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YOUR WEEKLY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SERVING CHELSEA, HUDSON YARDS & HELL’S KITCHEN

WHAT’S ON THE BALLOT Real Time Rider Information at Bus Stops: Five additional electronic boards to display real time bus arrival information at key bus stops throughout District 3. | $250,000 | District Wide Historic Street Lighting for 7th Avenue South: Funds would install historic lamp posts on Seventh Ave. South, between Commerce St. and Carmine and Clarkson Sts. | $250,000 | Greenwich Village Historic District Basketball Court Renovations at Chelsea Park: This project would repave and repaint the court surface, install new hoops and add new seating | $575,000 | W. 28th St., btw. Ninth & 10th Aves. Tree Guards to Promote the Health of New and Established Trees: This project would install over 200 tree guards to protect valuable and vulnerable trees throughout District 3. | $242,000 | District Wide Renovate Park Surrounding Chelsea District Health Center: This project would restore the grounds of the City-run health center in Chelsea that reopens in spring. | $350,000 | 303 Ninth Ave Security Cameras at the NYCHA Fulton Houses: This project would fund the purchase of security cameras and monitors in the NYCHA Fulton Houses. | $500,000 | NYCHA Fulton Houses Security Cameras for NYCHA Elliott-Chelsea Houses: This project would fund the purchase of security cameras and monitors in the NYCHA Elliott-Chelsea Houses. | $500,000 | NYCHA Elliott-Chelsea Houses Gym Renovation at PS M721: This project would fund a new fitness center for special needs students who currently lack adequate recreation space. | $500,000 | 250 W. Houston St. Technology Upgrade for Public Schools: This project would support growing technology demands in every public school in District 3. | $350,000 | District Wide New Air Conditioning for Dance Studio at PS 11: The project would fund the installation of one split system AC unit in the dance studio at PS 11. | $400,000 | 320 W. 21st St. Technology Upgrade for Libraries: This project would fund technology upgrades — including new desktops, printers and more — at libraries in District 3 | $200,000 | District Wide

PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING IS $1M IN BETTERMENT THROUGH BALLOTING

Photo by Sam Bleiberg

L to R: Malachi, Lizbeth, Ashley, and Sean said a win for the Technology Upgrade project would further engage public school students in the learning process — and in an effort to facilitating engagement in the Participatory Budgeting process, the minimum age for voting has been lowered from 14 to 11. See page 4 for Sam Bleiberg’s visit to last week’s Project Expo.

BY SAM BLEIBERG Upgrades to parks and green spaces, new tech for libraries and schools, improved public safety, and better bus stop info all have a place among the worthy projects vying for your support this week, as part of Council District 3’s annual Participatory Budgeting process. The program allows locals, ages 11 and up, to cast their vote for five out of 11 ballot items. The top vote-getter is fully paid for, with other projects greenlit until the allocated amount of $1 million in discretionary funding has been distributed. District 3 residents can cast their votes at several area polling sites, at the district office, online (via pbnyc2018.d21.me) and, for the first time, at LinkNYC kiosks. Locally sponsored resident committees, NYC agencies, and nonprofits have been mobilizing voters throughout the week, and will continue to do so until voting closes on Saturday, April 15. “Participatory Budgeting is democracy in action,”

© CHELSEA NOW 2018 | NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

said NYC Council Speaker (and District 3’s councilmember) Corey Johnson, in a statement to Chelsea Now. “It gives every constituent an opportunity to take part in the budget process, and it gives them the tools and the forum to address local issues in a grassroots way. It has already brought tremendous improvements to our neighborhoods, and that’s because of the creativity and the energy that the community puts into this process each year.” The process kicked off at last Thursday’s Project Expo. Residents gathered at PS 41, aka the Greenwich Village School (116 W. 11th St.), to hear directly from the project sponsors. Johnson’s district office hosted the outreach event, which brought together residents, volunteers, and students to share their visions for the community. Although the process officially began April 7, Expo attendees could cast their votes then BUDGETING continued on p. 4 VOLUME 10, ISSUE 15 | APRIL 12 – 18, 2018


Progressive Hell’s Kitchen Club Sticks with Cuomo BY NATHAN RILEY Right in Cynthia Nixon’s backyard, just weeks after the actor and activist announced her Democratic primary challenge to Andrew Cuomo, the Hell’s Kitchen Democrats — a progressive newcomer on the local political club scene — voted last Thursday night to endorse the two-term governor for reelection. The club held its first endorsement meeting for statewide offices April 5, and elected officials showed up to make personal pleas for support. State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli appeared and described the duties of his office, talking about leveraging his office’s control of the state employees’ pension funds to insist that corporations hire women and minorities for their boards of directors. He also talked about working with shareholder activists to press corporate America to abide by the Paris Agreement on climate change, despite President Donald Trump’s withdrawal of the US from it. Club members had the chance to compare Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul and her primary opponent, Brooklyn City Councilmember Jumaane Williams. Hochul, who appeared on behalf of the governor, emphasized her record of supporting women’s issues including the right to choose in Republican districts in western New York State. She also argued that she and Cuomo are steadfast supporters of the long-stalled Gender Expression Non-Discrimination Act, a transgender civil rights measure, despite what she said was opposition from many upstate New Yorkers. “I am laser-focused on bringing our country back”

Photo by Donna Aceto

Governor Andrew Cuomo vanquished challenger Cynthia Nixon in an endorsement vote by the Hell’s Kitchen Democrats.

from Trump’s reactionary policies, said Hochul, who reminded the club that 2018 is the 100th anniversary of the first time women voted in New York State elections. Williams, for his part, promised to turn the lieutenant governor’s office into the state equivalent of the city’s public advocate role. “I will speak against the governor,” he promised.

“The emperor has no clothes,” he argued, citing corruption and high rents as failures of the current administration in Albany. When questioned about a City Council bill that made it easier for transgender New Yorkers to change their birth certificates, however, Williams acknowledged that he abstained from voting on that citing concerns he had about a specific portion of the language in the measure. Hochul, DiNapoli, and State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, the only other statewide elected officials besides Cuomo, also received the club’s nod. Specific tallies from the secret ballot were not announced. Despite the announcement this week that the renegade Independent Democratic Conference in the State Senate would abandon its alliance with the Republicans who control that chamber and rejoin the regular Democratic Conference, the Hell’s Kitchen Dems vowed to continue opposing IDC members facing primary challenges in September. The club endorsed former City Councilmember Robert Jackson in his challenge to Marisol Alcantara, who immediately joined the IDC after her 2016 election to a Senate seat representing the West Side. Jackson lost to Alcantara two years ago and is eagerly preparing for a rematch. The club also endorsed four local state legislative incumbents — Assemblymembers Richard Gottfried and Linda Rosenthal and Senators Liz Krueger and out gay Brad Hoylman. Gottfried, Rosenthal, and Krueger each addressed the club.

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September Opening for PS 33 Playground Designed with Student Input BY RANIA RICHARDSON It was an exciting day for the greening of Chelsea as students and faculty from PS 33 Chelsea Prep (281 Ninth Ave., btw. W. 26th & 27th Sts.) participated in the groundbreaking for a $1.16 million state-of-the-art playground. The neighborhood space will be located on the W. 26th St. side of the public elementary school, and is scheduled for completion by September. “School playgrounds play a vital role in our children’s physical, intellectual, and social development,” said PS 33 Principal Cindy Wang, in an email statement sent to coincide with the March 29 groundbreaking. “Our school playground is not only a place where students come together for recess, it is an extension of our communal learning environment where our children learn to share, collaborate, problem solve, and expand their creativity and imagination.” The current playground, she noted, holds fond memories for many students and their families — but the upgrade will provide a resource for the community “to enjoy for many years to come.” Also in attendance at the March 29 event were representatives from The Trust for Public Land, the New York City Council, and the city’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), entities that worked with the school to realize the plan for a modern, environmentally beneficial playground. Gone are the jungle gyms and swings sets of yore, to be replaced by modern climbing structures and other equipment in shapes that stimulate the imagination. There will be a twolane running track, basketball practice hoops, a synthetic turf field, and soccer goals. Game tables and a stage will complement the gym elements, and an al fresco classroom will enhance school activities. Existing trees will remain and new ones will bring better air quality to the neighborhood. Larger tree pits and permeable pavements will be added. Like all other New York City playgrounds, it will be open to the community outside school hours: on weekends, at the end of the day, and during school closings, providing access to physical activity to nearly 30,000 Chelsea residents who live within a 10-minute walking distance. “Once completed, the new green infrastructure at PS 33 will be able to absorb over 365,000 gallons of storm water each year and help to improve the health of the nearby East River,” said NYC Community Media

Courtesy of The Trust for Public Land

Move along, monkey bars: PS 33’s playground will feature modern climbing structures and other equipment in shapes that stimulate the imagination.

Green design components are a hallmark of the Playgrounds Program of The Trust for Public Land, a nationwide organization that creates parks and protects land, especially in and near cities where urban dwellers can experience nature where they live. Since 1996, The Trust for Public Land’s NYC Playgrounds Program has created almost 20 0 playgrounds throughout the five boroughs, working with the city to meet its standard of 2.5 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents. With 73 percent of low-income neighborhoods failing to meet the goal, the PLAYGROUND continued on p. 10 Courtesy of The Trust for Public Land

On March 29, NYC Council Speaker Corey Johnson (front row) and PS 33 students got their hands dirty when they broke ground on the playground project. In the back row, L to R: NYC DEP Commissioner Vincent Sapienza, Director of the NYC Playgrounds Program for The Trust for Public Land Mary Alice Lee, and The Trust for Public Land New York State Director Carter Strickland.

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Photos by Sam Bleiberg

Phyllis Waisman, a member of the Chelsea Garden Club, believes improvements to green spaces and parks benefit residents of all ages.

Brooke Schooley and Maury Schott of the 7th Avenue South Alliance believe historic lighting fixtures will make the street feel more like a neighborhood and less like a highway.

Participatory Budgeting’s Upgrades are the Products of Public Input BUDGETING continued from p. 1

and there — making for some very spirited pitches from the volunteer delegates who stood by handmade posters illustrating each proposal. As in previous years, the NYC Parks Department partnered with community members on several proposals. Phyllis Waisman, a member of the Chelsea Garden Club, had a two-word answer to what motivated her advocacy: “Green

spaces.” She cited the wide range of uses and visitor demographics as justification for improvements to the garden around the recently reopened Chelsea District health center. A proposal to install tree guards will have aesthetic and financial benefits, according to resident Jone Noveck. “Most of the trees they plant now have a poor likelihood of survival,” she said. “We may replace a tree two or three times. You save the taxpayers money if

WHERE AND WHEN TO VOTE NYC Speaker Corey Johnson’s District Office | 224 W. 30th St. (btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.), Suite #1206 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. through Fri., Apr. 13. The LGBT Center | 208 W. 13th St. (btw. Seventh & Greenwich Aves.) | 11a.m.-5 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14 and Sun., Apr. 15. Greenwich House | 27 Barrow St. (btw. W. Fourth & Bleecker Sts.) | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14 and Sun., Apr. 15. Fulton Houses Tenant Association Office | 419A W. 17th St. (btw. Ninth & 10th Aves.) | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14 and Sun., Apr. 15. Hudson Guild Elliott Center | 441 W. 26th St. (at 10th Ave.) | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14 and Sun., Apr. 15. Ivan Shapiro House | 459 W. 46th St. (btw. Ninth & 10th Aves.) | 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14 and Sun., Apr. 15. Manhattan Plaza | 400 and 484 W. 43 St. (btw. Ninth & 10th Aves.) | 4 p.m.-7 p.m. on Thurs., Apr. 12 Participatory Budgeting Fest at Dr. Gertrude B. Kelly Playground | W. 17th St. (btw. Eighth & Ninth Aves.) | 12 p.m.-3 p.m. on Sat., Apr. 14: This special event offers yummy Caribbean treats by Woke Foods, pizza, tunes by DJ Flip Bundlez, art-making by six different artists, wellness goodies by Earth Mother Medicine, Double Dutch lessons by Double Dutch Empire, salsa lessons by Balmir Dance Studios, and Participatory Budgeting voting, hosted in partnership with Friends of the High Line.

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you plant those trees in a more comprehensive way.” Involved with participatory budgeting for the first time this year, she pointed to the project as an example of the community stewardship and accountability inspired by the process. Eunice Hughes and Lisa Jasienowski, lifelong Chelsea residents, believe a project to refurbish the basketball court at Chelsea Park has the potential to revive what was once a vibrant community gathering place and an attraction for a city-wide audience. “Growing up, people would come from every borough to play basketball at Chelsea Park in the summertime. It was live,” said Hughes. Hughes and Jasienowski work with a local nonprofit called Infirnity that supports children in the area. Basketball is central to their outreach, and they lament the unattractive and dangerous court conditions. “There are so many young people that love to play ball. They come to our open gym night, but they don’t want to play outside because it’s unsafe,” Jasienowski said. “It’s a hub for the community. Think about the entire generation of youth that aren’t getting access to this.” The pair are not the only residents who believe improvements can change the perception of public spaces. The 7th Avenue South Alliance proposes the installation of historic streetlights, which they argue will transform the character of the stretch of the street to make it more welcoming for residents

and visitors alike. “Seventh Avenue South has been a problem. A couple of these intersections at one point were gauged among the most dangerous in the city,” said Brooke Schooley, a member of the Alliance. “This is the number one tourist destination for people coming to the West Village at the Christopher Street stop. We can provide an aesthetic feature like historic lights that can make it feel like more of a neighborhood and less like a highway.” The lights, which feature long arms, are deemed by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission as appropriate for wide avenues in the Greenwich Village Historic District. Safety was central to two ballot items, each of which would implement improved surveillance cameras in the Elliot-Chelsea Houses and Fulton Houses. Residents explained that the existing cameras do not move, creating various blind spots that perpetrators can exploit. Justin Waters, a lifelong Elliott-Chelsea resident, put together a video illustrating the blind spots in the current surveillance. “You can’t see all these areas. New cameras would eliminate the potential hiding spots and give peace of mind,” he said. Renée Keitt, a resident and gardener at Fulton Houses, expressed frustration that the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) could not invest funds in the project. “The fact of the BUDGETING continued on p. 15 NYC Community Media


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Women in Business, on Taking Leaps and Reaping Rewards BY VICTORIA CALI & NICHOLAS ESPOSITO It takes a passionate woman to become her own boss, and grow a business from the ground up. Here at the Greenwich Village-Chelsea Chamber of Commerce (GVCCC), we are recognizing a trio of powerful individuals who have crushed the stereotypes and crumbled the stigmas that once held them back. While the fight for eqaulity persists, these women continue to chip away at obsacles, while providing opportunities for others.

AMY’S BREAD Twenty-five years ago, Amy Scherber combined her passion for baking with her dream of having her own business by opening Amy’s Bread in 1992, which today offers a colorful variety of bakery items for all types of tastes. Some items are healthy, some are inexpensive, and some are just plain fancy. Regardless of what you pick, each item is guaranteed to make you feel good. When we spoke with Amy about what being a woman in business means to her, she said she was especially proud to “employ a lot of women and to empower them to grow in the company. Women are detail-oriented and are good at taking care of staff and customers.” She noted that at first, some of the men in her staff seemed hesitant about having a woman as their boss. However, over time, they recognized how Amy’s leadership and expertise made her an exceptional leader. Amy says she is very appreciative of her wonderful staff, both men and women, who she has always treated equally — and with respect. Amy does all of the negotiations for her business, but thinks that men are taken more seriously than women. However, this does not stop her. Since the early 1990s, Amy’s Bread has grown to seven locations. From the décor to the flow of the store to the layout, each location has Amy’s own personal touch. She’s proud that her stores have thrived, while surrounded by big chains. Asked why, she observed, “We are local and part of our neighborhoods,” Being a businesswoman makes no difference when it comes to the struggles faced by all business owners. Her biggest challenge has been maintaining a stable company through trying times — including the shifts toward a low-carb and gluten-free marketplace,

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Courtesy of Amy’s Bread

Amy’s Bread has seven locations in Manhattan, including this one in Hell’s Kitchen (672 Ninth Ave., btw. W. 46th & 47th Sts.).

Courtesy of Amy’s Bread

Amy Scherber, of Amy’s Bread, has been crafting handmade artisanal breads, cookies, cakes, and pastries for over 25 years.

seasonality, and volatile economic conditions. Amy has some words of encouragement for other women in business: “It’s important to be resilient and have a good sense of humor, stay calm, and stay healthy,” she said. “You must be mentally and physically up for the challenge. You have to be strong to lead your team or they will try to lead you.” Amy’s Bread is at Chelsea Market (75 Ninth Ave., btw. W. 15th & 16th Sts.) Visit amysbread.com or call 212462-4338. For Twitter and Instagram: @amysbread. On Facebook: facebook. com/Amys-Bread-175567305787521.

MY LITTLE SUNSHINE NYC

Courtesy of My Little Sunshine

Businesswomen across the country have different reasons that motivate them to be resilient and never give up on their dreams. For Tara Figotin, owner of My Little Sunshine, her kids have been her source of inspiration as she tackles the world of business in New York. For over seven years, My Little Sunshine has provided the surrounding communities a one-stop shop for stylish and wearable children’s clothing, unique toys, and amazing haircuts.

My Little Sunshine is a one-stop shop for stylish and wearable children’s clothing, unique toys, and amazing haircuts.

BUSINESS continued on p. 16 NYC Community Media


NYU LANGONE MEDICAL ASSOCIATES – CHELSEA At NYU Langone Medical Associates – Chelsea, we treat a range of cardiac conditions, including diseases of the aortic and mitral valves and coronary arteries, as well as venous and arterial disease, congestive heart failure, and adult congenital heart disease. We also provide primary and preventive care for adults, as well as pulmonary care, pulmonary function testing, advanced sleep services, and cardiac imaging and testing in one convenient location. We’re bringing together the comprehensive resources, technology, and expertise of NYU Langone with the physicians you’ve come to know in your neighborhood. Dianne Acuna, MD

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NYC Community Media

April 12, 2018

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Community Council Notes Drop in Crime, Uptick in Parties BY TABIA C. ROBINSON About a dozen Chelsea residents attended the 10th Precinct’s Community Council meeting on Wed., March 28, to voice their concerns about a number of things happening in their neighborhood. Commanding Officer Capt. Paul Lanot began by noting that crime for the past 28-day period was down 19 percent. The decrease can be attributed to an arrest made in the recent burglaries of several commercial and residential buildings over the past few months. “There was a significant deployment in the area to work on crime prevention,” Lanot said. “When the individual was arrested, there was a big drop in crime.” He then stressed the importance in LED lighting, cameras, and security — for businesses as well as residences. “These tools can go a long way,” Lanot noted. “It’s also important for residents to remember to close and lock their windows when they aren’t home.” Locals were then given the floor to voice their concerns. A resident who lives on the W. 25th St. complained about rooftop parties happening on the 200 block. The loud partying is usually happening during Sunday afternoon, and the resident worried about possible dangerous conditions. Lanot noted that he’s aware of daytime rooftop parties during which there have been injuries, or even fatalities. Crime Prevention Officer Jarett Di Lorenzo suggested that residents call 311 when these rooftop parties occur. The 10th Precinct is located at 230 W. 20th St. (btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.). Commanding Officer: Captain Paul Lanot. Main number: 212-7418211. Community Affairs: 212-7418226. Crime Prevention: 212-741-8226. Domestic Violence: 212-741-8216. Youth Officer: 212-741-8211. Auxiliary Coordinator: 212-924-3377. Detective Squad: 212-741-8245. The Community Council meets on the last Wed. of the month, 7 p.m., at the 10th Precinct or other locations to be announced.

Photo by Tabia C. Robinson

Commanding Officer Capt. Paul Lanot (at podium) answered questions at the March 28 meeting. L to R: Vice President Vinny Pizzonia, Crime Prevention Officer Jarett Di Lorenzo, Special Operations Lieutenant Peter Benekos, NCO Officer Robert Karl, and Hudson River Parks Officer Karolina Kondzielewska.

POLICE BLOTTER PETIT LARCENY: ‘Tooling’ around on bike A man was seen stealing a bike on the corner of 11th Ave. and W. 20th St. The incident occurred on Fri., April 6 at 5:40 a.m. During a search of the 31-year-old suspect, they found burglary tools, a screwdriver, a wrench, and marijuana. The man was arrested.

CRIMINAL MISCHIEF: Stupid stall scrawler An unknown person defaced a stall inside a Con Edison service center (281 11th Ave., btw. W. 28th & 29th Sts.). The incident occurred on Tue., April 3 at 9:30 p.m. There are cameras available in the hallway near the bathroom, but none in the bathroom. The repaint and repair of the stall will cost $250.

PETIT LARCENY: Sugary suitcase speaks volumes Raisinets are popular at the movies, but not usually the first snack you’d reach for in the candy aisle at a drug store. But one man did — and did so without paying for them. A store manager at Duane Reade (131 Eighth Ave., btw. W. 16th & 17th Sts.) saw a man take nine boxes of Raisinets

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EDITOR Scott Stiffler ART DIRECTOR John Napoli

CONTRIBUTORS Lincoln Anderson Stephanie Buhmann Dusica Sue Malesevic Winnie McCroy Christian Miles Puma Perl Rania Richardson Tabia C. Robinson Paul Schindler Eileen Stukane

off the store shelf and put them into a black suitcase. The incident happened on Fri., April 6 at 5 p.m. The 60-yearold suspect left the location and was later arrested. The total value of Raisinets is $18.

PETIT LARCENY: Nature calls and crime answers You do everything right and you can still get your bike stolen. Needing to take a bathroom break, a man locked his bike onto a bus stop pole on Fri., April 6 at 12:55 a.m. — but when he returned, it was gone. The incident happened in front of 264 W. 23rd St. (btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.). The Shimano bike is worth $450.

PETIT LARCENY: Soap stealer gives them the slip Soaps and power adapters are in high demand, but that doesn’t mean you walk into the store and steal them. A man entered Duane Reade (322 Eighth Ave., btw. W. 26th & 27th Sts.) on Fri., April 6 at 10:25 p.m. He stuffed soaps, adapters, and body washes into his pockets. When he was stopped by employees, he ran out of the emergency exit and fled toward Seventh Ave. —Tabia C. Robinson

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Chelsea Now is published weekly by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201. (212) 229-1890. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $75. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2017 NYC Community Media LLC, Postmaster: Send address changes to Chelsea Now, One Metrotech North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201. PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR: The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue.

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Governor Cuomo Gives Hudson River Park $50 Million BY LINCOLN ANDERSON Showing he’s serious about fulfilling his pledge, made in his State of the State address earlier this year, that he would finish building the Hudson River Park if re-elected to another term, Governor Andrew Cuomo has included $50 million in capital funds for the waterfront park in the annual state budget. According to Gotham Gazette, the budget also “includes language to ensure that New York City makes the phased and matched investments necessary to get the job done.” Tom Fox, one of the City Club of New York members who sued the Hudson River Park Trust over Barry Diller’s Pier 55 plan, was heartened by the news. Last October, the City Club plaintiffs agreed not to file objections to new US Army Corps of Engineers permits for the Diller project in exchange for Cuomo’s pledge to finish the 4.5-milelong park between Chambers and W. 59th Sts., and also to include funding for restoration of wetland areas. The budget includes $1.5 million for restoration of “soft areas” along the park’s shoreline. “It appears he kept his word,” Fox

File photo courtesy of The Villager

Governor Andrew Cuomo has committed to completing the Hudson River Park if elected to a second term.

said, “and so did we. In this day and age, shaking hands can still work.” However, many more dollars will be needed to complete the park. The most recent figure given by the Trust is that it will take $619 million to get the job done. The Trust declined comment, but CUOMO continued on p. 23

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NYC Community Media

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PLAYGROUND continued from p. 3

Playgrounds Program is especially important. Proud of the nonprofit’s collaboration with New York City, Carter Strickland, The Trust for Public Land’s New York State Director, observed that former asphalt lots are being transformed into vibrant, green play spaces for children. The Playgrounds Program includes student participation in the design process through brainstorming and hands-on education of related subjects such as science, math, and architecture. All 628 schoolchildren at PS 33 had the opportunity to be part of the project. In a statement to Chelsea Now, Principal Wang called it “an immersive, hands-on learning experience,� for students who were “challenged to incorporate many different disciplines in their work, but particularly incorporated STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] to help develop a one-of-a-kind playground and public space for our community.� “Students, parents, teachers all came together, brainstormed and pooled their ideas,� said NYC Council Speaker Corey Johnson (whose dis-

Courtesy of The Trust for Public Land

A schematic of the playground shows what area kids will be enjoying by fall 2018.

trict includes the PS 33 area). An allocation of $750,000 from the Council’s capital discretionary bud-

get will help fund the renovation. “This is going to be a place where kids have fun. It’s going to be a place

where they want to be. And that’s what we want in our schools — inside and outside,� he said.

    

  

  



   

     

     

        

     

      

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NYC Community Media


BUDGETING continued from p. 4

matter is we all know NYCHA doesn’t have money.” Participatory Budgeting, she said, “allows us to get things that are desperately needed in the development… It’s a matter of safety. It’s a matter of people’s lives.” When asked about the need to rely on Participatory Budgeting for safety on NYCHA property, Johnson’s office expressed interest in ensuring that the supplemental cameras were installed independent of the voting results. The Expo saw a strong turnout of young people — a result of initiatives by nonprofits and the City Council to encourage youth involvement in local politics. This year, the Council lowered the voting age from 14 to 11. Johnson’s office appointed a Participatory Budgeting Youth Fellow to represent young people throughout the process. “Local government is underused and is such a powerful tool because you can have direct involvement,” said Cole. “It allows people to choose how they want their neighborhoods to look. It makes the process more democratic.” A sizable group on the youth committee for the voting outreach effort attended, and gave Chelsea Now their input on how the projects fulfill the needs of their age group. “We’re giving a youth perspective on what we want to see fixed,” said Imani. When asked what she looks for in a project, she said, “Inclusiveness, in terms of benefitting a wider variety of people — not just age-wise, but in terms of different communities.” Her colleague, Mason, echoed this sentiment. “Projects should be inclusive, something that also benefits kids but could benefit the elderly or adults as well. This year it seems there’s more inclusion of institutions that could benefit from participatory budgeting as well.” Many high school students in attendance used the opportunity to advocate for a proposal to benefit public schools. The district-wide project would supplement the technology that students claim helps make lessons more engaging and provides access to necessary tools for students that lack Internet or computer access at home. “Sometimes students may have to go home and might not have computers or Internet connection at home. They might have to go to libraries and waste their time trying to figure out how to get things done,” said Ashley, a student at the High School of Fashion Industries. “If we upgrade everything, children can do work at school instead of going out of their way to figure it out. If it’s at school, it’s easily approachable.” Malachi, a student at Quest to Learn NYC Community Media

Photos by Sam Bleiberg

Eunice Hughes and Lisa Jasienowski, who work with the youth nonprofit Infirnity, said improvements would revive the basketball court at Chelsea Park as a hub for the community.

Malachi attended the exposition to provide feedback on the proposals from the perspective of a young person.

Elliott-Chelsea and Fulton residents are asking for security cameras to cover blind spots in the current surveillance system.

on W. 18th St., described technology’s role in his curriculum. “We spend most of our time on computers. Sometimes there are problems with the Wi-Fi, or our project can get deleted. It would be good to know if this is done properly that won’t happen.” Young people were not the only demographic concerned with improved technology. Audrey Henningham, a volunteer for Johnson’s district office, attended to support a project to upgrade technology in libraries. She says the printers in the four local libraries are often out of order and the letters are worn off many of the keyboards. “I grew up in the library, so this is an important project for me,” she said. Supporters of all projects agreed that the Participatory Budgeting process enhances resident participation in local governance. For Keitt, the forum is a tool to make her voice heard and enact change. “It’s an exciting way to actually get something done. We can see it working,” she said. Erik Bottcher, Chief of Staff to Speaker Johnson, added, “Participatory budgeting has shed light on the city’s capital budget process for many people who really didn’t know how it worked. It’s also getting many people excited about the city’s budget process for the first time.” BUDGETING continued on p. 21 April 12, 2018

15


BUSINESS continued from p. 6

My Little Sunshine represents a unique spin on your average childcentric clothing store. Years ago, Figotin noticed a change in the neighborhood she had once called home, which had become far more family-oriented. This, along with becoming a mother, inspired her to open My Little Sunshine as a place for families to satisfy a number of their kids’ needs in just one visit. She takes pride in how she curates her stores — by constantly searching for quality items and products that you can’t find at your typical outlet. This gives guests at My Little Sunshine a far more personable shopping experience, which has been one of Figotin’s primary objectives. For Figotin, being a strong woman in business means finding a manageable balance between work and life. When she first opened the doors to her business she knew that “What you put into it is what you get out, and it can be hard to put in your all when you have family.” Along with juggling the many tasks that come with being a mom, Figotin has created a vibrant and inviting business that has helped her grow My Little Sunshine beyond the Chelsea community. When we asked her if she had any advice for newly-established women in business or women thinking of opening their own business, she said: “Follow your dreams, especially if you’re passionate about them, and go for it despite any challenges or doubts that you may have.” My Little Sunshine is in Chelsea at 177 Ninth Ave. (btw. W. 20th & 21st Sts.), and in Tribeca at 145 Hudson St. (corner of Hubert St.). Visit mylittlesunshinenyc.com or call 212-929-0887 (Chelsea) and 212-966-8840 (Tribeca). For Twitter and Instagram: @mylittlesunnyc. On Facebook: facebook.com/ MyLittleSunshineNYC.

Courtesy of My Little Sunshine

Tara Figotin, owner of My Little Sunshine, with her children.

Courtesy of Naturopathica

Naturopathica provides products, tips, spa treatments, and expert advice to help you look and feel your best.

NATUROPATHICA For over two decades, Naturopathica has concocted world-class, natural skin care products and herbal remedies for loyal customers all across the country. Lucky for us, we had the chance to speak with Barbara Close, founder and CEO of Naturopathica, who knows a few things about being comfortable in her own skin, while also making it look great. While Naturopathica has been a go-to source of holistic skin care and

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April 12, 2018

spa treatments, and expert advice to help you look and feel your best.” For Close, being a women in business means embracing the chaos by striving to be a creative problem solver. By taking risks and being creative in her business pursuits, she has been able to maintain a business that is engaged with modern trends and open to changes. However, she expressed that none of it would be possible without the supportive and talented team she has formulated. When we asked her if she had any advice for fellow women in business, she professed that it is important to “stay flexible and open-minded” and be able to “adapt to circumstances, especially now in the digital age when change happens rapidly.” She also assured women to not “shy away from risk, because a healthy appetite for risk can be rewarding.”

Courtesy of Naturopathica

In business, as in life, Naturopathica founder and CEO Barbara Close says a “healthy appetite for risk can be rewarding.”

herbal apothecary for hundreds of clients in the US, Barbara Close’s passion for herbal medicine is one that hits near home. After her mother was diagnosed with cancer, she realized that traditional Western medicine did not offer satisfactory palliative care. So, she turned to herbs and natural remedies for a myriad of her mother’s symptoms such as easing anxiety, quelling nausea, and soothing her skin. Fast forward 20 years and Naturopathica has evolved into a reputable and trusted holistic care shop. When we spoke with Close on what makes her business unique, she assured that, “Whether you’re stopping in because of eczema, a stiff neck or a hangover, we can provide a toolkit of products, tips,

Naturopathica’s Chelsea location is at 127 W. 26th St. (btw. Sixth & Seventh Aves.). Visit naturopathica.com or call 646-979-3960. For Twitter and Instagram @naturopathica. On Facebook facebook.com/ Naturopathica.

Cali and Esposito are marketing interns for the Greenwich VillageChelsea Chamber of Commerce. For info on the GVCCC, call 646470- 1773 or visit villagechelsea. com. Twitter: @GVCCHAMBER. On Facebook: facebook.com/ GVCCHAMBER.

NYC Community Media


Wine as a Passion, and at a Good Price BY LAURA HANRAHAN On a Friday night in Chelsea, Empire State of Wine has a constant flow of customers stopping in to pick up a bottle or two for the weekend. Owner Eddy Le Garrec expertly helps each client fi nd his or her perfect match. Whether you’re looking to fi nd a red to pair with homemade pizza, or wanting something that will be a crowd-pleaser at a dinner party, he knows just the bottle. It would be hard to guess that this cozy wine shop that is a go-to spot for many local residents opened just a few months ago. A French native, Le Garrec opened the doors to his store, at 111 W. 20th St., between Sixth and Seventh Aves., on Dec. 1. But its feeling is hardly typical. With colorful shipping containers, vibrant yellow walls, upbeat music and lit-up signs decorating the space, it resembles more of a California beach bar than your average New York City wine store. Cases of wine are displayed out in the open with easy-to-read signs giving aspiring oenophiles all of the essential information about each bottle, including its American Wine Critics’ rating. “What I was thinking when I created this is that, for a lot of people, wine is intimidating,� he explained. “So that’s why I put up the ratings, because sometimes when I talk to customers, they’re scared to talk to me. So the fact that they have all the information is great.� In the middle of the store is its most popular section — bottles under $15. Le Garrec makes shopping even more streamlined for those who are new to wine by dividing the section into light, medium and full body. “ ‘Under $15’ is awesome because it’s kind of a comfort zone,� he said. “When they’re there, they know I’m not going to kill them for something that’s $25. It’s creating a nice environment.� Empire State of Wine isn’t Le Garrec’s first vino venture. He found massive success in Florida as the number-one seller statewide of wine above $75 and champagne with his company W Wine Boutique. He eventually sold the business and moved to Chelsea, unsure of what his next move would be. “I kind of got depressed,� he said. “I had all this money but I had nothing planned, so I went back to school NYC Community Media

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Eddy Le Garrec is often changing up his wine stock, based on the best vintages that are available at any given moment. He has direct relationships with many wineries worldwide and an expert knowledge of every variety of grape.

in New York. I learned how to make documentaries. It’s a great passion to have, but there’s no money,� he said with a laugh. Le Gerrac had no intention of going back into wine until he walked by his local wine shop — a whopping 4,000 square foot store — only to fi nd that it had closed overnight. “I thought, ‘Oh, my God, this is so stupid, it’s such a fantastic location,’ � he said. Le Gerrac quickly called the landlord, negotiated down the size of the store, and within a few months had opened Empire State of Wine.

Because of his years of experience, relationships with wineries and expert knowledge of seemingly every grape all over the world, Le Gerrac is able to buy directly from the winery, avoiding markups added by suppliers and greatly reducing the cost per bottle to the customer. To illustrate this, he pointed to a bottle of 2015 Beaujolais that he sells in the store for $18. “I had a supplier that came to sell me the exact same wine, but in 2012, which wasn’t a great vintage — 2015 is fantastic — for $18 and 15 cents,� he said. “I said maybe you should be buying it from me.� Le Gerrac, however, hasn’t limited his store to just wine. He also sells several spirits, including a vodka he says is even better than Grey Goose and a tequila that he described as “dangerously good.� Because of Le Gerrac’s purchasing style, he tends to have a high turnover rate, with new types of wine constantly being brought in. “For example, 2015 was unbelievable in France and 2016’s going to be even better,� he said. “But 2017, not good, so I’m not going to have French 2017.� When asked why other wine stores in the city aren’t able to offer the same experience he has created, Le Gerrac cites his two unmistakable qualities: his passion and his knowledge. “It’s very simple,� he said. “In New York either you have this very pretentious, intimidating wine store or you have the little guy down the street who doesn’t know anything. So, I knew there was a niche between the two: someone who does it right and doesn’t take advantage of the customer.�

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April 12, 2018

17


Score One for the Quad ‘‘Fever’ grips cinema on a significant Saturday night BY SCOTT STIFFLER One-year-olds aren’t usually this sophisticated — but the manner in which the Quad Cinema has chosen to celebrate the first anniversary of its rebirth is a self-aware exercise in symbolism and synergy that speaks to the bread and butter business of looking back, while wholeheartedly embracing the unknown. On April 14, one year to the day after it reopened to reveal the fruits of a 24-month renovation process, “Saturday Night Fever” will be screened as part of the Quad’s ongoing “First Encounters” series. Created and curated by C. Mason Wells, Director of Repertory Programming, the series invites “notables from the film world and beyond” to come face to face with a flick they’ve never seen before — then asks them to engage the audience in conversation. “It’s a very interesting process,” Wells said. “It’s unlike any other series I’ve programmed before. Those reactions are so genuine.” On board for his virgin experience with the 1977 disco-era classic is John Cameron Mitchell. Inexplicably, the book writer and stage/fi lm star of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch” — who directed its fi lm adaptation, as well as 2006’s “Shortbus” and the upcoming “How to Talk to Girls at Parties” — has never seen the vehicle that propelled John Travolta out of Mr. Kotter’s TV classroom and into the global consciousness. But surely Mitchell knows a little something about it — and that, Wells said, is part of what gives “First Encounters” its off-kilter mojo. “With the better-known films in the series,” he noted, “you’ve heard quotes from it, and you have a sense, in your head, of what it might be like. ‘Saturday Night Fever’ looms so large for American culture. But the movie itself is a lot darker and stranger than its reputation suggests.” So when the Bee Gees sing “How Deep is Your Love” as credits roll and it’s time for Mitchell to weigh in with his verdict, “It will be interesting to see John’s preconceived ideas come across.” Asked if any guest had ever suffered the inevitable fate of all adventurous moviegoers — loathing the film — Wells deadpanned, “It hasn’t happened yet.” But he promised there’s still plenty of unpredictability built into the series. The majority of audiences, he noted, seem to arrive at “First Encounters” with both familiarity and affection for the selection, leading to a post-screening experience that “flips the script on what Q&A sessions are. You usually have a director or actor, and they are the experts on that film. Here, the audience knows more than the guest.” That’s resulted in more than a few humorous exchanges. “We like to be fun and cheeky and adventurous,” said Wells, “but we take movies very seriously.”

18

April 12, 2018

Courtesy of Scott Francis

The Quad’s marquee, seen here announcing an April 2017 return after a two-year restoration.

Courtesy of the Everett Collection via the Quad Cinema

John Cameron Mitchell has his first viewing of “Saturday Night Fever” on April 14, and then shares his reaction with the audience.

Backing up that declaration is the fact that within the past year, The Quad (which opened in 1972 as NYC’s fi rst multiplex) has screened over 400 35mm prints as well as engagements for over

100 fi rst-run fi lms and new digital restorations. “International and domestic, old and new,” Wells said of the Quad’s programming, which since its grand reopening has included actor retrospectives featuring Barbra Streisand, Goldie Hawn, and Daniel Day-Lewis, as well as director retrospectives from the likes of Billy Wilder and Bernardo Bertolucci — plus thematic series (3D fi lms and the Inspector Clouseau fi lms, among them), alongside a solid block of queer programming the prerestoration Quad was well-known for. (Among 2017’s highlights, a 4K digital restoration of Toshio Matsumoto’s seldom-seen “Funeral Parade of Roses,” a 1969 black and white, documentarylike look at Tokyo’s drag and “gay boy bar” scene, whose visuals and violence were said to influence “A Clockwork Orange.”) Extending the April 14 celebration, Wells said the “Quadrophilia” series, which “is an ongoing thing we do that brings back some of the more popular hits from films that opened or screened at the Quad in the four decades past,” will further serve to “remind people what we’ve done so far.” Their meta take on the series — screenings of “Quadrophilia” selections that happened since reopening — includes a musical fanatic’s delight on April 16, with a 3pm screening of 1983’s QUAD continued on p. 23 NYC Community Media


Pedigree Activities During the Dog Days of Spring Lydon’s guide to poetry, TNC, puppies BY MICHAEL LYDON late night East Village. Rain glistens off shattered street glass like fallen stars. —from Phillip Giambri’s “Dancing on Razor Blades” When the author of the above walked into Veselka (144 Second Ave.), his grin widened and warmed, and so did mine. Phillip Giambri is the kind of guy you can’t help liking! He’s easy to spot, too: a small, bright-eyed man with the trim figure of a bantamweight boxer, a black cane in hand but barely used, a knowing grin on his face, and a baseball cap with “Ancient Mariner” stitched above the brim. Born in South Philadelphia 76 years ago, Giambri has spent many of those years in the East Village — in the bars, yes, but also at a bewildering number of jobs, including actor, hairstylist, janitor, drifter, recording engineer, hired hand, traveling salesman, submarine officer, barfly, banker, biker, bronco buster, announcer, mail-order minister, photographer, and computer guru. “I’ve always liked to figure things out,” Giambri said over a cup of coffee. “A restless mind, you could say that, I’ve got a restless mind. And now I’m working harder than ever. I know I’m in a race against time. I’m trying to get everything done.” Giambri’s love of poetry has come to the fore in recent years — some call him the Muse of St. Mark’s Place — taking him from reading his work at open mics organized by others to open mics he organizes himself, including a three-year run of his “Rimes of the Ancient Mariner” reading series at the now-defunct Three of Clubs. His first book, “Confessions of a Repeat Offender: Musings on a Life Gone Right in Spite of Myself,” came out two years ago. “Giambri has mastered the voice of the sad luck loser,” wrote one reviewer, praising his “moments of enlightenment” and his unique blend of “bitterness, humility, honor, and pride.” “Reading my work for an audience,” Giambri said thoughtfully, “that’s the best way I can what I can rethink what I’m trying to get listeners to understand.” For much of the spring Giambri will be out of the city (“I’m going to Poland for the annual International Submariner’s Association Convention,” he told me) — but he’ll be back for a scattering of gigs in April and May, plus an evening at the Cornelia Street Café on June 18. For more info, pay a visit to ancientmarinertales.com. So all you landlubbers, prepare to go down to the sea in ships this June with Photo by Michael Lydon

Phillip Giambri is easy to spot, but doesn’t stay in one spot for long. NYC Community Media

LYDON continued on p. 20 April 12, 2018

19


LYDON continued from p. 19

the Ancient Mariner — Cornelia Street will gladly supply the rum, ho, ho, ho!

THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY Veteran actors Crystal Field and George Bartenieff founded Theater for the New City (155 First Ave.) in 1971, and in its five decades “TNC,” as fans and friends call it, has put on countless plays and pubic events in a half-dozen theaters. For all its ups and downs, and there have been many, TNC has hewed closely to its core commitment to community. Week in week out, season in, season out, Crystal and her gang of actors, directors, designers, and playwrights (George Bartenieff left in 1992) have mounted play after play after play, all varied in content and style, but all declaring the group’s dedication to human equality. And, along the way, the TNC has won dozens of Obies and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Over the years I’ve been to many TNC endeavors, even taken part in a few — most memorably, playing carols with our band when a jovial crowd cheered the lighting of the Tompkins Square Christmas tree. Sometimes TNC’s political message is a bit heavy-

handed for my taste, but I’m always impressed by the dedication of everyone involved. Plus, I know of no theater that gets more shows up on their feet, no matter the obstacles in their way. For example, in the Cino Theater, “Verzet Amsterdam,” a play by Barbara Kahn about Dutch artists resisting Hitler, opened April 5 and continues through April 22. “The Confession of Lily Dare,” a comedic love letter to the “confession film” genre written and starring Charles Busch, will continue through April 29, followed by the May 3-20 run of “Fat Asses: The Musical” — touted as “three larger-than-life ladies who find themselves ostracized from their friends, families and even their weight-loss support group.” Whew — I get breathless just listing the names and dates! What do I recommend? Well, the Charles Busch show for sure! He’s always outrageously funny. What else? I say, take a smorgasbord approach. Whatever you taste at TNC will be so new and different that on the way home, you’ll feel like a whole new person! More info about their many productions can be found at theaterforthenewcity.net.

DOGS ARE SO GOOD! We humans invented the wheel

about 3500 BC, then two-wheeled chariots, then four-wheeled ox carts — but why did we wait 5,500 more years to invent the bicycle? Did Carl the Caveman try a two-wheeler, fall off, crack his skull, then toss his prototype into the nearest tar pit? That question brings to mind another: Why did it take so long for dog runs to catch on? Think back a few decades. You clip Fido onto his/her leash, out to the street and round the block, pee here, poop there, sniff here, sniff there, and home we go. Poor Fido got almost no exercise, met canine pals only for brief hellos with you tugging on the collar in the opposite direction — all in all, a dog’s life. But dog runs? Little slices of doggie heaven! You get to the dog run, and Fido can’t wait. Off the leash and away he/she bounds, barking with joy. You throw a ball, Fido scampers away at top speed, grabs it, trots back, and drops the ball at your feet. You two do it again, oh, maybe 30 times. Fido spots a pal, dashes over, flattens his/her forepaws, chin on the ground, issuing an invitation to play as clearly as if spoken. That leads to some goofy wrestling and chasing while you read a book, chat with a friend, or look up to see buds swelling on the trees, puffy white clouds floating eastward to the sea.

My wife Ellen and I have a black cat, Bobbie, but no dog (our work schedules wouldn’t be fair to a canine pal), so we make up for the loss by enjoying the friendship of every dog in the East Village — well, maybe not every dog, but almost. Ellen’s mantra: “Dogs are so good.” She often forgets the human’s name, but seldom forgets either the dog’s name or what inexpressibly cute thing he/she did the last time we met. Dog runs large and small dot the Villages East and West. I’ve no statistics to prove it, but I’m sure that the exercise, companionship, and canine joie de vive our furry friends get from daily dog run sessions add significantly to their (and your!) health and longevity. So whether you have a dog or not, get yourself down to the dog run nearest you — for us, that’s the run in Tompkins Square Park (500 E. Ninth St.) — and hang on the fence for a quarter hour or so and see these sweetie-pies cavort and leap and bark and trot until their tongues are hanging out and their lips pulled back in happy smiles. Keep your eye out for Bluebell, a handsome, well-trained border collie who loves to hide behind people’s legs then jump out and catch a Frisbee in full fl ight. Woof, woof! Good Bluebell, good dog!

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NYC Community Media


Photos by Sam Bleiberg

PTA board member Sarah Kim noted an AC unit in the PS 11 dance studio would be used for after school and summer programs in addition to standard school days. BUDGETING continued from p. 15

Attendees went on to say that Participatory Budgeting opens the door for further involvement in local government. Bottcher added that the process “builds a culture of voting.” Noveck explained the exposition as an asset for learning about opportunities for additional community projects. “It’s a very good way to participate and

meet other people who want to participate so you can collectively work on bigger projects,” she said. “If you participate even marginally, what you realize is where you do want to participate. Otherwise it seems really daunting.” Access descriptions of each proposed ballot item and get info on voting sites via council.nyc.gov/pb. To vote online, visit pbnyc2018.d21.me. For LinkNYC kiosk info, visit link.nyc.

Justin Waters, his grandmother, and Renée Keitt (far left) believe improved security cameras are essential for safety at Elliott-Chelsea Houses and Fulton Houses.

Audrey Henningham said she “grew up in the library,” but that the technology in the local branches is outdated. NYC Community Media

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QUAD continued from p. 18

Photo by Mettie Ostrwoski

April 16’s screening of “Original Cast Album: Company” is a callback from a program Greta Gerwig (seen here) curated in 2017.

CUOMO continued from p. 9

Connie Fishman, executive director of Hudson River Park Friends (formerly Friends of Hudson River Park), issued a statement. “We are grateful for the $50 million promised by the governor and approved by the state Legislature,” she said. “Combined with the potential funds from the sale of [park] air rights, this will go a long way toward completing the park’s northern section. We’d like to thank the governor for his commitment to completing Hudson River Park in the next few years, and our local elected officials for supporting us throughout this process.” Assemblymember Deborah Glick said the city and state should commit to funding the park over the long term — not just to finishing its construction. “It is a good step,” Glick said of the $50 million, “but it is intended to pay for capital build-out, while a major part of the expense has been repairing storm damage and keeping up with maintaining NYC Community Media

“Yentl” (from that aforementioned Streisand retrospective) and a 5:30pm screening of 1970’s “Original Cast Album: Company,” which was part of a 2017 series curated by Oscar-nominated director Greta Gerwig. “She’s a big Sondheim fan,” Wells noted, citing her use of his work in ‘Lady Bird.” Also of note among the “ton of stuff” Wells was eager to plug when asked what else was worth pricking our ears up for, is a “near-complete 35mm survey” of work by independent fi lmmaker Alan Rudolph. The director will come in from the West Coast to appear at select screenings during the series, which runs April 27 to May 9. Among the over 20 titles are “Choose Me,” “The Moderns,” and this publication’s personal pick: 1985’s new-wavemeets-noir “Trouble in Mind” (with Kris Kristofferson as an ex-cop/ex-con, Lori Singer as a former fl ame/diner owner, and Divine, in a villainous male role). Said Wells of Rudolph, “He’s never had a proper retrospective. His movies were hits in the ’70s and ’80, but he never quite broke through to the level of his contemporaries.” Like so much of what the Quad excels at, the well-programmed lineup promises to hook the uninitiated and reward the devoted. The Quad Cinema is located at 34 W. 13th St. (btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves.). For more info, visit quadcinema.com.

a heavily used park. We can never build ourselves out of the ongoing expense of this waterfront park. I would hope that the governor and mayor recognize the true long-term cost of the park is also a public responsibility and should not be shouldered solely by commercial developments in the park.” City Council Speaker Corey Johnson said he will do his part to ensure the city upholds it end of the bargain in funding the park. “The Hudson River Park is one of our community’s most vital assets,” he

said, “a green oasis on a West Side that is otherwise starved of parks. For too long, it hasn’t received the funding from state and local sources that it deserves. The $50 million capital allocation by Governor Cuomo is a game-changer. Now, we in city government must meet our obligations and support a park that has given our community so much. One of my top priorities as speaker is to ensure, by the end of my term, that the build-out of Hudson River Park is fully funded and that the park is on strong financial footing for decades to come.”

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NYC Community Media

Chelsea Now - April 12, 2018  

April 12, 2018

Chelsea Now - April 12, 2018  

April 12, 2018

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