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HERSTORY DENIED AS RED TIDE FLOODS HILL

Photo by Zach Williams

Times Square onlookers react to news that Donald Trump has just won Florida. See page 4. © CHELSEA NOW 2016 | NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

VOLUME 08, ISSUE 45 | NOVEMBER 10 - 16, 2016


Trump Wins, But Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen Residents Chose Clinton

L to R: Taz Pereira, 33, and Eran Amir, 39, said they chose Clinton for her experience and qualifications.

Photos by Dusica Sue Malesevic

The line outside PS33, the polling station for Penn South residents.

Spencer Reeves, 21, voted for the first time in a presidential election, and said he wanted a more progressive country.

Love Malone, 39, a registered Republican, did not vote the presidential ticket this year, but said Trump has “good intentions.”

“I think this is an extraordinarily important election, as our character is being put to the test,” said Julie Morgenstern, who voted for Clinton at PS111 in Hell’s Kitchen.

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November 10 - 16, 2016

BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC Donald Trump is the president-elect, but Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen voters overwhelming chose the Hillary Clinton/Tim Kaine ticket, according to unofficial election results. For Assembly District 75 — which includes Murray Hill, Chelsea, Clinton, parts of Midtown and the Upper West Side — 45,871 votes were cast for Clinton compared to 5,764 for Trump, according to the city’s Board of Elections’ unofficial results on its website. For Assembly District 67 — which includes Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen and parts of the Upper West Side — 50,915 votes went to Clinton while 6,188 votes were for Trump, according to the unofficial results. Voters had the option to choose the Clinton/Kaine ticket under the Democratic, Working Families and Women’s Equality parties; and the Donald Trump/Mike Pence ticket under the Republican and Conservative parties. Chelsea Now added those columns together for each candidate for the above results.

Matt Graves, administrative associate in the candidates records unit, cautioned that these results are unofficial, and do not include absentee or affidavit ballots, he told Chelsea Now by phone Wednesday. The unofficial results are based on ballots that had been scanned at poll sites, he explained. The ballots scanned at poll sites will be “recanvased,” i.e., confirmed, Graves said. Each affidavit ballot — when a person goes to the wrong poll site and swears to their address to cast their vote — has to be checked, and absentee ballots counted, he said. Final election results can take around 25 days, he said. In 25 days, Trump will still be president-elect, but the mood on Election Day at polling sites in each neighborhood was one of selfies taken to commemorate voting, and people patiently waiting in line to cast their vote. Chelsea Now spent about five hours at two sites, and no voter said they chose Trump. At PS111 (440 W. 53rd St., btw. Ninth & 10th Aves.) in Hell’s Kitchen, Taz Pereira, 33, and Eran Amir, 39, took a celebratory selfie together outside the

polling station — it was the first time voting for both. “We’ve gotten our citizenship recently,” Pereira explained. “It’s the first time voicing my opinion. One of the most important elections for a long time.” Born in Brazil, Pereira moved to the United States when he was 12 and has lived in Hell’s Kitchen for two years. Originally from Israel, Amir won the green card lottery and became a citizen in 2015. Amir has lived in the neighborhood for eight years. Pereira said, “I think Trump represents what’s most wrong with America. I do not understand how one could vote for him.” Immigration was a key issue for both, and Amir said he chose Clinton because of her experience and qualifications. Another first-time voter, Spencer Reeves, 21, said he voted for Clinton. “I grew up around people who agree with Donald Trump’s ideals,” said Spencer, who is from Mississippi. “I would like a more progressive country.”

L to R: Penn South residents Doris Shapiro, 87, and Vivien Traiman, 71. Both said women’s reproductive rights and health were important issues for them.

Jane Hogg, 84, and Donald Hogg, 89, both Penn South residents since 1989, voted at PS33 in Chelsea.

Stella Mallard, 57, said two crucial issues for her were housing for seniors and affordable higher education.

POLLS continued on p. 3

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He added, “I think it was important to vote today because my generation will be majorly affected. The consensus is that we’re lazy and don’t care about our future. I wanted to be someone who goes against that.” Registered Republican Love Malone, 39, told Chelsea Now, “I think [Trump] has good intentions. However, what the country needs now is someone experienced.” Malone, who has lived in Hell’s Kitchen for 10 years, said the economy was an important issue for her. Julie Morgenstern said that she found the voting process a moving, emotional experience. “Everyone shows up,” said Morgenstern, who declined to give her age. “Here we are in Hell’s Kitchen, and you see the diversity of the neighborhood.” Longtime Penn South residents, Vivien Traiman, 71, and Doris Shapiro, 87, said women’s reproductive rights and health were crucial issues for them. When asked why she voted, Traiman exclaimed, “Are you kidding me? For Shapiro, “It is about Trump and his approach, and, you know, how lowbrow it was. He was very vehement, and he was lying.” Traiman and Shapiro voted at PS33 (281 Ninth Ave., btw. W. 26th & W. 27th Sts.). From mid-afternoon to past 5 p.m., the line curved around to W. 28th St. Fellow Penn South resident Jane Hogg, 84, told Chelsea Now it was her birthday, and all she wanted for a present was for people to grab their friends and vote. Hogg voted early at around 6:45 a.m., and her husband, Donald Hogg, 89, that Tuesday afternoon. “This is the first time ever, by the way, they were out of stickers,” she noted, adding that she was Hillary all the way, but appreciated some of the issues Bernie Sanders brought to the fore, including making college more affordable. College affordability was an issue voters repeatedly brought up to Chelsea Now. Hell’s Kitchen resident Stella Mallard, 57, said she had two grandchildren burdened by student loans. She said she didn’t think higher education should be free, but it should be reasonable. Mallard also has deep roots in the .com

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civil rights movement, which her parents participated in. “They fought so hard for this,” said Mallard, who grew up in Birmingham, Alabama and moved to the city 30 years ago. “It is very important for me as an African American” to vote. A Chelsea resident since 2010, Vanessa Pestritto, 31, said she liked exercising her right to vote, and she cared most about maintaining freedom, such as reproductive rights. “Hillary Clinton’s taken a lot,” Pestritto said. “I don’t think it’s ever been this hard for someone to become president.” For Joel Greene, 43, the rights of the LGBT community, people of color and women were important to him. He voted for Clinton, who he said was the most qualified candidate the country has seen in a long time — and that Trump scares the bejesus out of him. He added, “It’s the fate of our country right now.”

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In Hell’s Kitchen, An Election Night Endurance Test BY ZACH WILLIAMS Hell’s Kitchen appeared to offer an escape as I pedaled south on Seventh Ave. on Election Day, Tues., Nov. 8, 2016. Behind me were 18 months of presidential politics, and I was determined to ride out the remaining hours before the polls closed. One of the two most-disliked candidates in American history would become president. Eleven hundred hours of my life could have been better spent in the end. There were hundreds of news articles and a dozen debates. Long nights waiting for primary results turned into early mornings consuming analysis, predictions and the judgments of people across the political spectrum — and this does not count the time spent arguing with friends and family on the phone, or perusing the latest outrages on social media. Hundreds of millions of other Americans went through the same experiences. That energy had to go somewhere else. So I turned my Schwinn at W. 43rd St. and headed toward the Hudson. And there they were in front of me, at least a few dozen of those voters. They lined up outside a polling station on W. 37th St. between Ninth and 10th Aves. I wanted to get away but I also did not want to be alone in confronting this year-and-a-half experience. The locals would know how to find my escape, so I hit the brakes and headed towards the door. They too had spent a thousand-plus hours following the ups and downs of the election. Keith Albert reckoned that he could have powered four light bulbs for a couple months had all that electricity and greenhouse emissions not flowed to TVs, computers, and smartphones. I looked at him as he crossed the street and reconsidered whether I could simply turn off the urge for more. This election was an endurance test, according to Penny Lane. Her fellow high school teachers had debated the election for countless hours around the lunch table. She wanted to see Clinton elected as the first female president. There was still more to consume before she could turn away. And she was not as convinced as some of her neighbors that Hillary Clinton was going to beat Trump. “I’m going home and drinking wine and watching PBS every excruciating moment of it,” she said. “It’s not just a matter of energy. I feel terrified.” I was not ready to give up on finding some peace in the emerging political storm. The residents of the West 30s

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November 10 - 16, 2016

Photos by Zach Williams

Harlem resident and Trump supporter Hugo Lantigua engages in a heated discussion with a Hillary Clinton supporter on Tuesday night before the outcome of the election was clear.

had a good suggestion, so I moved north. At the bottom of a bottle I could find an escape. A chalkboard outside Tout Va Bien, a French restaurant on W. 51st St. caught my eye. It offered a choice: I am “Republican, Democrat, Drinking wine.” The owner, Michael Touchard, came out and explained that on a day like this he had loaded up on 30 extra bottles of liquor, recognizing that the 2016 presidential election meant more, more, more. “You can’t escape it,” he told me.

THE TIME OF RECKONING

The two campaigns faced off from their respective corners in Hell’s Kitchen, Trump Tower in the northeast and Javits Center in the southwest where the party was just getting started in anticipation of the first female president. The middle ground was Rudy’s, a bar near the intersection of W. 44th St. and Ninth Ave. I sat in the backyard and sipped on a Narragansett Beer and no one was talking about Trump or Clinton. A young couple sat down across from me and they seemed friendly. “Are you a fellow election refugee?” I asked. They smiled meekly and continued talking with each other. Then there was a flash of light from an overhead projector and a face emerged on the wall behind

A man stops to take a photo in the early evening of a satirical sign outside Tout Va Bien on W. 51st St. (btw Ninth & 10th Aves.) in the early evening of Tues., Nov. 8.

me. I could sip a beer and smoke my cigarette, but the election had caught me again. The polls were now closing and the crowd began to grow as the networks called Kentucky, then Vermont, and the notion that this would be an early night dissipated as I headed out the door. This was the time of reckoning. I heard “Trump” by the time I reached W. 42nd St. and I could see the cable news through the restaurant windows on W. 40th St. I could move around all I wanted, but the election was closing in as they called more states and Election Night became the horse race that the networks had wanted all along. Solace had become impossible but I could still find sympathy

so I headed for the one place where the lights would attract a crowd like moths. The place where I wouldn’t need a smartphone to know what was happening. The lights of the city would brighten my mood, and, at the very least, I could better understand how to unplug from this election as soon a winner emerged. But I did not expect the scene I found at Times Square as the eleventh hour neared. The networks had seized control of the crossroads of the world. ABC News set up a stage in the middle of the pedestrian plaza and police protected them with metal gates and automatic weapons. ELECTION NIGHT continued on p. 8 .com


Stump Speech: Election 2016

Picking Apart The Trump Cake America Baked BY MAX BURBANK I do not know how to write this article. Clearly I’m too stupid, as I never for an instant entertained the idea I’d have to. It’s cold comfort that almost every political writer out there is in the same boat — a big, listing, boatload of stupid. I’ve scrapped six or seven approaches since around 2 a.m. Wednesday morning. I thought about framing it as an obituary. You know, “After a protracted battle with xenophobia, white identity and churlishness, America died on November 9, 2016, at the age of 238.” That’s crap though. Clinton won the popular vote — so it’s not that dead. Coughing up blood? Maybe. But it’s not plug-pulling time yet. Let’s not be alarmist; at least not until the entire family has gathered at her bedside and figures out if the damage is irreversible. Look, the midterm elections are in just two years. Surely, until then, we can feed America pudding through a tube and hope for the best. I thought about playing against tension; doing a goofy, elated, edge-of-hysteria thing: “Well, I was 100 percent wrong when I said a Trump victory was demographically impossible, wronger when I wrote that America was better than this, and most wrongerest of all when I said a human-shaped, orange leather bag of weasel bile would never be elected president because this wasn’t Bizarro America, so there’s a really good possibility I’ve been wrong on everything! Trump IS going to make America great again! ISIS WILL be defeated on January 21!! We WILL build the biggest, most beautiful wall, and not only will Mexico pay for it, they WILL include a 20 percent gratuity!!!” I crumpled that draft and missed the wastebasket, and I am not ashamed to say it was because I could barely SEE IT through my tears of RAGE, HEARTBREAK, and TERROR! Also because, as my middle school gym teacher told my parents, I am so bad at sports it may be diagnosis-related. I avoided writing this column by turning to Facebook, because I’m co-dependent, but like my friends at a comfortable electronic distance. An old student of mine had written “Oh my God. The White House Interior Decoration.” I found that funny, heartening and brave. I responded, “If you can make jokes, I can at least get out of bed and make coffee.” Then I went into the kitchen to find my coffee machine had died during the night and was not so much making coffee as spitting occasional gobs of mostly steam at the grounds. Now I’m not superstitious; I don’t believe in signs and omens. But when Mr. Coffee speaks directly to you by committing suicide? It’s hard to write this column because I am sad. I am very, very sad, and you should feel sad for me because as a middle-aged white man, while I did not vote for Trump, I do know this election was all about me and my delicate feelings. I’m .com

Image by Michael Shirey

Photo courtesy pix11.com

Trump’s victory party confection has a telling expression, best suited for those on the opposing side.

uncomfortable about America right now, and if this election taught us anything, it’s that you need to be focused with laser-like intensity on my needs. Sure, those needs are, at the moment, diametrically opposed to the majority of my cohort, but screw that! A MIDDLE-AGED WHITE GUY IS SPEAKING HERE! IN CAPS! I’m so sad and scared for women and Muslims and undocumented immigrants and the disabled and the LGBTQ community and Jews and anyone whose skin does not fall in the day-glo orange to lily-white range. I’m worried for Trump’s political opponents; for Republicans whose support was a mite too tepid; for everyone relying on Obamacare; for journalists — from the dogged investigators all the way down to crappy little joke-boy pundits like me. And I’m really, really sad for Hillary — and if you aren’t, screw you. Whatever you think about her, you know she worked hard as hell for longer than many of you have been alive. She worked harder in a week than most of us will in our lives. All those times I was laying on the couch in my bathrobe (okay, underwear) watching “The Flash” on the CW? That woman was working, and it really looked like she’d be the first female President of the United States, and instead it’s that guy who bragged about grabbing women by the pussy to impress Billy Bush. You think you’re bummed out today? You don’t know from bummed out. I blame the cake. You know the one I’m talking about. That damn Trump cake made for his victory party. You saw it. That was not a cake sculpture of a winner. That was a cake sculpture of a paunchy, slack-faced dude for whom it was just sinking in what a ginormous loser he truly was; a man who’d bitten off several Trump Steaks more than he could safely chew; a snake oil salesman moments away from being tarred and feathered and ridden out of town on a rail. It was a cake sculpture of the man we expected to see. Shame on that cake sculpture Trump. And more shame on me for believing a cake sculpture. That is the true message of this election. Never, never put your faith in a cake sculpture. So I’m sad. Many of us are. But that’s today. Tomorrow we pick ourselves up and begin to fight. We abandon our foolish talk of fleeing to Canada or Ireland or wherever, because who the hell wants an American on their couch right now? Seriously, they’d be worried we’d drink the liquor, steal the silver, and leave the dog in a family way, and THEIR CONCERNS WOULD BE LEGITIMATE! Silver linings? Well, the likelihood that I get to keep writing my little joke-boy “political satire” has gone up. At least until they work their way down to sticking small-time wannabees like me in Trump Re-education Camp #1138. I wonder, will they let me bring my laptop? Do you think they’ll have Wi-Fi? November 10 - 16, 2016

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Dem Bid to Recapture State Senate Falters BY PAUL SCHINDLER I n a year when New York Democrats hoped that with Hillary Clinton at the top of the ticket they might finally achieve a goal that has largely eluded them in the past half-century — control of the State Senate — that effort appears to have fallen short. With clear results in 61 of the 63 Senate races, Republicans have 30 wins, Democrats 31, while two Long Island races are as yet too close to call. If those two contests produce one Democratic winner and one GOP victor — as the unofficial returns suggest — Democrats would have a 32-31 edge, but Brooklyn’s Simcha Felder, who represents a socially conservative Orthodox Jewish constituency, has caucused with the GOP for his entire four years in the Senate, so Republican control would in all likelihood continue. For LGBT political advocates, the Democrats’ failure to gain control of the Senate is a bitter pill, with Republicans having bottled up a number of key agenda items, most prominently the Gender Expression Non-Discrimination Act (GENDA), a transgender civil rights measure. Two new LGBT political action committees have emerged in the wake of the last year’s demise of the Empire State Pride Agenda, and both focused their initial efforts on flipping the Senate. TransPAC, a group dedicated to achieving “full and equal rights” for the transgender community, distributed more than $85,000 in 11 State Senate races, while Equality NY PAC, a newer group that aims to represent the broader LGBT community on a host of issues — with transgender civil rights at the top of the list — made donations totaling $10,000 in nine Senate races and two Assembly races. Those donations helped three victorious Democratic incumbents — Long Island’s Todd Kaminsky, who was aiming for a full term after winning a special election for a vacant seat earlier this year, George Latimer from Westchester, and Manhattan’s Brad Hoylman, the Senate’s only out LGBT member. Jim Gaughran, who benefited from a TransPAC donation, currently trails Long Island Republican incumbent Carl Marcellino by just under 2,500 votes out of more than 135,000 cast. Elsewhere on Long Island, challenger John E. Brooks is clinging to a 33-vote lead over incumbent Michael Venditto. Brooks was not supported in his bid by either TransPAC or Equality NY. Even if both of those tight races end in Democratic victories when the results are certified, the Senate Democrats face the challenge of wooing the Independent Democratic Conference— a rump faction that now numbers seven and is led by the Bronx’s Jeff Klein — to return to the fold and give Minority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins of Westchester the power to preside over the Senate. The IDC has leveraged its position with the Republicans to give its members more influence than they could have hoped for as minority senators, but the conference, though supportive of LGBT issues, has failed to deliver on issues like GENDA, a ban on sexual orientation and gender identity “conversion therapy” for minors, or eliminating the state’s ban on gestational surrogacy contracts, which the GOP refuses to take up.

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When prospects for Democrats flipping a number of Senate seats appeared strong during the campaign, there was widespread hope that the IDC, prodded by Governor Andrew Cuomo’s role in the effort, would rejoin the party regulars. If the Republicans win 31 or 32 seats outright and have the support of Brooklyn’s Felder as well, what the IDC does becomes irrelevant. Even if Democrats gain 32 seats, not counting Felder by winning both Long Island races, it’s unclear whether Klein is prepared to move his faction back into cooperation with other Democrats. He might find he has a stronger hand with the current Republican majority leader, John Flanagan of Long Island, who would lose his post without the IDC’s help. A spokesperson for the IDC did not respond to a request for comment from Gay City News (our sister publication). Mike Murphy, a spokesperson for Stewart-Cousins’ office, remained upbeat the day after the election about the Democrats’ prospects for winning both of the two close Long Island contests and then finding common ground with the IDC. “After the votes are counted we expect there to be a majority of Democrats in Chamber and as always, we expect all Democrats to work together,” he said in a emailed statement. Hoylman, who has consistently stressed the need for Democratic control of the Senate to advance LGBT legislative priorities, also sounded a note of cautious optimism in what he clearly saw as otherwise a very bad day for Democrats and the LGBT community. Noting the Brooks and Gaughran races, he said, “The good news is that even though Trump carried Suffolk County by eight points, Democrats made inroads there.” Hoylman said legal challenges are likely in both races, delaying certification of the winners. Should both Democrats prevail, he said he would be hopeful about the possibility of bringing the IDC back into the fold, especially given the challenges New York State will face with the presidency, both houses of Congress, and control of the Supreme Court all in Republican hands. Hoylman would not even dismiss the possibility that should Democrats end up with only 32 seats in total that they could prevail on Felder to return to their ranks as well. Emphasizing that he has not been in any discussions about that possibility, Hoylman said, “Of course one assumes he’ll continue to caucus with the Republicans. But given what’s happened in Washington that might alter the way he looks at it. I’m not taking any possibility off the table.” “Of course, we are disappointed,” TransPAC executive director Mel Wymore said in an email message. “New York State missed an opportunity to show leadership when the rights of so many are under attack. At the same time, TransPAC received tremendous support in this first year out, and that’s a powerful sign of hope. To paraphrase Secretary Clinton, our work was never about one person or even one election. Our work is about securing equal rights for the transgender community. We will carry on.” SENATE continued on p. 12

Photos by Donna Aceto

State Senator Brad Hoylman.

Mel Wymore, the executive director of TransPAC.

Matthew McMorrow, a leader in the effort to launch Equality NY PAC. .com


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3:40 PM


Michael Touchard, the third generation owner of Tout Va Bien, said he aimed to serve supporters of all presidential candidates on Election Day with 30 extra bottles of liquor bought for the occasion. ELECTION NIGHT continued from p. 4

The eyes of a thousand people bounced between the television screens and their smartphones to find out more about whether Trump would win. But no one had time for my troubles. This was New York City and the people of Clinton country had problems of their own. The hoped-for landside victory receded from possibility. The networks kept it close in their projections on the big screens, but the smartphones told a different story. Trump was up in Michigan, Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Wisconsin. “Oh my god,” said a middle-aged woman a few feet away. Cheers went up when they announced that Clinton had won Oregon and Washington and the five electoral votes that New Mexico could muster. “It’s like the band on the Titanic is playing their favorite song,” I said, because the unexpected was starting to come true.

WHITE KNUCKLING THE RED AND BLUE OF IT The nuances of the Electoral College have been rather simple since the Blue States and the Red States aligned in the 2000 election. The Democrats had the West Coast, Northeast and Great Lakes and the Republicans got pretty much everything else. Florida and Ohio were the prizes and the GOP entered 2016 at a disadvantage. Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican nominee, won 24 states but only 206 out

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of 538 electoral votes. If Donald Trump were to prevail four years later he would have to win states that Republicans had not carried in decades, places like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, a state he lost by 13% in the Republican primary in April. Summer 2016 did not treat his campaign kindly after the party conventions. His poll numbers fell after his public argument with the family of a deceased Iraq veteran. The controversies continued: ties with white nationalists, a proposed ban on Muslims entering the United States, Obama’s birth certificate, Trump University, tax returns, corporate bankruptcies and the allegations of sexual assault that pundits thought, yet again, meant the end to his chances at winning the White House. Polls told a similar story. Hillary Clinton opened up a wide lead in October after weathering an FBI investigation into her emails and ongoing accusations that she was the socially-stilted candidate of a corrupt political establishment. Chatter spread on cable, social media and in the newspapers that despite her unpopularity she would win Republican strongholds like Arizona, Georgia and maybe even Texas. She was up in all the polls when Election Day arrived. The New York Times gave her an 84 percent chance of victory and Penny Lane reckoned that she was voting because she did “not want a close election.”

SCREENING FOR ANSWERS

Times Square became silent and all of the network screens went to commercial. Florida had gone to Trump and Corey Allen was feeling good. The 33-year-old

Photos by Zach Williams

A French journalist works on an article as he waits for election results in Times Square on Tuesday night.

A woman takes a photo to share on social media, as TV networks call the swing state of Florida late Tuesday night.

had invested so much personal energy in support of Trump, and now he had a chance to brag among a crowd that overwhelmingly favored Clinton. He taunted a Clinton supporter who did not know what he knew. Her whole campaign was just a front for a “New World Order” led by George Soros and the Rothchild family. “When I wake up at two in the morning, I start thinking about it,” he said. He did not follow the network news so much because he had InfoWars, a website created by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones. He rejoined his two friends who were waiting for screens to come back on, but they did not and the suspense continued. For Allen this was just further confirmation that Clinton would steal the

race in the end. Ten minutes passed and the network screens all remained off. A bar a few blocks away had a television screen and the pundits pointed at maps on-screen of voter turnout in precincts across the swing states. Customers sat on their stools, nursed their beers and awaited the final results. And depending on what happened, one side of the bar was going to be disappointed. “It’s really 50-50 here,” explained the bartender of Blue Ruin at W. 40th and Ninth Ave. “So this is the swing state of Blue Ruin?” I aksed. ELECTION NIGHT continued on p. 12 .com


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November 10 - 16, 2016

9


Tension in Times Square: At The Cross

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November 10 - 16, 2016

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sroads, Watching Their World Change Photos by Daniel Kwak; Nov. 8 & 9, 2016

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November 10 - 16, 2016

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Photo by Zach Williams

Customers at Blue Ruin, a bar near the intersection of W. 40th St. & Ninth Ave., react to Donald Trump’s victory speech early in the morning on Wed., Nov. 9.

ELECTION NIGHT continued from p. 8

In celebration of more than 31 years of service comes God's Love We Deliver Cookbook: Nourishing Stories and Recipes from Notable Friends, packed with family recipes and personal anecdotes from 75 supporters of God’s Love We Deliver. Contributors to the organization’s first-ever cookbook include Isabella Rossellini, Ina Garten, Danny Meyer, Michael Kors, Mario Batali, Meryl Streep, Stanley Tucci and many, many others. All proceeds from this initiative go directly to support the mission of God's Love We Deliver.

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“Oh yeah.” The patrons sipped their beers as Clinton supporters left Javits Center for home. Then the dozen or so people who remained at the bar began reaching the bottom of their beers and the news flashed that the unexpected was coming. Hillary Clinton would concede the election to Donald Trump. The bartended announced a non-partisan round of shots. “I mean it,” she said after a man by the pool table shouted “President Trump” with an uncertain amount of irony. And then the man on the stool

SENATE continued from p. 6

Matt McMorrow, one of the leaders who helped launch Equality NY, noted the two tight Long Island races and said, in an email message, “If Brooks ultimately wins, we would strongly encourage the IDC and Simcha Felder to rejoin the mainline Democrats to give the Democrats the majority. Of course, if history is a guide, it is unlikely all eight would agree to do that. What’s unfortunate is that if ever there were an opportunity to change the composition of the State Senate, it was this year. Sadly, should the GOP prevail with or without the IDC, we can expect the more conservative Republican senators to continue blocking votes on many progressive pieces of legislation.” McMorrow also looked more broadly at the national scene and wrote,

next to me put down his glass and looked at Trump on TV as he reveled in victory. He realized that Trump had made good on at least one campaign promise. He did not know if the wall would be built or Trump would round up all undocumented immigrants. The possibility that a President Trump would usher in a new era of prosperity by sheer will seemed remote. But after 17 months of campaigning, Trump had made good on something and the man to my left acknowledged that as he place both his elbows on the bar. “He’s won so much I’m so sick of winning,” he said.

“Last night’s election results were a disaster for the LGBTQI community. There’s no way to sugarcoat it. Donald Trump, with Republican majorities in both houses of Congress, will have carte blanche to undo much of the gains our community has made over the past eight years, including by reshaping the Supreme Court in a way that may think differently about the marriage equality rulings, among other things.” The US Senate Democrats’ ability to filibuster anti-gay legislation in Congress, he said, is the only available protection against such reversals. The results of November 8, McMorrow added, underscores “the need for our community to remain vigilant, engaged, and organized against those forces that are hellbent on blocking and rolling back the progress we have fought so hard to achieve.” .com


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November 10 - 16, 2016

13


POLICE BLOTTER THE WEST SIDE’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Publisher

Jennifer Goodstein

Editor Scott Stiffler

Editorial Assistant Sean Egan

Art Director Michael Shirey

Graphic Designer Cristina Alcine

Contributors

Lincoln Anderson Stephanie Buhmann Jackson Chen Sean Egan Bill Egbert Dennis Lynch Dusica Sue Malesevic Winnie McCroy Puma Perl Paul Schindler Trav S.D. Eileen Stukane Zach Williams

Executive VP of Advertising Amanda Tarley

Account Executives Gayle Greenberg Jim Steele Julio Tumbaco

Published by

NYC Community Media, LLC

One Metrotech North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (212) 229-1890 Fax: (212) 229-2790 www.chelseanow.com scott@chelseanow.com © 2016 NYC Community Media, LLC Member of the New York Press Association

Chelsea Now is published weekly by NYC Community Media

LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201. (212) 229-1890. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $75. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2016 NYC Community Media LLC, Postmaster: Send address changes to Chelsea Now, One Metrotech North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11201.

PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR: The Publisher shall

not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue.

14

November 10 - 16, 2016

MURDER: Subway shove An attack that occurred on the Times Square 1 train subway platform on Mon. Nov. 7 resulted in the tragic death of a 49-year-old Queens woman. A little after 1pm that afternoon, the woman was pushed, seemingly randomly and without reason, by an unknown woman onto the tracks — into the path of an approaching 1 train, which killed her. Witnesses were able to get the attention of officers at the station, and the suspect seen shoving the woman was quickly apprehended. The woman in question, 30-year-old Melanie Liverpool-Turner, is a Queens resident who reportedly has a history of mental illness, including schizophrenia and depression. Complicating matters further, Liverpool-Turner may also be linked to a second fatal subway accident: In October, she told police that she shoved a woman into the path of an L train because she “hear[s] voices,” during a canvas of the area after the accident. Other eyewitness accounts of that incident asserted that the victim jumped into the train’s path herself, which led police to disregard Liverpool-Turner’s confession. Liverpool-Turner is being charged with second-degree murder (at her Tues., Nov. 8 arraignment, she denied that she admitted to the crime).

LEAVING THE SCENE OF PROPERTY DAMAGE: Crashing gas Much like a child refusing to acknowledge a certain smell for fear of accurate accusation, a New Jersey driver was resolute in his effort to not take the blame for a gas-related incident at BP Gas (466 10th Ave., at W. 36th St.). At about 6am on Sun., Nov. 6, a 2016 Ford Hardtop truck with New Jersey plates pulled in, looking to get some fuel. Upon parking, though, the driver accidentally backed up into a gas pump, causing damage to the structure and breaking the pump’s nozzle. The truck’s driver drove away, either oblivious to or not phased by the destruction left in their wake — though, as a 28-year-old BP employee told police in his report, video captured the incident as well as truck’s license plate number.

HARASSMENT: Bus blindside A 28-year-old woman was left shocked and shaken on Fri., Oct. 28, when, at about 10:30am, a woman that she had never seen before pushed her up against a bus on the 300 block of W. 17th St. She proceeded

to pull the victim’s hair and scratch at the right side of her eye, before cryptically declaring, “Tell your boss to stop following me,” and walking away. The victim was understandably confused and alarmed, and reported the incident to the police.

GRAND LARCENY: Grand scam Usually one only has themselves to blame for their poor credit score — though one unfortunate man recently discovered that he would have to share the burden of guilt with an unknown party. While conducting a credit report check, the 10th Ave. resident learned that a Capital One account had been opened up in his name without his permission or authorization. The man reported his findings to police on Tues., Nov. 1, after a Federal Trade Commission identity theft report revealed that a total of $19,310 of charges were made to the fraudulent account. It is unclear if there are any leads as to who the perp is, though it represents another case of online identity theft — an issue on the rise highlighted by 10th Precinct higher-ups at last month’s Community Council meeting.

FORCIBLE TOUCHING: Club Creep

THE 10th PRECINCT Located at 230 W. 20th St. (btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.). Commander: Capt. Paul Lanot. Main number: 212741-8211. Community Affairs: 212741-8226. Crime Prevention: 212-7418226. Domestic Violence: 212-7418216. Youth Officer: 212-741-8211. Auxiliary Coordinator: 212-924-3377. Detective Squad: 212-741-8245. The Community Council meets on the last Wed. of the month, 7pm, at the 10th Precinct or other locations to be announced.

THE 13th PRECINCT Located at 230 E. 21st St. (btw. Second & Third Aves.). Deputy Inspector: Brendan Timoney. Call 212-477-7411. Community Affairs: 212-477-7427. Crime Prevention: 212-477-7427. Domestic Violence: 212-477-3863. Youth Officer: 212-477-7411. Auxiliary Coordinator: 212-477-4380. Detective Squad: 212-477-7444. The Community Council meets on the third Tues. of the month, 6:30pm, at the 13th Precinct.

CASH FOR GUNS

$100 cash will be given (no questions asked) for each handgun, assault In the early morning hours of Mon., weapon or sawed-off shotgun, up to Nov. 7, an unacceptable action on the a maximum payment of $300. Guns part of a boorish bouncer occurred a little are accepted at any Police Precinct, PSA or Transit District. before 4am at the Flash Factory (229 W. 28th St., btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.), where his 24-year-old victim was spending his evening. At the end of the night, when trying to pay for his table, the guest was apparently given a “hard time” by the club’s bouncer, who The Community News Group is harassed him verbalproud to introduce BROOKLYN PAPER RADIO. Join Brooklyn ly. As the man walked Paper Editor-in-Chief Vince back away towards DiMiceli and the New York Daily News’ Gersh Kuntzman every the main entrance, the Thursday at 4:45 for an hour of bouncer got physical, talk on topics Brooklynites hold dear. and grabbed his butEach show will feature intocks and genitals from studio guests and call-out behind — without the segments, and can be listened WITH to live or played anytime at your permission and authorconvenience. ity of the customer. When he was safely at SPONSORED BY home, the man called JOSEPH LICHTER, the authorities to report D.D.S. VINCE DIMICELI GERSH KUNTZMAN the incident.

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Chelsea Hotel Will House Condos, Guests, Permanent Residents BY DENNIS LYNCH Home to a handful who’ve lived there for decades, and a daily draw for tourists lured by its bohemian past, the iconic Chelsea Hotel has changed hands once again — this time, for $250 million. The new owners plan to renovate the building and reopen it as a hotel and condominium by 2018, which their predecessors planned to do when they bought the property in 2013. The group of buyers, who purchased the storied hotel and residence under the name SIR Chelsea LLC, includes Richard Born and Ira Drukier of BD Hotels and hotelier Sean MacPherson. They first became involved at the Chelsea Hotel (222 W. 23rd St., btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.) in February, and took over renovations in July. The partners have a history of successfully restoring boutique hotels, including the Bowery, Greenwich, Marlton, and Maritime hotels in Manhattan (some of which feature condominiums). They plan to build 25,000 square feet of condo space at the Chelsea, although it is unclear how that will be spread in the hotel, which has been renovated, gutted, and “butchered” by previous owners throughout its 131 years, according to Zoe Pappas, the president of the Chelsea Hotel Tenant Association. She met Born, Drukier, and MacPherson in February, and is optimistic that they will do right by the 50 or so long-term tenants — the Chelsea Hotel’s last real connection to its past as the home of some of most important creative minds of the 20th century — and finally finish the renovation process many tenants want to put behind them. “Ira Drukier is very experienced in construction and he’s taking it head on — he is coming to the site almost every day; he knows what is happening,” Pappas said. “In our experience that’s a success when they’re here controlling what’s going on.” Drukier’s partner, Born, said the group was “still in the process of evaluating and planning for the Chelsea,” and that it was “premature” to comment on the breakdown of space and prospective prices. It is unclear what will happen to the dozens of rent-stabilized apartments in the hotel as current residents move out or pass away. State law allows tenants in rent-stabilized apartments to hand off their apartments to a family member so long as that successor has been living in the apartment for at least two years before the tenant leaves or dies. Some Chelsea Hotel tenants have .com

young or adult children that could take over their apartments at rent-stabilized prices, Pappas said. The owners indicated to her they would like to keep some of the apartments in the Chelsea Hotel as such. Born did not comment on the outstanding Department of Buildings (DOB) violations on the property, which include a Stop Work Order to halt demolition on the eighth and 12th floors for a failure to properly protect tenants. Born called the orders an “insignificant speed bump,” and that “maybe two or three tenants” were still having issues, in a comment to the Real Deal. Pappas and other tenants corroborated that the issues were mostly with a small group of tenants. They alluded that a few tenants actively sought to slow down renovations and cause issues for the owners at the property. Problems arose at the Chelsea Hotel, and the hotel board ousted longtime manager Stanley Bard in 2007. Bard’s family had run the hotel for much of the 20th century and were extremely accommodating to the struggling artists that set up shop there. That changed immediately after he left — the board and its managers handed out eviction notices and reportedly tried to intimidate tenants to leave. They sold the hotel to developer Joe Chetrit in 2011, who tenants sued for using similar tactics, including shutting down water and electricity to their apartments. “He used to turn off the elevator and water; he wanted us out,” said 39-year resident (and Chelsea Now contributor) Gerald Busby. “We were rats in the walls for all he was concerned.” The hotel company King & Grove bought out Chetrit in 2013 and changed tack. They decided to cooperate with the tenants in the association, and later that year they agreed to 4.7 months free rent, a 20% reduction in rent until they completed construction (increased to a 35% reduction earlier this year), complete interior renovations of tenants’ apartments, free rooming at other King & Grove hotels during those renovations, and even a $60-per-day meal allowance. But the renovation slowed, costing the development team mounds of cash. The developers hired a broker to help refinance the debt, take out more loans, and find another partner in 2015, according to the Wall Street Journal. King & Grove sold its share earlier this year. The drawn-out ordeal has made some tenants instinctively cautious about any and everything going forward, according to one longtime tenant. First floor

Photo by Sean Egan

The new owners of the Chelsea Hotel hope to reopen it in 2018, as a condo/ hotel.

resident Judith Childs said some tenants are still in court with the previous owners and there was “no question that nerves are still on edge.” She is “perfectly well-satisfied” with her experience with the SIR Chelsea team and didn’t want to rove towards conjecture. “They have their hands full, we’re here — that’s a fait accompli,” she said. “The better they do, the sooner they get things fixed, the sooner we’re out of their hair. They’re real estate developers, not angels, but I’m not going to speculate about what

they might do.” What they certainly will have to do is clear those violations with the city. There are 22 open DOB Environmental Control Board violations on the Chelsea Hotel dating from 2010 through last month, including 15 “immediately hazardous” violations, according to the DOB. Violations include inadequate fittings on gas lines leading to meters, a failure to safeguard an open elevator shaftway, and a handful of others for improper elevator work.

November 10 - 16, 2016

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Veterans Day Observances

Photo by Erika Kapin

Photo by Sean Egan

The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum’s Veterans Day ceremony welcomes back former crew members of the Intrepid.

The “Chelsea Doughboy” statue on Ninth Ave. is the site of an annual memorial ceremony.

The origins of Veterans Day can be traced to the ending of World War I nearly a century ago. Known at the time as “The Great War,” World War I officially ended on June 28, 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in France. But the fighting had actually ended seven months earlier when an armistice between the Allies and Germany went into effect on Nov. 11, 1918. The following November United States President Woodrow Wilson declared Nov. 11 “Armistice Day” in honor of the cessation of the hostilities, and the day became a federal holiday in 1938. That act was amended in 1954 after veterans service organizations, in recognition of the efforts of soldiers who fought in World War II, asked that the day be renamed “Veterans Day” so it honored all soldiers, not just those who fought in World War I.

VETERANS DAY PARADE The largest Veterans Day Parade in the country begins on Fri., Nov. 11, at 10 a.m. at the Eternal Light Monument (Fifth Ave. at W. 24th St., next to Madison Square Park). Starting at approximately 11:15 a.m., the Parade proceeds up Fifth Ave., from 26th to 52nd St. For more info, visit americasparade.org.

ANNUAL CHELSEA VETERANS DAY MEMORIAL CEREMONY After 2014’s successful revival of a decades-old tradition (for the first time since the 1960s), you are once again invited to join in paying tribute to veterans, active duty members of the military, National Guard members and reservists. State Senator Brad Hoylman (whose office is providing the wreath) will attend, along with Auxiliary Officers of the 10th Precinct. The ceremony takes place in front of a 14-foot-tall granite stele, on which a bronze World War I soldier is displayed. What came to be known as The Chelsea Doughboy was installed on April 7, 1921. Rain or shine at 10 a.m. on Fri., Nov. 11. Meet on the west side of Ninth Ave. (btw. W. 27th & W. 28th Sts.). The Ceremony will last approximately 15 minutes. For more info on the history of the statue, visit nycgovparks.org/parks/chelsea-park/monuments/232.

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November 10 - 16, 2016

INTREPID SEA, AIR & SPACE MUSEUM ANNUAL VETERANS DAY CEREMONY Veterans numbering into the hundreds — including former crew members of the USS Intrepid — attend this annual tribute. Rear Admiral John F. Weigold, IV (Reserve Deputy Commander, US Pacific Fleet) and representatives from the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum will make remarks, followed by a wreath laying in the Hudson River in honor of United States veterans and former crew members of the Intrepid. From 3:30–4:30 p.m. on Fri., Nov. 11, at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (Pier 86; W. 46th St. & 12th Ave.). The pier ceremony is free, and open to the public. For more info, call 212-245-0072 or visit intrepidmuseum.org.

FOR HELP AND RESOURCES GI Rights Hotline: 877-447-4487 Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255 Manhattan Vet Center: 212-742-9591 Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America iava.org | 212-982-9699 NYC Office of Veterans Affairs nyc.gov/html/vets | 212-442-4171 New York Regional Office of Veterans’ Affairs veterans.ny.gov | 800-827-1000 Paralyzed Veterans of America pva.org | 212-807-3114 The Soldiers Project thesoldiersproject.org | 877-769-7438 Vietnam Veterans of America vva126.org | 212-349-1895

HOLY APOSTLES SOUP KITCHEN FAST-A-THON

Photo by Hannah Albee

Weekdays from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., New York City’s largest soup kitchen provides about 1,000 meals to some of the one-in-six city residents who spend every day of the year without having their basic nutritional needs met. Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen’s Annual FastA-Thon asks you to eat only one meal on Thurs., Nov. 17, just as their guests do every day. Friends, family, and colleagues will sponsor your fast, or you can donate the amount you would have spent on food that day. The Right Rev. Andrew R. St. John (the kitchen’s Interim Executive Director) says, “By coming together as a community to fast and raise much-needed funds for the soup kitchen we are also reminded that our guests’ hunger is real, is urgent, and requires our attention and care.” Funds help ensure Holy Apostles (296 Ninth Ave. at W. 28th St.) can continue meet the needs of anyone who passes through their doors. To sign up or donate, visit holyapostlesfastathon2016.causevox.com or call 212-9240167.

.com


The Art of the Game Gains Ground Aesthetics and oddities impress at CultureHub Con

BY CHARLES BATTERSBY With grand narratives, soaring musical scores, and top-notch voice acting among its commonplace traits, the debate over whether or not the video game is an art form has moved being a simple “yes” or “no” question, to prompting more nuanced discussions of what constitutes art within the boundaries of a constantly evolving medium. On Oct. 28 and 29, the East Village performance complex La MaMa hosted the video game festival ArtCade Con. Presented under the auspices of its art and technology lab, CultureHub, attendees could try everything from abstract interactive storytelling to a game that the Iranian government doesn’t want people to see. The focus was on experimental and independent games made by small teams, or even just one person. However, a few of the games were commercial products available for sale through online downloads. “Owlboy” was in development for nearly 10 years, and had become a joke among hardcore indie game fans. It launched mere days after ArtCade Con, and the con provided one of the first opportunities for people to try out this long-anticipated game. It is a labor of love by developers who were looking to show the advantages of old-fashioned 2D graphics. Aside from the graphics, “Owlboy” also drew interest from its bittersweet story of a mute boy who is unappreciated by the people of his village, no matter how many times he saves them. “1979 Revolution: Black Friday” is available on PC and mobile devices in most of the world but, earlier this year, it was banned in Iran. It is set during Iran’s revolution in 1978, and players control a photographer who chronicles these events. Even though it has come to be called the “Islamic Revolution,” there were many factions vying for control of Iran at the time, and players get to shape the story through their choices. They can’t change historical events, but they can learn about the different social, political, and theological forces at work at the time. Along the way the game subtly .com

Courtesy CultureHub

And they’re still playing: Gamers from the 2015 ArtCade Con get a grip on things.

teaches about Persian culture, which also helps players make wise choices during the story (if an interrogator offers a beverage, it’s polite to accept, for instance). Created at the NYU Tisch School of the Arts’ Game Center as the 2016 thesis project of Jose Tomas Vicuna, “Black Emperor” had virtually no story at all, but emerged as one of ArtCade Con’s biggest crowd-pleasers. Described as an “action-paced arcade inspired by Japanese psychedelic rock and the bosozoku motorcycle culture of the ’70s,” it had no narrative — but its simple graphics and addictive challenges evoked the sense of being in an arcade in the 1980s. Even the most skilled players could only last a minute or so without crashing their motorcycle, and it drew a crowd of fans cheering each other on. It was exactly the sort of game that players would line up to spend a quarter on 30 years ago. “Beglitched” takes the “Match 3” gameplay of “Bejeweled” and adds in an elaborate story that resonates among

Photo by Eve Comperiati

Worth the wait? “Owlboy” was in development for a decade.

geeks. In it, players stumbled across a laptop owned by a famous hacker. The game uses an interface, which looks like an older computer operating system, and is presented as though the player is looking through files on someone else’s

computer. The layers of storytelling, and difficult puzzles make it a more compelling experience than its casual cousins like “Candy Crush.” ARTCADE continued on p. 19 November 10 - 16, 2016

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November 10 - 16, 2016

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Photo by Davis Cox

A group engaged in the Games for Change section. ARTCADE continued from p. 17

The “Beglitched” idea of playing a hacker, and the jokes about operating systems and Internet culture highlight a recurring pattern at ArtCade Con. The games often formed an insular bubble where the players were just as geeky as the designers themselves. Some of the other games even had esoteric references to the process of game design, which could only be appreciated by others in the industry (much like a novel about a writer with writer’s block, or a movie

House HOUSE Calls CALLS

Serving manhattan and the entire tri-State area

about life in Hollywood). Other games at ArtCade Con had little commercial potential, yet clearly delighted players. The designer of “Morning Makeup Madness” describes it as a prototype, but players enjoyed it as much as the more elaborate projects. People had a mere 10 seconds to apply five different kinds virtual cosmetics to a woman’s face. Those who frantically accomplished this would “beat” the game, but ruin their makeup. ArtCade Con also showed some of the problems that game designers will face Same day Service available

Photo by Marina Lemos

“Beglitched” puts its player inside the mind of a famous hacker.

now that games have become accepted as art — a label self-proclaimed “artists” can hide behind. Games like “Mu Cartographer” and “Islands” were so abstract that players often fiddled with the controls for a few seconds before walking away confused. The objectives, and how the controls affect the onscreen action, left players questioning what they were supposed to do, or if they were supposed to do anything at all. The designers of these projects now have the choice of redesigning their interface, or claiming that the players “just didn’t get it.”

Prolific designer Robert Yang spoke on an Artist Talk panel about his work, much of which was centered on creating virtual penises. He boasted that it took 1,000 lines of code to make a virtual toilet flush in his urination simulator “The Tea Room.” His games will no doubt face the same skepticism as when Marcel Duchamp autographed a toilet and proclaimed it “art.” For more info on CultureHub and ArtCade Con, visit culturehub.org and lamama.org/artcade_2016.

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PCR 3


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*IF WITHIN 30 DAYS OF PURCHASE FROM P.C. RICHARD & SON WE ADVERTISE A LOWER PRICE OR YOU SHOULD SEE A LOWER ADVERTISED PRICE FROM ANY “BRICK AND MORTAR” OR “AUTHORIZED ONLINE” RETAILER, WE WILL GLADLY MAIL YOU A CHECK FOR 100% OF THE DIFFERENCE. ONLY RETAILERS THAT ARE DESIGNATED BY THE MANUFACTURER AS AUTHORIZED, SHALL BE CONSIDERED TO QUALIFY WITHIN THIS POLICY. IT APPLIES TO ALL BRAND NEW MERCHANDISE WITH THE EXACT MODEL NUMBER. EXCLUDES; THANKSGIVING DAY THROUGH CYBER MONDAY SALES EVENTS THAT STIPULATE LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE AND/OR SALES LIMITED TO A SPECIFIC HOUR OR TIME OF DAY, GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALES, ONE-OF-A-KINDS, LIMITED QUANTITIES, DISCONTINUED ITEMS, INSTALLATIONS, DELIVERY, REBATES, EXTENDED SERVICE, FINANCING, FREE GIVEAWAYS, AND BUNDLE OFFERS. OTHER EXCLUSIONS MAY APPLY. (SEE STORE OR VISIT PCRICHARD.COM FOR COMPLETE DETAILS). †DISCOUNTS DEDUCTED FROM P.C. RICHARD & SON NEW LOW PRICE OFFERS, CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER P.C. RICHARD & SON PROMOTION. PERCENT DISCOUNTS, SHALL NOT APPLY TO AND EXCLUDE: COMPUTERS, MONITORS, PRINTERS, TABLETS, EREADERS, PREPAID CARDS, VIDEO GAME CONSOLES, APPLE, DESIGNER APPLIANCES, SELECT POLK, KLIPSCH, WEBER GRILLS, BOSE, SAMSUNG TV’S, SONY TV’S, GE CAFE & GE PROFILE APPLIANCES, PRIOR SALES, DEALERS, CLEARANCES, SPECIAL SALE ITEMS, P.C. RICHARD & SON GIFT CARDS, OR COMPETITIVE ADS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. EFFECTIVE 10/12. INTEL, INTEL LOGO, INTEL INSIDE, INTEL INSIDE LOGO, INTEL CENTRINO, INTEL CENTRINO LOGO, CELERON, INTEL XEON, INTEL SPEEDSTEP, ITANIUM, AND PENTIUM ARE TRADEMARKS OR REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF INTEL CORPORATION OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER COUNTRIES. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. © 2016 P.C. RICHARD & SON

PCR 4

November 10 - 16, 2016

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November 10, 2016

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