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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

April 28, 2016 • $1.00 Volume 86 • Number 17

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Call it Fort Pot Rx: 14th St. dispensary is slammed as ‘like a jail’ BY PAUL DeRIENZO

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s Pennsylvania became the 24th state to legalize medical marijuana last week and with ballot measures to legalize the weed in several others, including California this November, New York’s medical marijuana law is finally getting off the ground.

In states where pot is legal, like Colorado, there have already been $1 billion in sales and tens of millions of dollars in taxes collected, including for school construction, while in New York medical marijuana is carefully regulated to prevent even the slightest hint of recreational POT RX continued on p. 10

Car ve-out freak-out: Some Village families not in 75 Morton zone BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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illage school advocates and parents are putting on a push to change a zoning quirk for the new 75 Morton St. middle school that would make Baruch College Campus High School — all the way over on the East Side — and not 75 Morton the zoned middle school for students living in

a “gerrymandered” slice of the Village. The controversial zoning carve-out begins at Eighth and Greenwich Aves. on its west side and stretches down to 12th St. on the south, Fourth Ave. on the east and up to 14th St. on the north. It follows the same zoning for elementary schools that

PHOTO BY SARAH FERGUSON

West Villager Alber t Wilking brought a velvet Prince shrine that he created to Tompkins Square Park last Sunday — coincidentally, right as a pop-up dance par t y on bic ycles for the Purple One was rolling in. See Page 3.

Prisoner Purple: ‘Talkative’ con made cut for tree camp BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

CARVE-OUT continued on p. 4

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n response to The Villager’s information request, the Australian Department of Justice has released files documenting Adam Purple’s imprisonment for sexually molesting his oldest stepdaughter. At the end of last year, The Villager broke the shocking story — first told to the newspaper by Purple’s two daughters — of how legendary Lower East Side gardener Purple, real name David Lloyd Wilk-

ie, spent up to two years in jail Down Under in the 1960s as a result of the conviction, and was then deported to America. A follow-up article included subsequent interviews with his two former stepdaughters, who further corroborated his history of child sex abuse. Purple, who was born in Missouri and had worked as a journalist in the States, moved with his blended family to Australia after getting a job teaching English at a technical college there. The family included his second

wife, Romola, her two daughters, Dorothy and Diane, and Wilkie’s own two daughters from a previous marriage, Jenean and Lenore. It was a far cry from “The Brady Bunch.” As Jenean previously told The Villager, Purple’s sexual abuse of the girls — which had already been occurring in the U.S. — only rose to more debauched levels in Australia. The family lived in isolated areas, away from prying eyes, and Purple threw wild parPURPLE continued on p. 12

Soho leader booted (again) from C.B. 2........p. 2 Crime: Getting punchy in East Village..........p. 9 A real crane in the glass.........page 14

www.TheVillager.com


HERE WE GO AGAIN! It definitely raised eyebrows at Community Board 2 last week when longtime Soho activist Sean Sweeney was not reappointed to the board, which includes the Village, Soho, Noho and Little Italy. An influential presence Downtown, Sweeney is executive director of the Soho Alliance community organization and also a power in the Downtown Independent Democrats political club. One veteran C.B. 2 member told us, requesting anonymity, that there are suspicions that Sweeney’s removal was — surprise, surprise — because of his ongoing clash with Councilmember Margaret Chin. Sweeney and Chin previously famously feuded over the Soho Business Improvement District — Sweeney and the majority of Soho residents opposed it, but Chin backed it, and the new BID was approved by the city. More recently, it’s been war between the two after Chin backed Gigi Li’s effort to challenge Jenifer Rajkumar for district leader last year — only to wind up with Community Board 3 Chairperson Li having to withdraw from the race after she failed to collect enough valid ballot petition signatures and, even worse, in the face of actual petition fraud charges filed by Rajkumar supporters. That obviously was a big embarrassment for Li and her patron, Chin, and also potentially politically damaging for Li — just how badly, we’ll see in September, when Li, Rajkumar and a slew of other candidates, including the new Assembly incumbent, Alice Cancel, will run in the Democratic primary for former Speaker Sheldon Silver’s seat. In fact, Chin bumped Sweeney off the before over the Soho BID brouhaha. Sweeney said there’s no way his attendance at meetings can be to blame for why he got the boot this time. “My attendance is very good, obsessively so,” he said. “O.K., so I miss the month of February. Big deal — I can’t take a month vacation?... It’s public knowledge that Chin

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April 28, 2016

did not reappoint me in 2012, the year I organized the Soho community against the Soho BID that she tried to push down our throats. And yes, I was very involved last summer in exposing the fraudulent petition signatures that Chin’s protégé Gigi presented to the Board of Elections. And yes, Chin has a history of vindictiveness,” Sweeney said. After he was dropped from C.B. 2 four years ago by Chin, thenBorough President Scott Stringer promptly “picked up” Sweeney and put him back on the board. When Gale Brewer became borough president in 2014, she renewed Sweeney’s appointment — yet she didn’t renew him this year. The question is why? So far, neither Brewer or Chin are answering. “We don’t ever comment on appointment/nonappointment reasons,” said John Houston, Brewer’s spokesperson. Similarly, when Brewer did not reappoint Ayo Harrington to the East Side’s C.B. 3 last April, her office declined to comment on the reason why. Harrington of course was the most vocal critic on C.B. 3 of Li’s leadership of the board, her accusations sparking a full-blown Equal Employment Opportunity investigation into whether Li was failing to appoint blacks and Latinos to committee leadership positions. Hmm…does there seem to be a pattern here? Perhaps if you want to stay a member of C.B. 2 or 3, you better lay off Li! Or else Brewer will bounce you! Meanwhile, a Chin source said she wasn’t commenting on “Sweeney’s Second Removal,” either, noting that Brewer was the one who would have to explain why since she was the one who ultimately made the decision not to reappointment the Soho activist. Speaking of Rajkumar, she wasted no time announcing her campaign for Assembly this week, hot on the heels of Cancel’s victory in the April 19 special election for the Assembly seat. Cancel was the only Democrat allowed to run in that race. The September primary will be open to all Dems who qualify to get on the ballot.

RUBBING IT IN: Assemblymember Deborah Glick was quick to point out that her September primary election rival, Arthur Schwartz, did not make the cut as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in July — at least not based on results of last week’s presidential primary in the 10th Congressional District, which includes the Village. Based on Hillary Clinton’s performance in the district versus that of Bernie Sanders, the former won four delegates compared to the latter’s two. The Clinton delegates are Glick, Comptroller Scott Stringer, former Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum and George Miranda. For Sanders, the two delegates are former state Senator Tom Duane and Jenine Lurie. “I came in third on our slate,” Schwartz said. “If Bernie had gotten one more delegate in our congressional district, I would have been elected. I was not surprised that I ran behind Duane; the 10th C.D. included almost all of his old Senate district. I fully expect to be named to one of the

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Actor Adam Sandler with his dog, Babu Sandler, chilled on the bench outside The Frog’s Crown on Spring st. near Sixth Ave. Maybe we will be seeing more of the Sandlers since this cafe is actually our photographer’s “office.”

slots Bernie gets to fill as a result of the statewide vote, and will be a delegate to the convention.” Schwartz, who is Sanders’s New York campaign counsel, said he also expects gay political activist Allen Roskoff, who also ran as a delegate on the local Sanders slate, to be tapped to attend the convention. “The Sanders campaign has 36 or so slots to fill. Hillary has 48,” Schwartz noted of the coveted remaining spots. Ben Yee, who is running for Democratic State Committee, and lives on the East Side, was elected as a Bernie delegate in the 12th Congressional District. The Village Independent Democrats recently endorsed Yee for State Committee over former District Leader John Scott. “Ben is a rising star,” Schwartz said. (Scoopy recently reported that Yee is a board officer in V.I.D, but that was incorrect.)

DOUBLE DRIBBLING: As most readers may already know, former Assembly Speaker Silver’s corruption trial has been rescheduled to May 12. In other Silver developments — and, boy, have there been some doozies! — we recently learned that the oncepowerful pol, who is married, was cavorting with two married blondes up in Albany, lobbyist Pat Lynch and former Assemblymember Janele Hyer-Spencer. HyerSpencer, who reportedly sports pierced nipples and a tattoo above her derrière, roars around on a Yamaha motorcycle and has a mean hook shot on the hoops court. We know Silver was a legend on the Lower East Side at the Luther Gulick Playground blacktop courts as a kid and then played ball up in Albany with other power brokers, so we could kind of get that, if he had a mistress, it would at least be someone who could take it the rim and knock down jump shots. But we wouldn’t exactly have pictured the Orthodox Grand Streeter with a hot motorcycle mama! Oh SCOOPY continued on p. 6 TheVillager.com


PHOTOS BY SARAH FERGUSON

What more fitting way to honor Prince than a midriff-baring blouse?

The group Public Space Party held a rolling Prince pop-up dance party Sunday, with a stop in Tompkins Square Park. Darlene Blander paid homage to the Purple One at a mobile velvet “shrine” created by Albert Wilking.

Prince dance parties keep popping up everywhere BY SARAH FERGUSON

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andom tributes to the musical genius Prince keep cropping up all over. On Sunday afternoon, folks were getting “Delirious” in Tompkins Square Park at a pop-up dance party and bike ride organized by the group Public Space Party. People donned their purple finest to “get crazy” to their favorite Prince dance tracks that were blasted from iPods hooked up to speakers towed on two different bike trailers. There was also a wagon-drawn shrine to the Purple One created by West Villager Albert Wilking, who by divine providence showed up in Tompkins without knowing the event was going down. “I wanted to be Prince when I was young,” Wilking confessed. “He was so out. He was so himself. It scared me to be so out.” Prince died last Thursday at age 57.

Lipstick in Prince’s signature hue adorned lips...

TheVillager.com

Most found out about the Tompkins event through Facebook. “I came because he’s everything,” said Saritha Gateau, 28, of Brooklyn. “He’s my joy, and I’m heartbroken.” As “Purple Rain” blared, she and about 30 others set off on an unpermitted ride down Broadway to the Prince St. subway station, where they partied with random passersby like it was “1999.” The group then set off for Sheridan Square, where they boogied to “Kiss” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover” in front of the famed Stonewall Inn. It took a little coaxing, but soon all sorts of “Beautiful Ones” were joining in. “We’re Public Space Party, and we celebrate public space,” shouted organizer Ben Shepard, to no one in particular. Their brief “liberation” of Sheridan Square was a fitting tribute to an artist who pushed the envelope in so many ways. Shepard, who actually teaches the politics of “play” at City University, said he first drank the purple

Kool-Aid in 1981 when he saw Prince open for the Rolling Stones in Dallas. “It was his “Controversy” tour, and he had on this purple negligee,” Shepard recalled. “We were in shock. This was 12 years after Altamont, when people died at a Stones concert. Three years later, we all saw “Purple Rain” and fell in love with Prince. He helped us grow a little bit — get out of our silos.” Similarly, Darlene Blander of Ocean Hill, Brooklyn, said she fell in love as a teen after hearing Prince’s hit single “Controversy,” with its lyrics: “Am I black or white? Am I straight or gay?” “I have a purple room,” Blander said. “I’m all about the purple.” On Thursday night, Cooper Union students also held an impromptu Prince dance party in the plaza south of the Foundation Building.

...and also faces.

April 28, 2016

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Carve-out freaking out Village families Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association News Story, First Place, 2015 Editorial Page, First Place, 2015 Editorials, First Place, 2014 News Story, First Place, 2014 Overall Design Excellence, First Place, 2013 Best Column, First Place, 2012 Photographic Excellence, First Place, 2011 Spot News Coverage, First Place, 2010 Coverage of Environment, First Place, 2009

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April 28, 2016

CARVE-OUT continued from p. 1

was put in place in 2014 to ensure that P.S. 340 — the new elementary school at the former Foundling Hospital site, at W. 17th St. and Sixth Ave. — would have enough students from the surrounding area. Village parents on W. 12th and 13th Sts. didn’t like the zoning back then — since it involves having their little kids cross 14th St. — but people accept that it’s now too late to do anything about it. A chance to change that zoning won’t come up again for years. But parents and advocates are now hoping to head off the new middle school zone, so that their kids attend the 75 Morton school, when it opens, which is nearer, and which has a real connection to the community. The proposal was first shown on April 20. Jeanine Kiely, chairperson of the Schools and Education Committee of Community Board 2, said the Department of Education is just taking the “easy” approach by having the middle school zoning mirror the elementary school zoning on this little notch of the Village. “People understand the elementary school zone was created to fill the new elementary school,” Kiely said of P.S. 340. “These blocks were gerrymandered out of the Greenwich Village school zone. We’re not trying to change that.” Kiely said adding these excluded blocks into the 75 Morton zone would not significantly change the size of the district — which stretches from 59th St. down to Lower Manhattan — or its racial demographics. Meanwhile, the Village students would have a longer trip to Baruch — about 1.5 to 2 miles — by bus or on foot. “And the L train will be knocked out soon,” Kiely added. More important, though, the fight to create 75 Morton has been a great team effort by Village parents and advocates for years, plus it will simply be a great school, she assured. In short, Villagers want to be a part of it — not shunted into another school in another neighborhood. “The community has been fighting for this school since 2007,” Kiely said, adding it would be a positive “symbolic gesture” to keep the W. 12th and 13th St. families in the Morton zone. “We’ve been working on this school for 10 years. There’s no reason to take the easy way out.” Only about 20 percent of district students actually attend their zoned schools, Kiely noted, and 75 Morton St.’s admissions will be based partly on zoning and partly on some sort of screening method, still to be determined. A decision will likely come next Tues., May 3, when the Community Education Council for District 2, meets at

A recently released map showing the proposed middle school zoning that C.E.C. 2 is set to vote on next Tuesday. Families living in the notch extending into the West Village would be zoned for Baruch College Campus High School on the East Side.

A design rendering of the renovated 75 Mor ton St., which is set to open in fall 2017.

its office, at 330 Seventh Ave., at 6:30 p.m. The middle school zone is on the agenda, and the C.E.C. has announced it attends to vote on the issue at the meeting. Community Board 2 last month passed a resolution in support of put-

ting the carved-out area into the 75 Morton zone. In the meantime, advocates and parents are furiously e-mailing local school officials to lobby them to make the change. C.B. 2 also plans to send another letter in support of the change. TheVillager.com


Memorial for poet John Farris

Are your child's immunizations up to date?

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John Farris on the roof of Bullet Space, the East Village arts collective where he lived.

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he life of Lower East Side poet John Farris will be celebrated this Fri., April 29, at Judson Memorial Church in the West Village, at 55 Washington Square South, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Farris died in January at age 72. The memorial is being organized by A Gathering of the Tribes and famed conceptual artist David Hammons. There will be short readings by Farris’s daughters and a rabble of poets that knew him best, including Bob Holman, Chavisa Woods, Ron Kolm, David Henderson, Michael Carter and Tribes maestro Steve Cannon.

The reading will be interspersed with funny stories from Farris’s fellow artist housemates at Bullet Space and other friends who knew this boho bard back in the day. Also performing will be jazz artists Jemeel Moondoc, Matthew Shipp, William Parker, Craig Harris and Farris’s grandson, Richard Dye. Diehard Farris fans can also check out the after-party at his favorite haunt, Nublu, 62 Avenue C. Should be epic.

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U.S. Army Corps gives O.K. to new Pier55 ‘arts island’ BY ALBERT AMATEAU

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Wendy Suzuki at NYU Bookstore This event is free and open to the public. Thursday, May 5 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm NYU Bookstore 726 Broadway Dr. Wendy A. Suzuki is a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology in the Center for Neural Science at New York University where her work has been recognized with numerous grants and awards including the prestigious Troland Research Award from the National Academy of Sciences. Join us for a presentation by Dr. Suzuki in celebration of the paperback edition of her book, Healthy Brain, Happy Life, which explores the relationships between exercise and the brain. Light refreshments will be served and all are welcome!

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April 28, 2016

he U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Wednesday gave the Hudson River Park Trust the go-ahead to start construction of the $130 million Pier55 project. The corps modified its existing permit on the replacement for Pier 54 off of W. 13th St. to allow construction of the project, funded largely by Barry Diller and Diane von Furstenberg. The Army Corps’ action was the last regulatory hurdle for the project. On March 31, the state Department of Environmental Conservation gave Pier55 its final approval. A lawsuit filed by The City Club of New York to force the project to undergo a full environmental impact statement, or E.I.S., review was dismissed two weeks ago. The City Club board of directors has not yet decided whether to appeal the state Supreme Court dismissal, according to Tom Fox, a City Club member and an individual plaintiff in the suit. Madelyn Wils, president and C.E.O. of the Trust, the state-city authority responsible for the 4.5-milelong riverfront park, said, “As stewards of the Hudson River, the Trust worked carefully to reconstruct Pier 54 in a way that would be respectful of the environment. The project is a shining example of what innovative public-private partnerships can accomplish for the good of the city. And now that the regulatory agencies have issued their permits, we are excited to be in a position to start construction.” Pier55 would be built partially on

SCOOPY continued from p. 2

well, just another thing we didn’t know about Silver, we guess. As for Lynch, who was his press secretary for six years before starting her own lobbying firm, in fact, we had always heard whisperings that there was something between them, so the revelations of their relationship did not exactly shock us. Indeed, the media are reporting that it was an “open secret” in Albany and that the two were caught canoodling in the elevator at the State Capitol and so forth. “Ah, it’s good to be the king — or the speaker,” as Mel Brooks might

the former footprints of Pier 54 and Pier 56. But most of it would be on a new footprint — over part of the river that was not previously covered by a pier deck. The 2.7-acre project, funded by a $113 million endowment by the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation, will be accessible from the Manhattan shoreline by two pedestrian bridges and be supported on concrete piles. The undulating square-shaped structure will rise from 8 feet to 62 feet above the surface of the river and include three areas for public performance with a total capacity for 5,000 people. Supporters of the project include U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, who characterized the project as “a jewel in the crown for New York City.” Schumer said he frequently cycles along the greenway bike path next to the park and eagerly anticipates stopping by Pier55 “for a concert, a show or just to watch the river roll by.” Mike Novogratz, chairperson of Friends of Hudson River Park, the park’s private fundraising group, said he was looking forward to the start of the pier’s construction later this spring and completion in 2019. “We will be lucky to have one of the great park piers of the city — and anywhere — right here in our backyard, to share with all New Yorkers for years to come,” he said. The project, more an island than a pier, will include walking paths, hills, seating areas and open lawns. Admission to 51 percent of its programs would be free, while 49 percent could be priced at a rate comparable to similar attractions in the city.

say. That is, until you face serious jail time! Beyond the salacious details, the two women clearly benefited from their relationships with Silver. Hyer-Spencer went on to get plum positions with the Department of Education and Staten Island Family Court, with Silver’s help, sources told the New York Post. Meanwhile, Silver certainly looked like a hero when he blocked former Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s West Side stadium. Meanwhile, Lynch was a lobbyist for Madison Square Garden, which obviously feared the competition the arena would pose. Manhattan Federal Judge Valerie Caproni recently released an opinion on Silver’s mistresses and how they benefited from the connection. “They arguably are not entirely ‘innocent’ third parties,” she wrote. “Each allegedly had an extramarital affair with a public official and then exploited her relationship with the public official for personal gain.” TheVillager.com


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POLICE BLOTTER Printing House fatal A construction worker dismantling scaffolding at the tony Printing House condo, at Hudson and Clarkson Sts., died last Thursday after a wood plank fell from the 10th floor and struck him in the head. Responding police officers found Louis Mata, 32, of Port Chester, N.Y., on the Leroy St. side of the building shortly after 5 p.m. unresponsive with severe neck and back injuries. E.M.S. rushed him to Lenox Health Greenwich Village, where he died. The Daily News reported that Mata had been wearing a hard hat. The News also reported that the luxury building has several open violations, including at least two for facade safety problems, according to Department of Buildings records. A complaint filed the day before Mata’s death charged that the building had “no permit in place for roofing, asbestos, exterior repairs and scaffolding.” Also according to records, a Buildings inspector visited the site last Thursday and found its scaffold permit expired in October.

L.E.S. rape attempt A Lower East Side woman was groped by a stranger who followed her into her building last weekend, but he was scared off and fled before anything worse could happen. Police said that on Sat., April 23, at 3:20 a.m., a 24-year-old woman entered the elevator to her building, in the vicinity of Stanton and Pitt Sts., when a man followed her inside. When the elevator reached her floor, the stranger began to grope her as the car’s door opened and pushed her against the wall before fondling her. The man followed her to her apartment, but fled when a male from inside came to the door. The suspect is described as a lightskinned Hispanic, about 16 to 20 years old, 5 feet 2 inches to 5 feet 4 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call the Police Department’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477) or for Span-

ish, 1-888-57-PISTA (74782). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers Web site at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS. COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) and then entering TIP577. All tips are strictly confidential.

Shelter homicide An argument between homeless men at an East Village shelter had a tragic ending last week. On Fri., April 1, around 2:10 a.m., police responded to a 911 call of a male assaulted inside 8 E. Third St., the Project Renewal men’s shelter. Upon arrival, officers discovered a resident of the shelter, Michael Antonicelli, 69, with head trauma. E.M.S. transported the victim to Beth Israel Hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries the next day. Pursuant to an investigation, Edwin Hernandez, 55, another resident of the shelter, was arrested at the scene and charged with felony assault. The incident was subsequently classified as a homicide. According to news reports, Hernandez struck Antonicelli in the head, causing him to fall backwards, hitting his head on the floor, fracturing the back of his skull. Both men were homeless and lived on the shelter’s third floor. According to WPIX news, police said the two were acquaintances and had known each other for an “extended period of time.” Witnesses told police, “They were arguing all morning.”

Fake-gun muggers Police busted a mugger and his female sidekick in the Village right after they had stuck up a man with a phony pistol. On Fri., April 22, around 9:20 a.m, officers responded to a 911 call of a male with a gun at Washington Place and Sixth Ave. Upon arrival, Sixth Precinct Police Officers Thomas Sheehy and Christopher Rossi were met by a witness who gave them a description of the suspect. The description was transmitted over police radio.

Sixth Precinct cops arrested a mugger who was allegedly using this convincing-looking imitation firearm.

Subsequently, Police Officer Christian Rich, of the Sixth Precinct Traffic Safety Unit, observed a man matching the description running down the street. After a brief chase on foot, during which the suspect reportedly knocked down a senior citizen, Rich apprehended the man. An imitation pistol was recovered from the defendant, police said. While they were still at the scene, a 29-year-old male victim approached the officers and informed them that he had just been robbed at gunpoint by the same individual along with a female accomplice, who was also apprehended. Ramell Huggins, 25, of 507 E. 11th St., was charged with robbery, criminal mischief, escape, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Sakema Daniel, 26, of 2991 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, was charged with robbery.

Clearing the record The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office will hold its second “Clean Slate” event, at Grand Street Settlement, at 80 Pitt St. near Rivington St., this Sat., April 30, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Clean Slate is a one-day warrant-forgiveness opportunity where New Yorkers with open summons warrants for qualifying crimes can have them cleared from their record, without fear of arrest. More than 700 New Yorkers from all boroughs came to the first Clean Slate event in November in Harlem, at which 409 summons warrants dating back almost 20 years were vacated. In addition to the D.A. and the Lower East Side settlement house, other program participants include the New York Police Department, the Office of Court Adminis-

tration and the Legal AID Society. “Clean Slate offers New Yorkers an opportunity to clear outstanding summons warrants for minor offenses from their records — and their lives,” said D.A. Cy Vance, Jr. “I urge anyone with an open summons warrant to join us at Clean Slate this Saturday at Grand Street Settlement.” The program has the strong support of local politicians Borough President Gale Brewer, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh and Councilmembers Margaret Chin and Rosie Mendez. “A low-level, nonviolent infraction shouldn’t ruin a life,” Brewer said. “I’m thrilled to support District Attorney Vance’s Clean Slate initiative.” The types of summons warrants that can be cleared at this event include disorderly conduct, public consumption of alcohol, public urination, littering, unlawful possession of marijuana, some subway offenses and more. In addition to the outstanding warrant, the underlying summons can also be resolved at this event without fines or other penalties. The presiding judge will issue Adjournments in Contemplation of Dismissal, or A.C.D.’s, which require the recipient to avoid new arrests for six months, before the dismissal and sealing of his or her case. Warrants for felony or misdemeanor charges cannot be resolved at Clean Slate, but Legal Aid attorneys will be present to offer free legal advice in an effort to help individuals resolve such cases. Additionally, Clean Slate will offer a resource fair with job training, healthcare information and on-site referral services. Family members are welcome, and free prizes will be given away all day. Open summons warrants from any of the five boroughs can be resolved at this event, regardless of one’s current residence or immigration status. Those wishing to clear open summons warrants must bring a photo ID, but it is not necessary to bring the original summons. For more information about Clean Slate and qualifying offenses, visit http:// manhattanda.org/sites/default/files/ Clean%20Slate%20FAQ.pdf or call 212335-3310.

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Victim’s friends have guard up; Assaults up, too BY MARY REINHOLZ

A

street memorial for Elliot Caldwell was held last Thursday in front of a garden on E. 12th St. between Avenues B and C, drawing about 15 young men from the gritty Alphabet City neighborhood. Some of them wore black T-shirts with messages reading, in part, “In Loving Memory of Eliot [sic] Caldwell,” with the dates of the 23-year-old’s birth and death inscribed in white. They sat on chairs directly across the street from where Caldwell, the father of a 3-year-old son, was shot in the back late at night on Aug. 14 in front of Campos Plaza I. He had grown up there and lived nearby, according to Albert Roman, a relative and resident of the New York City Housing Authority development at 635 E. 12th St. He spoke to this reporter earlier in the day, providing information on the memorial. “There will be a barbeque,” he said. Few among the mourners who showed up around 4 p.m. wanted to talk about Caldwell or his relationship to his suspected killer, Theodore Holloway, also 23, who lived at Campos Plaza and allegedly fired at his neighbor from the back seat of a parked car, according to DNAinfo. Holloway was arrested April 15 by Ninth Precinct police and charged with second-degree murder. “You ask too many questions,” said a Latino woman in her 30s who sat in a chair a few feet from a makeshift shrine to Caldwell. Lush greenery sprouted from the garden behind it. Several men put their arms over their heads when they saw a camera. “No pictures!” one of them shouted. “Get the f--- out of here!” said another, who rose to his feet after one photo was taken from a distance of two attendees at the memorial who had agreed to be photographed in profile. “If you show their faces, you will put their lives in danger!” warned a heavyset woman who had been preparing food on the street. She identified herself only as Diane and demanded to see the photo. A squad car with two cops from the Ninth Precinct was parked a few yards away. One of the officers said he could understand the anger of the mourners having their grief interrupted by an outsider. Lieutenant Patrick Ferguson, Ninth Precinct head of special operations, said the next day that police patrol the housing project daily. He characterized the attendees at the Caldwell memorial as “Campos kids” upset by the sudden presence of media. Asked if a photograph in a newspaper would endanger their lives, he said, “That’s an exaggeration.” Ferguson did not offer any theory on the motive for Caldwell’s killing or whether there was gang activity in-

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY MARY REINHOLZ

The memorial for shooting victim Elliot Caldwell on E. 12th St.

volved. He described the victim as a “street kid” he had known for 11 or 12 years. “I used to talk to him all the time,” he said. “It’s sad.” “He was a good kid,” said a clerk behind the counter at the deli around the corner at 185 Avenue C. “He used to come in here all the time.” Halloway’s arrest was announced April 19 by Deputy Inspector Peter J. Venice, Ninth Precinct commanding officer, during a monthly meeting of the precinct’s community council at the E. Fifth St. stationhouse. “We were in a hurry to catch the perpetrator because he was involved in other incidents, including one in January,” Venice said. “He came out of the housing project and we were able to grab this guy. We take violent crimes very seriously.” Venice told the gathering of about 30 locals that there had been a 10 percent increase in crime in the precinct over the last 30 days, with “spikes” in categories like stolen auto (which includes motorcycle thefts) and felony assaults. In the latter category, he noted that a homeless man at the E. Third St. Men’s Shelter died Fri., April 1, after a dispute with another resident, reportedly over a $3 cigarette debt, according to the New York Daily News. The victim — who was found with head trauma — was identified as Michael Antonicelli, 69. Police arrested Edwin Hernandez, 55, for felony assault. “One male hit the other and he was taken to [Beth Israel] hospital where he passed on,” Venice said of the incident. “We have cops there every day,” he said of the shelter, which is run by the non-

profit Project Renewal, on 8 E. Third St. on the Bowery. “It’s unfortunate what happened,” the deputy inspector said. A Police Department spokesper-

son later said that Hernandez allegedly struck Antonicelli, who fell to the floor, striking his head. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner later ruled the death a homicide.

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Advocate pans E. 14th St. pot dispensary DISPENSARY continued from p. 1

use. Patients must be registered with the Health Department, obtain a prescription from a state-certified doctor and possess a registration card. No edible or smokable forms of pot are allowed, only an eyedropper of cannabis liquid selling for $100 to $300 that can be used in a device called a vaporizer. Beth Marchand, director of marketing and sales at Columbia Care, the approved provider with four locations in the state, including one at 212 E. 14th St., near Third Ave. said, “We have been open and serving patients since January. As the number of qualified physicians and patients increases within the program, we are seeing more qualified patients reach out to us at our four locations in New York. Education and safe access to products and services is our number one priority and that is what we are most focused on.� But Dennis Levy — the Green Party candidate in the recent special election for the 65th Assembly District, who is H.I.V. positive and a lifelong marijuana legalization advocate — called the New York program “frustrating and flawed.� He added that he believes “the selection ‘process’ was corrupt.�

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Pot legalization advocates recently made their cage...or rather, case‌ in Washington Square.

Levy, who lives in the Al Smith Houses on the Lower East Side, expressed distaste with the 14th St. facility, which he called a “fortress.� He quoted a friend who is a patient describing how he entered the facility. He said patients pass through “two security systems before you even run into another patient.� In addition, visitors “must flash a medical marijuana card in front of a camera. If everything is

in order, the first set of doors opens to a vestibule and the door slams closed behind you.� “It reminds me of jail� said Levy, who added that insurance does not cover the cost of medical pot, so patients must pay in cash, which is clearly a burden for low-income individuals. “It’s totally screwed up!� Levy continued in his e-mail to The Villager. “Who wants to go through all of the B.S. to get smokeless ‘chemicals’?

There’s no smokable or edible marijuana of any kind for sale! Everybody said it gives them the ‘creeps.’ � Levy went on to advocate for a new marijuana bill, the Marijuana Regulation Taxation Act, which has been proposed by East Side Assemblymember Liz Krueger and cosponsored by eight other lawmakers. The bill would legalize marijuana for adults in New York and provide for its sale and taxation. According to Assemblymember Crystal Peoples-Stokes of Buffalo, a sponsor of the bill, “Marijuana prohibition has cost the state $675 million each year while disproportionately targeting minorities.� Although the bill currently has little traction, the legalization wave should pick up if California, as expected, legalizes pot this November. In the meantime, marijuana patients will suffer the indignity of security vestibules and second-class status. One E. 13th St. resident living near the new dispensary told The Villager that she and her neighbors are concerned about negative quality-of-life impacts from it. Asked if there actually had been any so far, she said no, but that they are nevertheless concerned and keeping their eye on it.





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11


Australia releases Adam Purple prison records; PURPLE continued from p. 1

ties fueled with his high-octane homebrewed beer. He was also heavily into LSD. The prepubescent girls were “trained” to perform naked sex shows for the partygoers, and schooled by Purple on how to use varnished wooden dildos that he carved for them, the now-adult women said. Dorothy told The Villager that Purple sexually abused her nightly for years — regularly performing oral sex on her — culminating in him raping her when he was 36 and she was 12, for which he was arrested. Wilkie was convicted on April 14, 1967, and sentenced a month later. Despite all four women telling The Villager their own detailed and convincing stories of Purple’s sexual abuse, some Purple loyalists were unwilling to accept it, saying they wanted more proof of his conviction and imprisonment. Jenean and Lenore each provided The Villager with their own copy of a court document of the child-custody case in which Romola won custody of them, and in which the judge noted that Purple was then serving time in prison for the crime. Yet even that still didn’t satisfy the Purple true believers. Australian privacy laws are known to be among the world’s strictest. However, the Office of the General Counsel of the Australian Department of Justice last month released to The Villager one file of Purple’s prison records. This month, after finding more records pertaining to Purple, it released a second file. The first record includes a “case history” of David Lloyd Wilkie, and features reviews of him by prison committees conducted on various dates. The recommendations focus on whether he should be transferred from certain jails — or gaols, as the Australians call it — to tree farms or camps. The reports note that Wilkie spent time in Long Bay State Penitentiary and Goulburn Training Centre, as well as the Laurel Hill and Mannus Afforestation Camps, where he apparently planted trees. The records note that Wilkie’s sentence was two years, with no possibility of parole for nine months. They also say that he held a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, and had spent two years in the U.S. Army and 10 years working as a journalist. (Purple, in fact, worked for the Army news service). He had also worked as a concrete finisher for half a year before prison, though had been injured on the job. His offense is listed as “indecent asslt [sic] on female under 16 years.” Wilkie had appealed his conviction, but then abandoned his challenge, the papers state. “Future plans: Wants to be deported to the U.S.A.,” notes one of the re-

12

April 28, 2016

PHOTO BY CARL HULTBERG

Two decades after his release from prison in Australia, Adam Purple handed out his fliers at the Rainbow Family Picnic in Central Park in 1986. offence he is a picture of outraged and injured innocence.” Listed under Wilkie’s preferred “recreational and leisure activities” are: “hiking, swimming, read (history), push bike, drink.” Another page notes that Wilkie stood 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighed 13 stone, or 182 pounds. The second Australian Department of Justice file is listed under “David Thomas Wilkie.” The confusion over his middle name is not explained, though Purple used various names during his lifetime, going by Lloyd in Australia and David in America, for example, and of course Adam Purple once he hit the Lower East Side. This file includes a May 15, 1967, mug shot of Wilkie. It also notes that he had been sentenced to “2 years h.l.,” apparently referring to “hard labor.” (In a May 15, 1967, letter provided to The Villager by one his of daughters, Wilkie’s wife, Romola, had written to A 1967 Australian prisoner “Description Card” with a mug shot of Da- Jenean and Lenore’s grandparents that vid Lloyd Wilkie, the future Adam Purple, in scanned files provided to he was, in fact, facing two years hard The Villager by the Australian Depar tment of Justice. Unfor tunately, labor. the scan of this document was not ver y good and much of the writing “Lloyd was sentenced Friday,” she is illegible. wrote. “He refused to co-operate with the Psychiatrist. Had he done so, he views. could possibly extend to the university would have been out on bond & under Under “Other Significant Data,” an degrees that he claims. He is a ready treatment. Since he refused to see any official’s skeptical description of pris- talker who seeks to gain the greatest psychiatrist after the first one, he was oner Wilkie paints him as garrulous yet possible advantage for himself from sentenced to 2 (two) years ‘Hard Laself-centered and hardheaded, while any interview and finds extreme diffi- bor.’… He will never be able to get a derefusing to accept his guilt: culty in seeing any but his own point cent job unless he goes for treatment.” “Poor appearance, good social per- of view. At present all he can think sonality. This rather peculiar looking about is getting out of Australia as soon PURPLE continued on p. 13 American has a good education which as possible. Naturally, concerning this

TheVillager.com


‘Talkative’ inmate was transferred to tree camp PURPLE continued from p. 12

Earlier, on April 14, 1967, his wife had written, “He was found guilty on two counts of assault (indecent) & sentencing has been postponed‌pending his examination by many competent Psychiatrists. The Judge said that this was the most demented man ever to appear in his court.â€?) This second batch of records provided to The Villager notes that Wilkie, at that time, was working in Goulburn Training Centre as a “sweeperâ€? and a “bookbinder.â€? Indeed, it may have been in prison in Australia that he created 600 hundred copies of “Zentences,â€? his famed miniature-size flip book of mixand-match Zen koans. He certainly had the time on his hands to do it. A report by Goulburn’s “chief overseerâ€? notes that Wilkie always had a lot to say for himself — apparently a bit too much yakking for the overseer’s taste. Under “Report of industry and disposition,â€? the overseer notes of Wilkie: “satisfactory — Talkative — always.â€? Under “General conduct in prison,â€? he states of Wilkie: “satisfactory — asserting his rights — otherwise cooperative.â€? In summary, the officer in charge notes of Wilkie: “In his short term at this centre he has been a satisfactory though talkative prisoner. General con-

A description of David Lloyd Wilkie in an Australian Depar tment of Prisons repor t by a Classification Committee, which was determining the best prison facilit y to send him to for rehabilitative jobs training.

duct also satisfactory. I recommend his transfer to a camp.� This second file ends in March 1968 with the comptroller general of prisons scrawling a one-word affirmative decision: “Mannus.� And so, David Lloyd Wilkie was transferred to Mannus Afforestation Camp, where he planted trees. Based on the records provided, this was the last Australian prison facility in which he was held. After serving his time, he was deported to the U.S., as he had requested — to California, according to his estranged family members. After a brief stint amid the hippies in Haight-Ashbury, he

then made his way to New York City, where before long he recreated himself as Adam Purple, going on to become an environmental icon. Who knows? Perhaps the forestry skills he learned as a prisoner convicted on child sex-abuse charges a world away in Australia helped him — even inspired him — as he cultivated his magnificent Garden of Eden here on the Lower East Side. When she e-mailed this second batch of prison records on Wilkie, Alisi Kaleti, the information access and privacy officer for the Office of the General Counsel of the Australian D.O.J., wrote that even more of his re-

cords are available — though cannot be released. “Additional records have been located that fall within the scope of your application,� she said. “My supplementary decision...is that you have been granted [only] partial access to the newly located records because I consider that on balance there is an overriding public interest against full disclosure. ... Under the public interest consideration in...the Government Information Public Access Act of 2009, these records have not been released in full because it would reveal personal information about people other than Mr. Wilkie.�

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PHOTO BY CARL HULTBERG

A forlorn Adam Purple on Eldridge St. in 1986 on the site of his former Garden of Eden after the cit y razed it for an affordable housing complex. A lone tree sur vived the demolition. The garden had a number of fruit-bearing trees.

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April 28, 2016

13


PHOTOS BY CLAYTON PATTERSON

A real crane in the glass A crane crashed into a sixth-floor window of a Lower East Side building on Monday around 6:30 p.m. and then got jammed there. Firefighters took their time figuring out a safe way to extract the crane’s bucket from the Essex St. building without causing further damage or an even worse accident. Three hours later, the crane was removed from the window. The accident’s cause was chalked up to a crane malfunction.

14

April 28, 2016

TheVillager.com


New buzz on Pier55 includes bees and butterflies BY EMILY SIEGEL

T

he new Pier55 is planned to be a mecca for performers. In addition, its extensive landscaping offers the possibility for it to be a thriving natural habitat for pollinators. A fortuitous moment led Pier55 landscape architect Signe Nielsen to realize that she was unintentionally creating a place for bees and other pollen spreaders, and she decided to run with it. “As I began to look at the list of plants, I realized how many of them were pollinators,” she said. “I don’t want to say it was an afterthought, but it was not the driver.” Once the realization was made, Nielsen decided to make pollinators a part of the entire plan. She selected only plants that were good pollinators, like aster and milkweed, and did research to make Pier55 a good habitat for people, as well as pollinators. First and foremost, the pier is for people, but Nielsen liked the idea of it being an environmental safe haven for insects with shrinking populations. “With pollination comes bees, and some people are desperately afraid of them and people are seriously allergic to them,” she said. “So I think that while there’s a lot of enthusiasm for what it means, we also have to be cognizant of what that means in the context of a public space.” The incorporation of a pollinator habitat into a New York City park is timely and necessary. The White House created the National Pollinator Health Strategy in 2015 to address the decline in pollinators and its negative effect on agriculture. Honey bees are the typical pollinator that comes to mind, but bats, beetles and butterfl ies also fall into this category. Part of the plan includes creating more pollinator habitats where these creatures can feed. Though small, Pier55 will be a pit stop where traveling pollinators can visit on their way to other destinations. “When they’re going from a very productive habitat, one that’s very good for nesting, as they go from here to there, there are at least some way stations for them along the way for food or water,” Nielsen explained. “They’ll nest and breed in these sort of bigger, more commodious places, but they can’t make the travel distance without food and water.” Nielsen has aligned this plan to accommodate pollinators with her overall artistic vision for the pier’s plant color scheme. She has timed the blooming of her selected flowers so that every two months there will be a transition of color. She has incorporated colors that are favorable to each type of pollinator. The gradation starts with pastels in the spring, then whites, yellows and blues, then oranges and yellows, and then russets and golds in the fall. TheVillager.com

Under its landscaping plans, Pier55 will be festooned with plants that are prolific pollinators, which will be a magnet for insects with shrinking populations, like bees.

Landscape architect Signe Nielsen realized that Pier55 could be a hot spot for pollinators as well as per formers.

“This is not about it being a showy garden. It’s about it being a garden that’s really a beautiful place to be in,” she said. “It’s a place you want to be in and have ever-changing seasonal qualities.”

Nielsen has worked on environmental projects in the past, but this particular project is one where she can really flex her artistic and architectural muscles. Her role does not begin until construction is farther along, but she’s already

itching to begin the process so that she can see the finished product. “I hope it’s…actually I know it’s going to be very beautiful. It’s like having a child,” she said. “You’ve raised this thing, you’ve put it out there, you’ve done everything you can to give it the best gene pool and nurturing you can. But at a certain point it just has to walk on its own. But you still care.” A lawsuit filed by the City Club of New York against the Hudson River Park Trust requesting that it do a full environmental impact review was recently dismissed, leaving a permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as the next step. However, it was not immediately known if the City Club would appeal the decision. According to a spokesman for Pier55, construction is expected to begin this summer and will be completed by 2019.

Help green 6th Ave. mini-plots

L

ocal green thumbs have an opportunity to have their own little mini-garden plot and at the same time brighten up the streetscape. As part of its plan to build a protected bike lane on Sixth Ave. from Christopher St. to 13th St., the city’s Department of Transportation will install pedestrian islands between the bike and vehicle lanes that will make it safer to cross the street. These new islands also can house some mini-gardens — if there are people to take care of them. Community Board 2 is seeking volunteer maintenance partners to plant and tend these tiny gardens, so that the islands can be more than just cement. Local residents, businesses or institutions are all welcome to take part in

this effort, which will entail providing soil and planting flowers and then maintaining them. The mini-plots’ size would be roughly 4 feet by 5 feet. Locations are planned at W. 10th St. south side, W. 11th St. north side, W. 12th St. north and south sides and W. 13th St. north side. W. 12th St. has already attracted one avid gardener’s interest, but the care of those mini-plots might possibly be shared. Anyone interested in becoming a volunteer Sixth Ave. mini-gardener at these locations is asked to contact Shirley Secunda at secunda@cb2manhattan.org by May 1. There also will be similar opportunities to green new concrete islands from W. 14th St. to 33rd St. where the new protected bike lane will continue. April 28, 2016

15


PHOTOS BY Q. SAKAMAKI

Bernie Sanders rallied in Coney Island on April 10. Some — including Hillar y Clinton — say many of his progressive ideas aren’t realistic, and that he’s living in a Coney Island-like political fantasyland, so to speak. But Rhode Island voters, for one, didn’t agree, giving the democratic socialist a win there in Tuesday’s primar y. While Clinton bested Sanders in four other primaries Tuesday, he still racked up good numbers, winning many delegates on a propor tional basis. And despite her hammering the Vermont senator on gun issues, she only just barely eked out a win in Connecticut, site of the Sandy Hook school shooting tragedy. Sanders has said he plans to keep running through to the Democratic National Convention in July, if not to win the nomination, then to keep pushing a progressive agenda.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Only in Bernie-land

Vote against corruption

To The Editor: At the Bernie Sanders rally in Washington Square Park, I spoke to some New York University students that actually believe that Bernie will get N.Y.U. to become a free college. What fantasyland do these kids live in? I can see community colleges being free or lower cost, but let’s get real. Between Hillary and Bernie, I think I will sit this election out. I don’t know what scares me more, these two or the Cons in the other party.

To The Editor: Re “Vote Sanders and join the political revolution” (editorial, April 14): The only issue that should matter to anyone is getting the corruption out of Washington. The “Progressive” era, best represented by Teddy Roosevelt, has been whittled away by the “establishments” to the point it no longer exists. The modern-day “robber barons” have enriched themselves, along with the crony-loving congresspersons who, almost invariably, become lobbyists in “retirement.” Anyone read “Throw Them All Out” or “Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few”? We are in trouble, folks. The wealthy have been paying less and less in taxes since the early ’60s. This is the main rea-

Jerry Blake

son for the deficit spending Washington is guilty of. Who is it that would keep taxes on the wealthy low, and keep making them lower, in the face of a certain financial crisis that would result from a monumentally, irreversible debt bomb? Only the corrupt — who benefit from it. Corporatists and Congress — might as well be a movie, “The Devil’s Advocate II.” Jim Hynes

Independent news To The Editor: Re “Vote Sanders and join the political revolution” (editorial, April 14): Thank you. I was starting to wonder if there were any independent news outlets left in the United States. The Sanders campaign really needs to focus on older and minority voters who are already registered. I believe many people will switch once they hear Bernie’s message. John Hardt

IRA BLUTREICH

Brother Bernie! Let it be! To The Editor: Re “Vote Sanders and join the political revolution” (editorial, April 14): Bernie is our answer — let it be, let it be! Kay Wheeler

Will U.S. Attorney Bharara “flush out” de Blasio? 16

April 28, 2016

E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 1 Metrotech North, 10th floor, Brooklyn, NY, NY 11201. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. Anonymous letters will not be published. TheVillager.com


Lost the gig, but Nyro’s voice still rings true NOTEBOOK BY K ATE WALTER

W

hen I learned that the Village Voice was revamping its music section, I flashed back to 1984 during my struggling music critic days recalling the piece that got away. I’d wanted to review “Mother’s Spiritual,” the new album from the singer-songwriter Laura Nyro. The dark haired, bisexual beauty was my contemporary — and I had a fantasy link. A Voice review was powerful at that point and I was a one of its few female music writers. Rock and jazz criticism was a male bastion, hard for a chick to break into, but I had good clips and a fine ear. I pitched by phone, delivered pieces on floppy discs, sat next to my renowned editor as he slashed words. I was thrilled to see my byline and rushed out after midnight to buy an early copy from the newsstand. With assistance from Todd Rundgren, “Mother’s Spiritual” was Nyro’s mature masterpiece. I loved the bouncy melodies and the lyrics about goddesses and sisterhood and saving the planet. She sounded happy and content, in love with another woman — exactly how I felt in my life at the time. It was a comeback album, after a six-year break from recording to focus on parenting. She’d left her beloved New York City for the trees of Connecticut. The sound was airier, brighter, upbeat. Nyro had dropped the urban angst / love-struck / boy crazy persona of her earlier most-popular LP’s: “Eli and the Thirteenth Confession” and “New York Tendaberry.” How would fans react? I pitched my editor, Robert Christgau, who wanted to assign the review to a mother because motherhood was the album’s main inspiration. But I was gay. Didn’t that connection count? So Bob assigned it to his sister, also a reviewer. I was disappointed at the nepotism. She wrote a largely negative review, calling the album “politically tame and musically passé,” and made digs at Nyro’s feminist credentials. Nyro felt so misunderstood, she wrote a rebuttal, deeming the review “ornery.” Had I gotten the assignment, I would have raved about her new disc. My piece could have boosted Nyro’s career — and mine — at a critical juncture. I already knew the basics. She was born Laura Nigro in the Bronx (Jewish mother and Italian father, a musician). A TheVillager.com

The album that the writer had hoped to review back in 1984.

quintessential New Yorker, she went to High School of Music and Art, harmonized in the subway stations, wrote the hit song “And When I Die” when she was only 16. She was deep at a young age and sadly prescient. My friend’s best friend went to high school with Nyro and hated her quirky voice. I loved it. I also always liked that she didn’t care about being commercial (to the frustration of her managers.) Nyro’s career peaked when she was in her twenties, although she continued recording and performing to a devoted female fan base. She married, divorced, had a son, and later fell in love with a woman. Nyro was with her female partner, a painter, for two decades, although the songwriter eschewed the lesbian label. I never married or had a child. But like Nyro, I dated men when I was younger, came out gay and had a long-term relationship with another woman. But unlike Nyro, I was an openly queer writer whose career kept building as I got older. I published my first book in my sixth decade, thankful I lived long enough for that to happen, glad I was not a young success. I have no major writing regrets except for this one assignment I did not land. I’d often thought about this weird twist of fate, how chance affects an artistic career. After I saw a tweet that Nyro would have been 68 had she lived, this inspired a bingeing marathon:

I watched Nyro on You Tube, blown away by her poignant version of “Walk on By.” I ordered CD’s of her seminal albums and her biography, “Soul Picnic: The Music and Passion of Laura Nyro,” by Michele Kort. I was jealous when I read that Nyro studied with Swami Satchidananda, the founder of Integral Yoga. I’ve been taking classes at Integral Yoga in the Village for the past two decades. She knew him personally and sang at a Carnegie Hall benefit for the institute. “Mother’s Spiritual” was the only record I’d saved from my vast collection when I moved from St. Mark’s Place 20 years ago. At the time, it was only on vinyl. Since I had no record player, I hadn’t heard it in decades. Now I wanted to hear this album 30 years later. Was it really that great? I looked online. The CD cost $400. Why was “Mother’s Spiritual” the highest-priced CD on Amazon? (Apparently, few copies were cut and it was rare.) I finally found a used copy for $18. Wow —it totally held up and spoke to me now. I danced around my loft singing: “I don’t need no diamond rings. I got all my pretty things. I’m looking for the highway to my soul.” For days, her songs kept playing in my head. The album is so alive it seems extra-tragic Nyro passed away before her 50th birthday. She died at 49 from ovarian cancer in 1997. When I saw an ad for an upcom-

ing concert at the Tribeca Performing Arts Center, “Christine Spero Plays Laura Nyro,” I bought tickets, recalling when I saw Nyro performing at The Bottom Line. It was a religious experience. She sat at the baby grand, sang and played by candlelight (no band) to a hushed, spellbound audience. I wish I had seen her more but I’d gotten into Nyro late. It was an epiphany when I embraced Nyro’s changing sound in the ’80s and then worked my way back through her music. No way could Spero (a talented jazz singer / pianist) recreate Nyro and wisely she didn’t try. Instead she and her band rendered fresh versions of Nyro’s famous songs, like “Stone Soul Picnic,” “Eli’s Coming” and “Sweet Blindness.” The baby boomer audience sang along. The tribute concert reinforced my belief that Nyro was very important, one of the great American singersongwriters of the past century. But recognition came late. In 2012 Nyro was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and her son accepted the award. Nyro’s influence on female artists is huge: Rickie Lee Jones, Joni Mitchell, Carole King, Janis Ian, Suzanne Vega, Phoebe Snow, Sandra Bernhard and Bette Midler all acknowledge their debt. She paved the way for Tori Amos, Tracy Chapman and Sarah McLachlin. Yet Nyro never achieved major fame or superstardom with her songs that were big hits for other artists. I’m sad there’s no Broadway musical extolling her work and exposing her to a younger audience. Ironically, Nyro’s biggest hit was her cover of King’s “Up on the Roof.” Nyro was a brilliant artist with a loyal cult following but she was reclusive and always made music her way, kinda like how I’ve run my writing life. Today, listening to “Mother’s Spiritual,” I wonder if her career might have taken off again if only I had gotten that assignment for the Village Voice music section 30 years ago and my review had appeared in print: “Mother’s Spiritual” is innovative, jazzy rock, soulful, with swooping melodies and gorgeous phrasing. In classic Nyro, her quirky voice hops octaves madly as she works out idiosyncratic piano arrangements. But motherhood mellowed her. She lost the dark, plaintive mood. Now she is singing about goddesses and talking to trees. I can’t stop dancing to her sprightly new sound. I love this album. Walter is the author of the memoir “Looking for a Kiss: A Chronicle of Downtown Heartbreak and Healing” (Heliotrope Books, 2015). April 28, 2016

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BY TEQUILA MINSKY

A

fter its building was sold and the landlord tripled the rent, Avignone Chemists, a Village pharmacy with decades of history, shuttered its doors one year ago. All that remains of the former Bleecker St. pharmacy is the painted sign on the building’s wall facing Sixth Ave. What sort of place could possibly afford that kind of astronomical rent? Apparently, Sweetgreen can. A salad bar and restaurant, Sweetgreen serves salads with seasonal kale, romaine, arugula and mesclun greens, with grains like quinoa and faro, as well as salads that are variations of Caesar, Thai, hummus or Cobb. Nine salads were available as freebies on the store’s two pre-opening days, but custom ones are also available. Word of the pre-opening samples got out to New York University students and nearby yoga studios and neighbors. The brisk business also gave the new staff a chance to work out the kinks. David Gruber, a member of Community Board 2 and a leading Carmine St. activist, was spotted late Saturday afternoon with a salad to go. One can put a positive spin on the storefront’s transition since salads can keep you healthy, so you won’t need to visit the pharmacy as often.

PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Salad days for new business in old Bleecker pharmacy spot

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Immersive ‘Idiot’ is strippeddown Dostoevsky, ready to party Carefully calibrated collab mines talent from two tribes

L to R: Lauren Cipoletti (hugging), Daniel Kublick and Merlin Whitehawk.

BY TRAV S.D.

PHOTOS BY CARL SKUTSCH

Purva Bedi (in dress) and Daniel Kublick. TheVillager.com

T

wo are better than one.” So saith Ecclesiastes and so doeth Robert Lyons and Kristin Marting, artistic directors of the New Ohio Theatre and HERE, respectively, as they team up for the latest of their cross-institutional collaborations. Currently in previews, “Idiot” — an adaptation of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s “The Idiot” — will be presented at HERE through May 21. “The Idiot” is a novel from what might be called Dostoevsky’s middle period, written in the wake of the success of “Crime and Punishment” and a

decade before his culminating work, “The Brothers Karamazov.” It was initially published in serialized form from 1868 to 1869, while the Russian Master was living in Germany. The book is centered around the Christ-like Prince Myshkin, a man who tries to lead a pure life and is treated with scorn and derision by nearly all those around him. This is the third time Lyons and Marting have collaborated on theatre pieces derived from Dostoevsky texts. In 1991, their take on “The Possessed” was IDIOT continued on p. 20 April 28, 2016

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IDIOT continued from p. 19

presented at the Ohio Theatre’s original Wooster St. location; a second version was produced at HERE in 2008. And in 2001, they assembled an evening called “The Fever,” which drew from the Dostoevsky short stories “White Nights,” “The Double” and “The Landlady.” The current production of “Idiot” is being produced through HARP (the HERE Artist Residency Program). It is being called the world premiere, although earlier incarnations have been presented in workshops. It was first developed at the Catskills Mountain Foundation’s Orchard Project in 2014 and “highly designed workshop versions” were shown last year in HERE’s CultureMart festival, North American Cultural Laboratory’s Deep Space in Highland Lake and New Ohio’s Ice Factory festival. Marting is credited as director and choreographer for the project, Lyon with providing the text. As to how that shakes out in practice, Marting says, “We conceived the project together, and adapted it together, and then Robert does more work on refining the text and putting it into a more contemporary context — and then we work with the designers together to evolve the design concepts, so it’s really intermixed.” It’s a process that Lyons calls “fluid.” “I would also include the designers in that process too,” he continues. “At the end of the day the core storytelling decisions are Kristin’s and mine, but through all of that, everybody’s kind of dramaturgically engaged in the storytelling.” HERE’s mission is to create “new, hybrid performance…a seamless integration of artistic disciplines — theater, dance, music and opera, puppetry, media, visual and installation, spoken word and performance art.” True to form, the current production employs immersive staging, original music, sophisticated live cinematography (i.e. the use of live video), and Marting’s patented employment of stylized gesture and movement. The creative team includes Nick Benacerraf (scenery), Ray Sun (video), Larry Heinemann (music), Kate Fry (costumes), and Jeanette Oi-Suk Yew (lighting). Benacerraf is a core member of The Assembly, a collective of performance artists now in residence at the New Ohio, and Fry is also costume designer on The Assembly’s current

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April 28, 2016

PHOTO BY CARL SKUTSCH

Merlin Whitehawk (in green) and Daniel Kublick.

production. And yet, though they each have their role to play, Marting adds, “They all weigh in on everything. The costume designer may have ideas about how the video works for one part, the videographer has ideas about a costume moment, and everybody kind of weighs in. Everyone has an investment and people are free to say things about moments, whatever their role is on the project.” Like any good Russian novel, “The Idiot” contains a cast of thousands. The present adaptation boils all that down to the four principal characters: the titular “Idiot,” (Daniel Kublick), his rival Ganya (Merlin Whitehawk), a spoiled socialite (Purva Bedi), and a notorious woman (Lauren Cipoletti). The performers all have movement and dance backgrounds in addition to acting credits, and great use is made of those skills in the current production. As Prince Myshkin, Kublick may have the biggest brunt to bear, as the key to his character — and the entire production — is the fact that the Prince is subject to repeated epileptic fits, requiring controlled contortionism on his part, and major shifts in tone and reality from the rest of the team, both onstage and off. The overarching concept is that the audience is at a party. The audience is arrayed on all four sides of the theatre, with the playing space and video screens in the center, and separate spaces for a karaoke stage, a photo booth and a bar. When the audience first arrives, says Marting, the Prince greets each audience

member and shows him to his seat, and welcomes him to the party. This is the immersive element. And yet there is an added factor at the center. After the 2015 workshops, says Lyon, “We had this huge conceptual leap and then we said, ‘Okay, the whole thing is happening at this party inside the Prince’s mind. The earlier iteration was more like objective storytelling…now we’re experiencing it through the Prince’s brain.” At key moments the Prince experiences what the artists call “recessions,” moments when he’s thinking about characters and imaging realities with them that don’t exist. And driving it all: the Prince’s periodic fits, indicated through stylized movement, flashing colored lights and video effects. Marting elaborates, “What we discovered from our research is that a fit has different components. There’s an epiphany, and then after the epiphany there’s the black hole where you really fall into convulsions and you lose consciousness. And so, in the show, what we’re doing is we’re building to the place where he has this real epiphany and he hits this ecstatic moment, one time in the show. But all these other times, he’s seeking it. And he doesn’t find it. But he also doesn’t want to go into it. Because when you go into that ecstatic moment, you don’t get to stay there. Then you fall into this horrible convulsion and lose control of yourself, and you’re not able to be who you are in this. So it’s this very barbed question in his mind.” Adds Lyon: “He’s had access to

these epiphanies before, and that’s what fuels his world view. He wants to live in a way that’s transparent and without guile, and because he’s had these visions with the beauty and the harmony and all that. It’s the juxtaposition of those moments and the effect that it had on his personality, with these other three characters — who are all caught up in societal matchmaking, greed, obsession, self-destruction — that’s the core juxtaposition of the story. It’s all about love and obsession and hatred and self-hatred and the most combustible of human emotions, and here’s this guileless guy who walks into it, and eventually it takes its toll.” Lyons enthuses about their mutual history: “When the Ohio [Theatre] was on Wooster Street, and then Kristin opened HERE, I always felt like they were like sister theatres or something. [The two theatres] were so close and so many artists went back and forth between them. Then, when we lost the Wooster Street space, it was like a miracle that I ended up in the West Village, which is still within walking distance of HERE.” Adds Marting, with a laugh, “So we still can meet for drinks at the end of our shows.” But closing night is not until May 21. Til then, the party will be in Prince Myshkin’s mind. Tues.–Sun., 8:30pm, at HERE (145 Sixth Ave., just below Spring St.). In previews through May 2. Opening May 3, then through May 21. For tickets ($25), visit here.org, call 212-352-3101. TheVillager.com


PHOTO BY ASHLEY WELLS

Nkosi Nkululeko reading from the page.

PHOTO BY TAYLOR MALI

L to R: Tyehimba Jess and Nkosi Nkululeko, interviewed by guest host Steven Willis.

Trading fours at Page Meets Stage Series celebrates a shared love of music and words BY PUMA PERL

Through a shared love of music and words, they connected, trading fours like jazz musicians after midnight, Komunyakaa offering up his shortlined images, and Jess responding in hard-driving lyrics, even breaking out his mouth harp. It’s the rare, sacred night where poetry leaves me breathless. That was one of the few. Poet and educator Taylor Mali is the Founding Curator of the monthly series, originally called Page vs. Stage. The first show took place November 11, 2005, at the Bowery Poetry Club and paired Mali, a veteran Slam poet and performance coach, with Billy Collins, former Poet Laureate of the United States. “We pretended that it was much more of a competition,” Mali told me, “but it never has been. From the beginning, we’ve called it an ongoing conversation to see where poetry lives. What makes the format unique is the

M

y first visit to Page Meets Stage took place on a winter’s night just over six years ago. The Bowery Poetry Club was filled to capacity, despite the barriers that often keep people away — an admission charge and no open mike. Onstage sat poets Yusef Komunyakaa, an NYU professor and 1994 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry winner, and Tyehimba Jess, several decades younger, and a former member of Chicago’s Green Mill Slam Team, where Slam began. Komunyakaa, born in 1941, is the author of over a dozen published books, including verse plays, essays, and a volume of jazz poems, “Testimony: A Tribute to Charlie Parker.” Jess had three books to his credit at the time; his latest was entitled “leadbelly: poems.”

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back-and-forth nature of the reading, which gives the poets the opportunity to ‘answer’ each other.” Following the poem for poem exchange, there is a brief interview conducted by the evening’s host; then the poets close with

two poems apiece. There are three members of the Curating Committee in addition to Mali, and a rotation of hosts. PAGE continued on p. 22

murrow the inspiring world-premiere by joseph vitale

“What we do in this country in the whole field of human freedom is now being conducted in the full light of the mass media. Our history will be what we make it.” May 4-7, 12-14, 17-21 at 8PM; May 8 & 22 at 3PM; May 11 at 2PM

The Wild Project, 195 E. 3rd Street Tickets: 212.352.3101 | PhoenixTheatreEnsemble.org April 28, 2016

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PAGE continued from p. 21

At the March 2016 show, Tyehimba Jess was back for another round. This time, he had jumped from “stage” poet to “page” poet, one of only three who have played both sides of the bill, and was now cast in the role of the elder. His partner, Nkosi Nkululeko, is a 20-year-old Harlem native recently named the NYC Youth Poet Laureate for 2016 (he was also part of the 2014 Urban Word NYC Slam Team and the 2015 Urbana-NYC Team.) The pair played off, and to, one another, each piece enhancing the next. “Nkosi is an amazingly talented young brother who inspired me into the selections I made throughout the reading,” said Jess, when asked about material preparation. “We were both engaged in the call-and-response that allowed us to answer each other’s poems in ways that unfurled and deepened the meaning of our work. I have been raised around poets, musicians, and performers all of my life. My parents took me to many events,” said Nkosi, who is currently a practicing pianist as well as a performance poet. “One thing I would like the audience to know is my deep appreciation for sharing a stage with Tyehimba Jess. My writing is undergoing a transformation from being in the same spaces and learning from those like him, and many other writers, performers, and thinkers who I deeply admire.” As a poet, performer, and obsessively literal person, I pondered the designations of page and stage. “Tyehimba is a great page poet who reads exceptionally well,” explained Mali. “Although curators predict who brings the most passion to performance, often we have readings where both are equally stagey.” Poet/actor Steven Willis served as guest host and curator for the event. “The criteria is that the ‘Page’ works primarily in literature, and typically will have published one or more books, while the ‘Stage’ does primarily spoken word. This doesn’t mean that they don’t have published works, but indicates a solid, core spoken word following,” said Willis. “A page poet says, ‘I don’t need to memorize this because it’s so good on its own,” added Mali. “A stage poet says, ‘This poem is so good it would be shame if I didn’t memorize it.’ ” “Performance poems can have the same complexity as page poems. The

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April 28, 2016

PHOTO BY PETER DRESSEL

Taylor Mali at Bowery Poetry Club, during one of the first Stage Meets Page pairings.

art of memorization brings a new spirit to poetry, and, when memorized well, can bring a totally new meaning to the poem,” Nkosi Nkululeko told me. “I do have some poems published in print and online journals.” “I learned a lot from watching Marc Smith, Patricia Smith, and other phenomenal poets who move crowds with their voice and memorization of the text that frees their gaze from the page and connects them more kinetically with the audience,” added Jess. “I try to bring the lessons I learned from Slam performance to my readings. I try not to define myself — but I work mostly as a poet with a keen interest in history and music, and the many personal stories found in that nexus.” Jess’ newest work, “Olio,” weaves sonnet, song, and narrative to examine the lives of mostly unrecorded African American performers directly before and after the Civil War, up to World War I. Page Meets Stage has been somewhat nomadic since the Bowery Poetry Club closed for remodeling in 2012. In September, they return to their original home. “It’s been a struggle finding the right fit,” said Mali. “We are thrilled about returning to the

PHOTO BY TAYLOR MALI

Performance poet Rives at The DL Lounge.

Bowery Poetry Club. We’ll be there [the second Wednesday of the month, September through November], and then we will reassess.” Eleven years is long time for a venue to last these days. I am hoping for many more years of surprise and spontaneity, Page Meets Stage-style. The final “Page Meets Stage” of the spring takes place on Wed., May 11, 7:30pm, at The COW (21-A Clinton

St., btw. E. Houston & Stanton Sts). Admission is $12 at the door, $6 if purchased through eventbrite.com. The featured pairing: John Murillo and Caits Meissner. For more info, visit pagemeetsstageseries.wordpress.com. Tyehimba Jess’ latest work, “Olio,” is available from online booksellers, bookstores, and directly from the publisher, Wave Books. Visit wavepoetry.com/products/olio. TheVillager.com


Just Do Art BY SCOTT STIFFLER

for Student Council President, which comes down to a choice between the candidate whose platform is built on the promise of a disco homecoming, and the one who just wants to stop the pranks plaguing the school. The May 14 show is followed by an interactive workshop that allows the audience to perform on the TADA! Stage alongside “Up To You” cast members, with whom they’ll learn a song and dance from the show. Through May 21: Sat. & Sun. at 2pm & 4pm (no shows May 8). Special performances Wed., May 4 at 10am & 12pm, and at 7pm on Fri., May 13 & 20. At TADA! (15 W. 28 St., btw. Broadway & Fifth Ave.). For tickets ($25 for adults, $15 for children; May 14 interactive ticket, $10 extra), visit tadatheater.com.

NEIGHBORS’ DAY AT THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

“UP ON THE ROOF” ART EXHIBIT

PHOTO BY FILIP WOLAK, COURTESY WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Your zip code for their zeitgeist: On April 30, the Whitney celebrates its first anniversary on Gansevoort St. with free admission for nearby neighbors.

A year goes by after somebody new moves next door, and you’ve either struck up a friendship or filed a lawsuit from the carpal tunnel effects of dialing 311 to complain about the noise. Fortunately, for those living in close proximity to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the first anniversary of its arrival on Gansevoort St. is, by and large, a cause for celebrating how successfully this Uptown transplant’s art, architecture and sweeping terrace vistas have woven themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood. In a gesture of gratitude to a Downtown community that, says museum director Alice Pratt Brown, “has embraced us from the start,” residents of the 10011, 10012, 10013 and 10014 zip codes will be granted free admission on April 30 — just in time to view the “Laura Poitras: Astro Noise” and “Open Plain” exhibitions, closing May 1 and May 14, respectively. Sat., April 30, 10:30am-10pm, at the Whitney Museum of American Art (99 Gansevoort St., btw. Washington & West Sts.). For tickets (two per household; children and teens under 18 always admitted without charge), visit whitney.org/neighborsday. For general info, call 212-570-3600. TheVillager.com

IMAGE COURTESY ELLEN BRADSHAW

Ellen Bradshaw’s “Up on the Roof” exhibit, through May 14 at Pleiades Gallery, finds the artist high above Manhattan and in command of sweeping views.

PHOTO BY KAILA MACKENZIE

The TADA! Youth Ensemble hoofs it back to 1977, in the family-friendly musical “Up To You.” A post-performance workshop on May 14 lets you get in on the song and dance action.

TADA! YOUTH THEATER PRESENTS “UP TO YOU” It’s a blast from the past that’s a sign of our times, when the TADA! Resident Youth Ensemble gets transported back

to 1977, for an hour-long exploration of self-identity, interpersonal drama, and fiercely competitive campaign tactics. Appropriate for ages 5 and up, the original musical “Up To You” finds the cheerleaders, bullies, geeks and jocks of Hamilton High embroiled in the race

It’s no leap for Ellen Bradshaw to paint tall buildings — but the skyscrapers, bridges, public plazas and water towers in her current exhibit didn’t materialize in a single bound, or, necessarily, at rates faster than a speeding bullet. They did, however, all originate from time spent on perches high above the city. Created over the past year, inspiration for “Up on the Roof” struck, says Bradshaw, suddenly and sometimes by accident. A lawyer’s office, her own 25th floor balcony, a rooftop bar and the window of her husband’s room at the Hospital for Special Surgery (as he recovered from a knee replacement!) all commanded Bradshaw’s attention, then her brush. Herald Square, the East River, the Empire State Building and a panoramic view of Flatiron District water towers get the same moody but inviting treatment she gives to her strikingly composed collection of street level images from the South Street Seaport, the High Line and the late, great Fulton Fish Market. Here, however, the view is strictly bird’s eye — but the action (pedestrians in mid-stride, fog crawling across bridges) is once again observed from a distance, and given a soft glow that still somehow manages to vibrate with cinematic intensity. Through May 14 at Pleiades Gallery (fourth floor of 530 W. 25th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.–Sat., 11am–6pm or by appointment. Visit ellenbradshaw.com. April 28, 2016

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GOTTDIENER , TOWA C/O NOAH GOTTDIENER, POA 239 E. 61ST ST. NEW YORK, NY 10065

LUTZ , JESSICA 245 EAST 46TH STREETAPT 4F NEW YORK, NY 10017

CASEY , JOHN 344 WEST 17TH STREET 3A NEW YORK, NY 10011 CHANG , DANIEL S 300 EAST 85TH STREETAPT. 2401 NEW YORK, NY 10028 COLUMBIA EMERGENCY PHYSIC PO BOX 11503A NEW YORK, NY 10286 CORAM ALTERNATE SITE SERV 505 EAST 70TH ST RM NEW YORK, NY 10021 CUSTOM CARE SOLUTION LLC 215 PARK AVENUE SOUTH SUITE 1402 NEW YORK, NY 10003 DAVID H COLE MD 22 E 21ST ST STE 7F2 NEW YORK, NY 10010

GRIGGS , RICHARD C 140 BROADWAY 26TH FL NEW YORK, NY 10005 HEADQUARTERS FINANCIAL GROUP I 140 BROADWAY 26TH FL NEW YORK, NY 10005 HEERDT MD, ALEXANDRA S PO BOX 26668 NEW YORK, NY 10087 J P MORGAN CHASE C/O NYDS ROCH CLTN DIALYSI P O BOX 27731 NEW YORK, NY 10087 JOHN MASTROBATTISTA MD 159 EAST 74TH STREET MANHATTAN, NY 10021

MAFCO HOLDINGS 35 E 62ND ST NEW YORK, NY 10021 MAKONNEN , RAS T 530 W 178TH ST APT 3C NEW YORK, NY 10033 MCSHANE , JOHN B 110 E 59TH STREET 18TH F NEW YORK, NY 10022 MEMORIAL HOSP FOR CANCER 1275 YORK AVE NEW YORK, NY 10021 MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MED PO BOX 1028 NEW YORK, NY 10029 MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MED PO BOX 16211 GUSTAVE L LEVY PLACE NEW YORK, NY 10029

PARKS , CATHERINE 341 EAST 19TH ST APT 1C NEW YORK, NY 10003 POPP , HILARY K 6 SUMMIT CIRCLE SOMERS, NY 10589 RIVERA CRUZ , NATACHA 600 WEST 169TH STREET APT 65 NEW YORK, NY 10032 SCHWARTZ , ISABEL 315 E 65TH ST PH B NEW YORK, NY 10065 SEINFELD , DAVID 35 E 75TH ST NEW YORK, NY 10021 SHELDEN , AARON 505 E 79TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10021 SMALLBERG , GERALD 1010 FIFTH AVE NEW YORK, NY 10028 SUAREZ , DEREK 324 EAST 94TH STREET APT 3 NEW YORK, NY 10128 TRIBECA DENTAL DESIGN 144 CHAMBERS ST NEW YORK, NY 10007 WESTCHESTER MEDICAL CENTE PO BOX 30757 NEW YORK, NY 10087

A report of unclaimed amounts of money has been made to Thomas P. DiNapoli, Comptroller of the State of New York. A list of the names contained in such a notice is on file and open to public inspection at the principal office of the insurance company, located at 165 Court Street, Rochester, New York 14647 where such abandoned property is payable. Such held amounts of money will be paid or delivered to proven entitled parties by the insurance company listed above through August 31, 2016. On or before September 10, any remaining unclaimed monies will be paid or delivered to the State Comptroller.

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2010-2030/A CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO: Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Irma Garcia-Sanchez, Pedro Garcia, New York City Human Resources Administration. And to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Emilia Garcia, a/k/a Emilia Garcia Sanchez, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Emilia Garcia, a/k/a Emilia Garcia Sanchez, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 2140 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10037. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on June 10, 2016 at 9:30 A.M. in Room 509, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially be settled; (ii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unknown distributees; (iii) that Pedro Garcia show cause why his claim, if any, for payment of decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral expenses should not be disallowed; (iv) that the claim of the New York City Human Resources Administration in the amount of $50,088.37 for public assistance rendered to decedent in the form of Medicaid be allowed and paid; (v) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedules C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (vi) that the persons above and mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (vii) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (viii) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. April 21, 2016 (Seal) Hon. Nora S. Anderson, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Chief Clerk. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 11 Park Place, Suite 615 New York, New York 10007 (212) 896-3310

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Appsolutely awful (or) Make your smartphone dumb RHYMES WITH CRAZY BY LENORE SKENAZY

N

ew apps, the world is awaiting! (Or maybe not.) Footbook: Facebook for people too shy to look up. Fibr: Allows you to find fiber, instantly, anywhere. KnitBit: Keeps track of how many inches you have knitted in a day. FateBit: After actuarial table determines when you will die, stopwatch counts down the time you have left. Wads App: Trident, Wrigley or Bazooka? Photograph the bottom of your shoe and wonder no more. The Verizon Grrr: Sends a slightly stinging jolt through the phone of friend who hasn’t answered your text within 28 seconds. The Verizon Yowch: Sends a surprisingly robust jolt through the phone of “friend” who hasn’t answered your text within 29 seconds. The Verizon Singe: Sends a searing jolt that leaves a phone-shaped welt on butt of the a--hole who “couldn’t” answer your text within half a minute. Where’s My Brain? RFID technology locates fantasy where brain has strayed and brings it back to task at hand with a loud “Never gonna happen,” or “Get back to work!” Google Naps: Presents viewer with I.R.S.-generated instructions on how to

fill out Tax Form 1099-PATR, Taxable Distributions Received From Cooperatives. Google Naps+ : Presents viewer with I.R.S.- generated instructions on how to file for advance payments of the premium tax credit that were not made for you, your spouse or any individual you enrolled in coverage for whom no one else is claiming the personal exemption (Part 1). Google Catch: Activates 3-D video of writhing worm. Simply attach phone to fishing line. Google Glug: Allows fish to call each other and laugh about idiot in wading boots. Google Pyke: Allows fish to see each other and laugh about idiot in wading

$100M in music merch seized

FLASHBACK BY YANNIC R ACK

I

n 1989, a band of music-minded miscreants made the East Village the center of their activities. No, they weren’t rowdy punk rockers. “Acting on a tip from tenants who were suspicious of the late night activities of strangers entering their building…police recovered a large amount of property from the basement of an East Village building,” began an article in The Villager on April 20 of that year. The report detailed how Ninth Precinct officers unearthed around $100 million worth of equipment — everything from stereos, keyboards and about a dozen guitars, to leather jackets, CD’s and some 10,000 cassettes — that made the operation look like a sting on an underground rock club. But the basement of 157 E. Second St. was quiet most nights, at least if you didn’t count men regularly arriving late TheVillager.com

at night to unload their cars and vans. Tenants of the building said this had been going on for a year and a half. But they began to get suspicious once the shady drop-offs increased in frequency after the tenants association took over management of the building and fired its super. One of the residents recounted how, soon after, he followed two men into the basement to witness two other men watching TV and counting money. “ ‘They said they were friends of the super and worked in the flea market,’ ” he told The Villager. The following week, after he had been fired, the super reportedly returned one last time to “get some things” and brought along 10 men, who emptied out parts of the basement until the suspicious residents finally flagged down a police officer. According to the article, the super denied any involvement in the electronics stash and claimed he had allowed storage of the items as a favor, without receiving any compensation.

boots. Google Wet Smack: Allows idiot in wading boots to smack self in the head with wet, otherwise no-longer-functioning phone. FaceSlime: Allows others to laugh at idiot with algae on face. InstaSpam: Signs user up for amazing time-share deals. InstaScam: See above. InstaBam: Get your Obama quote of the day — or download the previous 2,627! InstaCram: Summarizes English Class favorites in two or three lines. E.g., “Guy mad that whale ate leg. Also, there’s symbolism.” InstaFam: Lonely? This R.F.G. (Random Family Generator) adds a total of up to 17 people to your family queue and then deletes two because you are no longer on speaking terms. Note: “BIL” designee will stop by within the hour to borrow your drill (return not guaranteed) and take a beer from your fridge. SnapCat: SnapChat for old ladies. SnapLap: SnapChat for old cats. TempleShalomRun: Players rush to get to temple on time. Bagels of gold, red and blue provide protection and a platform for lox. InstaGerm: Function encourages you to hand your phone to a nearby child, then take it back.

Shhhazam: Shushes people wearing headphones who don’t realize they’re singing out loud. Spotify, Dry Cleaning Edition: Distracts user applying ketchup, mustard or mayo to sandwich while wearing nice clothes. Google Mistranslate: Takes ordinary English and produces gaffes that may or may not result in war. Doodley: Records each day’s doodles and lets you know if you are approaching fatal levels of boredom. Nozee: Exactly how many times did you push your glasses up your nose today? Enemyster: Create new enemies by finding others who snort at your opinions, hobbies or moral judgments. Amazon’s Amazon Direct: Leeches, piranhas and intestinal parasites delivered to your door while still alive. Mine Shaft: Players fall down virtual mine shaft and waste rest of their lives trying to get out. Elfie: Allows user to take photos of self with imaginary friend, who does not show up in photo. Pyft: New app that...never mind. It’s nothing, really. Skenazy is founder of the book and blog “Free-Range Kids” and a contributor at Reason.com

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BROOKLYN The Community News Group is proud to introduce BROOKLYN PAPER RADIO. Join Brooklyn Paper Editor-in-Chief Vince DiMiceli and the New York Daily News’ Gersh Kuntzman every Monday at 4:30 for an hour of talk on topics Brooklynites hold dear. Each show will feature in-studio guests and call-out segments, and can be listened to live or played anytime at your convenience.

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