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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

May 19, 2016 • $1.00 Volume 86 • Number 20

‘I’ll get the lead out,’ ‘Heavy Metal’ Toledano tells pols, Health Dept. BY YANNIC R ACK

E

mbattled East Village landlord Raphael Toledano claims he is finally cleaning up his act, taking steps to limit lead dust exposure in his buildings after pressure from local elected officials led the city to announce it would inspect 20 of the real estate mogul’s tenements for the dangerous substance.

Meanwhile, tenants in one of his buildings recently definitely cleaned up — namely, on a harassment lawsuit filed against the young mogul, reportedly winning a $1 million settlement. A representative for the tenants said she was not at liberty to provide details. As for the lead issue, the toxToledano continued on p. 10

Hoylman is onboard with car-free 14th St. for L job...maybe more BY YANNIC R ACK ocal leaders are demanding that the city close 14th St. to cars during an upcoming L train shutdown that could last up to three years. In addition, they potentially even want to keep the critical crosstown thoroughfare bike-and-bus exclusive after the subway is up and running again.

L

The ideas were pitched during a town hall organized last week by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to inform straphangers about plans to temporarily limit L train service starting in 2019. The event drew a few dozen local residents, who sat scattered about the spacious auditorium. L TRAIN continued on p. 8

Bingo! She turns 100!.....page 15

Photo by Jonathan Alpeyrie

Outside Mount Sinai Beth Israel’s Linsk y Pavilion, at E. 16th St. and First Ave.

Beth Israel on life support? Hospital is closing: Nurses BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

F

ollowing The Villager’s bombshell online report last Friday that Beth Israel Hospital could be sliding toward closing, the mayor and local politicians quickly sounded off. They expressed their deep concern over the unthinkable possibility — that Manhattan could lose its lone remaining large full-scale hospital south of 28th St. Prominently citing The Villager article, on Tues., May 17, a phalanx of eight local politicians wrote a joint letter to Kenneth Davis, president and C.E.O. of Mount Sinai Health System. “We want to express our

grave concern about the possibility of losing inpatient services at the Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital campus,” they wrote. They noted that the article follows previous reports last fall that Davis and First Deputy Mayor Anthony Shorris met to discuss “plans to shrink Beth Israel,” and that the politicians, too, have been receiving calls from Beth Israel staff worried about staff levels being reduced. “Beth Israel has been a constant presence and resource for the entire city, and the East Side of Manhattan in particular,” the eight politicians wrote. “Any downsizing or closure of Beth Israel threat-

ens to further strain an already overburdened network of healthcare providers in Manhattan, reduce healthcare options and curtail services in the immediate neighborhood, and eliminate jobs.” The letter was signed by City Councilmembers Daniel Garodnick, Rosie Mendez and Corey Johnson, Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, state Senator Brad Hoylman and Assemblymembers Brian Kavanagh and Richard Gottfried. Although Gottfried’s and Johnson’s districts don’t include the hospital, they are the Hospital continued on p. 6

A farewell salute to ‘Peace Pentagon’...............p. 19 Ephemera Project may be here to stay..............p. 30 www.TheVillager.com


Photo by Guillame LeBourhis

Enjoy it while it lasts: Sometimes — actually, often — a picture is worth 1,000 words. And this beautiful picture of a majestic view of the Hudson River is worth at least two 1,000-word articles, maybe more. ... Village literary luminary Susan Brownmiller recently sent it to us, urging us to run it. “Take a look at my friend Guillaume’s photo of the patch of river that is to be developed by Barry Diller and Diane von Furstenberg,” she said. “It shows what the neighborhood will lose when the development is built.” Brownmiller was referring to

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“It’s worth the trip down the street!” 2

May 19,2016

Pier55, which now has all the required approvals allowing its construction to move forward. The project would see a glittering, bee-friendly “arts island” rise from the Hudson — to a height taller even than

most Village buildings — in the spot bookended in Guillame LeBourhis’s photo between the Whitney Museum of American Art to the south and The Standard hotel to the north, and on its east, by the skeletal former pier-shed arch from the old Pier 54, where the bedraggled Titanic survivors disembarked. The new Pier55, which will be attached to shore by two pedestrian bridges, will overlap the old pile fields of Piers 54 and 56, which can also be seen in the photo. We haven’t heard yet whether the City Club of New York has decided to appeal the court’s unfavorable decision on its lawsuit on the pier project. Assuming there are no further legal challenges, Brownmiller and other Villagers will have to get used to a carnival-like entertainment pier lighting up their view of the waterfront in the evenings. We assume the sweeping shot was taken from Brownmiller’s Jane St. penthouse balcony. A neighbor of hers, Nicolas Bustamante, owner of the new Bespoke Kitchen restaurant on Hudson St., admitted to us that Brownmiller’s balcony is the envy of the building. As for the Pier55 project, Pier 54’s decking has been removed and there already has been significant construction work done to “bump out” the shoreline a bit in the spot where the new pier will be, better to accommodate the droves of people who will come streaming in to enjoy the park and its numerous music and theater performances and art shows. We can almost picture it now, imagining what it will look like— thanks to LeBourhis’s picture. TheVillager.com


Photo by Clayton Patterson

Maybe he was right! The party is really over!

In the 1980s, ar tist and musician Peter Missing blanketed Alphabet City with his “Par ty’s Over� icon. An upside mar tini glass with three strikes crossed out, it was widely seen as a protest against gentrification. Missing, who relocated to Berlin in the early 1990s and lived there for many years, now lives in Copenhagen. He recently created this graffiti mural, more than 50 feet long, in the garden-like First Park, at Second Avenue and E. Houston St. With Beth Israel Hospital repor tedly downsizing and possibly closing, to be possibly replaced by luxur y condos, among other things, it increasingly looks like Missing was right — the par ty really is over!

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Outdoor Food Court with seated CafĂŠ starts 11am Live Music on our Bandshell starts Noon Blue Wolf Blues Band, Patrick Poladian Jazz Quartet, Sledge and the Hammers Swing Band

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May 19, 2016

3


Red alert at white-brick building Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association News Story, First Place, 2015 Editorial Page, First Place, 2015 Editorials, First Place, 2014 News Story, First Place, 2014 Overall Design Excellence, First Place, 2013 Best Column, First Place, 2012 Photographic Excellence, First Place, 2011 Spot News Coverage, First Place, 2010 Coverage of Environment, First Place, 2009

PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF LINCOLN ANDERSON

A portion of the whitebrick facade at The St. Mark apartment building, at Third Ave. and E. Ninth St., started to bulge outward last Wednesday afternoon May 12, causing evacuations and a partial closing of the avenue. The small bulge — on the 15th floor — was spotted around 5:30 p.m., according to reports. Firefighters and other workers quickly secured the precarious patch of bricks, luckily none of which plummeted to the street. According to reports, three

apartments were evacuated. ABC News reported that five street-level stores were told to close, and that the tony co-op currently has 17 open Department of Buildings violations, including one for facade safety. Trigger, owner of the Continental bar across the street, will always remind you that his friend punk rocker Joey Ramone used to live in “the white building.” Again, luckily, there was no “Blitzkrieg Bop” — as in, no one was brained by falling bricks.

ARTS EDITOR

SCOTT STIFFLER

CONTRIBUTORS ALBERT AMATEAU IRA BLUTREICH TINA BENITEZ-EVES SARAH FERGUSON BOB KRASNER TEQUILA MINSKY CLAYTON PATTERSON JEFFERSON SIEGEL SHARON WOOLUMS

ART DIRECTOR MICHAEL SHIREY

GRAPHIC DESIGNER John Napoli

Executive VP of Advertising Amanda Tarley

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jack Agliata ALLISON GREAKER JIM STEELE Julio tumbacO

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR. MARVIN ROCK

Member of the New York Member of the National Press Association Newspaper Association

The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 00426202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2016 NYC Community Media LLC. PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR

The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue. Published by NYC Community Media, LLC One Metrotech North 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (718) 260-2500 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2016 NYC Community Media, LLC

4

May 19,2016

Photos by Chris Ryan

Emergenc y responders used a giant cherr y-picker to help secure the detaching section of facade last Wednesday evening, as a crowd of onlookers gathered. TheVillager.com


Planned Service Changes

D WEEKEND 11:30 PM Fri to 5 AM Mon May 20-23 No D service between 59 St-Columbus Circle and Stillwell Av D service runs between 205 St and 59 St-Columbus Circle, and via the A to/from Chambers St F ( Q ) trains and free shuttle buses provide alternate service Travel Alternatives: • Free shuttle buses run between W 4 St and Grand St, stopping at B’way-Lafayette St. • To/from 7 Av, use the ( Q ) at the nearby 57 St-7 Av station, or use the nearby 50 St 1 station. Transfer between 1 and D trains at 59 St-Columbus Circle. • For 47-50 Sts, 42 St-Bryant Pk, 34 St-Herald Sq, and B’way-Lafayette St, transfer to the F at W 4 St. • In Brooklyn, take the ( instead. ( trains are rerouted via the D between 36 St and Stillwell Av in both directions. Transfer between D and ( trains at Times Sq-42 St/Port Authority. Stay Informed Call 511 and say “Current Service Status,” look for informational posters in stations, or visit mta.info – where you can access the latest Planned Service Changes information, use TripPlanner +, and sign up for free email and text alerts.

© 2016 Metropolitan Transportation Authority

TheVillager.com

May 19, 2016

5


B.I. not rebuilding but closing, staff say; Will tem was not yet tipping its hand on what its long-term plans are for the hospital. Asked point blank last week whether the hospital would be shuttering, a spokesperson issued a short statement that neither confirmed nor denied the staff members’ reports: “Mount Sinai is committed to serving the community and offering the highest level of patient care. Leadership is currently discussing various options to accomplish these goals,” the spokesperson said.

Hospital continued from p. 1

chairpersons of their legislative bodies’ respective health committees. Mayor Bill de Blasio also expressed concern about the report. “The mayor is committed to ensuring communities have the healthcare facilities they need and preventing the sudden closure of hospitals,” Karen Hinton, the mayor’s top spokespersson, told The Villager. “The healthcare industry is changing rapidly and we must be prepared to protect patients and healthcare workers alike.” It was only six years ago that the Village suffered a devastating blow with the closure of St. Vincent’s Hospital, and the painful loss is still being felt viscerally. In a statement, State Senator Hoylman, whose district includes Beth Israel and formerly also included St. Vincent’s, demanded that the state “clear the air” about exactly what’s going on. “Members of our community are understandably concerned by news accounts suggesting the potential loss of hospital services in connection with Mount Sinai Beth Israel,” Hoylman said. “I’d urge the New York State Department of Health to clear the air by proactively reassuring the community that the level of care they are entitled to will be maintained. Working with my colleagues in government, I will continue to advocate for the highest quality healthcare services for those living and working in my district, and will keep constituents updated as I learn more.” Borough President Brewer stressed that, if in fact there is a move to rezone the Beth Israel site for residential use, it would at least have to go through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure, or ULURP, a seventh-month-long public review process. “My office is looking for answers to the questions raised by recent reports that Beth Israel might be closing,” Brewer said. “If true, such a closure would be a major loss to the Downtown community. “But it’s my understanding that long-approved site plans for the hospital’s location are restricted to a ‘largescale community facility’ and can’t be changed without a ULURP process. So I’m hopeful that a significant healthcare function there can be preserved — and that’s what I’ll fight for.” State Senator Daniel Squadron added that the public must be involved in whatever plans are afoot for the hospital. “As I’ve long said, decisions about healthcare facilities need to come with significant public engagement and planning,” Squadron said. “Recent reports about Beth Israel raise serious concerns — obviously, it’s critical that health services be preserved. I’m working with my colleagues for more information on

6

May 19,2016

Emptying buildings

Photo by Jonathan Alpeyrie

Mount Sinai Beth Israel’s distinctive-looking Linsk y Pavilion, at E. 16th St. and First Ave.

this critical health facility which serves community members throughout my district.”

Developers’ dream Beth Israel’s main campus occupies a full square block in ritzy Gramercy, from E. 16th to E. 17th St. between First Ave. and Nathan D. Perlman Place, bordering the east side of leafy Stuyvesant Square park with its enormous old trees — surely coveted Manhattan real estate, if ever there was. Asked if the property would be a “yuuuge” draw for salivating developers, as Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump might say, Bob Perl, president of the East Village’s Tower Brokerage, said definitely. “It is super-yuuuuge,” Perl said. “It must be one of the remaining largest properties to become available and there will not be many more in the future.” Yet, at the same time, he said, “The

value of land sales has dropped over the past six months, but that does not mean all the big guys will be going after a choice opportunity like this one.” Perl said that’s because some of the big developers are more interested in commercial projects. As thevillager.com exclusively reported last week, nurses from Mount Sinai Beth Israel called the newspaper last Tuesday, saying that word is now coming down from higher-ups that the historic hospital ultimately will close — and “sooner rather than later.”

‘Big announcement’ Official word may come extremely soon, they added. “They are going to make a big announcement before the end of the month,” one of them said. “We anticipate this is coming next week.” “Next week” is now this week, but as of press time, Mount Sinai Health Sys-

This week, The Villager again asked the same question, plus asked what Mount Sinai’s plans are for Beth Israel’s Gillman Hall on E. 17th St. — a soon-to-be-vacated residence for on-call nurses and other hospital staff — as well as the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai residents building on E. 13th St., where staff similarly have been told to vacate by the end of August. Is Gillman Hall already on the market? And is there, in fact, a plan to create a vastly “scaled-down” Beth Israel Hospital somewhere at the Eye and Ear Infirmary site? Again, the Mount Sinai Health System’s response was short on specifics — but this time had the added kicker that the health chain won’t be saying anything more for a while on any of this. “Given the importance of Mount Sinai Beth Israel to the community, we understand why there are a lot of rumors and misinformation circulating,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “However, Mount Sinai is 100 percent committed to serving the community and offering the highest level of patient care. We are working on a plan which will enhance existing services and develop new facilities in the Beth Israel community. Until then, we will not have any further comment. In the meantime, there will be no disruption in any of our patient care services.”

New hospital plan fades A statement the health system gave the paper nearly a year ago — after it was leaked that the plan then was to rebuild Beth Israel — was similar to the one from last week, but had included an additional sentence: “Our vision is to create a state-of-theart hospital at Mount Sinai Beth Israel with exceptional inpatient and outpatient care, as well as essential emergency facilities.” That language about a new hospital, however, was notably absent from the two statements Mount Sinai issued in the past week. Beth Israel was founded by a group Hospital continued on p. 7 TheVillager.com


prime Gramercy block soon sport condos? Hospital continued from p. 6

of 40 Orthodox Jews on the Lower East Side in 1890. It has been located on Stuyvesant Square since 1929. In 2013, it merged with Mount Sinai — after which it became known as Beth Israel Mount Sinai — to create one of the nation’s largest nonprofit health systems. Last June, as again first reported by The Villager — based on the tip of a concerned reader who heard it from his doctor — Beth Israel officials were telling staff that the hospital campus would be sold and the hospital rebuilt nearby. In a way, it all now sounds like it could be eerily similar to what happened with St. Vincent’s, where ambitious plans to build a new state-of-the-art hospital tower fell through, shortly after which St. Vincent’s closed under a mountain of debt.

Nurses spill the beans According to three veteran Beth Israel nurses who contacted The Villager last week, hospital administrators kept up the rebuilding mantra until a couple of months ago — when the narrative abruptly shifted dramatically, and it was learned that the place would be shuttered for good. Now, no one is saying much at all. “Suddenly, it’s gotten very quiet,� one of the nurses said. There are monthly meetings of top hospital officials and staff, which are attended by some of the nurses. Recently, at one of these meetings, it was revealed that Beth Israel, in fact, would be closing, they said. The news quickly spread among the rest of the nursing staff. All three nurses who contacted The Villager have worked at Beth Israel for about 20 years, and all spoke on condition of anonymity. They said Mount Sinai has told them they will be given jobs in the health network’s other locations, so they don’t want to jeopardize their future employment by revealing their identities. Mount Sinai has been strongly warning staff not to talk to the press about the closing, they noted. The first nurse to call said she decided to reach out to The Villager because the newspaper broke the story last year on the hospital’s rebuilding plans.

‘Closing in months’ “They’re going to close in months,� she said. “They’re going to start by downsizing. They are taking the services that were thriving at Beth Israel and moving them uptown. They have cut doctors’ salaries here, and therefore pushed them out.� In one clear example of downsizing, the hospital no longer has a neonatal intensive-care unit. Instead, newborns in TheVillager.com

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Par t of Mount Sinai Beth Israel overlooks leaf y, historic Stuy vesant Square park, in foreground.

need of these services are “transferred uptown.� “They’ve already moved the NICU [‘nick-yoo’] uptown,� the nurse said. “They had said they were going to rebuild — and this is what we were told,� she said. “First, they said they were going to rebuild at the corner of 17th St., where they own apartments. They said they were going to build by the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary — they also own that.� In addition to its flagship Upper East Side hospital and Eye and Ear, the Mount Sinai Health System also includes Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai West (formerly Roosevelt Hospital), Mount Sinai Brooklyn (formerly Kings Highway Hospital) and Mount Sinai Queens. “They claim that they’re losing $32 million a month,� the first nurse said. “We don’t know the truth.�

Keeping some programs Mount Sinai, however, reportedly does plan to keep open the Phillips Ambulatory Care Center – Mount Sinai Beth Israel — an outpatient care center on Union Square East — she said. Beth Israel’s methadone program — the country’s largest, with numerous locations — will also continue to operate, she added. Hospital continued on p. 16

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7


Hoylman onboard with car-free 14th during L work L train continued from p. 1

State Senator Brad Hoylman, building on a previous report from a public policy think tank, asked the M.T.A. to consider making 14th St. a dedicated bus and bike route to facilitate commuter alternatives. “I’d really like to see the possibility that you consider closing 14th St. to traffic,” the senator said during the event, at the Salvation Army Theatre, at 120 W. 14th St., earning cheers and applause from the audience. “And maybe, after this is done, we’ll consider keeping 14th St. closed to traffic,” he added. Hoylman’s comments came on the heels of an April report from the Regional Plan Association, which originally floated the car-free 14 St. idea as one strategy to accommodate the hundreds of thousands of daily L train riders who will be looking for replacement service if the line is shut down. The report suggests restricting 14th St. between Union Square and Sixth Ave. in both directions to buses, bikes and pedestrians, with trucks permitted to make overnight deliveries or use loading zones on nearby avenues that would take the place of parking spaces. Under the proposal, the rest of traffic could travel east of Union Square and west of Sixth Ave., but only one-way toward each river. The planning exercise was sparked by the M.T.A.’s intention to shut down the Canarsie Tunnel, which carries L trains below the East River, starting in 2019. The subway shutdown is required to repair extensive damage that was caused by Superstorm Sandy when it flooded the 92-yearold tunnel with 7 million gallons of corrosive saltwater. The agency is currently mulling two scenarios for the repair work. The first would close both tunnel tubes for 18 months, shutting down L train service completely in Manhattan. The second scenario would only close a single track at a time — with the total project lasting three years — which would still allow for less-frequent trains to shuttle across the borough. Reduced Manhattan service is not possible under the first proposal — the “get in, get done, get out” option, according to M.T.A. Chairperson Thomas Prendergast — since the agency says it won’t be able to keep trains running in the borough without connection to a maintenance yard in Brooklyn. “There isn’t a yard in Manhattan, and we can’t otherwise service the trains that would be stuck in Manhattan,” explained Veronique Hakim, the M.T.A.’s president of New

8

May 19,2016

Photos by Yannic Rack

Equipment damaged by Superstorm Sandy, which flooded the Canarsie subway tunnel under the East River with 7 million gallons of saltwater, was on display at the event.

York City Transit. Under the second option, trains would still be running both ways but only carry about one-fifth of the commuters that currently use the line, according to the M.T.A. The agency says that 225,000 daily riders would be affected by the shutdown, including around 50,000 traveling solely in Manhattan. “[There’s] an awful lot of ridership and volume along the 14th St. corridor,” said Prendergast. M.T.A. officials at the meeting did not respond directly to Hoylman’s comments. But Hakim later gave a vague answer to a similar question from Christine Berthet, the former chairperson of Community Board 4, who asked whether cars would be restricted on the crosstown street. “On dedicated bus lines, and restricting cars and other types of vehicles on 14th St. — working with the city Department of Transportation, making 14th St. work is obviously a top priority here,” she said. This week, a D.O.T. spokesperson said the agency would work closely with the M.T.A. regarding all options. Either way, the M.T.A. is already planning to help alleviate the strain of reduced L train service with a range of improved alternative transportation options. Under both scenarios, additional M, J and G trains would run to accommodate commuters, with J and

Z trains making local stops between Myrtle and Marcy Aves. in Brooklyn. Free outside-of-the-system transfers would be provided between the Broadway G and Lorimer St. J, M and Z stops. In an 18-month full-closure scenario, there would also be a bus service across the Williamsburg Bridge and M14 Select Bus Service across 14th St., with some buses running up to E. 20th St. to connect to a ferry from Williamsburg. The M23 S.B.S. and M34 S.B.S. would also be extended to connect to a new ferry — the amount of extra bus service required prompted Hakin to admit the M.T.A. would need “S.B.S. on steroids to make this work.” Under a one-track closure, additional buses would also run along 14th St. and between Bedford and Lorimer Sts. in Brooklyn, and the agency is working with the city to figure out whether to install dedicated bus lanes on the Williamsburg Bridge. The M.T.A. says it will also improve the subway stations at Bedford Ave. and First Ave., with new elevators and stairs and a new entrance at Avenue A for the Manhattan stop. Even though full-blown work on the tunnel reconstruction won’t begin until January 2019, the M.T.A. says it will pick one of the two scenarios in the next few months, after gathering more feedback from resi-

dents in Canarsie and presenting the two options to all affected community boards. “We’ve got time to do these options right,” Prendergast said. The only audience members who directly opined on the two options — via previously submitted question cards — seemed to prefer the shorter, 18-month closure, which one commenter referred to as the “preferred first option.” After a similar town hall in Brooklyn last month, many had perceived the agency to be not-so-secretly favoring the quicker option, but the top brass were careful to avoid showing any preference last week. “The first option, not the preferred one,” M.T.A. Chief of Staff Donna Evans was quick to correct the commenter. “People say, ‘You’re probably preferring one option,’ ” Prendergast added later. “No, we’re having a dialogue. We need to make sure we understand the pros and cons of these options.” So far, which option will be chosen, and how it will affect residents and commuters in both Brooklyn and Manhattan, remains to be seen. But no matter which scenario is picked, the transit honchos admitted that it wouldn’t be an easy burden for straphangers. “This is going to be a hardship,” Hakim said. “But at the end of the day, we need to get it done.” TheVillager.com


ADVERTORIAL

TOP DRIVER DISTRACTIONS Using mobile phones

Leading the list of the top distractions behind the wheel are mobile phones. Phones now do more than just place calls, and drivers often cannot pull away from their phones, even when driving. According to the California Department of Motor Vehicles, studies have shown that driving performance is lowered and the level of distraction is higher for drivers who are heavily engaged in cell

TheVillager.com

phone conversations. The use of a hands-free device does not lower distraction levels. The percentage of vehicle crashes and nearcrashes attributed to dialing is nearly identical to the number associated with talking or listening.

Daydreaming

Many people will admit to daydreaming behind the wheel or looking at a person or object outside of the car for too long. Per-

haps they’re checking out a house in a new neighborhood or thought they saw someone they knew on the street corner. It can be easy to veer into the direction your eyes are focused, causing an accident. In addition to trying to stay focused on the road, some drivers prefer the help of lane departure warning systems.

Eating

Those who haven’t quite mastered walking and

chewing gum at the same time may want to avoid eating while driving. The majority of foods require a person’s hands to be taken off of the wheel and their eyes to be diverted from the road. Reaching in the back seat to share some French fries with the kids is also distracting. Try to eat meals before getting in the car. For those who must snack while en route, take a moment to pull over at

a rest area and spend 10 minutes snacking there before resuming the trip.

Reading

Glancing at an advertisement, updating a Facebook status or reading a book are all activities that should be avoided when driving. Even pouring over a traffic map or consulting the digital display of a GPS system can be distracting.

May 19, 2016

9


I’ll get the lead out: ‘Heavy Metal’ Toledano Toledano continued from p. 1

ic metal was found to proliferate in three of Toledano’s buildings last month, sparking local politicians to call on the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which said last week that it has started to inspect all of the landlord’s buildings that currently have open permits for construction work. “I’ve heard from scores of constituents about the harassment they’ve endured in Toledano buildings. And now we’ve learned their health is at risk, too, because of dangerously high levels of lead dust,” said state Senator Brad Hoylman, one of the officials who called on the city to monitor the buildings. “The situation is outrageous and unacceptable,” Hoylman said. “Mr. Toledano needs to remedy this immediately.” Last month, city inspectors tested dust samples from three buildings owned by Toledano that had recently seen renovation or demolition work done on individual units. They found that dust from one of them, 233 E. Fifth St., contained 16 times the safe amount of lead, according to federal guidelines by the Environmental Protection Agency. Two other tenements, at 235 E. Fifth St. and 514 E. 12th St., also showed elevated levels of the toxic metal. Now, reps for Brookhill Properties, Toledano’s real estate investment firm, say the company has been taking a proactive step by hiring an environmental consulting firm, ALC Environmental, that will train Brookhill’s work crews and provide on-site monitoring of them during any construction work going forward. “They will oversee the environmental compliance oversight during ongoing construction at all Brookhill Properties sites, to be certain tenants are properly protected, and to advise us to any environmental compliance issues,” a company spokesperson said. “Should we be notified of a potential environmental compliance issue, we will have it attended to and corrected immediately.” But the residents — though heartened by the show of support from their local elected officials and the city — fear the landlord’s steps are only a temporary plan to ward off the Health Department inspectors, and that the lead pollution will just start up again once their results come back negative. “We’re very happy and deeply grateful — especially to Senator Hoylman’s office. They’ve been behind us every step of the way,” said Nina D’Alessandro, who started the Toledano Tenants Coalition, a group of concerned residents fighting back against the landlord. “But our fear is that Toledano will just clean up before the city comes in, and then get right back to business as usual when the Health Department is gone again,” she said. The residents say their health has already suffered, and they worry that the dust will especially affect children in their buildings. According to the city, dust from lead paint — which was banned here in 1960, but is still found in older buildings — is the most common cause of childhood lead poisoning, which can adversely affect a child’s health, learning and behavior. “I have a sore throat and I’ve had migraines for two months,” Holly Slayton, a 514 E. 12th St. resident, told The Villager last month. “My daughter just had an upperrespiratory infection. I can’t even be in my apartment half the time.” In their May 5 letter to the Health Department, the officials — who also included Borough President Gale Brewer, Assemblymembers Deborah Glick, Richard Gottfried and Brian Kavanagh, and Councilmembers Corey Johnson and Rosie Mendez — urged the agency to conduct thorough testing at all of Toledano’s buildings that currently have construction permits.

10

May 19,2016

File photo by Yannic Rack

Tenants from three Toledano-owned East Village buildings, some wearing hazmat suits and dust masks, protested outside their landlord’s Union Square-area offices last month, urging him to use legally required lead-abatement procedures.

“In the past month, tenants living in buildings acquired by Brookhill Properties, owned by Raphael Toledano, have reported high concentrations of toxic lead in dust and debris arising from negligent and dangerous construction work,” the electeds wrote. “We are extremely troubled by reports that similarly reckless construction is currently taking place or slated to begin in several other buildings owned by Mr. Toledano, putting our constituents further at risk.” The buildings that are being tested — in addition to the three already known to be affected — are 97 Second Ave., 27 St. Mark’s Place, 58 St. Mark’s Place, 223 E. Fifth St., 229 E. Fifth St., 228 E. Sixth St., 66 E. Seventh St., 95 E. Seventh St., 334 E. Ninth St., 221 E. 10th St., 253 E. 10th St., 329 E. 12th St., 510 E. 12th St., 327 E. 12th St., 325 E. 12th St., 444 E. 13th St. and 125 W. 16th St. “The Health Department takes reports of unsafe work practices very seriously, and we are working closely with Senator Hoylman to evaluate construction practices at properties owned by this landlord,” Deborah Nagin, director of the Health Department’s Healthy Homes Program, said in a statement. After the announcement, one tenant at 233 E. Fifth St., which tested positive for unsafe lead amounts last month, said that the residents wouldn’t mind the construction if the work crews at least followed the city’s standards — including sealing work areas, properly disposing of construction debris and cleaning up after themselves. Rules for construction work in buildings with lead paint are included in both New York City’s Local Law 1 and the E.P.A.’s Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Program Rule Compliance Guide. “At the very least, we expect they follow that — wrapping things in plastic, moving furniture, mopping afterwards — it’s not rocket science,” said the tenant, who asked to remain anonymous. “If they wanted to get going, they could simply use the regulations as a checklist.” In a separate letter to Toledano himself, the politicians also blasted the landlord for allegedly engaging in other forms of tenant harassment at his buildings. “Numerous constituents,” they wrote, “have contacted our offices alleging that they have been baselessly denied lease renewals, served frivolous notices to vacate, intimi-

dated by your agents, or even threatened with disruptive construction and uninhabitable living conditions. Let us be clear: These actions are both unacceptable and unlawful.” The 25-year-old Toledano added more than a dozen East Village buildings to his real estate portfolio last year. However, he is currently the subject of a state investigation into tenant harassment. In addition, residents at 444 E. 13th St. have taken him to court over alleged attempts to drive them out of their rent-stabilized homes through illegal construction and persistent threats and buyout offers. The Real Deal, citing anonymous sources, reported this week that the tenants’ case has just recently been settled for more than $1 million. Stephanie Rudolph, a lawyer at the Urban Justice Center who represented the tenants, said that she couldn’t reveal any details but that the case “has been resolved in a manner satisfactory to all parties.” In January, The Villager revealed that the young landlord also has a past assault conviction for beating up a group of teenagers in New Jersey four years ago — news that only ratcheted up the worries of many of his alreadyconcerned tenants. Even now, with the city stepping in, D’Alessandro said she was still worried about Toledano’s conduct. Her own building has not seen any construction yet, but currently has three apartment vacancies, which could mean construction work is on the horizon. Yet, she added that the attention from the city was reassuring — especially since another notorious Manhattan landlord, Steven Croman, was just hit with an indictment last week for harassing rent-stabilized tenants into leaving their apartments, among a pile of other criminal and civil charges filed by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. “We’re very nervous,” D’Alessandro said. “We’d like to actually meet with Toledano and talk things over, but that’s not happening yet. “But this is a really good sign, and frankly it’s not only the pledge from the Department of Health, but also the fact that Croman was indicted,” she said. “Maybe we really can get some protection — not just a spot check, but ongoing support. That’s what we really need.” TheVillager.com


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11


Police Blotter

bike is valued at $1,100. Police arrested Joey Santiago, 32, for felony grand larceny.

Rape-attempt arrest

Officer impersonators

Police last Friday arrested a suspect in an attempted Lower East Side rape two months ago. On April 23, at 3:20 a.m., according to police, a 24-year-old woman entered the elevator to her building, in the vicinity of Stanton and Pitt Sts., when a young man followed her inside. When the elevator reached her floor, the man began to grope her as the door opened and pushed her against the wall before fondling her. He followed the victim to her apartment, but fled when a male from inside came to the door. Based on a tip, Gabriel Bulina, 18, was arrested at his home on Staten Island and charged with attempted rape, sexually motivated burglary, sex abuse and forcible touching.

E. 9th sex assault According to a resident of 733 E. Ninth St., this past Saturday night around 6:30 p.m., a man posing as a deliveryman grabbed a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crotch from behind as she was walking up the stairs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She screamed and turned and saw

him and then a neighbor came out of his apartment door and the man fled,â&#x20AC;? a building resident told The Villager. The suspect was described as a young Hispanic man. On Tuesday, residents reportedly found that apartment-door locks had been tampered with and that their front-door lock was broken.

 Police said that on Sun., March 20, around 5 p.m. a 29-year-old Lower East Side man was exiting his residence in the Baruch Houses on Baruch Drive when two men stopped him in the lobby and identified themselves as police officers. One of the individuals proceeded

to mace the victim while the other punched him. The individuals removed his Metro PCS cell phone, as well as about $100 in cash and a credit card and fled into 72 Baruch Drive. EMS responded but the victim was not transported to the hospital. The suspects are described as Hispanic males. Anyone with information is asked to call the Police Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crime Stoppers Hotline, at 800-577-TIPS. Tips can also be submitted by logging Blotter continued on p. 13

Negatively 4th St. On Wed., May 11, at 3:35 a.m., a man was allegedly assaulted on the southwest corner of W. Fourth and Grove Sts. The 24-year-old victim told police that a man punched him in the head with a closed fist. Manuel Perez, 24 was arrested for misdemeanor assault.

Taco Bell bike swipe The Taco Bell at 18 E. 14th St. was the scene of a robbery on the afternoon of Tues., May 10, police said. At 2:20 p.m., the victim stated that his bicycle was filched from the vestibule of the Taco Bell. He then followed the alleged cycle swiper and awaited the arrival of police. The

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Police Blotter Blotter continued from p. 12

treatment. Jesse Mangano, 18, was arrested for felony assault.

onto the Crime Stoppers Web site, www.nypdcrimestoppers.com, or by texting them to 274637 (CRIMES) and then entering TIP577.

Dangerous game

Creep-accino A woman was forcibly touched by a man inside of a Starbucks at 72 Grove St., according to cops. The woman asked for two cups of coffee at around 4:45 a.m. on Tues., May 10, when a stranger approached her and suddenly grabbed her crotch, she said. Robert Kleinman, 57, was arrested for misdemeanor forcible touching.

Cop bopped in face A police officer responded to a report of a fight at University Place and E. 13th St. on Sat., May 14, at 1:24 a.m. When the officer attempted to break up the fight, though, a man struck him in the face, causing bruising, swelling and substantial pain to the right side of his face. The police officer was taken to Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital for

According to police, on Sun., May 5, at 11:10 p.m., an 18-year-old man had a verbal dispute with another man, around age 30, while inside 39 Eldridge St. over a broken gaming machine. The older man then pushed the younger one to the wall face first and then stabbed him in the lower torso with an unknown object. The victim’s friend, 20, tried to intervene and the attacker then slashed him in the left arm with the weapon. The assailant then fled the location in an unknown direction. The victims were treated for their injuries at Bellevue Hospital and released. The suspect, described as an Asian man, was last seen wearing a green shirt and a yellow jacket. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Police Department’s Crime Stoppers Hotline.

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Keep on rolling — around the country and town BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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porting their trademark facial tattoos and their canine sidekicks, travelers are back in town. Well, just a few early birds, so far, it seems. Three of them, all in their early 20s, and their pooch were hunkered down outside the Astor Place Starbucks last Monday morning. Max, center, in photo at right, said he grew up on the Lower East Side, but his family then moved around, including an apparently forgettable stint in what he called “Massa-two-s--ts.” With him were Beck, left, and Mary, who appeared to be watching something on her cell phone. Crusty travelers need phones, too, to keep in touch with their families and loved ones, the homeless youth say — despite the fact that it makes some skeptical passersby wonder how down-and-out they really are. The trio had just arrived from Portland — they had hopped a freight train — but were leaving soon for Seattle. “It’s too hot here,” said Max, apparently referring to both the rising temperature and the coming deluge of fellow crusty travelers. “It’ll blow up in about a month,” he said. “There’ll be kids on every corner.” As for the name they go by, Max

Photos by Lincoln Anderson

said, “Gutter punks...train hoppers...I embrace the ‘crusty’ label. Yeah, I’m a little dirty...but I wash in restrooms.” Speaking of which, he said, they were about to go to the Streetworks drop-in center, at 33 Essex St., to shower. “It’s a really great resource,” he said.

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Last summer was “The Summer of the Crusty Pit Bulls,” as at least two travelers’ pit bulls went on a rampage in the East Village, attacking punk photographer Robert Bayley’s pug, Sidney, who died soon after, and viciously chomping the arms of two men who tried to shield their dogs from attack. But Max said his mutt — part Lab, part Great Pyrenees and part pit — is gentle. His name is Space Bag. “You know, like the cheap box of wine,” he

said with a smile. A bit farther south, down at the Citi Bike station by City Hall, Nicole Welcome, 28, in photo below, was “swapping in an inner tube” on a bike-share cycle that had a flat. She’s not a traveler, per — she lives on Delancey St. — but she travels all over the city fixing the blue bikes. “Wherever the red lights are at,” she fixes the bikes, she said, referring to the red “broken” lights on the bike docks.

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Bingo! East Village woman hits the century mark By Albert Amateau â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m old â&#x20AC;&#x201D; O.K.,â&#x20AC;? said Teklya Husiak, with a dismissive wave last Thursday when her birthday was announced during the weekly bingo at the Selfreliance Association of American Ukrainians on Second Ave. The announcement turned into a major celebration when Oksana Lapatynsky, the full-time social worker at the association, welcomed City Councilmember Rosie Mendez to Teklyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100th birthday celebration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel anything like my age,â&#x20AC;? Teklya said to a visitor from The Villager. Carlina Rivera, Mendezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legislative aide, read a City Council proclamation recognizing Teklya as an esteemed resident of the community since 2001, when she moved from Brooklyn to the East Village. A family celebration, including five grandchildren, had taken place a few days earlier on May 8, Teklyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actual birthday. Regulars at the Thursday gathering sang two different versions, with several verses each, of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mnohaya Litaâ&#x20AC;? (Many Years), a traditional hymn that serves as the Ukrainian equivalent of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy Birthday.â&#x20AC;? Teklya needed only one breath to blow out the three candles on the birthday cake and she polished off her slice of cake in short order. She was born in 1916 near Chicago to

Photo by John Blasco

Presenting Teklya Husiak with a City Council proclamation were Councilmember Rosie Mendez, kneeling, and her aide Carlina Rivera, holding proclamation. At right is Husiakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son John.

an immigrant couple, Danylo and Kathryna Petryk, according to a biographical sketch written by her son John. In 1920, when Teklya was four, she moved with her parents and her American-born brother and sister back to the family home in Fedropl, a village near Peremyshl, a city in a Ukrainian district under Polish control.

With the clouds of war looming in 1937, her parents sent Teklya, 21, and her American-born brother and sister back to the U.S. Their parents and five other siblings were arrested by the Russians after the war and were sent to Siberia as part of Stalinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resettlement policy. A few years after arriving back in the

U.S., Teklya met John Husiak, a Ukrainian immigrant who was serving in the U.S. Army at the time. They were married in 1944. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know my dad was in the Army guarding prisoners of war in Michigan,â&#x20AC;? John said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I still have his Army coat.â&#x20AC;? After the war, the couple moved to Brooklyn and had three sons, Daniel, who died in 2008, John and Stephan. Teklya became a widow in 1977 but continued to live in Brooklyn until 2001, when she moved to the East Village. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been friends for 15 years,â&#x20AC;? said Nataly Duma, president of the Selfreliance Association for 20 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is a remarkable woman,â&#x20AC;? said Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Carole. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was first married 24 years ago, I was anxious about fitting in with the family. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Ukrainian and I was Jewish â&#x20AC;&#x201D; very far from her world. She was a little standoffish at first but we worked at it. It took us about a year but we grew to accept and love each other,â&#x20AC;? Carole said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mother has voted in every major election since 1940, and she intends to vote Democratic in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general election,â&#x20AC;? said John. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All she really wants is for the Department of Transportation to repave the southwest corner of Second Ave. at E. Seventh St., so that she can cross the street safely and easily to St. Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church and the Selfreliance Center for the weekly bingo,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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15


Hospital not rebuilding but closing, staff say Hospital continued from p. 7

Confident sources Asked where she is getting her information about the plan to close the hospital, the first nurse assured that it’s a fact, but that she could not reveal her source. “I’m hearing it basically straight from the horse’s mouth,” she assured. The Villager asked if there were others who could corroborate her story, and two other nurses promptly called. “It’s very true — it’s a true story,” said the second nurse. “The announcement has not been made, but there is a very big announcement coming next week to employees. It’s a done deal. The official announcement was [already] made to a few. “They didn’t want people to know yet. They’re sending us e-mails telling us not to speak to the media or our assemblyman. Up until two months ago, they said they were rebuilding. “The closing isn’t supposed to happen fast in a month — like Long Island College Hospital. But — who knows? — maybe it will be a month and two days. “The rumor is they are diverting patients elsewhere,” she noted. She said their union, 1199, doesn’t seem to be doing much to fight the closing. In general, it all feels pretty peculiar to her. “They just want it to be a very quiet transition,” she said of Mount Sinai. “Something’s not right. Something’s off.”

Telltale signs The third nurse to call said there certainly have been telltale signs of downsizing. Her department, for example, has been busy, yet has not added a single new doctor since Mount Sinai took over. She had always anticipated that downsizing was the plan, but not closing. Yet, they were recently told that the hospital’s Gillman Hall residence, on E. 17th St. — which is used by nurses on call and hospital fellows and residents — must be vacated by the end of June. When Mount Sinai took over Beth Israel, the third nurse said, at first there were suddenly a lot of “suits” walking around. There were assurances that the hospital would see its hours increase, that more doctors would fill the facilities. But neither happened. “Was the plan always to close, and they’re just going through the motions?” she wondered. “They haven’t brought in anything they said they would do to make the place busier. You see older doctors leaving. It’s like they’ve set it up

16

May 19,2016

Photo by Jonathan Alpeyrie

The closing of a full-ser vice hospital at Beth Israel could mean the loss of one of Downtown’s few remaining emergenc y rooms — unless it is replaced by a stand-alone E.R. without hospital beds, as was done at the former St. Vincent’s Hospital site.

to fail. In the surgical O.R., a lot of people have left. In the General Medicine, a lot of doctors have left.” Nevertheless, the administration has been trying to keep everything under wraps. “They were saying a month ago, ‘Stop saying it’s going to close,’ ” she noted. The hospital’s equipment and its buildings, however, are all in good condition, she said. “I went to nursing school in London,” she noted. “This is not an old building.”

What will Bill do? When he ran for mayor, de Blasio campaigned on a platform of stopping the wave of hospital closings. But the Beth Israel nurses have little faith that he can do anything in this case. “I don’t know if de Blasio has the power — or the political will” to keep Beth Israel open, the third nurse said, adding, “He didn’t do much at LICH when he ran for mayor.” In August 2013, mayoral candidate de Blasio held a press conference outside the closed St. Vincent’s Hospital, which many saw as a calculated swipe at Christine Quinn, since the hospital was in her Council district and many felt she had not done enough to try to save it. “Mayor Bloomberg let 12 hospitals close on his watch,” de Blasio told the crowd. Bloomberg, he declared, “did

not lift a finger” to try to save St. Vincent’s. “We’re not going to accept the arguments that because it’s a challenging situation, we’re not going to get involved,” de Blasio said then. “Mayors are supposed to get involved — that’s what we’re here for. This is the moment when we need to turn the corner.” Pointing over at the Greenwich Lane luxury condo project rising on the former St. Vincent’s site, de Blasio told the crowd, “Brothers and sisters, we cannot, and we will not let this happen again.” But it’s a good bet that if Beth Israel does, in fact, close, “this” will happen again — namely, it will be replaced with yet another high-end residential apartment complex, the same exact thing that happened with St. Vincent’s.

‘working-class hospital’ If Beth Israel closes, those that will be hit hardest are working-class people on the Lower East Side, in Chinatown and even Brooklyn, the third nurse pointed out. “We see a lot of lower-income Lower East Siders, Chinatown — that’s like our primary population,” she said. “It’s working class. We get some from Williamsburg, too, it’s right over the bridge.” Beth Israel treated a lot of residents from those neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy, such as people with diabetes who needed dialysis, she noted.

The hospital also treats an Orthodox Jewish population. It has “sabbath elevators,” which stop on each floor, so that observant Jews don’t have to violate the Shabbos prohibition against work by pushing buttons. Late Friday afternoon, a day after The Villager article was posted online, a woman who said she works at Beth Israel called anonymously to say she also believes the hospital is shuttering. “What I understand from a very reliable source is that the hospital is closing, but that the only part of it that is staying open is the Bernstein Pavilion, which serves the mental health community,” she said. “So it’s going to be a comprehensive mental health agency.” The Bernstein building is located on Perlman Place between E. 16th and E. 15th Sts., so not on the main hospital block just to the north.

Heard from Eye and Ear In addition, this week an employee at the Eye and Ear Infirmary, having read The Villager article, called to say that the plan to close its residents building is creating a real panic. The Eye and Ear Infirmary has three buildings, located between E. 14th and E. 13th Sts. along Second Ave. — its north and south buildings, plus the residents building on E. 13th St. “We’ve been hearing a lot about Hospital continued on p. 34 TheVillager.com


Holly from F.L.A. is remembered on the L.E.S.

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riends and fans gathered at LaMaMa on Saturday afternoon for a memorial to Holly Woodlawn, the transgender actress and Warhol superstar. She died on Dec. 6 at age 69. She was born Haroldo Santiago Franceschi Rodriguez Danhakl in Puerto Rico to an American soldier and a native Puerto Rican woman, and grew up in Miami. At 15, she headed north, hitchhiking her way to New York City. Lou Reed made her famous in the opening verse to his 1972 song “Walk on the Wild Side”:

Photos by Clayton Patterson

From left, Elsa Rensaa, Ruby Reyner and Jimmy Webb at the Holly Woodlawn memorial. Reyner’s seminal glitter band Ruby and the Rednecks influenced David Bowie. Webb, long the hear t and soul of East Village punk boutique Trash and Vaudeville, recently left the store after its move from St. Mark’s Place.

Holly came from Miami, F-L-A/ Hitchhiked her way across the U.S.A./ Plucked her eyebrows on the way/ Shaved her legs and then he was a she/ She says, “Hey, babe, take a walk on the wild side.” Arriving in New York, Woodlawn turned tricks on the street to survive. She went on to star in the Andy Warhol movies “Trash” and “Women in Revolt,” but may be best remembered for the Lou Reed verse. She was a participant in the Stonewall Riots in the summer of 1969. Saturday’s memorial was produced by Penny Arcade, Jeremiah Newtown and Steve Zehentner.

A memorial photo of Holly Woodlawn, muse of Andy Warhol and Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground.

From left, Agosto Machado, a well-known Downtown drag queen; Lori Seid, LaMaMa technician; and Randy Wicker, a longtime gay rights activist, cloning advocate and par tner of the late Mar tha Johnson.

Jeremiah New ton and Penny Arcade, t wo of the Woodlawn memorial’s producers. A renowned per formance ar tist, Arcade, early in her career, also starred in Warhol films. New town produced the film “Beautiful Darling” and co-edited the book “My Face for the World to See: The Diaries of Candy Darling,” both about Candy Darling, another transgender Warhol superstar, who, like Woodlawn, appears in Lou Reed’s “ Walk on the Wild Side.” TheVillager.com

John Vaccaro, director of the Theatre of the Ridiculous, an underground theater in the 1960s that had a connection with Andy Warhol’s Factor y scene. May 19, 2016

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Beth Israel is a key lifeline; We can’t lose it

TALKING POINT By Paul Newell hile plans for closing Mount Sinai Beth Israel have yet to be confirmed, it seems evident from reporting in The Villager and elsewhere that closure plans are well underway. Lower Manhattan is a vibrant community. The 65th Assembly District — which I represent as a Democratic district leader — has 150,000 men, women and children of all ages and backgrounds, who work hard to support their families and make their communities a great place. For most of the Lower East Side and Chinatown, Mount Sinai Beth Israel is the shortest ambulance ride away. In such emergencies, the extra minutes in New York City traffic can mean life or death. Furthermore, if Mount Sinai Beth Israel hospital closes, we will be even more dependent on hospitals located in Flood Zone 1.

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Paul Newell.

The reality is that our community was among the hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy. We are the largest city in the U.S., and among the premier cities of the world. For us to have so few flood-protected hospitals for the millions of residents and workers in central and Lower Manhattan, and only one remaining hospital (New York-Presbyterian / Lower Manhattan Hospital) serving Lower Manhattan, is not only outrageous, it’s callous, shortsighted and extremely poor urban planning. In 2010, I co-founded the Coalition for a New Village Hospital in response to the threatened closure of St. Vincent’s Hospital. We fought for years, but

eventually that 161-year-old community lifeline was cut. In 2013, I fought with our neighbors against the closure of Brooklyn’s Long Island College Hospital, and that hospital was closed as well. Now it seems that they’re ready to cut one of our final lifelines, which is not only an affront to hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers, it’s an abject threat. Healthcare in a city of 8.5 million residents needs to be about resource allocation based on need, not on real estate prices or the corporate bottom line. How would this area survive a disaster like September 11 with no local hospital? Clearly, the people making the decisions aren’t the same people who will be left without a hospital. I want to take this moment to state my strong support for SEIU 1199 and the New York State Nurses’ Association’s efforts to prevent Certificate of Need regulations from being tampered with by corporations. Decisions like removing hospital service literally impact who lives and who dies — and the proper way to make these decisions is not by informing the staff and then putting a gag on them. Rather, it’s by involving the community that will be impacted, not to mention the workers of the hospital, in a collaborative needs assessment.

Letters to the Editor Hey — we told you so! To The Editor: Re “Pier 40 air rights appraised at $75 million; St. John’s ULURP process set to start” (news article, May 5): There is no reason the Pier 40 ball fields cannot co-exist with commercial development on the pier. If the Hudson River Park Trust and Tobi Bergman had allowed the Korman/Durst plan to proceed, that would exist today. Douglas Durst Durst is chairperson, The Durst Organization, and former chairperson, Friends of Hudson River Park

Evan Forsch

Should be St. Vincent’s Park To The Editor: Re “We still owe Sisters of Charity and St. Vincent’s” (talking point, by Arthur Schwartz and Martin Tessler, May 5) and “St. Vincent’s and AIDS: What’s in a (park) name?” (news article, May 12): Truly, it is said, “Let no good deed go unpunished.” For more than 160 years, the Sisters of Charity at St. Vincent’s Hospital unselfishly served our community and our city. From the cholera epidemic of 1849 to the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, the nuns were there for us. Indeed, in the 1980s, St. Vincent’s provided more AIDS beds than any other institution in New York City. St. Vincent’s also cared for survivors of the Titanic, the

I call on the board of Mount Sinai Health Systems to reconsider their decision immediately, and on the powers that be in New York City to make very clear that this decision is at best premature, and at worst incredibly dangerous. I will be following this story as it develops, and reaching out to partners in healthcare advocacy and throughout our communities, so we can make sure our needs for healthcare are addressed, regardless of the corporate bottom line. Subsequent to The Villager’s article, executives at Mount Sinai have responded that they have no intent of shutting down the Beth Israel campus. I sincerely hope this is true. In the meantime, it is vital that we hold them accountable to their mission. The state Legislature and the governor should inform Mount Sinai that any changes to Beth Israel’s Certificate of Need will be opposed. Likewise, the City Council and Mayor de Blasio should inform Mount Sinai that any deed or zoning changes at the hospital’s current Gramercy site that endanger the health of New Yorkers will be blocked. Newell is a Democratic district leader and a candidate for Lower Manhattan’s 65th Assembly District in the upcoming September primary election

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire and 9/11, as well as countless others in its world-class emergency room. Yet now we have a small but well-heeled group of arrivistes joining with three local politicians to deny the sisters and St. Vincent’s their rightful due. Where were these “activists” and officials when the nuns needed a hand changing the soiled diapers of an incontinent AIDS victim? Where were they to assist the good sisters when a dying person needed a glass of water in the middle of the night? Where were they when an expiring patient needed a caring hand to hold? Yet now they secretly — behind our backs — seek to remove any serious mention of the good works and service that St. Vincent’s and its nuns delivered to our community and our city since 1849. The good that the sisters provided our community needs to be recognized. The nuns did not seek glory, but were glorious nevertheless. Naming a park for their more than 160 years of good deeds is the least we can do to honor them. Let’s do it! Sean Sweeney

St. Vincent’s snub payback To The Editor: Re “St. Vincent’s and AIDS: What’s in a (park) name?” (news article, May 12): Thanks to the position Councilmember Corey Johnson, Borough President Gale Brewer and state Senator Brad Hoylman have taken, they can be sure of not getting my vote when it’s time for re-election. letters continued on p. 20

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TheVillager.com


Adieu to ‘Peace Pentagon’; War Resisters relocate

GLOBAL (EAST) VILLAGE By Bill Weinberg he night of Thurs., May 5, was a bittersweet one for me. For probably the last time in my life, I crossed the threshold of 339 Lafayette St., for a “Moving the Movement” farewell party. I was bidding adieu to the building that three generations of activists had affectionately called the “Peace Pentagon.” The gathering was confined to one room of the three-story structure, with construction tape barring access to the other rooms, and the halls deserted. It was an eerie feeling. The first time I entered the building at the corner of Lafayette and Bleecker, I was in my senior year of high school. It was 1980, Reagan’s election was imminent, the Iran hostage crisis and Soviet invasion of Afghanistan dominated the headlines, and the big lurch to the right was in frightening progress. President Carter, who had been elected on a pledge to pardon Vietnam-era draft resisters, capitulated to the new bellicose zeitgeist by bringing back draft registration. I was in the first crop of 18-year-olds to have to register with the Selective Service System since 1973. This precipitated my first activist involvement — a student anti-draft group. Through this, I was inevitably drawn into the orbit of the War Resisters League — the venerable pacifist organization that grew out of anti-draft efforts in World War I, and was the anchor tenant at No. 339. There hasn’t been a year since then that I did not return to the building multiple times. Just my own interactions with the place will give a sense of the intensely diverse activity it hosted. It was a nerve center of organizing for the massive nuclear disarmament march of June 12, 1982, which brought one million people to the Great Lawn of Central Park, and in which I was a young foot soldier. By fate or coincidence, much of my life was for years wound up with Room 202. First, it hosted Sound & Hudson Against Atomic Development — the SHAD Alliance — with whom I agitated to close down the Indian Point nuclear plant in Westchester County. Later, the room housed my longtime activist home: the Libertarian Book Club (a left-wing anarchist formation first founded by refugees from Axis Europe in the ’40s), and its sibling orga-

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TheVillager.com

Photo by Ed Hedemann

In 1991, an anti-Gulf War banner hung from 339 Lafayette St. In June 1982, just before the No Nukes March in Central Park, the top of the building was draped in black bunting.

nizations. These included the anarchosyndicalist Workers Solidarity Alliance and Neither East Nor West, which built solidarity with antiwar and anti-nuclear resisters in the East Bloc. Later, in the ’90s, Room 202 hosted another organization I worked with, the Amanakaa Amazon Network, which was led by Brazilian ex-pats and worked to support the rubber-tappers and indigenous peoples resisting destruction of the rainforest. I was in the outer orbit of groups hosted in other offices in the building — the Nicaragua Solidarity Network of Greater New York, the Socialist Party and of course W.R.L. itself, which occupied the big corner office on the second floor. I more than once used the building’s AJ Muste Memorial Library for historical research on Gandhi and other nonviolence struggles of the 20th century. The AJ Muste Memorial Institute — generally referred to as “the foundation,” and named for one of W.R.L.’s stalwarts from the start of the Cold War until his death in 1967 — actually owned the building. After years of grappling with whether it was worth it to invest money in urgently needed repairs of the deteriorating structure, last October the foundation took the painful decision to sell the property. The New York Times reported that developer Aby Rosen purchased the building for $20.75 million. Although current zoning allows office or commercial space, residential condos may be in the offing if a “variance” is granted. After the farewell party, I sought out the only person I know who was around when W.R.L. moved into No. 339 back when I was still in first grade:

David McReynolds, for years a central figure in W.R.L. and a two-time Socialist Party presidential candidate. He, so to speak, was present at the creation. McReynolds first got involved in W.R.L. in 1960, when the organization was in an office at 5 Beekman St. that it had inhabited since World War II. At that time, peace activism was at a low ebb. But it was soon on the upswing again over “Vietnam and the nuclear test issue,” McReynolds remembered. W.R.L.’s importance was clearly demonstrated one night in 1969, when the offices suffered a break-in and were ransacked. McReynolds said he’s certain it was the F.B.I. or another government agency, and added that he was flattered by the burglary. “I thought nobody was paying attention to W.R.L.,” he said wryly. The break-in precipitated the move to No. 339, because the landlord at the Beekman building got scared and kicked them out after that. W.R.L. bought what would become the Peace Pentagon for $58,000. Back then, there was a locksmith and a hot-dog stand on the ground floor. (Later, post-gentrification, the groundfloor storefronts would be rented to boutiques and a vintage clothing store.) In 1975, W.R.L. founded the Muste Institute, to be the legal owner of the building and serve as a nonprofit channel for donations. That’s when McReynolds said the building was conceived as a “Peace Pentagon, where other groups could rent space at low cost.” And now that era has come to an end — at least as far as the property at No. 339 is concerned. McReynolds admits there were “a lot of hard feelings and struggle” over the decision to sell the

building. “I was one of those who opposed the decision to sell,” he said — but hastened to add: “I’d left the Muste board by then, so I had nothing to do with the decision to move out.” McReynolds also retired from W.R.L. staff in 1999. “My only link to the building was to go in and feed the cat, Rusty,” he said. The feline was named for his old comrade Bayard Rustin, the civil rights leader and also a W.R.L. fellow traveler for many years. Judith Mahoney Pasternak, a writer, veteran W.R.L. board member and former editor of the group’s magazine, the Non-Violent Activist, called me from Paris where she now lives to give me her own thoughts. “Yes, of course many of us were sad, because so much history had happened there,” she said. “But in the end it was the only possible solution for a decaying building.” The Muste Institute and W.R.L. will soon be moving to new premises — at 168 Canal St., on the corner of Elizabeth St. But it will be renting, not owning, and in considerably less space. Eventual purchase of a new building is apparently being contemplated. McReynolds and I both live on E. Fourth St., just a few blocks from No. 339, and I admit to a pang at the loss of another pillar of alternative culture in the neighborhood. McReynolds, who had much more of his life wound up in the building than I ever did, seemed more accepting of the change. “I’m glad I don’t have to feed the cat anymore,” he said. Rusty has found a new home with a family in Baltimore. May 19, 2016

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Photos by Lincoln Anderson

Hexes in effect around Washington Square Park The last segment of the Washington Square Park renovation project — reconstruction of the sidewalks around the park — is in its last leg. The old, cracked asphalt paving is being torn up and replaced with new hexagonal asphalt pavers. The work should be completed by this summer, capping off the roughly 10-year project. The restoration notably saw the park’s fountain “centered” to align with the arch and Fifth Ave. and the sunken central fountain plaza area raised to the same level as the rest of the park, among other things.

Letters to the Editor continued from p. 18

And Corey’s backpedaling won’t change my mind. Mike Conway

way that they validate affidavits is by checking them against the same voter database that those people weren’t in, which caused them to have to vote by affidavit in the first place,” Fader charged. That is a fun premise for a Kafka short story, but shouldn’t some level of intellectual rigor be a baseline requirement for a seat at the New York City Board of Elections?

Straight out of Kafka

Mike Hitchcock

To The Editor: Re “Elections chief defends botched N.Y. primary; Challenges loom” (news article, May 12): Well, this is a ridiculous procedure, akin to a circular firing line: “Most of those affidavits weren’t counted because the

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That’s no lady

Bunny’s new Stonewall show is a tour de farce BY MICHAEL SHIREY

A

re you one of those queens troubled with the creeping (creepy?) heteronormativity of our community? Do you lay awake at night debating whether you are bisexual or simply bi-curious? Are you angered at how mainstream drag culture has become (I mean, #pursefirst from “RuPaul’s Drag Race” is trending on social media right now)? Well hold on to your wig, girl, because Lady Bunny has just the thing for you. “Trans-Jester,” the Lady’s new stand-up show at the Stonewall Inn, promises to have the audience blushing one minute and busting their gut the next. “Welcome to Stonewall Inn — where they have been doing such a brisk business here that they have not had time to clean since the riots,” Bunny joked, poking fun — literally poking — at her chair’s ripped upholstery on the historic venue’s upstairs stage. The Lady’s words come from a place of love though, and she was quick to follow up with praise for the bar’s historical significance. “This dump is Ground Zero for LGBT rights in this country.” Bunny’s latest comedy showcase highlights her over-the-top sexual humor, laugh-out-loud song parodies (her cover of Adele’s “Hello,” told from the perspective of a hamster shoved up the Lady’s ass, had me crying), and trademark “Laugh-In” roast of everyone from Caitlyn Jenner (and the whole Kardashian Klan) to Bill Cosby and Donald Trump. Discussing Jenner and the high hopes for — and subsequent disappointment over — “I Am Cait,” Bunny said, “Honey, that show inspired me…to change the channel.” Bunny shares stories of her experience with the drag and transgender communities, her unapologetic use of the word “tranny,” and her concern about our country’s obsession with political correctness. And herein lies real point of the show. With “TransJester,” Bunny hopes to convince the audience to concern itself not so much with gender as with positive role models. Ya know, the role models who untuck a dildo from their dress midway through their act. “I am not going to tell anyone don’t experiment with gender,” Bunny continued, saying she was more TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY MICHAEL SHIREY

Lady Bunny at the historic Stonewall Inn (or is it the historic Lady Bunny at the Stonewall Inn?).

worried about the upcoming election and protecting the rights of our community than offending another “fag wearing lipstick” who doesn’t identify with the many letters of the “LGBT-whatever” community. “If you treat people with respect, labels don’t matter as much,” because “the same asshole who is going to bash a trans woman is going to bash this drag queen is going to bash an effeminate gay male,” Bunny said, reminding her audience, “Honey, I was around when the only letter in LGBT was G!” No one knows how long Bunny’s really been performing — believe me, if we don’t know, nobody does

— but the Lady is still sharp as a whip, and her words ring true now more than ever. So if you want to see a true New York legend, make your way down to Stonewall Inn, because — thank God — there is only one Lady Bunny Lady Bunny’s “Trans-Jester” is performed Mon.– Wed., through May 25; then, Mon.–Wed., June 6–29. All shows 7pm, at Stonewall Inn (53 Christopher St., btw. Seventh Ave. South & Waverly Pl.). For tickets ($19.99; $21.68 with online service fee), visit transjester.bpt.me. May 19, 2016

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‘Ships’ puts the wind back in Seaport Museum’s sails Exhibit beckons you to Manhattan’s tip

COURTESY SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM

“Fulton Fish Market” (1933, Photographic print, 8 x 10 in.).

COURTESY SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM FOUNDATION

“Wavertree under sail” by Oswald Brett, 1969 (Crayon on paper, 9 ½ x 6 ¼ in.).

BY TRAV S.D. One seldom-observed outcome of natural disasters is that their repercussions can often last for years, long after the initial impact has left the headlines and the worst of the effects have faded from the forefront of the public consciousness. A case in point is the South Street Seaport Museum, one of New York City’s great cultural jewels, which

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was slammed by Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012, and has remained mostly closed to the public ever since. Or rather, had been until the March 17 opening of its first exhibition since the disaster: “Street of Ships: The Port and Its People.” For nearly 300 years, from the early 17th century through the early 20th, the Manhattan neighborhood roughly

bounded by Pearl Street and the East River was home to a thriving international port, characterized by docks crammed with sailing ships and nearby shops, warehouses, and offices to support the shipping industry. By the 1900s, steam replaced sail, ships grew larger, and only the port facilities on the Hudson River side could accommodate them. The South Street Seaport Museum was founded in 1967 to preserve and interpret the area’s history. The Museum’s multi-facility complex comprises galleries, performance spaces, a working 19th century print shop, a maritime library, a craft center, and a fleet of historic vessels. When Hurricane Sandy struck, Lower Manhattan was one of the hardest hit areas in the city. “The water outside [the Museum] on Fulton Street reached a level of six feet,” says the Museum’s Executive Director, Captain Jonathan Boulware (Boulware is a bona fide certified sea captain, hence the honorific). “On the one hand, we were extremely lucky in that none of our collections were damaged, and damage to the galleries them-

selves was superficial. On the other hand, we were unlucky in that much of our infrastructure — things like electrics, and heating and cooling systems, and the escalators — were destroyed.” A combination of FEMA and New York State money helped to get their facilities back in shape, and now the fully-restored first floor atrium of the Museum houses “Street of Ships: The Port and Its People.” This small-scale exhibition provides a sampler of art and artifacts related to the Seaport’s role in world history, and an update on the Museum’s efforts at restoration. Paintings, photographs, lithographic prints and objects related to the port’s maritime, architectural and commercial history are on view. Among the more impressive items are a ship’s figurehead by master carver Sal Polisi, several ship models, a very large lightship bell, and an actual ship’s dingy. My favorite section of the exhibition depicts innovators and entrepreneurs who led the way in helping New York achieve supremacy in a field SEAPORT continued on p. 23 TheVillager.com


COURTESY SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM FOUNDATION

A ship’s figurehead by master carver Salvatore Polisi is one of the highlights of “Street of Ships: The Port and Its People,” on view through 2016.

COURTESY SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM COLLECTION

“Coffee House Slip” by H. Fossette, circa 1850 (Engraving, 3 ¼ x 5 in.). SEAPORT continued from p. 22

long dominated by much older cities. Captain Peter Schermerhorn (17811852), founder of “New York’s First World Trade Center” is the man for whom Schermerhorn Row (the heart of the Museum itself) is named. Importer Abiel Abbot Low (1811-1893) was a pioneer in the China trade; the exhibition displays a 200-year-old porcelain punch bowl to illustrate the sort of items he brought to America. The Black Ball Line, founded by Quaker merchant Jeremiah Thompson (17341835), was path-breaking in operating the first regular trans-Atlantic packet service for both passengers and cargo. Israel Collins (1776-1831) and

his son Edward Knight Collins (18021878, here represented by a wonderful Mathew Brady photograph) went the Black Ball Line one better by introducing steamships. Another section of the exhibition concentrates on Bowne & Company Stationers and Bowne Printers, an integral component of the Museum’s complex since the beginning. Several 19th century printing presses, and many examples of the printers’ art are on view. The cornerstone of the exhibition, and of the Museum’s current efforts in general, is devoted to the restoration of the 1885 sailing ship Wavertree. Called the “flagship” of the Museum’s fleet (the South Street Seaport owns

A creative menu brought to you by Chef Franco Barrio with locally sourced produce serving New York style food in the heart of the West Village.

five historic vessels), the Wavertree was essentially undamaged by Sandy, but was nonetheless in need of restoration. Currently in dry dock at Staten Island, she is nearing the end of a 15-month, $13 million, city-funded preservation effort. She is slated to return to the Seaport in July of this year, where she will once again be a centerpiece of the Museum’s educational programs. The Peking, a 1911 German four-masted barque long popular with fans of the Seaport, was sold to the German Port Museum in Hamburg in November 2015. The South Street Seaport Museum has had to negotiate many a rogue wave over the years, including wellpublicized financial problems, and

the 1-2-3 punches of 9/11, the Great Recession and Hurricane Sandy. But it is one of New York City’s great cultural treasures. And for many aspects of New York’s art and history, it is, to this reviewer’s mind, the only game in town. “Street of Ships: The Port and Its People” is a timely reminder of this, and an eloquent case for why every New Yorker should support this museum. “Street of Ships: The Port and Its People” is on view through 2016, at the South Street Seaport Museum (12 Fulton St., btw. South & Water Sts.). Admission: free for Museum members, $12 for adults; $8 for seniors (65+), Merchant Mariners, Active Duty Military & students (valid ID); $6 for kids (ages 6–17), free for children ages 5 and under. Museum hours: Wed.Sun., 11am–5pm. For info & tickets, visit southstreetseaportmuseum.org or call 212-748-8600.

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

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Just Do Art BY SCOTT STIFFLER

ALBUM RELEASE SHOW: LIAM MCENEANEY’S “WORKING CLASS FANCY” In an era when the means to chime in on everything from food to relationships is as easy as accessing the keyboard on your phone, there’s still plenty of room — and, when done well, a pressing need — for the sharp observations and precise analysis of a road-tested stand-up comedian. Even in a profession whose ranks are swelled by idiosyncratic thinkers with a gift for gab and the ability to repeatedly nail the absurdity of everyday folly, Liam McEneaney is an odd duck; the rare bird who’s as much fun to listen to as he is to laugh at. This quality is on ample display throughout the NYC native’s latest comedy album, “Working Class Fancy” — whose 26 tracks address sad sack blue collar concerns like junk food and public transportation within an ever-shifting landscape of surreal storytelling. The result is material that’s meticulously constructed but free of pretention, and injected with a prime directive of human decency that repeatedly veers into the direction of the cheap laugh, then pivots to one of recognition. You may not inhabit the same beefy and bearded frame as McEneaney, but it’s easy to identify (or at least sympathize) with the constant insecurities, frequent befuddlement, and occasional rage of an aging, newly single guy taking an “honest look at where I am in life.” Released by the Comedy Dynamics label and available on multiple platforms

as of May 20, “Working Class Fancy” is a one-take, real-time set recorded in January of this year, before a sold-out crowd at Brooklyn’s Bell House. Much of the album finds the writer/performer in the crosshairs of his own social and cultural criticisms — as McEneaney witnesses a downscale holiday tableau at a 24-hour Dunkin’ Donuts located much too close to his apartment; advises a friend on how to propose marriage in a crack house; and tries in vain to grasp the mindset of anyone who’d stop short of finishing their cake (i.e., “the antidote to loneliness”). Just as his material about dating and breaking up doesn’t have a whiff of misogyny, the self-deprecating stuff is more about being cognizant of room for improvement rather than being helpless in the face of insurmountable flaws. Then there’s plenty of material that’s just plain left-field loopy, best exemplified by his weary, gravel-voiced crooning of an imagined Tom Waits song that crystalizes the essence of what it’s like to ride a bus in Hollywood. Like the cake McEneaney covets, it’s a layered treat you’ll find hard to resist. Free. Tues., May 24, 7pm at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (126 Crosby St., btw. Prince & Houston Sts.). For artist info, visit heyitsliam. com, where you can access his popular “Tell Your Friends” podcast.

BETWEEN STOPS: AN EXHIBITION OF SUBWAY PORTRAIT SKETCHES Having worked as a photographer and illustrator for the publishing, banking, airline and life insurance industries throughout the 1980s,

ST. ANTHONY’S MARKET EVERY FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY WEST HOUSTON STREET (BETWEEN THOMPSON & MACDOUGAL) SOHO

Vintage Clothing • Antiques • Furniture Artisinal Foods and More! VENDORS & CUSTOMERS WELCOME!

718.332.0026 • www.metroflea.nyc 24

May 19, 2016

PHOTO BY MINDY TUCKER

Let there be cake: Liam McEneaney celebrates his new comedy album, May 24 at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe.

COURTESY THE ARTISt

Robin Kappy’s collection of subway commuter portraits is on display through June 5, at Chelsea Classical Studio.

Robin Kappy left that career to become a psychotherapist. Decades later, in the pursuit of fine art, the longtime Penn South resident brought with her a commercial advertiser’s quicksilver draftsmanship and an educated listener’s ability to capture the essence of her subject. “Between Stops: An Exhibition of Subway Portrait Sketches” is a contemplative collection of nearly 50 pencil drawings that were created, as the title suggests, while commuters waited for their next train. Seen mostly from the neck up, often with eyes closed and facing the ground, they don’t seem particularly concerned with the consequences of missing that next ride — nor does Kappy care to depict any elements of the hectic underground environment. “Between Stops,” then, becomes more about preserving a moment of transition than investigating the why or where of one’s final destination. Free. Opening reception Thurs., May 19, 6–9pm. Then, through June

4, by appointment and Saturday afternoons, at Chelsea Classical Studio (526 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.; Suite #415). While at the gallery on Saturday afternoons during the exhibit, Kappy will be offering quick portrait sketches for sale, to those willing to pose. Visit robinkappy.blogspot. com and chelseaclassicalstudio.com.

THE 21ST ANNUAL LOWER EAST SIDE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS “Smorgasbord” doesn’t come even remotely close to describing the epic scope, creative depth, funky vibe, celebratory spirit and mind-expanding material swimming around the annual three-day mulligan stew that is the Lower East Side Festival of the Arts. Host venue Theater for the New City (TNC) chose this year’s theme — “Art Knows No Walls or Barriers” — not only as a cheeky birdflip to anti-immigration fervor, but as a

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tribute to the neighborhood’s status as a place where energizing forces from Irving Berlin to The Ramones have created work that’s been exported to, and embraced by, all corners of the globe. For three days — and nights, and wee small hours of the morning — free reign will be given to dozens and dozens of local theater and dance companies, actors, singers, musicians, performers, poets, auteurs, painters, sculptors, filmmakers, and other unconventional entertainers who defy description (which is actually a pretty good blanket description of every act and action you’ll come across). Among those already booked: NYC cabaret darling KT Sullivan interprets the American Songbook; after a screening, “Manchurian Candidate” composer David Amram reminisces about the beat origins the 1959 film “Pull My Daisy,” which he scored; works by playwrights including Eduardo Machado, Lissa Moira, Barbara Kahn and Robert Homeyer; East Villageappropriate handmade clothing, arts and crafts from local vendors; a youth-focused program with talent from local schools; a poetry summit that’s less about slamming and more about jamming; an exhibit which fills the TNC lobby with painting, photography, sculpture, and collage work from local artists (opening reception May 25, 5:30–8pm); and performances from Folksbiene National Yiddish Theater, Tammy Faye, bubble master John Grimaldi, comedian Reno, Chinese dance star Ashley Liang; four-octave phenom Phoebe Legere; folksinger/activist Judy Gorman; plus (and they really mean it) many, many more. Free. Fri., May 27, 6pm–2am; Sat., May 28, 12pm–2am; Sun., May 29, 6pm–1am. At, and around, Theater for the New City (155 First Ave., btw. E. Ninth & E. 10th Sts.). For the calendar of events, visit theaterforthenewcity. net or call 212-254-1109.

PHOTO COURTESY TNC

Live rhythm performance troupe COBU, one of dozens of acts featured during May 27–29’s Lower East Side Festival of the Arts.

FORGIVENESS — PART I: FORGIVING THE PERSONAL Gurus, gods, mothers and memes recommend it as a key ingredient to enlightenment (to say nothing of a good night’s sleep) — but putting the trespasses of others behind you is easier said than done. This multi-media movement and music piece, by social impact arts organization B3W Performance Group, began during a seven-month period in 2015, when Artistic Director Emily Berry traveled the world to conduct community workshops based on the protocols of The Forgiveness Project, a secular organiza-

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COURTESY THE ARTISTS

B3W ponders forgiveness, in a new piece based on personal accounts.

tion which encourages forgiveness as a means to end cycles of conflict. Based on personal accounts documented by Berry, tenets from the Dalai Lama’s “The Wisdom of Forgiveness,” group discussions, improv, and journalism on the part of the B3W collective, this performance

will “unravel the consequences and the expressions of multiple viewpoints and stories of forgiving, providing the audience an opportunity to witness personal struggles and stories of forgiveness that will lay a path for both personal and societal healing.”

Fri., May 20 & Sat., May 21 at 7:30pm; Sun., May 22 at 3pm. At BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (199 Chambers St., btw. Greenwich & West Sts.). For tickets ($25 general, $15 students/seniors), call 212-220-1460 or visit tribecapac.org. Also visit b3w.org and theforgivenessproject.com.

May 19, 2016

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TLM REALTY HOLDINGS, LLC Art. of Org. filed with Secâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;y of State (SSNY) on 2/4/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Dahan & Nowick, Att: M. Marc Dahan, Esq., 123 Main St., White Plains, NY 10601. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/19 - 0623/2016

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TSAF OPPORTUNITY SPV I, LLC Auth. filed Secâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;y of State (SSNY) 9/15/15. Off. loc: NY Co. LLC org. in DE 9/14/15. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom proc. against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Michael Tiedemann, 520 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SCF 268 LENOX LLC AMENDED TO SCF 286 LENOX LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/9/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 41st Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WHAE, L.L.C. Art. of Org. filed with Secâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/15. Office location: NY Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Christoforos Kotentos, 175 W. 13th St., NY, NY 10011. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF STUDIO BUJEE LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/16. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 4/13/16. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Bujinlkham Bold, 227 E. 58th St., NY, NY 10022. DE address of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Drive, Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016

Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RSP WAVERLY PROPERTY LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/4/16. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 5/3/16. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o RSP Companies, 3 Columbus Circle, 15th Fl., NY, NY 10019, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of BRAVE EAGLE WEALTH State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. PurMANAGEMENT, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of pose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 State of NY 3/4/2016. Off. Loc.: NY Co. SSNY NOTICE OF designated as agent QUALIFICATION OF upon whom process RUCKER FARM LLC against it may be served. Authority filed with NY SSNY to mail copy of Dept. of State on 3/3/16. process to The LLC, 315 Office location: NY W 36th, Ste 304, New County. LLC formed in York, NY 10018. DE on 2/25/16. NY Sec. Purpose: Any lawful act of State designated agent or activity. of LLC upon whom proVil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 cess against it may be served and shall mail NOTICE OF process to the principal REGISTRATION OF VOGEL BACH & HORN, business addr.: c/o US Farm Trust Advisors, LLP Cert. of Reg. filed with LLC, 1325 Ave. of the Secâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;y of State (SSNY) on Americas, Ste. 0703-2, 2/19/16. Office location: NY, NY 10019. DE addr. NY County. SSNY of LLC: Corporation Trust designated as agent of Co., 1209 Orange St., LLP upon whom process Wilmington, DE 19801. against it may be served. Cert. of Form. filed with SSNY shall mail copy of DE Sec. of State, 401 process to 1441 Federal St., Dover, DE Broadway, Ste. 5031, 19901. Purpose: all lawNY, NY 10018. Purp.: ful purposes. any lawful activities. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 NOTICE OF NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF QUALIFICATION OF BECK FARM LLC PHOTON SYSTEMS LLC Authority filed with NY Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on Dept. of State on 2/26/16. NYS fictitious 4/29/16. Office location: name: Beck Farm of IdaNY County. Princ. bus. ho LLC. Office location: addr.: 2030 Dow Center, NY County. LLC formed Midland, MI 48674. LLC in DE on 2/24/16. NY formed in DE on Sec. of State designated 12/20/02. NY Sec. of agent of LLC upon whom State designated agent of process against it may be LLC upon whom process served and shall mail against it may be served process to the principal and shall mail process to: business addr.: c/o US c/o CT Corporation Sys- Farm Trust Advisors, tem, 111 8th Ave., NY, LLC, 1325 Ave. of the NY 10011, regd. agent Americas, Ste. 0703-2, upon whom process may NY, NY 10019. DE addr. be served. DE addr. of of LLC: 1209 Orange St., LLC: The Corporation Wilmington, DE 19801.

Cert. of Form. filed with NAME OF LLC: DE Sec. of State, 401 GREYHOUSE CREATIVE Federal St., Dover, DE GROUP L.L.C. 19901. Purpose: all law- Arts. of Org. filed with NY ful purposes. Dept. of State: 3/17/16. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom proNOTICE OF FORMATION cess against it may be served and shall mail OF 1601 RIVERSIDE, process to: Business FilLLC Arts. of Org. filed with ings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Secy. of State of NY Ste. 101, Albany, NY (SSNY) on 4/11/16. 12205, regd. agt. upon Office location: NY whom process may be County. SSNY designated served. Purpose: any as agent of LLC upon lawful act. Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Diserio Martin O?Connor NOTICE OF FORMATION & Castiglioni, LLP, One OF MURRAY & KEAN Atlantic Street, Stamford, LLC CT 06901. Purpose: any Arts. of Org. filed with lawful activity. Secy. of State of NY Vil: 05/19 - 06/23/2016 (SSNY) on 4/26/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated LIMITED LIABILITY as agent of LLC upon COMPANY NOTICE OF whom process against it FORMATION OF A may be served. SSNY LIMITED LIABILITY shall mail process to: COMPANY ( LLC) 130 W. 30th St., #2C, NAME: DB GRATEFUL NY, NY 10001. Purpose: LLC any lawful activity. Articles of Organization Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016 filed by the Department of State of New York on: 02/03/2016 Office location: County of New NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 123 WEST York Purpose: any and all 87TH STREET LLC lawful activities Secretary of State of New York Arts. of Org. filed with NY (SSNY ) is designated as Dept. of State on agent of the LLC upon 2/19/2016. Office locawhom process against it tion: NY County. Princ. may be served. SSNY bus. addr.: 123 W. 87th shall mail a copy of St., NY, NY 10024. Sec. process to: 1 Battery of State designated agent Park Plaza, 26th Floor of LLC upon whom process against it may be New York, NY 10004 Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016 served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th NOTICE OF QUALIFICA- Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom TION OF 251 WEST 30TH OPERATOR LLC process may be served. Authority filed with NY Term: until 12/31/2056. Dept. of State on 5/2/16. Purpose: all lawful purOffice location: NY poses. Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016 County. Princ. bus. addr.: 885 3rd Ave., 19th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 4/7/16. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/19 - 06/23/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEARABLE MEDICINE TECHNOLOGIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1250 Broadway, 36th Fl., Ste. 3641, NY, NY 10010. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/12 - 06/12/2016

SKETCHY IDEA PRODUCTIONS, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 5/5/16. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process The LLC, 7 Penn Plaza, 11th Fl., NY, NY 10001. General purpose. Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016 COOPER SQUARE PARTNERS LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 5/10/16. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process The LLC, 299 Broadway, Ste. 1615, NY, NY 10007. General purpose. Vil: 05/12 -06/16/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF INNOVOPG, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/15. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1370 Ave. of the Americas, 19th Fl., NY, NY 10019. LLC formed in DE on 12/10/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Meister Seelig & Fein LLP, 125 Park Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10017. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016

Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/12 - 06/16/2016

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF IMPACT SALES, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/6/16. NYS fictitious name: Impact Sales, LLC of Delaware. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 915 W. Jefferson St., Boise, ID 83702. LLC formed in DE on 3/4/16. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd. (NCR), 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o NCR, 850 New Burton Rd., Ste. 201, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF HUMPHREYS URBAN ARCHITECTURE/NEW YORK, PLLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/07/16. Office location: NY County. PLLC formed in Texas (TX) on 09/23/15. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY NOTICE OF Purpose: QUALIFICATION OF IO 12207-2543. Architecture. EDUCATION LLC Vil: 05/05 - 06/09/2016 Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/27/16. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. NOTICE OF FORMATION addr.: 3423 Piedmont OF GP 19TH STREET I Rd. NE, Ste. 300, AtlanLLC ta, GA 30305. LLC Arts. of Org. filed with formed in DE on Secy. of State of NY 3/17/16. NY Sec. of (SSNY) on 04/22/16. State designated agent of Office location: NY LLC upon whom process County. Princ. office of against it may be served LLC: 136 E. 19th St., and shall mail process to: Unit 1-2W, NY, NY c/o CT Corporation Sys- 10003. SSNY designated tem, 111 8th Ave., NY, as agent of LLC upon NY 10011, regd. agent whom process against it upon whom process may may be served. SSNY be served. DE addr. of shall mail process to the LLC: 1209 Orange St., LLC at the addr. of its Wilmington, DE 19801. princ. office. Purpose: Cert. of Form. filed with Any lawful activity. DE Sec. of State, 401 Vil: 05/05 - 06/09/2016 TheVillager.com


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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOROUGH 2, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/14/16. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/11/16. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 111 8th Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, Attn: CT Corporation System, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/05 - 06/09/2016 SOBA CAPITAL LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3-18-16. Office in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Paul Peragine, Esq., 2 Wall St., 20th Fl. NY, NY 10005. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 05/05 - 06/09/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WILLOW DEPOSITOR LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/16. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/14/16. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMRC PINE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 80 Maiden Lane, Ste. 22004, NY, NY 10038. Purpose: any TheVillager.com

lawful activity. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SEWING COLLECTIVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/16. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 304 Hudson St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10013. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF FLEX INNOVATION GROUP LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/7/16. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 800 Boylston St., FL 24, Boston, MA 02199. LLC formed in DE on 7/16/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 O&T TRAINING LLC Arts of Org filed NY Secy of State (SSNY) 4/15/16. OFC in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Oshrat Tal 301 W 42nd St #19E NY NY 10036. Purpose:any lawful act. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TOWNSEND INSURANCE GROUP, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/14/16. NYS fictitious name: Townsend Elite Insurance Agency LLC. Office location: NY County. LLC organized in MA on 12/20/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. MA and principal business address: 75 W. Main St., Georgetown,

MA 01833. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of the Commonwealth, One Ashburton Place, Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WEATHER GROUP, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/11/16. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 300 Interstate North Pkwy. SE, Atlanta, GA 30339. LLC formed in DE on 10/26/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/28 - 06/02/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HV HOYT STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Abby Hamlin, Hamlin Ventures, LLC, 675 Third Ave., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10017, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TRUE NORTH ST. JACOB STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606. NOTICE OF Purpose: Any lawful QUALIFICATION OF MARTINDALE PA, LLC activity. Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016 App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/12/16. Office location: NY NOTICE OF FORMATION County. LLC formed in OF TEMPO 12C LLC Nevada (NV) on Arts. of Org. filed with 12/28/15. SSNY Secy. of State of NY designated as agent of (SSNY) on 04/15/16. LLC upon whom process Office location: NY against it may be served. County. SSNY designated SSNY shall mail process as agent of LLC upon to: National Registered whom process against it Agents, Inc., 111 8th may be served. SSNY Ave., NY, NY 10011. shall mail process to c/o Principal office of LLC: Loeb Block & Partners 11271 Cinder Cone Trail, LLP, 505 Park Ave., 8th Scottsdale, AZ 85262. Fl., NY, NY 10022. Arts. of Org. filed with NV Purpose: Any lawful Secy. of State, 101 North activity. Carson St., Ste. 3, Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016 Carson City, NV 89701. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016 GS & AA CONSTRUCTION LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 4/13/16. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 9709 148th St., Jamaica, NY 11435. General purpose. Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WFP TOWER D CO. G.P. LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 04/08/2016. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 12/18/2014. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/21 - 05/26/2016

Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BRONDESBURY LLC Arts of Org filed NY Secy of State (SSNY) 4/8/16 in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Paul Bernstein 43 Silver Birch Dr. New Rochelle, NY 10804. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GEMINI PROPERTY NEW YORK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/05/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NOTICE OF FORMATION NY 12207-2543. OF MSC ART LLC Purpose: Any lawful Arts. of Org. filed with activity. Secy. of State of NY Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 (SSNY) on 4/5/16. Office location: NY County. TOTTON BODY LAB LLC SSNY designated as Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of agent of LLC upon whom State of NY 1/4/2016. process against it may be Off. Loc.: New York Co. Robert Neil Totton served. SSNY shall mail designated as agent process to: The LLC, 420 upon whom process Lexington Avenue, Ste. against it may be served. 2450, NY, NY 10170, SSNY to mail copy of Attn: Marc Salama-Caro. process to The LLC, 282 Purpose: any lawful W 118th St., Ste 5N, activity. New York, NY 10026. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 Purpose: Any lawful act NOTICE OF FORMATION or activity. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 OF FRESH SPACE OF COLUMBUS CIRCLE NOTICE OF LLC QUALIFICATION OF Arts. of Org. filed with MARSANTAS LLC Secy. of State of NY App. for Auth. filed with (SSNY) on 04/05/16. Secy. of State of NY Office location: NY (SSNY) on 4/1/16. Office County. SSNY location: NY County. LLC designated as agent of formed in Delaware (DE) LLC upon whom process on 3/29/16. SSNY against it may be served. designated as agent of SSNY shall mail process LLC upon whom process to c/o Corporation against it may be served. Service Co., 80 State St., SSNY shall mail process

to: 853 7th Ave., 10A, NY, NY 10019. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/14 - 0519/2016 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SOHO CHINA (US) LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/1/16. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/30/16. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, Attn: CT Corporation System, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VOLTERRA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/7/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Volterra Capital Management, LLC, 33 West 19th St., 4th Floor, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 at 2:00 P.M. at 42 BROADWAY, 5th floor, on a petition for LEGENDARY NIGHT SPOTS INC to establish, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk cafe at 61 CHRISTOPHER ST in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/12 - 05/19/2016

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 at 2:00 P.M. at 42 Broadway, 5th floor, on a petition for VAP UNION SQUARE, LLC to establish, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk cafe at 113 UNIVERSITY PL in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/19 - 05/26/2016 May 19, 2016

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SPITTAL POND LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/29/16. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Thomas R. Ellis, 40 W. 57th St., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10019. General purpose. Latest date to dissolve: 12/31/2095. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016 TALENT IGNITION PARTNERS, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 4/1/16. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Paul Sinaly MBA CPA, 251 Fifth Ave., 4th NY, NY 10016. General purpose. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KNA STUDIOS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/16. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Timothy P. Terry, 667 Madison Ave., 24th Fl., NY, NY 10065. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a catering establishment license, #TBA has been applied for by Restaurant Associates, LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in a catering establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 25 Madison Ave, 28th & 29th Floors New York NY 10010. Vil: 05/19 - 05/26/2016

TEAM HOME INSPECTIONS LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/28/16. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 4768 Broadway, #707, New York, NY 10034. General purpose. Vil: 04/14 - 05/19/2016

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by Whitmans Westside LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 500 West 30th Street New York NY 10001. Vil: 05/19 - 05/26/2016

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by Elmwood Ventures LLC d/b/a Buddha Bar to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 62 Thomas Street New York NY 10013. Vil: 05/12 - 05/19/2016

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2010-2030/A CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO: Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Irma Garcia-Sanchez, Pedro Garcia, New York City Human Resources Administration. And to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Emilia Garcia, a/k/a Emilia Garcia Sanchez, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Emilia Garcia, a/k/a Emilia Garcia Sanchez, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 2140 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10037. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on June 10, 2016 at 9:30 A.M. in Room 509, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially be settled; (ii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unknown distributees; (iii) that Pedro Garcia show cause why his claim, if any, for payment of decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral expenses should not be disallowed; (iv) that the claim of the New York City Human Resources Administration in the amount of $50,088.37 for public assistance rendered to decedent in the form of Medicaid be allowed and paid; (v) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedules C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (vi) that the persons above and mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (vii) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (viii) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. April 21, 2016 (Seal) Hon. Nora S. Anderson, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Chief Clerk. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 11 Park Place, Suite 615 New York, New York 10007 (212) 896-3310 Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney-at-law appear for you and you or your attorney may request a copy of the full account from the petitioner or petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney. Vil: 04/28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 05/19/2016

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2013-4826/D CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO: Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Anna Patriki, a/k/a Iouanna Patriki, Vassiliky Haramis, Catherine Rallis, Hariklia Delivasilis, Vicky Karakatsani, a/k/a Victoria Karakatsani, a/k/a Viktoria-Evangelia Karakatsani, Eleni Votsi, Panayiotis Psiroukis, a/k/a Panagiotis Psiroukis, Elizabeth Papoutsis, Hariklia Moularas, Peter Mourlaras, a/k/a Panayiotis Moularas, Arthur Halkas, Peter Halkas, a/k/a Panagiotis Halkas, Marianthy McCarthy, Verizon, Professional Claims Bureau, Inc., Rui Credit Services/Client-ConEdison, Heights 173, LLC. And to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Helen Psiroukis, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Helen Psiroukis, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 609 West 173rd Street, New York, New York 10032. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York on June 24, 2016 at 9:30 A.M. in Room 503, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially settled; (ii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unknown distributees; (iii) that the claim of Marianthy McCarthy for expenses paid in connection with the administration of decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estate be allowed in the amount of $132.00 and rejected in the amount of $775.54; (iv) that the claims of Verizon in the amount of $226.75, Professional Claims Bureau, Inc. in the amount of $65.00, Rui Credit Services/Client-ConEdison in the amount of $396.00 and Heights 173, LLC in the amount of $2,376.30 be rejected for failure to file a claim in accordance with the provision of SCPA Section 1803(1); (v) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedule C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (vi) that the persons above mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (vii) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (viii) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. April 26, 2016 (Seal) Hon. Nora S. Anderson, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Chief Clerk. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 11 Park Place, Suite 615 New York, New York 10007 (212) 896-3310

WHY PAY MORE? CALL NOW 646-452-2490 TO ADVERTISE ALL YOUR LEGALS AND NAME CHANGES

Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney-at-law appear for you and you or your attorney may request a copy of the full account from the petitioner or petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney. Vil: 05/05 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 05/26/2016 TheVillager.com

May 19, 2016

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Ephemera Project is a bit of Village local history; By Tequila Minsky

T

Photos by Tequila Minsky

A long-forgotten tin box stored in Westbeth’s basement that sur vived the flood from Sandy. Sculptor Milda Vizbar described the histor y of the box, sent from her aunt in Lithuania to her mother in Montreal. Swamped by the storm’s floodwaters, its contents of letters turned to mush, but its amber beads remained, carr ying its histor y.

Djuna Barnes’s autograph on a copy of her book “Night wood.” In her narrative accompanying this object, LindaAnn Loschiavo, a poet, journalist and dramatist, who formerly lived at 4 Milligan Place, spoke about meeting, getting the autograph of, and getting acquainted with her neighbor Barnes, who lived at 5 Patchin Place. Loschiavo ends her stor y with a pithy quote from Barnes: “Bohemia is a place where ever yone is as good as ever yone else.”

A set of cockpit keys belonging to Treso Koken, who was, at various times, a Bellevue E.R. nurse, a flight attendant and a personal assistant to the actress Zsa Zsa Gabor. Koken recalled being a flight attendant for the Flying Tiger Line — a U.S. cargo airline and a Cold War-era militar y char ter operator — which carried Hungarian refugees to Australia’s Wagga Wagga, American troops to Vietnam and Korean orphans to the U.S. The aviation company went “gear up” in 1992.

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May 19,2016

he Greenwich Village Ephemera Project, initiated by the Jefferson Market Library, is about objects and their stories from our Village neighbors. “The idea for the Greenwich Village Ephemera Project came out of our neighborhood oral history project, which started in 2012, and which has had a big impact on us at Jefferson Market,” explained Corinne Neary, the Jefferson Market branch senior librarian. “When we would go to people’s homes to do interviews,  we would  often spend time looking at  personal objects, and hearing  the stories that went with them.  Ever since, we’ve wanted to do something that highlighted these personal items, and their owners.” Jefferson Market Library staff members have been collecting objects since the  beginning of the year, and a cabinet at the library has begun to fill with these storyevoking objects. A set of keys, an inscription and autograph by Patchin Place writer Djuna Barnes, and a class photo from a local school are among the collected items with colorful tales that go with them. Some objects, like bygone local restaurants’ menus and souvenir items, were just donated as ephemera Village historical items without accompanying narratives. At the April 1 opening reception, attended by almost 60 people,  all of the objects and stories collected up to that point were displayed.  In a small display case in the library’s lobby, these  objects are currently on view on a monthly rotation. “Right now, it’s booked until September 2017!” said Neary. “We hope to keep it going in perpetuity; so people can continue to reach out to me if they are interested in the project.” She also mentioned that she would like to do more public programs, which are very popular. Meanwhile, local artist Lara Atallah is taking photographs of Ephemera Project participants and their objects. “We hope to create a book about the project,” Neary noted. TheVillager.com


Menus, mementoes and memories of bygone times

Kevin Curley’s contribution to the Ephemera Project was a photo of a P.S. 130 third-grade class that he taught in Chinatown in 1974. In his accompanying narrative, Curley, who formerly lived at 81 Bedford St., detailed his stint as a student teacher. He never set foot in a school again after ward, turning toward theater, studying acting and eventually becoming a play wright.

Menus and a souvenir photo — taken at El Chico — contributed by David Cohn, a collector of local ephemera. The photo of the Village Barn menu just shows its front and back cover, the latter boasting the talent to have per formed there. Its inside pages feature mid-20th-centur y-priced fare, like the “Village Barnwich: Grilled Cheese Tomato and Anchovies” for $1, “French Lamb Chops, Double Thick” for $3.25, “Shrimps A La Newburg, Saratoga Chips” for $2.65 and “Prime Sirloin Steak” for $4.25. A shrimp cocktail was 75 cents, coffee a quar ter. TheVillager.com

Corinne Near y, the Jefferson Market Librar y’s senior librarian, led the Greenwich Village Ephemera Project. It looks like it’s going to be more than a “fleeting” under taking — there will even be a book. May 19, 2016

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TheVillager.com

May 19, 2016

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Beth Israel stonewalls councilmember on plans Hospital continued from p. 16

they’re closing down Beth Israel,” she said, like the Beth Israel nurses, requesting anonymity for fear of losing her job. “There had been talk of closing down the south building and turning it into a smaller version of Beth Israel,” she said. “Now they have suddenly announced they are closing down our residents building. Some people have lived there like 14, 15 years. Some live there with their families. The 14-story residents building, at 321 E. 13th St., is occupied above the third floor by nurses and medical trainees who serve the infirmary, which is a 24-hour facility. There are around 10 apartments per floor. “It will be disruptive to those who are in there. We have to be out by the end of August,” the woman said. “They’re trying to move us to Stuyvesant Town and they’re going to subsidize us for one year — and they’re not saying anything beyond that. I heard the nurses might try to hire an attorney to fight it.” Like the Beth Israel nurses who reached out to the newspaper, she said, it’s time for some daylight to be shed on the health system’s plans. “Somebody should talk to the press,” she said. “Somebody should let people know what’s going on.” Asked if she suspects the Eye and Ear Infirmary is also being eyed for real estate development, she said, “That we’re being targeted? Absolutely. Are we going to be here in 10 years? It’s hard to say.”

Mendez trying to help Councilmember Rosie Mendez’s district contains both Beth Israel and the Eye and Ear Infirmary. Speaking this week, she said she has been getting “dozens of calls” from worried people who live in the E. 13th St. residents building, some of whom are retirees. However, she said, since the housing is provided by Mount Sinai, it’s doubtful they have any protection from being kicked out. The best that can probably be done at this point, she said, is to try to help the residents stay there as long as possible, giving them a better chance to find replacement housing. Concerned about the residents building and also Gillman Hall on E. 17th St. — plus then reading the shocking Villager article on top of that — Mendez, wanting some answers, last week called a Mount Sinai intergovernmental official who is her usual contact person there. But she said she got the exact same response as the newspaper. “There are two buildings that they are empyting out,” she said. “I called them. They said the same thing they told you — just like verbatim. I said,

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May 19,2016

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Mount Sinai Health System also includes the nearby New York Eye and Ear Infirmar y, on E. 14th St. From the sound of it, earlier plans to create a “scaled-down” version of Beth Israel Hospital in the infirmar y’s southern building, at right, recently may have been scrapped.

‘That sounds familiar, like I read it in my local paper.’ They said, ‘That’s our official statement. In the future, when we have something to say, we’ll call you and set up a briefing.’ ”

Meanwhile, as condos continue to replace hospitals, the Greenwich Lane at the former St. Vincent’s site, boasting 199 luxurious homes, is slated to open by late summer or early fall.

‘Something will happen’

Out of the flood zone

“It looks like, from the way they are talking, something’s going to happen,” Mendez said, “that they’re going to downsize and sell the property.” Mendez said she and a group of other local politicians — including Hoylman, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh and Councilmember Dan Garodnick — are working to set up a meeting with Mount Sinai officials to get some information. Garodnick’s district includes Stuyvesant Town, whose residents include many Beth Israel patients, as well as Beth Israel employees. “It’s very disconcerting,” Mendez said. “A lot of these hospitals that have closed have been in Manhattan. Each hospital closing impacts the others that are left.” In addition to St. Vincent’s, she noted, “We lost Cabrini in 2008. It had 400 beds.”

Mendez recalled how Beth Israel played a key role during Superstorm Sandy in 2012, when both N.Y.U. Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital were flooded and evacuated and St. Vincent’s had been closed two years gone by. “They took everybody to Beth Israel,” she said. “There were people in the hallways and in makeshift rooms. They were overcapacity. … Is the state looking at this? It’s worrisome.” Sea levels are rising — while hospitals are vanishing. If Beth Israel closed, the only Downtown hospital left would be New YorkPresbyterian / Lower Manhattan Hospital. Relatively small with 170 beds, it is located all the way down just south of the Brooklyn Bridge. One of its chief functions is as a maternity hospital for Chinatown.

Hospitals to condos Perhaps foreshadowing what may well happen with Beth Israel, Gramercy Square, a glitzy $350 million 223-apartment condo complex, is planned for the former Cabrini site, midblock between E. 19th and 20th Sts. and Second and Third Aves.

‘There were signs’ “There were certain signs,” Mendez reflected of Beth Israel’s plans. “About a year ago, they eliminated all of their methadone inpatient beds — about 200-odd beds. And Gillman Hall on E. 17th St., people were being told they had to move. “He came to me before to speak to me

about the methadone beds,” she noted of the Mount Sinai official. “This time, I called him — so that’s also telling. “I think the rumors have been around, but I think The Villager article makes everything more real, not just rumor,” she said. “Something is going to happen.” The councilmember said if Mount Sinai plans to create new little clinics in place of the hospital, it would have to be cleared with the state. “Whatever they’re doing is close to the vest,” Mendez said. At this point, she said, no one might be able to find out anything more until Mount Sinai Health System is ready to make an official statement. “Which I will also probably read [first] in The Villager,” Mendez quipped.

Obamacare?... Hospitals! Clayton Patterson, the Lower East Side documentarian, said the news on Beth Israel is appalling and really shows the insane direction that New York is headed. “The amount of people moving in down here and the displacement of healthcare and services — that’s an incredible story that none of these f---ing yuppies seem to get,” he fumed. “We’re trading luxury apartments for the few for the healthcare of the many. “We’re talking about three major hospitals in the Downtown area closing — Cabrini, St. Vincent’s and now Beth Israel. Does it matter if you have Obamacare or not, if you can’t get to a hospital?” TheVillager.com


From scrawny teen to top of the Premier League

sports By Judith Stiles pring has finally arrived, along with a lovely smattering of city flowers that nudge everyone into a good mood. Finally. But what if the mood is broken because you suddenly get cut from your beloved soccer team? Oh, no! It usually is not so sudden and is most often preceded by a lot of time on the bench. Even so, it can be heartbreaking for an adolescent, especially one who plays on competitive travel teams, to be cut from the squad. The youthful love of playing soccer is a magical journey. So do not despair, keep going, and look to English footballer Jamie Vardy for inspiration. At age 16 he was “released” — cut — from his youth team at Sheffield Wednesday F.C., having been told he was too scrawny and too small. However, 13 years later, scrawny Mr. Vardy won the coveted Premier League Player of the Season Award, plus the Football Writers Association Footballer of The Year Award, an honor only doled out to the all-time greats, such as George Best, Thierry Henry and Cristiano Ronaldo. On top of that, Vardy propelled his team, Leicester City, to win this year’s English Premier League championship, and he also broke Ruud van Nistelrooy’s record by scoring in 11 consecutive games. Vardy has captured the attention of the entire sports-loving world, bringing international notice to his style of play and his rise from rejected adolescent footballer, to factory worker, to award-winning star of the English Premier League. What is it about Jamie Vardy as a player and a person that helped him survive being cut from Sheffield Wednesday F.C., only to rise up to be a top player on Leicester City in the E.P.L.? This was the question I had the good fortune of asking Richard Scudamore, the executive chairperson — top guy — of the English Premier League. “He is a fantastic example of a number of vital components coming together to make a complete player,” Scudamore answered. “There is focus, determination and tenacity, but that only takes you so far. He has developed an athletic energy that, combined with honed skills, makes him extremely effective and opponents very wary. Why now and not perhaps in the past? Not for me to say but it gives hope and encouragement to many.” Plenty of adolescent players have focus and determination — and, yes, it will only take you so far. Long before being scouted by Leicester City, Vardy made a name for himself scoring goals

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TheVillager.com

for Stockbridge Park Steels (Level 8 of the English football system). In 2011, he moved to F.C. Halifax Town, where he scored 26 goals in his first season, and then to Fleetwood Town in 2011, where he scored 31 goals in a single season. During those years, he was getting known as a “hit man” on the pitch, with a nose for the goal and an instinctive ability to find space on the field. Off the pitch, he made a different sort of name for himself when — while playing for Stockbridge Park Steels F.C. in 2007 — he received an assault conviction and as punishment had to wear an electronic tag for six months that monitored his mandatory curfew. Vardy continued to be resilient and hardworking as scouts noticed his spitfire energy that even pushed his teammates to play at his signature fourthgear pace. In 2012, he signed with Leicester City and the rest is history. Vardy ended this glorious 2016 season with a very impressive 24 goals and six assists, and his story, as Scudamore says, gives hope and encouragement to many. If you are a New York City youth player hoping to get scouted — perhaps for that prize college scholarship — take note of what Coach Tom Giovatto looks for in a player. Giovatto started out as a Greenwich Village neighborhood player —  a star in the Cosmopolitan Junior Soccer League. Years later, he went on to be head soccer coach at St. Francis College, a Division I program. In 2013, he was named the North Atlantic Region Coach of the Year, as well as the Big Apple Soccer Coach of the Year. He knows his stuff. “Spotting potential is different for all coaches,” Giovatto said. “Some things I look for in a player are good technique, work ethic and is he coachable? I look for players that will fit well in the system we play. I also always look at the way that they interact with their teammates, coaches and the refs.” As teen players develop, they are often told by coaches that, “cream rises to the top.” But rising to the top and getting scouts to notice doesn’t just happen because of gravity. It took Jamie Vardy a long 13 years of hard work, perseverance and fine-tuning his skills. For teens in New York City, opportunities to get scouted have increased in the last decade because the soccer “season” has morphed into playing games year-round, including training camps, development programs, tournaments and showcases. So, if you find yourself cut from last year’s team — no problem. Pull up your socks and find a new team. Think of Jamie Vardy.

English striker Jamie Vardy, left, has become the poster boy for the late-blooming star athlete.

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Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got the Answers you neeD.

OFFICIAL PRIDE PARTNER

MetroPlus Health Plan cares about the health, safety and overall wellness of our LGBT members. We have compiled resources that are specifically committed to assisting your needs. You will find assistance with primary care services, health and legal support as well as information on marriage, family planning, and more. Visit MetroPlus.org/LGBT-NYC.

METROPLUS.ORG 1.855.809.4073 (TTY: 711)

MetroPlus.org/LGBT-NYC MKT 16.119a

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May 19,2016

TheVillager.com

The Villager  

May 19, 2016

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