELRY US , LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/09/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: J R Jewelry US LLC, 70 west 36th Street, Floor 6th, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HQ ENERGY TRADING, LLC Articles of Org. filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/24/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 75 Carriage Road, Wilton, CT 06897. Purpose: Any lawful activity. The LLC is to be managed by one or more managers. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 RH 88, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/25/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process The LLC, c/o Robyn Heiberger, 240A E. 67th St., NY, NY 10065. General Purposes. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CENSEO HEALTH LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/30/09. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Address to be maintained in DE: 1675 S State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TS 509 W 34, L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy of State of NY on June 5, 2014. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in DE on 3/4/2014. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc. 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th floor, New York, NY 10011. NRAI is the registered agent as well. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org filed with DE Secy of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal & Duke of York Streets, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 Notice of Qualification of Park Square Capital USA LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 299 Park Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10171. LLC formed in DE on 8/14/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc. (NRAI), 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o NRAI, 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 50 CLINTON PROPERTY OWNER LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/09/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/05/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NEW YORK 255 LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/27/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1900 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19103. LLC formed in DE on 5/21/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 491 CHELSEA APARTMENTS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/08/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 08/18/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the NJ addr. of the LLC, 44 Woodcrest Ave., Short Hills, NJ 07078. Arts. of Org. filed with NJ Dept. of the Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, 33 W. State St., 5th Fl., Trenton, NJ 08646. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2329 FIRST AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/10/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 632 Broadway, 7th Fl., NY, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF QUOGUE AVIATION II LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/20/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/18/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 50 W. 57th St., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10019, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NH NEW YORK CITY LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/2/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in MI on 7/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MI and principal business addr.: 14115 Farmington Rd., Livonia, MI 48154. Cert. of Org. filed with Director of Corporations, Securities & Commercial Licensing Bureau, PO Box 30004, Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 127 ASSOCIATES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/4/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, One Penn Plaza, Ste. 4000, NY, NY 10119. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/18 - 10/23/2014 Name of LLC: Boredom Therapy LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/14/14. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Asaf Katzir, 140 W. 70th St., #4R, NY, NY 10023, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 MAXDELIVERY 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 08/06/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Gilbride, Tusa, Last & Spellane LLC Attn: JMW , 31 Brookside Drive, Greenwich, CT 06830. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FXFL LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/28/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: FXFL LLC 590 Madison Ave. Floor 25 New York NY 10022. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1560 BROADWAY GFI, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, 125 Park Avenue, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 Notice of Qualification of The Line LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/15/14. NYS fict. name: The Line NY LLC. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 10/19/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 3555 Timmons Lane, Ste. 800, Houston, TX 77027. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014

PARACADEMIA LLC Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 08/01/14. Office: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Milica Paranosic, 281 West 119th Street, #5A, New York, NY 10026. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DIANA ADAMS LAW & MEDIATION, PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/05/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Diana Adams Law & Mediation, PLLC, 48 Wall Street, 11th Floor, New York NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014

Notice of Qualification of BMC Software Federal, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/15/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 2101 CityWest Blvd., Houston, TX 77042. LLC formed in DE on 9/18/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HIPPIE ROSE LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/28/2014. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is: United State Corporation Agents, Inc 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. The principal business address of the LLC is: 499 Fashion Avenue, 3rd Floor NY, NY 10018 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/04- 10/09/2014

TheVillager.com


NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SPIN CERAMICS USA LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/22/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SILKSTONE HOSPITALITY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 17 Orchard St., NY, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 090/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOUTWELL FAY LLP Notice of Registration (Foreign) filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/21/14. Office location: NY County. LLP formed in CA on 6/15/98. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLP to: Boutwell Fay LLP, 1 Park Plaza, Ste 600, Irvine, CA 92614. Principal business address: 40 Worth Street, New York, NY 10013. CA address of LLP: 1 Park Plaza, Ste 600, Irvine, CA 92614. Certificate of LLP filed with Secy of State of CA located in Sacramento CA. Purpose: any lawful act. 2330640. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 IPPUDO KURO-OBI, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/8/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, c/o R.O.S.E., 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 2160, NY, NY 10170. General Purposes. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BETSOLA LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/08/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Betsy Olum, 222 Park Ave. S., NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF FILING OF THE ARTS OF ORGAN OF 2862 ASSOCIATES, LLC filed with NY Secy of State on 06/24/2014. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Julian W. Friedman, Ballard Spahr Stillman & Friedman, LLP, 425 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: To engage in all aspects of real estate development and management. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TRANS WORLD INTERNATIONAL, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/31/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1360 E. 9th St., Ste. 100, Cleveland, OH 44114. LLC formed in DE on 4/24/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SONS OF LEO LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 234 W. 44th St., Ste. 800, NY, NY 10036, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1679 S. DuPont Hwy., Ste. 100, Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 344 EAST 85TH ST LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Trevi Retail LLC, 130 E. 59th St., Ste. 14A, NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 8/7/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ABBOTT SELECT VENTURE FUND, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/17/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1290 Ave. of the Americas, 9th Fl., NY, NY 10104. LP formed in DE on 7/10/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Company, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 336 EAST 81ST ST LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Trevi Retail LLC, 130 E. 59th St., Ste. 14A, NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 8/7/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 100 SARDINES MANAGEMENT LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 5/5/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Portuga Restaurant, 31 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GRANUM, LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Sec. of State of NY (?SSNY?) on 7/10/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, c/o Globex Int’l, Inc., 515 Madison Avenue, 38th Floor, New York, NY 10022, Attn: Leonid Kogan. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN a license, number (PENDING) for on-premises Liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a Restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 209-15 East 56 Street, New York, NY 10022 for on premises consumption TOT, LLC d/b/a Amata Vil: 09/25 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GREENWICH 1982 LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) 8/4/14. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address:c/o Sabin, Bermant & Gould LLP, 4 Times Square, NY NY 10036 Attn: Managing Partner Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 58 DEVELOPER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Royal Realty Corp., Attn: Corporate Counsel, One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GGMC PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1651 Third Ave., Ste. 207, NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GRAMERCY DAISY 22 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 304 Sweetbriar Court, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INDUSTRIE CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/19/05. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Industrie Wear, Attn: Eli Hamway, 1375 Broadway, 15th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VOXILITY, LLC Application of Authority filed with Secreptary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/16/2014. Office location: NY County. Principal business address: 580 California Street, 12th floor, suite #1243, San Francisco, CA 94104. LLC formed in Virginia (VA) on 09/05/2012. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, 580 California Street, 12th floor, suite #1243, San Francisco, CA 94104. VA address of LLC: N/A. Articles of Formation filed with VA State Corporation Commission, 1300 E Main St, Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MYNYC PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/23/2014. Office location, County of New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 6 Stuyvesant Oval #8H, NY, NY 10009. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 210 WYCOMBE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/28/14.Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Paul Wrobleski, Clarfeld, 560 White Plains Rd.,Tarrytown, NY 10591. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 55W46 CONDO OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/8/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 8/7/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LONGCLAW, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/07/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Longclaw, LLC, P.O. Box 105, New York, NY 10009. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 16 FIELDVIEW LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whim process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: % Avi Telyas, 200 Central Park South, Apt 9-R, New York, NY 10019. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 57 DEVELOPER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Royal Realty Corp., Attn: Corporate Counsel, One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 353-357 BROADWAY OWNER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 14 FIELDVIEW LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whim process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: % Avi Telyas, 200 Central Park South, Apt 9-R, New York, NY 10019. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PROFILE ENTERPRISES 2 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/04/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 347 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gatsby Enterprises at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LOH CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/1/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Franklin Loh, 240 E. 93rd St., Apt. 14F, NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGCP IV LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/1/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 7/30/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 VERADEANA PROPERTIES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 3/25/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 240 East 47th St., Apt 17B, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

AMIKAM LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 7/1/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 70W 36th St., Ste 5A, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 36TH STREET HOSPITALITY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/13/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/28/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR WOMENS HEALTH PRACTICE, LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 12/30/2013 LLC. Registered in Wyoming on 11/21/2012 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Edline V. Walters, 232 Seven Spring Mountain Rd., Monroe, NY 10950. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 781 METROPOLITAN AVE JV LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Adam America Real Estate, 850 Third Ave., Ste. 13D, NY, NY 10022, Attn: Omri Sachs. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 32 FRONT PORCH LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/30/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 51 W. 52nd St., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARC NY24549W17, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/05/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/31/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Montgomery, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FIDUCIARY MANAGEMENT GROUP, LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/15/2002. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is: 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 803, NY, NY 10017. The principal business address of the LLC is: 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 803, NY, NY 10017 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 Notice of Qualification of TICO Investment Vehicle V, LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/10/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 8/19/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Madison Ave., 35th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/address of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/25 - 10/30/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by East Village Hospitality LLC d/b/a Racing for Pinks to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 242 East 10th Street NY, NY 10003. Vil: 09/18 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 353-357 BROADWAY OWNER MEMBER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

September 25, 2014

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Forty-five years later, an East Village school has BY YANNIC RACK

W

hen Joyce Pearlman started teaching kindergarten in the East Village 45 years ago, the neighborhood was, to put it mildly, a little different. It turned out that living in Mt. Vernon and teaching in the Bronx hadn’t quite prepared her for the move to Avenue C and E. 10th St. in 1969. “The first week I lived here, I opened up my window shades on Sunday — I moved in on Tuesday — and there’s a dead body in the middle of Avenue C!” she recalled. “And then I would see the drug exchanges — it was really Alphabet City.” “But what saved me, what was really great, was teaching at that school, teaching the neighborhood kids,” she said. Pearlman lived just a couple of blocks away from P.S. 61, at 610 E. 12th St., her new workplace, in the brand-new Village East Towers, three apartment blocks that were built as part of the state’s Mitchell-Lama Housing Program for middle-income families. One of the neighborhood kids was Todd Ferrara, who went to P.S. 61, too, although Pearlman said she didn’t teach him. Today, he lives just a few floors up from her apartment, with his wife and two daughters, in the same building he grew up in. Mitchell-Lama complexes “were mostly built in neighborhoods where nobody wanted to live,” Ferrara said of the building. “You know, this neighborhood, back then, was pretty decrepit. I would say a good 50 percent of the houses were just burned out or abandoned lots or whatever.” His parents, biology teachers at nearby Stuyvesant High School, were also among the towers’ original occupants. They moved from the 12th to the 20th floor in 1982, Ferrara’s last year at P.S. 61. Now, more than 30 years later, his older daughter, Julia, is about to start kindergarten in his old school building, at the East Village Community School, which goes from pre-K to fifth grade. She couldn’t attend the same school her dad had, even if she wanted to: The original P.S. 61 was shut down in 1996. At that time, it had already operated as a satellite school, hosting The Children’s Workshop School and The S.P.E.C.T.R.U.M. School, and in 2001 the newly renamed East Village Community School moved into the building. “I guess, in retrospect, there were some odd things about it that were hallmarks of a troubled inner-city

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Ms. Oliver and her class at P.S. 61 in 1950.

school, but it was not something that we really felt,” Ferrara said of his time there. He is glad his daughter is going to a safer school than he did. The playground, he remembered, would sometimes be littered with “drug paraphernalia,” especially on Mondays, and it wasn’t uncommon to have glue-sniffing junkies hanging around (adults, not kids), as well as other “unsavory characters.” And then there was the semester when everybody was buying knives. “One semester there was this hardware store that decided that selling $5 knives to kids was a great idea,” he recalled. “Everybody had one. I don’t think I did because I knew my parents would kill me. But when the school started finding out about it, the kids would give me the knives at lunch to carry into the school in my backpack. Nobody would suspect me, I was the tiniest kid, the assistant principal lived right downstairs on the 19th floor of this building. ... I think there would be more of a community outcry about that sort of thing today.” At the same time, Ferrara mourns parts of his old turf that are gone, particularly the family-owned grocery stores and the mom-and-pop businesses. He keeps a folder with

menus of closed restaurants, artifacts of a changing neighborhood. “When the 2nd Ave. Deli went, that was a blow,” he said. “When Di Bella [Bros.] went, that was a blow. When the Polish butcher closed, that was a blow. I’m just wishing the hipsters could afford to be here and open their butcher shops and their crazy stuff — you know, pickle stores or whatever — ’cause that’s what I miss!” Pearlman agreed that the neighborhood around her has transformed, for better or worse. “Well, in a sense, the neighborhood got safer and it got better, because the crime left, and the drugs,” she said. “Of course now it’s ludicrously expensive. I mean, we’ve lost all the ethnic businesses and the mom-andpop businesses.” Another thing that has changed since her early teaching years is education, and not just the curriculum. “Teachers can’t be like I was, they can’t hug and kiss their kids!” she said. “They can’t be affectionate. Teachers can’t touch a child, it could be child abuse, it could be sexual. They’re afraid to touch kids!” Some of her methods would be less controversial but still unusual nowadays. For example, when one of

the mothers of her students (she affectionately calls them “my moms”) would be running late because of her job, Pearlman said she would simply take the child home and babysit. “I really became part of their lives, and they became part of mine,” she said. “I still see them now. In fact, two or three kids that were in my kindergarten classes live in my building.” “I knew the kids, I knew the neighborhood. And I knew what kind of life my kids had in Campos Plaza and the buildings they lived in at the time. I just made sure that my class was the safest place in the world for them. And they wanted to be in school, because they knew I was there for them.” Pearlman taught at P.S. 61 until 1996, when the school closed after more than 80 years in operation. The building itself just celebrated its 101st anniversary as a school last weekend. An official celebration was actually scheduled for last year’s centennial but had to be pushed back because of construction work. Since P.S. 61 first opened its doors in 1913, a year after the building was built, the school has witnessed a lot. That’s why, intrigued by a large hisMY OLD SCHOOL, continued on p. 25 TheVillager.com


changed radically, just like its neighborhood MY OLD SCHOOL, continued from p. 24

torical plaque in its auditorium, Jason McDonald started getting interested in the place’s history three years ago. McDonald teaches history at Grace Church School, at E. 11th St. and Fourth Ave., but has a son at East Village Community School. Over the past two years, he has put together a book about the E. 12th St. school’s history, which will be used to teach children at all three schools that currently use the building. The book is also a guide through the last century. In it, McDonald de-

scribes the neighborhood during both world wars, as well as the effects of the 1950s red scare. He also quotes from a 1952 Life magazine article that profiled the school and its principal, Max Francke. Back then, some of Francke’s teachers had 50 students in their classes. In fact, the school had 2,011 students in 1,470 authorized seats in October 1952, making it New York City’s most overcrowded school. Back in 1914, there were 2,550 students enrolled in the building, according to Bradley Goodman, the current principal of East Village Community

School. This year, there are barely 600 kids enrolled across all three schools located there. “I don’t even know how they fit them into the building back then — in the same exact space!” he said. By the time Ferrara attended the school in the ’70s and ’80s, the overcrowding problem wasn’t so bad anymore. But that doesn’t mean the school had the best reputation. To escape school zoning, he said, many of his peers would give false addresses to attend schools that were considered better than P.S. 61. “Third grade was sort of the di-

viding line,” he explained, “when a lot of the kids whose parents had a little more wherewithal to game the system, all figured out that they could find a friend in the West Village or someone else and make up an address and send their kids there.” Nowadays, according to Principal Goodman, it’s usually the other way around, as the schools in the E. 12th St. building are more sought after. “We’ve become very popular,” he said. “Now we have families in Brooklyn. I don’t know if they’re faking it, but certainly there’s a much higher demand!”

Todd Ferrara in front of P.S. 61, when he was a student there.

A climate marcher’s confessions CLIMATE, continued from p. 4

marked a drag queen named Hucklefairy, who was done up in black spandex and polka dot wings to symbolize the plight of the monarch butterfly. “If nothing else, we’re a huge economic force,” she said. “The corporations who support warming have to see this volume of people as a threat.” I’m not so sure about that — yet. But the seeds have been planted. “I think what we achieved by the march was people having confidence in themselves and their power to act,” remarked anti-G.M.O. campaigner Vandana Shiva. She was speaking at a press conference Monday with other TheVillager.com

scientists to promote organic farming as a form of carbon sequestration. “There’s been so much discouragement in the environmental movement,” Shiva said. “This was about people knowing they have the power to act and to bring hope for the future. “Now, of course, a march in itself is not going to bring about change,” she added. “What will bring change is what people do with that hope. So that is why you find us at panels like this, discussing the role of organic farming, which can be an answer for everyone. Not everyone around the world can afford a wind tower or a solar panel. But everyone has to eat.”

Todd Ferrara and his daughter, Julia, who attends the East Village Community School, in the former P.S. 61 building, sit in front of the school, which is now graffiti-free. September 25, 2014

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September 25, 2014

TheVillager.com


Park’s last section sports play area, open vistas SECTION 3, continued from p. 1

TheVillager.com

In the park’s new section, plants that sprouted on the High Line during its decades of disuse have been preserved, at right.

PHOTOS BY JENNY RUBIN

cifically designed for children, namely, the Pershing Square Beams. To create this play area, the cement decking that previously held up the track ballast was removed. This revealed the steel girders that make up the park’s structural form, and a walkway was then ramped down that allows children to enter the gird work. All of these beams have been covered with a rubberized playground material for safety, and there are a number of interactive features: speaking tubes, periscopes and something dubbed the “gopher hole,” where children can go into the hole and then stick their head up in the planting beds. Another important distinction of the third section is the way the Friends of the High Line has treated it: as a found object. The “Interim Walkway” that blooms with wild plants on one side of this section preserves how the park looked in the years following its use as an active freight-rail viaduct. The “Interim Walkway” comprises about half of the new section and will offer the general public its first opportunity to see that original landscape. In an interview, Joshua David, co-founder of Friends of the High Line, explained that, after the trains stopped running, seeds drifted or were dropped by birds there, taking root in the High Line’s gravel ballast. Although it was an inhospitable landscape, those seeds grew into a lush natural wilderness of grasses, small shrubs and meadow flowers. “The Interim Walkway is a part of the High Line that we basically left in its natural condition, the way that we found it,” David said. “That’s what Robert Hammond [the Friends of the High Line’s other co-founder] and I first discovered some 15 years ago when we started this project, and it was the landscape that really inspired us to make a park on the High Line.” Another special aspect of this new section is its openness. While the park’s other two sections are hemmed in by buildings on either side for much of their length, that’s not the case here. The Interim Walkway follows the original train tracks along a curve that allows one to feel the nearness of the Hudson River and forget for a moment the surrounding city — until, of course, the dissonance of hammers pounding and the “zzz” of a construction saw at nearby construction sites, and car horns blaring, make parkgoers realize they’re not on a pier at a beach. “It’s definitely a lot more open,” said James Petty, 31, a Hell’s Kitchen resident in the park last weekend. He and another Hell’s Kitchen resident, Michael McGrattan, 30, faced out to-

Joshua David, Friends of the High Line’s co-founder, marched in Sunday’s procession at the new section’s grand opening.

Part of artist Adrian Villar Rojas’s installation. Over time, the blocks will change shape due to both the elements and growing foliage in them.

ward the rail yards — the many trains looking like the arms of an ancient god reaching out while cranes near buildings stretched for sky — and contemplated the Hudson Yards construction. “It’s very exciting to see the whole thing finally done,” said Brandon Warshofsky, 24. He and Esther Ryang,

23, both of Newark, N.J., were late for the People’s Climate March and decided to venture for pickles and the High Line instead. They also enjoyed the High Line’s latest artwork. An installation by Adrian Villar Rojas titled “The Evolution of God” graces the new section. Twelve cubes

were spaced out perpendicularly to the Interim Walkway on the side lush with vegetation, and employed random materials — socks, clothes, ropes and shells — to create layers within the blocks. Some of these already had foliage growing out of them. Rojas’s installation will remain for the year. During that time, it will have vegetation growing on it and from it, but will also in some places decay or change form. The bees could not stay away from the new, flower-filled park last Sunday, and neither could the people. Members of Friends of the High Line were keeping count at half-hour intervals and by 5 p.m. 9,300 people had already visited. Fanfare, fun and frivolity marked the ribbon-cutting ceremonies on a balmy Saturday before the opening. A procession included several community members and groups, as well as the resplendent Lesbian & Gay Big Apple Corps Marching Band, whose dancers shook and shimmied while the band laid down the beat. Each group had its own color and flags and carried a huge rail-yard signal that highlighted a different aspect of the neighborhoods — present and historic —  that the park passes through: a cow with its parts delineated for the Meatpacking District, as well as multicolored lips, drag queens, clothes and ships were featured. As politicians and David, of the Friends, spoke in the elevated park’s new section, the wind joined in the celebration. It caressed the foliage, which swayed in the gentle gusts, as the community’s medieval-like flags waved. For the Friends of the Highline, the third section’s opening is the fulfillment of a key part of the group’s original vision. “To us, that’s an incredible moment to arrive at,” David told The Villager. “It’s taken us 15 years, which can seem like a long time, but it’s actually a fairly short time for a project of this scope, which faced such tremendous challenges at the very beginning.” The final segment’s opening also means that there is 50 percent more park for the organization to maintain and operate. “The Friends of the High Line provides almost all the operation funding for the park, so it does pose a new challenge for us,” David said. There will be more staff hours to fund and manage to ensure that the High Line continues to be impeccably maintained, he said. “We’re very optimistic that we will keep it as beautifully as we have done in the first two sections,” David said. “I’m confident that we’ll determine a path that makes the High Line a strong and sustainable organization for the long haul.” September 25, 2014

27


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TheVillager.com

THE VILLAGER, SEPT. 25, 2014  

THE VILLAGER, SEPT. 25, 2014

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