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November 10, 2016 • $1.00 Volume 86 • Number 45

‘We want to do it right,’ hospital honchos say; Pols want more info BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

D

r. Jeremy Boal, the new president of the Mount Sinai Downtown health network, and Susan Somerville, Beth Israel Hospital’s president for the last three years, recently teamed up to lead a community informational meeting on the Beth Israel rebuilding

plans. A concerned crowd of more than 100 locals, including area politicians, filled Baruch College’s Mason Hall, on E. 23rd St., on Oct. 27 to hear the presentation of the hospital plans, followed by a Q & A. Despite Boal and SomerHOSPITAL continued on p. 12

Blue Ribbon will bite the dust, latest victim of unaffordable rent BY DENNIS LYNCH

T

he Village will lose a neighborhood favorite eatery and market at the end of the month. The Blue Ribbon Bakery Kitchen at the corner of Bedford and Downing Sts. aLd the Blue Ribbon Market nearby on Bedford St. will shut their doors because of

a sharp rent hint at the Bakery Kitchen. Rumors swirled in the neighborhood that Blue Ribbon was facing an astronomical “200 percent” or even “400 percent” rent hike on the larger restaurant space, but those could not be confirmed by press time. The reason the owners will RENT continued on p. 10

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

Bathed in blue but blue states too few. A Hillar y Clinton suppor ter in Rockefeller Center was aghast while watching the election results roll in Tuesday night.

Yuuuge fear and loathing as Trump shocks world BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

W

e’re on a highwaaay to hell!” Bon Scott blared over the speakers at Niagara bar Tuesday night, as Donald Trump — yes, it was incredibly true — was starting to build his lead against Hillary Clinton. It was around 9:20 p.m. and the TV screens at the Avenue A watering hole showed Trump

leading Clinton in electoral college votes 130 to 100. Connecticut had just gone for the former secretary of state, but Louisiana went for the bombastic billionaire. “Ohhh we’re halfway there! Ohhh, livin’ on a prayer!” a guy had sung out earlier in between sullen swigs of his beer. But the rock-lite tune by Bon Jovi — who actively supported Clinton in the race — didn’t fully express the moment. Something darker,

more extreme was needed. “Wrong song!” another twentysomething dude wearing a beanie shouted, then called out, “Highway to Hell!” Bartender Morgann Daniels promptly cued up the AC/DC anthem. As the song ended, Scott rasped the chillingly self-destructive lyrics, “And we’re going dowwwwn…all the ELECTION continued on p. 6

‘Joy of Lesbian Sex’ author Sisley dies������������ p. 17 Judge blocks sale in gay estate battle������������� p. 17 Oh, Obama! Election photos����p. 8

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when it is over.” Patz also added that continued references to Jose Ramos — the previous prime suspect in the 6-year-old Soho boy’s unsolved 1979 disappearance — as the boyfriend of Etan’s babysitter are inaccurate. “In future reporting,” Patz said, “please do not apply the word ‘babysitter’ to Susan Harrington. She was hired by a few parents to walk children home from school during the school bus driver strike. ‘Babysitter’ implies a level of intimacy; she was never alone in our loft with our children. That is an important distinction considering her relationship with Jose Ramos.” The last trial of Hernandez — a former Soho bodega worker — went on for months, and the same is expected this time around. Hernandez initially had confessed that he killed Etan, but later recanted. His defense attorneys continue to argue that he is mentally challenged and hallucinates.

INCUBATION SITUATION: The opening of the eagerly awaited new middle school at 75 Morton St. has been pushed back a year to September 2018 due to construction issues. For the coming 2017-18 school year, 75 Morton may possibly “incubate” its first sixth-grade class at the Clinton School for Writers and Artists, at 10 E. 15th St. Bonnie Laboy, the Community School District 2 superintendent, recently sent out a letter to break the news to the community. “Contractors are working diligently to complete the [75 Morton] project, but due to unforeseen structural steel conditions that could present significant safety concerns, the opening is being pushed back,” she said. “The Department of Education intends to propose the incubation of M.S. 297 in building M868… until construction on the school’s permanent space at 75 Morton St. is completed.” The Union Square-area school has space for the sixth graders, Laboy assured. Meanwhile, students and families are invited to a “Meet the Principal” event on Tues., Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. in the spacious gym of the aforementioned Clinton School (between Fifth Ave. and Union Square West), to meet Jacqui Getz, the leader of the 75 Morton school. Getz will share her exciting vision for the new Village middle school. ETAN TRIAL II: Stan and Julie Patz, the parents of Etan Patz, generally have seldom spoken to the press over the years. But after we saw Stan at a rally to save the Elizabeth St. Garden in September, we reached out to him about Pedro Hernandez’s retrial in Etan’s disappearance, and he shared his feelings, albeit briefly. In short, he’s hoping this time there will finally be a conviction. “Last year, at the end of the first trial, I made my views very clear — Hernandez is guilty beyond any reasonable doubt,” he told us. “Now that we are in… trial number two, I think it would be inappropriate to make any substantive comments. What you can write is that, after almost 38 years, my family and I will be glad

LANDMARK MOMENT: As anticipated, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission last week voted to calendar the third and final phase of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation’s proposed South Village Historic District. The hearing for the area under consideration will be held Nov. 29. If this proposed area is designated, it will bring to 1,300 the number of buildings G.V.S.H.P. has helped get landmarked since 2003. This includes 10 historic districts and historic district extensions, as well as more than a dozen sites designated as individual landmarks. Wow! Hats off to Andrew Berman, the society’s tireless executive director, and the rest of the G.V.S.H.P. staff. Truly extraordinary! WESTBETH FLEA HAS OUR VOTE: As if this Election Day didn’t already hold enough excitement, it also, as usual, marked the start of the Westbeth Fall Flea Market. It’s the 32nd year for the annual affair, sponsored by the Westbeth Artists Beautification Committee. “We are an old-school flea market,” organizer Gina Shamus said, “with unusual and unique items coming from artist collectors and artist producers. We also have vintage items. We have almost everything you can think of: housewares, clothing, lots of books, electronics, sporting goods. This season we have a huge amount of art books, and we always have original art. Great prices and a great experience. ” There are four more days of the flea market craze: Fri., Nov. 11, to Sun., Nov. 13, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., plus Sun., Nov. 20 — a.k.a. the big “Bag ’N’ Box Sale” — from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., when you can buy a cardboard box or big black plastic bag from the Westbeth folks for $5 and fill it with stuff. It all happens at the Village’s renowned artists’ enclave, at 55 Bethune St. (elevator access) and 137 Bank St. (stairs), both near the corner of Washington St. For more information, go to westbeth.org or e-mail westbethfleamarket@gmail.com or call 212-691-1574. ART IS AGELESS: Speaking of Westbeth, “Winter at Westbeth,” a new documentary by Rohan Spong, will premiere at the DOC NYC film festival at the IFC Center

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“It’s worth the trip down the street!” 2

November 10, 2016

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Poet Ilsa Gilber t, outside the 20 Washington Square Nor th senior center, where she lunches, is one of three ar tists featured in the documentar y “ Winter at Westbeth.”

on Wed., Nov. 16, at 5 p.m., and Thurs., Nov. 17, at 10:15 p.m. Done over the course of one year, the film profiles video artist Edith Stephen, 95, who hopes to complete an experimental film for her birthday; contemporary dancer Dudley Williams, 75, who rehearses for a triumphant return to the stage; and poet Ilsa Gilbert, 82, who faces her mortality through her revealing verse. The movie has been described as “An inspirational story about community, aging and the need to keep creating.”

VILLAGE VIEW ELECTION TO-DO: Things are heating up at Village View, where a battle over the possible privatization of the East Village complex could be looming. The Mitchell-Lama affordable co-op, with 1,200 apartments, will hold its election for board of directors on Nov. 16. Watchdogs are calling for transparency in the election, and were recently backed up by local elected officials, who sent a joint letter to the board to that effect. The board, in turn, responded to Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh, one of the letter’s signers, but we’re told he called their response “inadequate.” The board’s composition is critical, a source stressed to us, because it will vote early next year on the possibility of doing a feasibility study, the first step toward a vote on whether to leave the affordable-housing program. Currently, tenants can’t resale their affordable units. The apartments simply go back to the co-op and there is a waiting list to fill them. You get on the waiting list by lottery. Even if the co-op’s members were to vote to leave the MitchellLama program, the profit from selling units would not be that high, our stressed a source, who supports the complex staying in the Mitchell-Lama program, told us. “If the sale price is $500,000, 45 percent goes back to Village View, and then there are real estate taxes,” she said. “You’ll be left with $200,000, and you can’t buy anything around here with that.” Indeed, it doesn’t look like you can get anything in the East Village right now for under $400,000. And, hey, what about the principle of leaving a stock of affordable housing for future generations of New Yorkers to enjoy? CORRECTION: Last week’s article on Merchant’s House Museum’s 80th anniversary incorrectly stated that it is only open three days a week. In fact, the museum is open to visitors five days a week, from Friday to Monday, noon to 5 p.m., and Thursday, noon to 8 p.m. TheVillager.com


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Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association News Story, First Place, 2015 Editorial Page, First Place, 2015 Editorials, First Place, 2014 News Story, First Place, 2014 Overall Design Excellence, First Place, 2013 Best Column, First Place, 2012 Photographic Excellence, First Place, 2011 Spot News Coverage, First Place, 2010 Coverage of Environment, First Place, 2009

PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF LINCOLN ANDERSON

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CONTRIBUTORS ALBERT AMATEAU IRA BLUTREICH TINA BENITEZ-EVES SARAH FERGUSON BOB KRASNER TEQUILA MINSKY CLAYTON PATTERSON JEFFERSON SIEGEL SHARON WOOLUMS

ART DIRECTOR MICHAEL SHIREY

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PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

All you need is love — and Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania and... Gloomy vigilers in Washington Square Park found it hard to see the bright side after Trump’s triumph on Election Day. More vigilers would join them later.

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Love still trumps hate: Village vigilers

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he day after. Many were just stunned or reeling from the Trump victory. A vigil by Quakers in support of Muslims took place at Stuyvesant Square, antiRepublican and anti-Trump rallies were held at Columbus Circle. Pro-Bernie Sanders demonstrators rallied at Union Square — and against both Trump and Clinton —

and marched to Trump Tower. In Washington Square Park, there was a love rally on the gloomy, drizzly day. It started after noon with a handful gathered in the dry fountain, reading Hillary Clinton’s concession speech. Sydney Miller, a New York University student, launched a Facebook event encouraging New Yorkers discouraged by the election results to come together in the park to rally in support of Muslims, minor-

ity groups, women and others who may have been negatively impacted by Trump’s campaign rhetoric. As of Wednesday afternoon, more than 1,500 people had RSVP’d. Far fewer than that actually showed up. “Let Muslims, women, those who have disabilities, Latin people and everyone else Donald Trump has put down to get this far, know that this country doesn’t hate them. #LoveStillTrumpsHate,” reads the event description.

The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 00426202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2016 NYC Community Media LLC. PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR

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A dog in the park is one thing — but in the Oval Office?

4

November 10, 2016

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3:40 PM


Yuuuge fear and loathing as Trump shocks the world ELECTION continued from p. 1

waaay!” Scott, who drank himself to death, was singing about booze and drugs. And for the young bargoers, it was dawning on them that we are in for, well...one strange trip. Morgann followed that right up with R.E.M.’s “It’s the End of the World (As We Know It).” You could call it The Donald Doomsday Mix. As the night wore on, key battleground states, like Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania, went red as Trump only further piled up his lead. He beat Clinton soundly, with 275 to 218 electoral votes, though lost the popular vote by around 200,000 ballots. If Downtown Manhattan were the only place that mattered, Clinton would have crushed Trump. There were long lines at most of the polls, as people turned out to cast their vote for Clinton — and, equally, if not more importantly, against Trump. Election workers reported record numbers — topping even the two previous presidential elections won by Barack Obama. At the polling place at P.S. 41, at W. 11th St. and Sixth Ave., the line started forming shortly after 5 a.m. and stretched around the corner all the way to W. 10th St. “Oh, my God, it was over the top,” said Marjorie Kouns, the site’s information clerk. The long river of voters flowed unbroken throughout the day, as people came in droves to weigh in on what most felt was one of the most critical elections of our lives. Local stars felt that way, too. “We had our celebrities show up,” Kouns said. “Sarah Jessica Parker, Matthew Broderick, Michael Kors, Marisa Tomei — and that says a lot to me.” At around 2 p.m., Village District Keen Berger had just completed her first round of checking all 15 poll sites in her part of the 66th Assembly District. “There were very long lines everywhere,” she reported. “The Palladium, they had lines down the street,” she said of New York University’s dorm on the former Palladium nightclub site on E. 14th St. Berger said that, according to Teresa Hommel, the P.S. 41 poll site coordinator, people had been voting there at a brisk clip of 1,000 per hour. A problem at P.S. 41 and also at P.S. 63, on E. Third St., and likely at many other poll sites, was that some optical scanners filled up with the flood of paper ballots that had been fed into them. Berger said Hommel earlier had been trying to figure out what to do with a machine packed full of the paper ballots. One idea was to remove the scanned ballots from the machine and put them in a “lock box,” so that the scanner could be put back into action. In the end, though, the problem was solved when a fresh,

6

November 10, 2016

The line outside P.S. 41 was down the block all day long.

Deborah Glick spor ted a spiff y blue pantsuit for her candidate, Hillar y Clinton.

empty scanner was brought in. Each scanner can hold somewhere 1,000 ballots. At P.S. 63, as the voting was wrapping up around 9 p.m. Tuesday night, Saran Thrasher, the poll site coordinator, said they chose to keep the unscanned ballots until after the poll closed, and then would scan them then. “We can’t leave here until we do it,” she said. Also on the ballot for re-election at P.S. 41 were Assemblymember Deborah Glick, who ran unopposed, state Senator Brad Hoylman and Congressmember Chuck Schumer. Entry / exit polling at the Greenwich Village School yielded many similar descriptions of the two presidential candidates when voters were asked why they were supporting Clinton and not Trump. No one seemed to be backing Trump — except possibly two guys who said they would talk after voting. Trump was described as “a disaster,” “insane,” “maniacal,” “frightening,” “a loose cannon,” “unpredictable,” “hideous,” “likely to get us into wars,” “psychopath” and “cuckoo.” In contrast, Clinton was called “experienced,” “rational,” “logical,” “strategic.” As one voter, Judith Levin, who teaches at N.Y.U., explaining her choice, put it, “It’s a no-brainer.” But others, though supporting Clinton, were less than enthusiastic. “She just doesn’t stand for anything,” said one man, who didn’t give his name. He had thought of backing Green candidate Jill Stein as “the ultimate protest vote,” but made up his mind by the time he entered the school’s door. Another man, Kevin Spina, however, who said he actually was a Green, did say he was voting for Stein because of her environmental positions and her pacifism. “Nothing the major candidates said

Trump, Glick scoffed, “They have to have their heads examined. I was a Hillary supporter, but I voted for Obama in 2008. This is not a time to have a fit of pique.” Karen, a young mother discretely nursing her daughter through a flap in her shirt, had just voted. She said she didn’t want to give her last name because the election was causing family tension. “I voted for the person who has not express social prejudices,” she said. “I don’t want my daughter growing up in that environment.” At the same time, she said she wasn’t particularly inspired by Clinton. She works in finance and actually saw one of the “secret” Wall Street talks Clinton gave that the candidate was pressured to release the transcripts of. “I don’t think she stated more dramatic views than what she’s stated in public,” she shrugged. Salah Murshad, manning a convenience store counter on Avenue A as oud music played behind him on Tuesday night, said Trump is dangerous — not just to Muslims, but the world. “He’s not good dealing with people, because he’s got a big mouth — no one can deal with that.” He said he’s not afraid of Trump’s tough talk against Muslims. “America, they go by law,” he said. “He can’t do whatever he wants because he is the president.” Daniel Stone was one of the last voters at P.S. 63 on E. Third St. before the poll closed for the night. A culinary instructor, he called the election a “disaster. All my European friends...it’s so embarrassing. “I blame Bravo television for everything!” he said. “It’s ‘Real Housewives’ — no one cares about the issues.” Yes, hard to believe, but we now have a reality-TV president. As Trump would say, believe it.

PHOTOS BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

made me feel that, if they were elected, the war in the Middle East would end,” he said. Berger has a political pedigree. Her father, Harold Stassen, was Minnesota’s governor and a perennial Republican candidate for president, unsuccessfully seeking the party’s nomination nine times. Asked for her own feelings on the election, Berger said, “Oh, I think it’s crucial. The country has to take a stand against all the things that divide us.” As for her thoughts on Clinton, she said, “You know, she’s not perfect — but neither am I.” She was then off to do a second sweep of her district’s poll sites, making sure everything was functioning well — and also distributing cookies to election workers. Glick was dressed for the occasion in a blue pantsuit and blue shoes — “a nottoo-subtle” message, she quipped. She had to wait for an hour to cast her ballot. “I got on line at 12:30 and vote at 1:30,” she noted. Eight years ago, when Clinton was running for president for the first time, Glick had expressed to The Villager how happy she was finally to be able to vote for a woman for president. She had voted for far too many “mediocre men” over the years, she said back then. Reminded of that comment on Tuesday, Glick noted, “I voted for Gore [in 2000]. That was a good guy.” Trump, on the other hand, is more than just mediocre, in her view and in the view of most of the others who were on line. “What I find incredible is that the man is obviously unhinged and a significant portion of the country is voting for him,” she marveled. “The Republicans are the victim of their own gridlock,” she said, of how Trump came to be the G.O.P. candidate. As for people like actress Susan Sarandon who said Clinton was worse than

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November 10, 2016

7


Whoa! Uh-oh! All-Seeing Trump was right!

PHOTO BY JONATHAN ALPEYRIE

Donald Trump giving his victor y speech early Wednesday morning at the New York Hilton Hotel in Midtown, with, from left, his youngest son, Barron, Trump’s daughter Ivanka, her husband Jared Kushner — publisher of the Obser ver and a real estate owner in the East Village and Soho — and Melody, Trump’s lesser-known daughter. Kushner has been accused of harassment by some tenants in his East Village buildings where renovations were being done.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN ALPEYRIE

Hat’s all, folks... On display under glas at Trump’s victor y par t y — the wack y hat that star ted it all.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN ALPEYRIE

A few hours before the polls closed, t wo men moved the All-Seeing Trump for tune-telling PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON machine — which proved to be accurate — into position near the New York Hilton, where The Kikkerland design store on Sixth Ave. in the Village had some fun with its front window, Trump would later celebrate his shocking por traying Trump and Clinton as circa 18th-centur y monarchs of sor ts,along with some of their kookiest quotes. win.

8

November 10, 2016

TheVillager.com


Donald does it; Kushner now part of first family

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

Eight percent of blacks suppor ted Trump. Not too many of them probably had the guts, though, to show it as publicly as this guy at Times Square on election night.

PHOTO BY Q. SAKAMAKI

On election night, Hillar y Clinton suppor ters at Harlem Tavern cheered as she won Virginia. But it wasn’t enough.

PHOTO BY Q. SAKAMAKI

The vibe for Virginia was positive at Harlem Tavern after Clinton won there. But she went on to lose key battleground states. TheVillager.com

November 10, 2016

9


Blue Ribbon Bakery will bite the dust, the latest RENT continued from p. 1

also close the nearby smaller Blue Ribbon Market on Bedford St. is because it relies on the Bakery Kitchen for many of its products. Blue Ribbon’s owners did not respond to requests for comment by press time. Blue Ribbon’s gourmet fare is hugely popular among locals, many who lamented its loss and the circumstances around it. The eatery has been a neighborhood fixture since 1998. “I was in tears when I found out,” Market regular Sheila Haas said. “If you go there and ask regulars, they’ll tell you they’ve been such a wonderful part of the community. There’s been so much change in the neighborhood, the stability they provided was just amazing.” The new tenants who will take over the Blue Ribbon Market space, at 14 Bedford St., applied for a tavern wine liquor license, which would allow them to serve beer and wine. They have named the business Pocket Bar, according to Community Board 2, whose S.L.A. Licensing Committee will weigh in on the application at its meeting on Thurs., Nov. 10, at the Scholastic building, 557 Broadway between Prince and Spring Sts., at 6:30 p.m. The matter will next go before the State Liquor Authority. On the other hand, the new tenants at the Blue Ribbon Bakery Kitchen location

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applied for full liquor on-premise license, which would allow them to serve all varieties of liquor — the same license the Blue Ribbon held. The application notes the eatery will “be casual with a California-inspired, curated menu that will highlight locally sourced ingredients,” according to the owner’s lawyer. Until this Tuesday, the application as described on the C.B. 2 agenda called for the new restaurant to include a D.J. and live music. But that sentence had been removed from the C.B. 2 site by Wednesday. The lawyer for the applicant told The Villager that the place would have “recorded background music only.” The owner is a former business development director for a restaurant group based in

the city. The Bedford-Downing Block Association urged members in an e-mail on Monday to petition C.B. 2 to deny the application at the former Market space, and to make sure the owner at the former Bakery Kitchen location “agrees to seal all windows, maintain a 24/7 closeddoor policy, enforce the proposed closing times (midnight on weeknights, 1 a.m. Saturday & Sunday) be personally accessible for noise complaints, and actively control patron noise outside the restaurant.” Livvie Mann, the president of the association, said it has the latter arrangement with the owners of all restaurants RENT continued on p. 11

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victim of soaring rents

The smaller Blue Ribbon Market is a favorite go-to food-and-coffee spot for locals. RENT continued from p. 10

in the area, including the Blue Ribbon Bakery Kitchen. A 30-year-resident of the block, she said there are “a million restaurants” in the area and the neighborhood could use another market instead of a bar at the former Market location. Restaurants aren’t what her neighbors need, she said.

“The kinds of businesses that restaurants replaced were shoe-repair places, tailors,” Mann said. “There was a deli where the market was — the kind of stores you want in a neighborhood where people live. Every time a service business closes and a restaurant moves in, it’s not your livable neighborhood anymore, it’s a neighborhood for people who come from Uptown for lunch or brunch.”

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Reading: The Artist’s Compass Tuesday, November 15 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm NYU Bookstore 726 Broadway In her book The Artist’s Compass, Rachel S. Moore offers a roadmap to those seeking to survive and thrive in the arts. Moore provides insights into the world of performance artists and nuts-and-bolts strategies for success. Moore is President and CEO of The Music Center, a performing arts center in Los Angeles. A former dancer with the American Ballet Theatre (ABT), she was ABT’s Executive Director from 2004-2012, and CEO until 2015. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

www.clwac.org TheVillager.com

November 10, 2016

11


Hospital ‘wants to get it right’; Pols want info HOSPITAL continued from p. 1

ville’s reassurances, the politicians pushed for more information, particularly from the state Department of Health. Local residents, meanwhile, expressed skepticism that the new hospital would adequately meet the community’s needs. The day before, Dr. Ken Davis, the Mount Sinai Health System C.E.O., had announced Boal’s appointment as the head of Mount Sinai Downtown, the new name the health system recently gave to its facilities below 23rd St. Boal’s job will be to oversee the creation of that new network’s centerpiece, a scaled-down Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital on Second Ave. between E. 14th and 13th Sts., which is slated to be completed in four years from now. Boal will also oversee the “enhancement” of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary on the same block, plus the upgrading of two other major medical hubs the health system runs in the Downtown area — on Union Square East and on W. 15th St. — plus other scattered physician sites. Boal, who trained in geriatric medicine, started out as an intern at Mount Sinai 25 years ago. He has two decades of experience in patient care and hospital management. He is currently still executive vice

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

COURTESY MOUNT SINAI HEALTH SYSTEM

Holding a July letter from local officials to the state Health commissioner, A ssemblymember Brian Kavanagh stressed that area politicians want full information on the process of closing down the current Beth Israel Hospital and building its replacement.

Dr. Jeremy Boal will be heading the Beth Israel Hospital rebuilding effor t as president of the new Downtown Mount Sinai health net work.

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November 10, 2016

president and chief medical officer of the larger Mount Sinai Health System. In January, he will fully take over the new Downtown network and Somerville will step down. Previously, Boal was chief medical officer for North Shore-LIJ Health System, now known as Northwell Health, which operates the Lenox Health Greenwich Village 24/7 stand-alone emergency department at W. 12th St. and Seventh Ave. on part of the former St. Vincent’s Hospital site. Under the Beth Israel rebuilding plan, the eyeglasses store at the southeast corner of E. 14th St. and Second Ave. will be replaced with an open plaza that Boal described as “a giveback” to the community. However, he later noted, Mount Sinai is also proactively opening up this corner because it potentially could be the site of a Second Ave. subway entrance/exit at some point in the future — so, they might as well do it up now. Over all, Boal said, Mount Sinai hopes the new compact full-service hospital — designed by architects Perkins Eastman, and sporting a scrim-like overhead structure to define the corner plaza — will be “sort of a gateway to the East Village.” The walk-in entrance for its emergency room will be on E. 14th St. Whether the ambulance bay, however, will be on 14th or 13th St. still hasn’t been decided.

The new hospital will only have 70 acute-care beds. But it will be built so that, if it turns out more hospital beds are needed, two or three floors could be added atop its E. 13th St. side. But Boal said Mount Sinai feels 70 is the correct number, at least right now. Nevertheless, Boal said, it’s good to have the possibility of adding beds. “It is critical to be able to expand,” he stressed. Currently, the existing Beth Israel Hospital, at E. 16th St. and First Ave., sees about 300 of its acute-care beds filled on a daily basis. (The hospital’s Bernstein Pavilion, at E. 16th St. and Perlman Place, has 150 beds for behavioral-health patients that are filled to capacity, and that number won’t change under the plan.) Mount Sinai arrived at the number or 70 acute-care beds by factoring in expected and planned reductions. For example, 60 of the current beds at Beth Israel will no longer be needed due to advances in ambulatory treatment, according to Mount Sinai. In addition, patients needing complex care, such as kidney transplants or neurosurgery, as well as women giving birth, all who would normally fill another 100 of the hospital’s beds, will be shifted to Mount Sinai’s uptown hospitals — including Mount Sinai West (the formerly Roosevelt Hospital) and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s. Another 40 beds will no longer be needed thanks to a new “Hospital at Home” program, for which the federal government recently gave Mount Sinai a $20 million grant, which will treat more people where they live. Finally, a 30-bed Mount Sinai Brooklyn Obstetrics Center will be created to serve Beth Israel’s current Brooklyn patients; about half of the births at Beth Israel are by Brooklyn residents. In fact, Boal pointed out, it’s best for people just to stay out of hospitals, if they safely can, since hospitals are full of infections, among other things. Plus, “patient satisfaction” is higher when people can be treated at home, he noted. About one-third of the city’s acutecare hospital beds are currently empty, and this percentage increases every year, Somerville pointed out. “The number of patients that spend time in hospitals will go down, and they’ll spend less time in hospital beds,” Boal stated. However, not all at the meeting were convinced. During the Q & A, Sue Ellen Kennedy, an East Village resident, accused the Beth Israel plan of being based on “magic beds” that don’t exist. As for Mount Sinai’s plan to sell its Beth Israel Hospital campus in Gramercy, Boal and Somerville explained that the square block between E. 16th HOSPITAL continued on p. 14 TheVillager.com


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13


Electeds seek clarity

HOSPITAL continued from p. 12

and 17th Sts. and First Ave. and Perlman Place — a.k.a. “the superblock” — will be sold, along with Gilman Hall, on the northwest corner of E. 17th St. and First Ave., plus a row of small buildings along First Ave. In short, all of the current Beth Israel property except for the Bernstein Pavilion will be sold, and all proceeds from the sale will be funneled into the $500 million Downtown plan, mostly for the construction of the mini-hospital, though more funds will likely be needed, they said. The current hospital will keep operating until the new one opens. As for what kind of housing will be built on the Gramercy site, they said Mount Sinai strongly supports affordable housing, but that it will be up to the developer to determine this. However, speaking on behalf of Gale Brewer, the Manhattan borough president, Matthew Washington, the deputy borough president, told the hospital officials, “The Borough President’s Office would love to see a 100-percent affordable housing project there.” The audience applauded its support. “We’re certainly going to advocate for it,” Boal said of affordable housing. Dan Sheppard, a deputy commissioner of the New York State Department of Health, explained that “certificates of need” are required for each step of closing down the current Beth Israel Hospital and opening the new smaller version. The “C.O.N.’s” will be viewable on the department’s Web site, he said. But local politicians at the presentation said they want a lot more notification and input than that. Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh, during his remarks, brandished a letter to the state D.O.H. commissioner that 16 of the area’s elected officials jointly signed back in July soon after news of the Beth Israel rebuilding plan broke. Their letter stated, in part, “Given our and the public’s concern over past losses of hospital services in Manhattan, it is important that D.O.H. attend a public meeting to explain the criteria and process that might be used by the department in evaluating and responding to the applications that Mount Sinai is considering for Beth Israel Hospital and Mount Sinai’s downtown services. We are hopeful that D.O.H. will provide the community with information and answer questions about the regulatory decision-making standards and process, and that any decisions your agency ultimately makes will be fully informed by the community’s input.” “There’s a lot of moving parts,” Kavanagh stated. “The hospital has been

14

November 10, 2016

very forthcoming — but we would like to see comprehensive review [of each stage of the process]. The community has seen hospitals come and go. We’d like much more clarity. We’re looking for the Health Department to act as the ultimate arbiter of this plan and make sure it’s meeting people’s needs,” Kavanagh said, to the audience’s applause. Added Wendi Paster, Assemblymember Richard Gottfried’s chief of staff, “Perhaps there was a communication problem because we would have liked to hear a little more. Also, we’d like to hear a little more about affordable housing.” State Senator Liz Krueger expressed concern that no one seems to be overseeing Manhattan’s shifting healthcare landscape — much less the whole city’s — in terms of public and private hospitals, and whether this seemingly increasingly random patchwork actually all works together. “I’m very concerned that somebody’s not looking at the big picture,” Krueger said. “This is like reorganizing the deck chairs of healthcare,” she added, riffing on the “rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic” line. However, Somerville added that Mount Sinai is, in fact, taking the time to do things correctly. “We’ve all seen where hospitals close and it’s terrible for patients — just a hard stop,” she said. “With the Beth Israel plan, the four-year timeline affords us the opportunity to get it right.” Boal added there would be many more meetings to keep the community informed about the plan’s progress. Umair Khan, deputy counsel to Public Advocate Letitia James, was skeptical that Mount Sinai would have space at its uptown hospitals for Downtown women to deliver babies, since this service won’t be done at Beth Israel anymore. “We know N.Y.U. [Langone] is filled to capacity, as is Bellevue,” he said. But Somerville answered, “We have pockets of beds in many facilities that aren’t being used.” Plus, there will be the new Brooklyn obstetrics facility, she added. Regarding the downsized East Village hospital’s emergency department, Boal explained, “This will be a very busy, very large emergency department.” The E.R. won’t treat trauma patients, though, who will continue to be sent to Bellevue Hospital, as is done now, he said. Somerville added that the new M.S.B.I. hospital will have “a surge plan,” such as would be needed during a flu epidemic, for example. Superstorm Sandy was a situation that saw a surge of patients, she noted. HOSPITAL continued on p. 15 TheVillager.com


on Beth Israel rebuilding plan for E. 14th St. HOSPITAL continued from p. 14

The new hospital will be built mostly on E. 13th St. on the site of a former New York Eye and Ear residential building and a small parking lot. There will be parking underneath the new hospital, Boal noted. Responding to concerns about the future of Beth Israel’s employees, the hospital leaders said they are proud of Mount Sinai’s agreement to ensure that all unionized employees get equivalent union jobs. “It has been an absolute priority to preserve jobs for employees,” Somerville said. “It’s not perfect, but we’re not doing layoffs.” A West Village woman, recalling the terror blast in Chelsea two months ago, said it could have been much worse, and that the area needs a Level I trauma center, like the one St. Vincent’s Hospital had before that hospital shuttered in 2010. “Everything is on the East Side, but we need something on the West Side,” she said of how hospitals south of 23rd St. are distributed. “St. Vincent’s closing was a tragedy that wasn’t supposed to happen,” Boal said, sympathetically. Lower East Side activist K Webster of Neighbors to Save Rivington House

A rendering of the planned Mount Sinai Downtown Beth Israel Hospital, a 70-bed mini-hospital with an emergenc y depar tment at E. 14th St. and Second Ave. Par t of the reason the new project would open up the corner is to accommodate the Second Ave. subway, if it ever comes down that far.

asked what Mount Sinai is doing “to prepare for the crisis you don’t know about.” “There’s Ebola, climate change, a lot of unknowns are out there,” she said. “We lost Rivington House, an AIDS hospice — the Department of Health

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dropped the ball in a major way.” Boal answered that Mount Sinai has “studied projections on aging and young families” for the new hospital’s service area. The health system, in fact, creates a “likely threat list” each year, he added. noting they had just worked up a scenar-

io for dealing with the possibility of “another Superstorm Sandy downtown.” The audience expressed its approval as Boal added that a key to ensuring the new hospital meets the community’s needs will be for it to have “multicultural physicians and services.”

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Share your input on the latest designs for storm protection. Spanish, Mandarin, and Cantonese interpreters will be present at all meetings. A Fujianese interpreter will be present on December 1. Meeting spaces are wheelchair accessible. For special needs assistance, please call Fay Lee at (718) 391-2411 by November 21, 2016. Dinner will be provided. Bill de Blasio, Mayor

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TheVillager.com

November 10, 2016

15


POLICE BLOTTER Killer drivers sentenced

A driver who was high on drugs when he swerved across Second Ave. and careened into an East Village grocery store three years ago, fatally injuring a 62-year-old florist, was sentenced to 20 years to life last week. Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, Jr. last Friday announced the stiff sentence against Shaun Martin, 35, in the fatal June 2013 crash at E. Fourth St. Martin, who was on PCP and meth, was reportedly going more than 80 miles per hour when his Nissan Altima flew onto the sidewalk at 6:50 a.m. and raked the store’s side, hitting Mohammed Akkas Ali. Two others were injured. Martin also first hit a hydrant, a pay phone, a Muni-Meter and a tree. Ali had worked 22 years at East Village Farm deli, also making fresh-squeezed juices and salads. He was in a coma a couple of weeks, regained consciousness, but never spoke or moved again, and eventually died from his injuries. Martin was convicted in State Supreme Court of all charges he faced, including second-degree murder, aggravated vehicular homicide, and firstdegree assault and reckless endangerment, among others. His attorney argued Martin was self-medicating and an addict. The judge was unsympathetic. “Shaun Martin’s drug-fueled joyride ended in tragedy,” Vance said after the sentencing. “Thanks to my office’s prosecutors and members of the Ninth Precinct, he will serve a prison sentence commensurate with his deadly conduct.”

Last month, in a separate case, another reckless speeding driver, Danny Lin, was sentenced to oneand-two-third years to five years in state prison for fatally striking Robert Perry, 57, with his BMW on the Bowery in November 2014. Perry, who was crossing Rivington St., was thrown 140 feet through the air. Lin sped off but stopped after hitting a hydrant at Stanton St. He was convicted of manslaughter. Vance declared, “We will continue doing our part to reduce vehicular fatalities by holding criminal drivers accountable for the harm that they inflict.”

‘Police pusher’ A woman allegedly called a police officer Donald Trump’s favorite word early Tues, Nov. 1. Police said that at 12:30 a.m. at Sixth Ave. and W. Fourth St., a woman pushed a cop and said, “You’re a f---ing pussy!” A crowd gathered. When the officer tried to handcuff her, she reportedly kicked multiple officers and flailed her arms. Tiesha Martin, 24, was arrested for misdemeanor resisting arrest.

‘Brother’ busted, too An officer was arresting a handcuffed prisoner in front of 163 Bleecker St. when a man tried to intervene. Police said that on Tues., Nov. 1, at 3:40 a.m., the meddling man was told to step back repeatedly but instead bear-hugged and pulled the prisoner, trying

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He ‘masked’ for it An officer trying to keep people back from an early-morning fight at MacDougal and Bleecker Sts. was pushed by a masked Halloween reveler. On Tues., Nov. 1, at 12:10 a.m., the masked man allegedly called the cop a “pig” and shoved him with two hands into a barrier. He then ran away, but returned 10 minutes later and officers recognized him. Upon a search, a phone previously reported stolen was found on him, police said. Devon Johnson, 20, was busted for misdemeanor resisting arrest.

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An alleged repeat burglar of Hudson Flowers, at 501 Hudson St., was finally caught on Fri., Nov. 4. According to police, the store was robbed four times in April and June. In the last robbery, on Sun., June 5, the owner arrived and noticed the front glass door and front window had been broken with a brick. The owner told cops that cigarettes, flowers and about $200 were stolen. Angel Vazquez, 56, was arrested for felony burglary. A police report did not say what led to him being pegged as the suspect.

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to free him. “That’s my brother, though,” he allegedly told police. Taquaein Denory, 25, was arrested for misdemeanor obstructing government administration.

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Emily Sisley, 86, psychologist, ‘Joy of Lesbian Sex’ co-author

OBITUARY

Dr. Emily Lucretia Sisley, a psychologist and writer who co-authored “The Joy of Lesbian Sex,” died Oct. 21 in New York City. She was 86. Sisley was born May 7, 1930, in Charleroi, Pennsylvania, daughter of Frederick W. and Harriet Litman Sisley. At 21, she moved to New York City and never looked back. For the last 50 years, she lived in Greenwich Village in a tiny, eccentrically decorated apartment. Sisley received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Long Island University. She was a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Board of Medical Psychotherapists. She served as chief psychologist at the Gramercy Park Institute. Her teaching appointments included Long Island University, Pima College, the Chiropractic Institute of New York, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. Sisley is also the author of “The Novel Writers” (1980) and co-author of “The Vitamin C Connection” (1983). She was an avid musician, playing piano, clarinet and viola, and a longtime supporter of the Metropolitan and City operas. Her great friend and neighbor Jean Warfield, now deceased, worked as a set designer for the Metropolitan, and their Morton St. apartments were often the site of musical galas featuring noted performers of the New York stage. Sisley was a founding member of the Morton St. Block Association, and was active in protecting her corner of the historic West Village for more than 40 years. She traveled widely, loved dogs, skiing

Emily Sisley.

and golf, and was her family historian. Those mourning her include her brother, Brigadier General Frederick E. Sisley (U.S. Marine Corps, retired), his wife Dinny and their children and grandchildren; cousins Mimi Alef, Maude Parkinson and Susan Wilson and their families; cousin Bruce J. Croushore and family; and devoted friends Mary “Gussie” Dimmick of Pittsburgh and Mary Phillips of New York. “The Joy of Lesbian Sex,” praised as an “informative, sensitively written manual” when it appeared in 1978, may seem somewhat outdated today but was groundbreaking for its time. It has been translated into many languages and has been a support for women exploring their sexuality over several decades. Contributions in Emily Sisley’s memory can be made to the Morton St. Block Association, P.O. Box 20136, West Village Station, New York, N.Y. 10014; or Greenwich House Music School, 46 Barrow St., New York, N.Y. 10014; or the ASCPA. Please include “in memory of Emily Sisley” on the check.

Keep your home, family & finances above water

Judge blocks building sale in gay man’s estate battle BY PAUL SCHINDLER

I

n a promising first step for a gay man fighting to keep the Village home he shared with his late partner for 53 years, a Surrogate Court judge has blocked the property’s sale by the dead man’s relatives and ordered them to show cause why Tom Doyle, as their uncle’s “surviving spouse,” should not be declared the “sole heir.” On Nov. 1, Judge Nora Anderson issued a temporary restraining against four nieces and nephews of William Cornwell selling the 69 Horatio St. townhouse he bought in 1979. Anderson’s order gave them until Nov. 18 to “show cause.” Cornwell and Doyle began their relationship in 1958. Cornwell bought them wedding rings after New York legalized TheVillager.com

same-sex marriage in 2011. According to Doyle, Cornwell’s declining health kept them from going to the city Marriage Bureau before Cornwell’s death in 2014. Cornwell left Doyle the building in his will, but it had only one witness, not the required two. After entering into contract with a buyer for more than $7 million, the cousins offered to let Doyle, 85, stay there for five years and pay him $250,000 from the building’s sale. Attorneys Arthur Z. Schwartz and Jamie L. Wolf filed suit claiming the men’s vacations in Pennsylvania made them common-law spouses there. “The temporary restraining order by the surrogate,” Schwartz said, “indicates that, at least, based on our papers, she believes we have made a plausible legal case that they were married.” November 10, 2016

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE

VILLAGER Don’t miss a single issue! East Village, Lower for Greenwich Village, Since 1933 The Paper of Record Square, Chinatown and Noho, Soho, Union

$1.00 June 23, 2016 • 25 Volume 86 • Number

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East Side,

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sue 2nd Ave. tenants lord city, Con Ed, land for ’15 gas explosion former

tenants,

Thanks for B.I. report

To The Editor: Re “No matter who wins…protest the inauguration!” (talking point, by Bill Weinberg, Oct. 27): Mr. Weinberg is apparently very confused. He says he intends to vote for Hillary Clinton on Nov. 8 and then protest her inauguration if she wins — in effect, protesting against himself. He will do this to express his disdain for her warlike policies, while using his vote to enable those policies. Weinberg has embraced this peculiar “political schizophrenia” in order to keep Trump out of the White House. Lesser-evilism is as old as two-party politics in America. In the 1960s, Barry Goldwater was the liberals’ boogyman, useful for keeping the Democratic faithful docile. In recent years, that role has been played by Bob Dole, George W. Bush, John McCain and Mitt Romney. Meanwhile, the Democratic leadership keeps moving farther and farther to the right. True progressives need to vote for Jill Stein. Like all Green Party candidates, she receives no corporate or war machine donations. A vote for Hillary is a vote for war; a vote for Jill is a vote for peace. (Contrary to Mr. Weinberg’s lurid allegation, Stein supports a peaceful settlement in Syria by disarming all parties — not an Assad victory.) And if Stein gets just 5 percent of the total vote, the Greens will receive millions in federal funds and major-party status for 2020. I will join Weinberg in protesting Clinton if she wins — but, unlike Weinberg, I won’t be protesting against myself.

To The Editor: Re “Downsized Beth Israel could be done in 4 years” (news article, Oct. 27): Your article on Beth Israel was excellent. Not having a hospital on the West Side for a number of miles is one of my issues.

John David Baldwin

includ-

and “Soing lead plaintiff Drea de pranos” actress dozen civil suit in round three Matteo, fi led a Court led a tenants have fi Manhattan Supreme that blames nearly $19 million last Tuesday for the city and the city and Con Edison lawsuit against the of the fi - not cracking down on others in the wake 121 that killed illegal gas hook-up at ery gas explosion led to the that three Ave. leveled Second two men and fi re on East Village blast and subsequent buildings in the 30 continued on p. last March. LAWSUIT and A roster of current

BY YANNIC R ACK

Lesser-evilism is just bad

A

s Punk photog make tarter ‘History’ on Kicks with new CBGB book BY BOB KR ASNER

PHOTO BY TEQUILA

(He has a of CBGB by Godlis. not to first name, but prefers

tolerance outside about peace and students sang Pages 17 to 23. P.S. 3 fifth-grade special section, See Gay Pride Inn on Monday.

‘More mobile munchies’?

MINSKY

the Stonewall

’s spirit U’ground Railroad ntown graffiti artist has keeps chuggingE.V.Dow

use it.) art book is The limited edition ew York, East Village, thanks street 1976. A local about to hit the shelves, leaves to a very successful Kickstarter photographer apartment, campaign and Godlis’s determihis St. Mark’s with full of punks nation to produce a book walks into a bar three says, is “His- integrity. Godlis spent and the rest, as he — on the Night,” the years — 1976 to ’79 tory Is Made At monograph on p. 4 eagerly anticipated GODLIS continued and outside of images shot in

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February 18, 2016 • $1.00 Volume 86 • Number 7

The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

Railof the Underground editor of the Lives Howard Gay, the New York City: Sidney Standard road in National Anti-Slavery Gay, Louis Napoleon and of Louis Howard weekly newspaper, Record of Fugitives.” week man of color and the Napoleon, a free wo events last the reunion was Anto the who conducted hundreds of Attending ndhearkened back Terrell, great-great-gra York fugitives from slavery through gela Napoleon on days when New BY LINCOLN in ANDERSON daughter of Louis 25, stabbed another graffiti the Under- New York City to freedom on side. station a was her mother’s writer, Christopher and Jusko, 21, in 1800 and a center Canada and elsewhere. at n East the Village Napoleon, ground Railroad graffi- born with an 8-inch The June 14 reunion ti artist movement name with an X, kitchen knife Burger, arrested who signed of the abolitionist forhis in the stairway of a squatter home of Otis Kidwell killing instrumental Civil War. rival tag- was building that led up to the at 272 E. Seventh nddaughter of anevertheless was a great-great-gra ger more Don five years ago St. outside by than p. 6 One of those events continued on Pastoressa’s secGay, was organized RAILROADond-floor still Village hasn’t had “Secret a Greenwich trial and of apartment. Slashed reunion in co-author remains locked up on Rikers in the neck and of Sydney Papson, stabbed in the of the descendants Island to this day. back, Jusko staggered down According to police, around the stairs and out of the build5:30 a.m. on Mon., Oct. 25, ARTIST continued on p. 10 2010, Jairo Pastoressa, then

been in jail for 5½ years for murder, without trial

BY ALBERT AMATEAU

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A

rollback ..... p. 14 must back a rent Editorial: R.G.B. sary .......p. 36 l rocks 40th anniver La Plaza Cultura

Handy Trump in

Soho slam .....p.

r.com www.TheVillage

It’s a closed book: St. Mark’s Bookshop is going out of business

8

BY COLIN MIXSON

current talks with investors will result in a eloved literary haven store emerging new bookfrom the ashSt. Mark’s Bookstore es of St. Mark’s, albeit, with has entered the final a new name, new operators stage of its terminal mon- and none of the debt. ey woes, and the proverbial “We’re basically going out book will soon close on Man- of business at this point,” hattan’s oldest independent said Contant. “There may be bookshop. a continuation of a bookstore But owner Bob Contant is still clinging to hope that ST. MARK’S continued on p. 14

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Burlesque with a new twist...........page

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January 14, 2016 • $1.00 Volume 86 • Number 2

Squadron slam s Senate for refusing to consider the Elevator Safety Act

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Athanasios Ioannidis, center, PHOTO BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL and Andrew Trombettas, while being walked into right, try to hide their faces their arraignment last Thursday. Trombettas “renting” his plumber’s is accused of license to twice rigging illegal gas-siphoningIoannidis, an unlicensed plumber who is accused of systems at 121 Second Ave.

‘Gas House Gang’ indicted in deadly 2nd Ave. explosion

BY YANNIC RACK

A

lmost a year after a gas explosion rocked the East Village, killing two men and leveling three buildings, four people were indicted last Thursday for manslaughter and other charges in connection with the blast. Maria Hrynenko, 56, who owns the building at 121 Second Ave. where the blast occurred, her son Michael Hrynenko, 30, contractor Dilber Kukic, 40, and plumb-

er Athanasios “Jerry” Ioannidis, 59, were also charged with criminally negligent homicide and assault in the second degree, according to the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. In addition, Andrew Trombettas, 57, was charged with “renting” his master plumbing license to Ioannidis so the latter could get work on the property approved, prosecutors said. Manhattan D.A. Cy Vance said last week that the defendants set up an elaborate ille-

gal gas line and hid the setup from inspectors, causing the explosion and subsequent fire on March 26, 2015, that claimed the lives of Moises Locón and Nicholas Figueroa and injured and displaced dozens of others. “The seven-alarm fire that killed two people and engulfed three buildings in March 2015 was caused by a foreseeable, preventable and completely avoidable gas explosion,” Vance said. All five defendants pleadGAS HOUSE continued on p.

6

Surgeon general wants you — to walk!.........page 4 Hawkers market sticks in their craw........page 8

The Paper

of Record for Soho, Union Greenwich Village, East Square, Chinatown Village, Lower East Side, and Noho, Since 1933

www.TheVillager.com

BY YANNIC RACK an aspiring rapper from Bronx, was the enants and heading to politicians ty a parat 131 Broome joined in calling St. state legislator on was fatally injured when he in an acs to cident just pass a bill that before midnight prove regulation would im- on Dec. 31. ing for elevatorand licensWhen the workers stuck between elevator got after a 25-year-o floors, Hewettld man was Brown crushed to reportedly death in an eleva- ers get out, but helped othtor on New was pinned Year’s Eve. Stephen Hewett-Brown, ELEVATOR continued on

T

To The Editor: Re “Bill would double number of food vendor permits” (news article, Nov. 3): This article tells us: “New Yorkers may be able to enjoy more mobile munchies over the next several years as the City Council considers a package of bills aimed at improving conditions for the city’s many street vendors.” Is this a news item or a public-relations press release? I couldn’t continue to read this article. Minerva Durham

T

Fans bid Bo wie good luck am farewell, id the stars

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Grey Art Gallery

goes global........pa

ge 21

BOWIE continued on p. 6 Ex-chef dies in skateboard accident...........p Are kids’ playd age 8 ates really for parents?......page 14 www.TheVill

ager.com

Negrin has the right angle To The Editor: Re “Triangle tricky business” (letter, by Howard Negrin, Nov. 3): Howard Negrin’s comments on the arrogance of the group proposing this modern street-art attachment to the famous landmarked Brown Building — site of the tragedy of the Triangle Fire of 1911 — highlight the egregious acts committed and the standard transparency protocols omitted by this ad hoc coalition. And this was all done with the assistance of our local politicians and city agencies — and the involvement of our governor, too! There was no Community Board 2 review of any of these plans. It was a well-kept secret within a society of entitlement proponents. And, it is not acceptable to this neighborhood or the community. Have any of these high-placed educators realized that 21 Washington Place, right across the street from the Brown Building, was the birthplace of esteemed author Henry James? Perhaps they can cut out his name to fly through the air, too? Mary Johnson E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 1 Metrotech North, 10th floor, Brooklyn, NY, NY 11201. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. Anonymous letters will not be published.

Write a letter to the editor. News@thevillager.com

Sound off!

p. 10

Composting com Spring St., twic es to e a week

BY TEQUILA MINSKY AND LINCOLN grounds. ANDERSON A photo of Part of a city-fund David Bowie ed produring his ers at the gram to encourag he term memoria l Ziggy Stardust “scrappy to in front of PHOTO BY Q. separate out e residents his Soho building. period amid votive New Yorkers” SAKAMAKI their organic candles and is tak- matter ing on added flowfor composti ng, the mean- drop-off ing at a spot site is in operation on the Lower at West Side Spring St. where local and Sixth Ave. resi- on Tuesdays dents are and Thursday flocking — well, from 8 a.m. s, twice weekly, to 11 a.m., for now — right drop off their to outside the C/E subway stabanana peels, broccoli stems and coffee COMPOST continued BY LINCOLN on p. 12 ANDERS ON early Sunday in London at 69 after an age lison Dalton 18-month battle Duke, notes with his famous with liver cancer. song lyrics, walking down was Along like with look “The stars La- his wife, the model very different fayette St. Iman, he carrying had lived at today” a bouquet the Soho address and personal of notes, like “Love you roses, heading rust-orange since 1999. forever + thanks to the memoAsked what rial in front Bowie meant for more permissio of David n to be a weirdo. I building. Although Bowie’s to her, Dalton, 59, said, hope your “He space crazy no tears was always, in his came from adventure is way, comher eyes, she hella fun.” pletely honest Similarly, appeared as if about what others who crying. was going through.” he came to pay their “They’re the respects She added color of ‘Aladat the memorial din Sane,’” her flowers in front of the memorial she to 285 Lafayette flowers, referring said of the , which St. said Bowie’s to Bowie’s ed cards with “Aladdininclud- openness 1973 album. about his ambiguSane” ous “He had a lighting bolts sexuality, lightning bolt that and stars for along with Starman, a color ever-changing his “David The superstar on his face.” bum stage persosinger died cover, photos Live” al- nas, gave them the courage of Ziggy Stardust and the Thin White

Norma Courrier

EVAN FORSCH

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November 10, 2016

TheVillager.com


Landmarks double-talk on Jane project was creepy

TALKING POINTS BY MICHELE HERMAN

I

went down to the Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing the other day and watched the commissioners sign off, as I suspected they would, on the revised plan for 85-89 Jane St., the Pro Piano buildings. No doubt the new, much smaller design is an improvement on the previous in-your-face iteration. But as I listened to the exchange between the commissioners and Stephen Harris, the presenting architect, I heard many illogical and self-serving replies to straightforward questions. Some of the discussion centered on the decision to destroy the existing stepped parapet wall on the garage, a detail that is apparently not original to the building but has been there for many decades and is arguably the property’s most distinctive and beloved feature. Question: “What prevents you from maintaining the original profile of the parapet wall?” Answer: “Much of the structure has to be reinvented anyway because it’s wildly out of plumb, and it seemed inauthentic to replicate it.” Question: “How is restoring the parapet less authentic than the entirely new design you’re proposing?” Answer: “It’s an aesthetic and judgment call. The existing parapet wall is not original to the building. We tried to perfectly restore 85 [the other building on the site].”

STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS LLP

A design rendering for the 85-89 Jane St. project. A previous design featured a pair of tall towers that have since been removed.

The commission seemed to accept the logic of another explanation that said, in effect, the rejiggering of the new addition that will go in behind the existing No. 85 building will make that existing building “read” like an addition and the new building “read” as if it were always there because it will be aligned with the street wall of the existing townhouses alongside it. (Keep in mind that it’s a single family asking for additional space beyond the tens of thousands of square feet already there.) When asked about the slightly odd

window and door arrangement of the slightly odd tall segment that contains a penthouse at the western edge of No. 89, Harris pointed to photos of several old industrial buildings nearby, long since demolished, that had a similarly odd look. He praised those old buildings for their utter lack of aesthetic consideration. The head of the commission praised the architect’s firm for its aesthetic considerations in the design, which involve manipulating the new and existing parts of the project to resemble a complex of

multiple buildings characteristic of the area, when what the firm is actually doing is taking down an actual building characteristic of the area. My ear was particularly attuned to the fawning and double-talk because I had already half-listened through a few prior items that day, all of them involving current owners of historic structures asking for modest alterations — things like a new garage door and stucco applied atop the rear wall of a private house to provide insulation. The tone during these discussions couldn’t have been more different. On these items, the commissioners, I thought, asked tough and practical questions of the sort that seemed like a baseline for all proposals: Will this action set a bad precedent? Who, other than the owner, will see this change? Does improved energy efficiency justify the loss of historic materials? Is this material durable and is the process reversible and, if so, how hard would it be to reverse it? When it came to Jane St., there was only passing mention of whether the removal of the garage’s distinctive parapet would set a precedent, despite the existence of at least three similar threatened structures in the immediate vicinity. Not a word about who might have to live with the additional bulk in the rear of the new development. Not a word about the environmental impact of the design — not even when the architect said that the new elevator, whose shaft will be visible from the street, is needed strictly to convey garden equipment to the roof — a garden serving one family. As usual, I had the slightly creepy impression that the conclusion had been reached before the discussion began and that it was tilted in favor of the developer’s desires rather than the preservation of history.

Something smells rotten about new food-cart bill BY ROBERT LEDERMAN

T

he New York City Council, under the direction of Speaker Melisa Mark-Viverito, is attempting to pass Intro No. 1303, a law that would double the number of food vending carts throughout the city. She has lined up 13 councilmembers — including Margaret Chin — plus the public advocate and the Manhattan borough president as sponsors, all of whom claim the law is solely intended to help immigrant vendors and to reform the problems with food carts. Yet, most of these same elected officials have built their political careers on harassing and persecuting vendors. Has the City Council abruptly reversed course after more than 100 years of effort to limit or eliminate street vendors and become vendor advocates? Why would Speaker Mark-Viverito TheVillager.com

and her colleagues sponsor a law that goes completely against the interests of every business improvement district, community board, resident, restaurant, store and the thousands of legal food vendors, disabled veteran vendors and street artists who oppose this bill? Perhaps the answer is in the speaker’s intimate connection to one vending cart corporation, MOVE Systems. MOVE is backed by Wall Street billionaires, a billionaire real estate developer, a fracked natural gas provider and a financial services corporation. As detailed in a press release from the speaker’s office, MOVE Systems wants to initially place 500 new high-tech food carts on the streets, powered by fracked natural gas, with each cart also tethered to a sidewalk electrical outlet. MOVE and the speaker have a significant legal obstacle to accomplishing this plan: Under New York City law you

can only own one food-cart permit. The City Council held an eight-hour public hearing on this bill on Oct. 26. Officials from every BID, from the Department of Consumer Affairs, the Department of Health, the Police Department, community boards, restaurants, stores and numerous vendor advocates all testified strongly against Intro No. 1303. Yet the speaker and her co-sponsors continue to promote the measure. As expressed in the testimony, as many as 90 percent of the city’s current 8,000 food carts are black market, meaning that the person issued the permit has illegally sold or leased it to the person operating the cart. The MOVEViverito agenda would double the number of black market carts. A Department of Health official testified that one food cart releases as much particulate pollution daily as a semi-truck driving 3,500 miles.

BID representatives said that the only way doubling the number of food carts would work is to privatize all vending spots by selling them to the highest bidder. The BIDs believe they would be entitled to a share of those fees. Once sold, those vending spots on public streets would belong to MOVE. How are immigrant vendors going to outbid a billionaire-backed vending corporation? MOVE’s corporate backers would make billions from the carts’ electronic ads, plus a cut of every sale. An article with links supporting each of the claims in this talking point, plus a video of the City Council hearing is available at https://www.facebook. com/stopintro1303/ . Lederman is president of A.R.T.I.S.T. (Artists’ Response To Illegal State Tactics), an advocacy group representing New York City street artists. November 10, 2016

19


ADVERTORIAL

Top driver disTracTions Using mobile phones

Leading the list of the top distractions behind the wheel are mobile phones. Phones now do more than just place calls, and drivers often cannot pull away from their phones, even when driving. According to the California Department of Motor Vehicles, studies have shown that driving performance is lowered and the level of distraction is higher for drivers who are heavily engaged in cell

20

November 10, 2016

phone conversations. The use of a hands-free device does not lower distraction levels. The percentage of vehicle crashes and nearcrashes attributed to dialing is nearly identical to the number associated with talking or listening.

daydreaming

Many people will admit to daydreaming behind the wheel or looking at a person or object outside of the car for too long. Per-

haps they’re checking out a house in a new neighborhood or thought they saw someone they knew on the street corner. It can be easy to veer into the direction your eyes are focused, causing an accident. In addition to trying to stay focused on the road, some drivers prefer the help of lane departure warning systems.

eating

Those who haven’t quite mastered walking and

chewing gum at the same time may want to avoid eating while driving. The majority of foods require a person’s hands to be taken off of the wheel and their eyes to be diverted from the road. Reaching in the back seat to share some French fries with the kids is also distracting. Try to eat meals before getting in the car. For those who must snack while en route, take a moment to pull over at

a rest area and spend 10 minutes snacking there before resuming the trip.

reading

Glancing at an advertisement, updating a Facebook status or reading a book are all activities that should be avoided when driving. Even pouring over a traffic map or consulting the digital display of a GPS system can be distracting.

TheVillager.com


The art of the game gains ground Aesthetics and oddities impress at CultureHub Con

BY CHARLES BATTERSBY

W

ith grand narratives, soaring musical scores, and top-notch voice acting among its commonplace traits, the debate over whether or not the video game is an art form has moved being a simple “yes” or “no” question, to prompting more nuanced discussions of what constitutes art within the boundaries of a constantly evolving medium. On Oct. 28 and 29, the East Village performance complex La MaMa hosted the video game festival ArtCade Con. Presented under the auspices of its art and technology lab, CultureHub, attendees could try everything from abstract interactive storytelling to a game that the Iranian government doesn’t want people to see. The focus was on experimental and independent games made by small teams, or even just one person. However, a few of the games were commercial products available for sale through online downloads. “Owlboy” was in development for nearly 10 years, and had become a joke among hardcore indie game fans. It launched mere days after ArtCade Con, and the con provided one of the first opportunities for people to try out this long-anticipated game. It is a labor of love by developers who were looking to show the advantages of old-fashioned 2D graphics. Aside from the graphics, “Owlboy” also drew interest from its bittersweet story of a mute boy who is unappreciated by the people of his village, no matter how many times he saves them. “1979 Revolution: Black Friday” is available on PC and mobile devices in TheVillager.com

COURTESY CULTUREHUB

And they’re still playing: Gamers from the 2015 ArtCade Con get a grip on things.

most of the world but, earlier this year, it was banned in Iran. It is set during Iran’s revolution in 1978, and players control a photographer who chronicles these events. Even though it has come to be called the “Islamic Revolution,” there were many factions vying for control of Iran at the time, and players get to shape the story through their choices. They can’t change historical events, but they can learn about the different social, political, and theological forces at work at the time. Along the way the game subtly teaches about Persian culture, which also helps players make wise choices during the story (if an interrogator offers a bev-

erage, it’s polite to accept, for instance). Created at the NYU Tisch School of the Arts’ Game Center as the 2016 thesis project of Jose Tomas Vicuna, “Black Emperor” had virtually no story at all, but emerged as one of ArtCade Con’s biggest crowd-pleasers. Described as an “actionpaced arcade inspired by Japanese psychedelic rock and the bosozoku motorcycle culture of the ’70s,” it had no narrative — but its simple graphics and addictive challenges evoked the sense of being in an arcade in the 1980s. Even the most skilled players could only last a minute or so without crashing their motorcycle, and it drew a crowd of fans cheering each other

on. It was exactly the sort of game that players would line up to spend a quarter on 30 years ago. “Beglitched” takes the “Match 3” gameplay of “Bejeweled” and adds in an elaborate story that resonates among geeks. In it, players stumbled across a laptop owned by a famous hacker. The game uses an interface, which looks like an older computer operating system, and is presented as though the player is looking through files on someone else’s computer. The layers of storytelling, and difficult puzzles make it a more compelARTCADE continued on p. 23 November 10, 2016

21


Stump Speech: Election 2016

Picking apart the Trump cake America baked BY MAX BURBANK

I

do not know how to write this article. Clearly I’m too stupid, as I never for an instant entertained the idea I’d have to. It’s cold comfort that almost every political writer out there is in the same boat — a big, listing, boatload of stupid. I’ve scrapped six or seven approaches since around 2 a.m. Wednesday morning. I thought about framing it as an obituary. You know, “After a protracted battle with xenophobia, white identity and churlishness, America died on November 9, 2016, at the age of 238.” That’s crap though. Clinton won the popular vote — so it’s not that dead. Coughing up blood? Maybe. But it’s not plug-pulling time yet. Let’s not be alarmist; at least not until the entire family has gathered at her bedside and figures out if the damage is irreversible. Look, the midterm elections are in just two years. Surely, until then, we can feed America pudding through a tube and hope for the best. I thought about playing against tension; doing a goofy, elated, edge-of-hysteria thing: “Well, I was 100 percent wrong when I said a Trump victory was demographically impossible, wronger when I wrote that America was better than this, and most wrongerest of all when I said a human-shaped, orange leather bag of weasel bile would never be elected president because this wasn’t Bizarro America, so there’s a really good possibility I’ve been wrong on everything! Trump IS going to make America great again! ISIS WILL be defeated on January 21!! We WILL build the biggest, most beautiful wall, and not only will Mexico pay for it, they WILL include a 20 percent gratuity!!!” I crumpled that draft and missed the wastebasket, and I am not ashamed to say it was because I could barely SEE IT through my tears of RAGE, HEARTBREAK, and TERROR! Also because, as my middle school gym teacher told my parents, I am so bad at sports it may be diagnosis-related. I avoided writing this column by turning to Facebook, because I’m co-dependent, but like my friends at a comfortable electronic distance. An old student of mine had written “Oh my God. The White House Interior Decoration.” I found that funny, heartening and brave. I responded, “If you can make jokes, I can at least get out of bed and make coffee.” Then I went into the kitchen to fi nd my coffee machine had died during the night and was not so much making coffee as spitting occasional gobs of mostly steam at the grounds. Now I’m not superstitious; I don’t believe in signs and omens. But when Mr. Coffee speaks directly to you by committing suicide? It’s hard to write this column because I am sad. I am very, very sad, and you should feel sad for me because as a middle-aged white man, while I did not vote for Trump, I do know this election was all about me and my delicate feelings. I’m uncomfort-

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able about America right now, and if this election taught us anything, it’s that you need to be focused with laser-like intensity on my needs. Sure, those needs are, at the moment, diametrically opposed to the majority of my cohort, but screw that! A MIDDLE-AGED WHITE GUY IS SPEAKING HERE! IN CAPS! I’m so sad and scared for women and Muslims and undocumented immigrants and the disabled and the LGBTQ community and Jews and anyone whose skin does not fall in the day-glo orange to lily-white range. I’m worried for Trump’s political opponents; for Republicans whose support was a mite too tepid; for everyone relying on Obamacare; for journalists — from the dogged investigators all the way down to crappy little joke-boy pundits like me. And I’m really, really sad for Hillary — and if you aren’t, screw you. Whatever you think about her, you know she worked hard as hell for longer than many of you have been alive. She worked harder in a week than most of us will in our lives. All those times I was laying on the couch in my bathrobe (okay, underwear) watching “The Flash” on the CW? That woman was working, and it really looked like she’d be the first female President of the United States, and instead it’s that guy who bragged about grabbing women by the pussy to impress Billy Bush. You think you’re bummed out today? You don’t know from bummed out. I blame the cake. You know the one I’m talking about. That damn Trump cake made for his victory party. You saw it. That was not a cake sculpture of a winner. That was a cake sculpture of a paunchy, slack-faced dude for whom it was just sinking in what a ginormous loser he truly was; a man who’d bitten off several Trump Steaks more than he could safely chew; a snake oil salesman moments away from being tarred and feathered and ridden out of town on a rail. It was a cake sculpture of the man we expected to see. Shame on that cake sculpture Trump. And more shame on me for believing a cake sculpture. That is the true message of this election. Never, never put your faith in a cake sculpture. So I’m sad. Many of us are. But that’s today. Tomorrow we pick ourselves up and begin to fight. We abandon our foolish talk of fleeing to Canada or Ireland or wherever, because who the hell wants an American on their couch right now? Seriously, they’d be worried we’d drink the liquor, steal the silver, and leave the dog in a family way, and THEIR CONCERNS WOULD BE LEGITIMATE! Silver linings? Well, the likelihood that I get to keep writing my little joke-boy “political satire” has gone up. At least until they work their way down to sticking small-time wannabees like me in Trump Re-education Camp #1138. I wonder, will they let me bring my laptop? Do you think they’ll have Wi-Fi?

IMAGE BY MICHAEL SHIREY

PHOTO COURTESY PIX11.COM

Trump’s victory party confection has a telling expression, best suited for those on the opposing side. TheVillager.com


Subterranean homesick blues Documentary explores the life of a New Yorker obsessed with the subways

BY STEVE ERICKSON

D

arius McCollum, the man at the center of Adam Irving’s documentary “Off the Rails,” is a complex character. Obsessed with the MTA’s subway and buses, he knows the system better than many actual transit employees. The MTA turned him down for a job when he was 17; had they hired him, the course of his life probably would’ve been much happier. Instead, he spends his days prowling the subway, looking for opportunities to don his MTA uniform and hijack a train or bus. His intent is benign — he’s never hurt anyone — and he’s always delivered passengers to their destination safely. Nevertheless, this compulsion has led to 19 years in jail. Darius is in prison right now, awaiting sentencing on his latest crime. Darius’ case raises larger issues about mental health and the way prison is so often used to treat it. He was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, which accounts for his high intelligence, his inability to connect with people (while he was once married, his ex-wife Nelly Rodriguez seems to be the only woman with whom he’s had a serious adult relationship), and his tendency to focus narrowly and relentlessly on things. If I can play armchair psychiatrist, he also seems to have a whopping case of obsessive-compulsive disorder. While his obsessions are potentially harmful, they haven’t played out that way so far in more than 30 years of unauthorized subway conducting and bus driving. His crimes have been victimless, yet he’s served more jail time than some killers or rapists. Irving tells Darius’ story mostly through his subject’s own words (in interviews filmed against a dark background, possibly in jail), interviews with lawyers, social workers, and psychiatrists who’ve worked with him, reenactments, and cuts to “Superman” cartoons. (There’s also a bit of original animation.) The “Superman” references aren’t intended to be taken literally, but to convey Darius’ inner life. Composers Duncan Thum and Steve Gernes’ pulsing electronic score recalls some of the first synthesizerdriven movie soundtracks by Wendy TheVillager.com

GEMINI PICTURES

Darius McCollum is currently in jail awaiting sentence. GEMINI PICTURES

Darius McCollum in a mug shot from his younger days.

Carlos, Brian Eno, and Tangerine Dream. Director John Crowley is on board to direct a narrative version of Darius’ story, with Julia Roberts set to play his lawyer. I’m not sure who will play Darius, but I’d like to suggest Michael K. Williams, who played Omar on “The Wire,” given Williams’ recent frankness about his struggle with addiction. While that film may turn out well, there’s something absurd

about making a Hollywood version of a life story that’s mostly brought torment and misery to the people who’ve participated in it. Movies about con artists tend to romanticize them. “Off the Rails” suggests their short-term pleasure is rooted in real pathology and leads to long-term struggles. I have to admit, though, that there’s something fascinating about Darius’ story, as much as it may be driven by mental illness, and Crowley isn’t the

first person to see fictional potential in it. Irving also interviews the playwright of “Boy Steals Train,” which is based on his life as well. There’s triumph amidst the pathos here, and it’s frustrating to try and figure out how Darius’ life could have been filled with more of those victories. Opens Nov. 18 at Metrograph (7 Ludlow St., btw. Canal & Hester Sts.). Visit metrograph.com.

ARTCADE continued from p. 21

ling experience than its casual cousins like “Candy Crush.” The “Beglitched” idea of playing a hacker, and the jokes about operating systems and Internet culture highlight a recurring pattern at ArtCade Con. The games often formed an insular bubble where the players were just as geeky as the designers themselves. Some of the other games even had esoteric references to the process of game design, which could only be appreciated by others in the industry (much like a novel about a writer with writer’s block, or a movie about life in Hollywood). Other games at ArtCade Con had little commercial potential, yet clearly delighted players. The designer of “Morning Makeup Madness” describes it as a prototype, but players enjoyed it as much as the more elaborate projects. People had a mere 10 seconds to apply five different kinds virtual cosmetics to a woman’s face. Those who frantically accomplished this would “beat” the game, but ruin their makeup. ArtCade Con also showed some of the problems that game designers will face now that games have become accepted as art — a label self-proclaimed “artists” can hide behind. Games like “Mu Cartographer” and “Islands” were so abstract that players often fiddled with the controls for a few seconds before walking away confused. The objectives, and how the controls affect the onscreen action, left players questioning what they were supposed to do, or if they were

PHOTO BY EVE COMPERIATI

Worth the wait? “Owlboy” was in development for a decade.

supposed to do anything at all. The designers of these projects now have the choice of redesigning their interface, or claiming that the players “just didn’t get it.” Prolific designer Robert Yang spoke on an Artist Talk panel about his work, much of which was centered on creating virtual penises. He boasted that it took 1,000 lines of code to make a virtual toilet flush in his urination simulator “The Tea Room.” His games will no doubt face the same skepticism as when Marcel Duchamp autographed a toilet and proclaimed it “art.” For more info on CultureHub and ArtCade Con, visit culturehub.org and lamama.org/artcade_2016. November 10, 2016

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A design rendering showing people shopping for spices and produce in par t of the Market Line retail strip in the Essex Crossing project.

‘Market midway’ plan at Essex Crossing BY DENNIS LYNCH

W

e finally have an idea of what the inside of the 15 0 , 0 0 0 - s q u a r e - f o o t Market Line semi-subterranean bazaar in the Essex Crossing megadevelopment will look like. The developers behind the $1.1 billion project released new renderings of Market Line that show shoppers picking up produce at its farmers market and enjoying a beer hall. Market Line will run east to west between three Essex Crossing buildings along Broome St. from Essex St. to Clinton St. It will have 40-foot-tall glass walls to let in light to its lower level, where its market, food hall and beer hall are planned. There will be retail at the ground floor of the three buildings and the Essex Street Market will be located at the corner of the Essex St. building near its current home, which will be demolished to make way for part of the development. The new Essex Street Market will be 30,000 square feet — double the existing market’s current size. It will have 45 vendor stalls and connect to the rest of the Market Line, which will have more than 100 vendor stalls. Essex Crossing’s development collective, Delancey Street Associates, will pay for the current Essex Street Market tenants to move, and tenants will pay the same per-square-foot rent as they currently pay, a representative for the group said. There are spots for around 150 shops in Market Line, with spaces ranging from 100 to 1,500 square feet. The market’s first portion will open in 2018 at Site No. 2, between Norfolk and Essex Sts., and will consist of food businesses, according to the Lo-Down. Essex Cross-

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ing’s developers have been reaching out to the local community to try to fill some of those shops. The city’s Economic Development Corporation announced last month that popular supermarket chain Trader Joe’s plans to open a location in Essex Crossing at 146 Clinton St. at the corner of Broome St. also in 2018. Other committed tenants include a Planet Fitness gym, a Regal Cinemas movie theater, a Splitsville Luxury Lanes bowling alley, and

New York University Langone Medical Center’s Joan H. and Preston Robert Tisch Medical Center. There will be 1,000 residential rental units in towers above Essex Crossing’s nine sites. Half of those will be designated for low-, moderate- and middle-income families. Essex Crossing in total will include 1.9 million square feet between residential, commercial and community space. Delancey Street Associates expect to complete construction by 2024.

d a l g h a y t Arch ’n r u o y g n i d a to be re ? r e p a p s w e n community Don’t miss a single issue! ! r e g la il V e h T o t e ib r Subsc Call 646-452-2475 November 10, 2016

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