Page 1

VOLUME 28, NUMBER 6

AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 9, 2015

MERRY RAVES FLOW FOR FISH CAROUSEL OPENING BY YANNIC RACK hree friends from Long Island, Christina, Millie and Jessica, made the long trip to Downtown Manhattan to celebrate Millie’s birthday last week. They hadn’t made a restaurant reservation, however, and at around noon they were a little early for drinks, too. Instead, they joined a steadily growing queue of visitors from near and far that stretched through The Battery (formerly historic Battery Park) last Thursday, Aug. 20, to catch a ride on

T

Continued on page 12

MURDER DOWNTOWN AT FEDERAL BUILDING

L

ast Friday afternoon, deadly violence hit Hudson Square as a disgruntled former federal worker shot and killed a security guard at the federal building at 201 Varick St. at Houston St. After shooting the guard, the man encountered a friend in the lobby who he knew from the New York Athletic Club, who slowly backed toward the elevator, according to The New York Times. The gunman then turned the weapon on himself and took his own life. The guard, Idrissa Camara, 53, was pronounced dead just before 6 p.m. at Lenox Health Greenwich Village, according to police. The Continued on page 10

Downtown Express photo by Milo Hess

Happy time blues Things were far from gloomy for Hudson River Park’s 16th annual Blues BBQ fest Sat., Aug. 22 on Tribeca’s Pier 26. Thousands came out to hear the bands, dance and eat plenty of barbecue.

Knife-wielding Tribeca teen is a top chef on Food Network BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC Like a typical teen, Allison Lee, 13, likes pizza and really really likes tortillas. What is not typical, however, is that she’s probably a better chef than most adults. Lee knows what she calls the “basics” — how to make a roux, the base for many classic French sauces, how to make a bechamel sauce, break down a chicken, and balance the flavors in a dish. At age 3, she remembers going into the kitchen with her mom to

bake brownies. “But the first thing that I made on my own were pancakes,” she recalled during an interview at her Tribeca apartment last week. “My dad was so nervous about letting me stand alone in the kitchen with the fire on.” Around four at the time, she was so short she had to stand on a stool to cook. Her father then took over the training in the kitchen, teaching her things like sauces and how to con-

1 MET ROT E CH • NYC 112 01 • COPYRIG HT © 2015 N YC COMMU N ITY MED IA , LLC

trast flavors. The interest in cooking grew slowly over the years as she continued to learn. If she had a dish in a restaurant, it would spur her to look up online different recipes for it. From those, she would create her own recipe and then try to see if it would work. Her sister Erica, 11, is often the taster. “She likes to experiment,” said Jonathan Lee, her father. Continued on page 6


Have Healthy Teeth & Gums For Life! • Catch problems early and prevent cavities • Clean, state of the art office

CHARGED ISSUE

General, Cosmetic, & Implant Dentistry • Gentle, caring, professional doctors

who listen to your concerns

• Clean, state of the art office

OPEN SuNDay & LaTE EVENINGS For your Convenience CHINATOWN FIZZLE

ay Ilyabayev Dr. Alevtina Edgar Call& TDr.odIgor (212)

571-0033

225 Broadway Suite 705, New York, NY 10007 212.571.0033 | CentralAveDentalNY.com

225 Broadway Suite 705 New York, NY 10007

www.CentralAveDentalNY.com

FREE CONSULTATION

(Regular Value $150) WITH NECESSARY X-RAYS

ZOOM WHITENING

(doesn’t apply to patients with dental insurance)

$350

(Regular Value $500)

Exp. 9/15/15

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL $89(Regular Value $220)

INVISALIGN $1000 OFF

Exp. 9/15/15

Cleaning | Comprehensive Exam | X-rays Oral Cancer Screening | Personal Consultation

Exp. 9/15/15

Exp. 9/15/15

LIVE WITHOUT PAIN

N EUROLOGY P AIN MANAGEMENT & EPILEPSY S PECIALISTS SPECIALIZING IN HEADACHE, PAIN, & EPILEPSY

Virginia Thornley, MD

($800 Value) Can be combined with offers. Kishan Patel, MD

20 units of Botox or

Leonid Iskhakov, PA

Tingling and Numbness · Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

• BOTOX and other types of treatment FOR Chronic Migraines

Dizziness and Imbalance · Epilepsy and Seizure

• BOTOX Treatment for Excessive Sweating and Muscle Spasm

Post Stroke and Mini Stroke Treatment and Prevention

• IV Multivitamins for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Fainting · All Type of Tremors and Shaking

• Epidural and Facet Injections

Attention deficit · Memory Problems

• Joint Injections and Nerve Blocks

Panic / Anxiety · Insomnia

($320 Value, Savings 50%) Appointment required and subject to availability.

Michael Jurkowich, MD

Ellen Edgar, MD

Alzheimer’s/ Dementia · Depression Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

Results Can Be Seen After the First Visit!

2

212.349.2787

August 27-September 9, 2015

25 units of Xeomin

$160

Muscle Weakness, Spasms and Cramps • IV Infusion to abort Migraines and OTHER Headaches

$350 Fillers

Back and Neck Pain · Joint Pain

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY:

Long-suffering Knick fans of a age might recall Michael Ray Richardson’s famed “the ship be sinking,” when they hear the latest with the Chinatown Working Group. The group is losing membership and even Anthony Wong, the group’s co-chairperson, acknowledged, “it’s the same thing every meeting.” T he Chinatow n organization formed seven years ago to try and give the nabe more planning clout with the city. The idea was for three community boards — namely 1,2 & 3 — to unite with community groups to develop a plan for the city to endorse, but it hasn’t worked out as hoped. Earlier this year, the group was dealt a blow when Carl Weisbrod, chairperson of the Dept. of City Planning (who was the founding president of the Downtown Alliance), sent a letter to Community Board 3 saying the special zoning district that the group had worked on for six years was “not feasible at this time.” This month, Community Board 1, the group’s contact point and meeting host, withdrew. Jan Lee, a founder of the Civic Center Residents Coalition, which left the working group last year, said, “there was no meeting of the minds” and the discussions “devolved into this just adversarial, nonsensical, oftentimes shouting at landlords.” But Wong insists the group will continue on by supporting C.B. 3 as it moves forward with the three special zoning districts mostly within its boundaries. He said the overall goal was still to create a community-based plan. “I think we did a lot,” he said. “In terms of a community-based plan, I think we do have a good picture of what the community wants. But it’s really time to sort of push it forward or else the community really is going to get shut out.”

certain Dr. Alevtina Edgar • Dr. Igor Ilyabayev

Buy 3 Treatments Get 4th Free Appointment required and subject to availability.

Stella Aronova, PA

Conveniently located at: 225 Broadway, Suite 705 New York, NY 10007 DowntownExpress.com

778182

• Catch problems early and prevent cavities

DowntownExpress.com

Let the confusion continue. The city’s oldest area and one of its newest share a border and a “Battery,” so any distinction between the two might always be difficult for some. There’s the place that many continue to call Battery Park, the historic green space which the city Parks Dept. agreed to rename “The Battery” earlier this year. The change had the strong support of Warrie Price, the park conservancy’s longtime leader, and was done in part to avoid the common confusion with Battery Park City, the residential neighborhood built late in the 20th century on landfill from construction of the original World Trade Center. But the new name for the older park might be catching on too well. NY1 ran a segment Wednesday on the spread of unofficial costumed Disney characters from Times Square to the historic park and ID’d one person in the story as “The Battery Resident.” We’d bet the house the resident was not a homeless person living in the park and assume she lives in Battery Park City.

MASTER OF HIS DOMAIN Troy Masters, a founder of Gay City News and its predecessor, LGNY, left the publication last Photo by David Lee Morea week to start a biweekly publication in Los Angeles. Gay City is a sister paper of Downtown Express, where Masters was also webmaster and an occasional contributor — readers may recall his essay this year about being the victim of gay bashings as a boy in Alabama. Paul Schindler, editor of Gay City News, wrote, “I know that he will be missed in New York, at Gay City News, and, in particular, by me for his grit and guts and his commitment to keep the LGBT press’ mission fresh and sharp.” “Gay City News represents my life’s work,” Masters said. “As excited as I am about my new venture, Paul and I have enjoyed a privileged working relationship over the years and I will miss the productivity and brainpower.” Masters’ new paper, The Pride L.A., will be part of Mirror Media Group, the publisher of the Santa Monica Mirror and five other community publications focused on West LA neighborhoods. We wish him well.

Downtown Express photo by Tequila Minsky

The big dance The French street artist JR recently installed a large-scale photo mural of a ballerina on a 75-foot-by-100-foot wall in Tribeca. The artwork is on the side of a residential building at 100 Franklin St.

Open House | City and Country Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

How a child learns to learn will impact his or her life forever. Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House | City and Country Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

a child learns tolearn learnwill will HowHow a child learns to Please visit www.cityandcountry.org for information and application materials. impact his or her lifeTel:forever. impact his orNew her life 146 West 13th Street, York, NY 10011forever. 212.242.7802 Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House | City and Country School Wednesday, November 18, 6-8pm Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

Open House | City and Country

146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802

Please visit www.cityandcountry.org for information and application materials.

www.cityandcountry.org

146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802

August 27-September 9, 2015

3


New park leader named in Battery Park City

STREET

W O R K R A P

YN

R

H

Photo © Gensler

T

ET RE

ST

T

IP

STR

RE

Pier 17

ET

EET

www.lmhq.nyc LAN E DEN

lmhq_nyc

facebook.com/lmhq.nyc

lmhq_nyc

ET

IVE

PINE

DR

RE

PINE STREE T

STREET

ER

ST

ST

ET

HN

EET

R STR E

SL

SOUTH STREET SEAPORT

EET

CEDA

DGE

EE

FR

ET

TCH

MAI

CK

TE

WA

N

RE

FLE

BRI

R S TR

ET RE ST

RL

MA

ST

EET

VE

ON

JO

RL

STR

RTY

WALL

PE

PEA

F NE

TT

A

LA

CL

IF

LIBE

PLA

PE

EN

EK

STR

T TREE OR S C T DowntownExpress.com

ID

T

LT

STR

THAMES

MA

STREE

horticulture of Battery Park City.” According to the release, Pomponio has worked for the conservancy for 18 years and has led its parks maintenance division since 1999. Pomponio, in a statement, said, “I’m grateful for the opportunity to lead our dedicated staff and serve the community in this new capacity. I look forward to working closely with leadership and staff as we preserve our pristine parks and innovative sustainability practices.” Shari Hyman, president of the authority and conservancy, in the same release said: “We have a remarkable team in place who have all played a significant role in creating a world class park system over the years…We are lucky to have them continuing in their leadership roles.”

A NEW SPACE TO MEET, CREATE, AND COLLABORATE IN LOWER MANHATTAN. JOIN US AT LMHQ AND DO MORE THAN JUST WORK. BE

FU

Bruno Pomponio, left, will be the new leader of the Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, although he will not get the executive director title of the outgoing head, Tessa Huxley.

PEARL

STR

EET STR D GOL

WILLIAM

T

NT

P

E

EE

Downtown Express file photo by Terese Loeb Kreuzer

ET

OKL

EET

ET

Photo courtesy of the Battery Park City Authority

ON

W O R

RE

R

Pedestrian Bridge

STREET

PLACE

STREET

EET

EET

CARLISLE

STR

STR

ES

DowntownExpress.com

STREET

TRINITY

ON

ICH

NGT

ENW

SHI

Y

END AVENU

AN

GRE

WA

H

ALB

T

N S TR

STREET

ET UT

EE STR

CEDAR

JOHN

RE

DO

ST

Y LE

RE ALBANY

SO

B AT T E R Y PA R K CITY

MA

WILLIAM

ST

LIBERTY STREET

Visit our archives at Downtownexpress.com

EK

ANN STREET

DEY

CORTLANDT

CEDAR

CE

150 Broadway, 20TH Floor, STREET New York, NY 10038 FULTON STREET 646-779-9616.

WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

Pedestrian Bridge

N

BRO

DUTCH

ST

NORTH COVE

BE

AL

STREET

TH

WE

...We do.

RU

E

ON

WORLD FINANCIAL CENTER

SP

TR

ET

GT

VESEY

ST

P

PLACE

BARCLAY

SO

FRANKFORT STREET

EA

RE

IN

Do you remember when________ happened downtown?

BROADWAY

ST

SH

STREET

C ITY HA LL PAR K

DI

K

H

WA

AVENUE

MURRAY

PARK

MA

R

IC

WEST

NW

MURRAY STREET

— DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC

CIVIC CENTER

in a phone interview. The authority said last week that Huxley is retiring, but late last month, two sources told Downtown Express that Huxley was being forced out, subsequent to a New York Post article reporting the same thing. The authority claimed to have announced Huxley’s departure at its July 29 board meeting, but board members made no mention of her during the public part of the meeting, and their chairperson, Dennis Mehiel, did not answer most reporters’ questions about her status after the board’s private executive session the same day. Many neighbors were upset that Huxley was leaving and praised her stewardship of the neighborhood’s parks. C.B. 1 passed a resolution asking that the authority explain their decision to change leadership. Notaro said the authority has not responded to that resolution. “I’m disappointed that there wasn’t transparency in this whole process,” said Dennis Gault, who has lived in Battery Park City since 1996 and has been a C.B. 1 member for 10 years. “It’s disappointing when we have leaders who ignore the will of the people. Gault said that he saw firsthand the work Huxley did and the parks, are one of the main reasons people reside in Battery Park City. Tammy Meltzer, C.B. 1 member and Battery Park City resident, said in an email, “Tessa is an amazing person and has been a great asset to the community. Her knowledge of horticulture, her hand in the development of the area as well as her team have been a testament to why this is such a prized area of beauty. She will certainly be missed by those that know her and those that have enjoyed the beautiful

A

EE

TRIBECA

CHURCH STREET

GR

NORTH END

4

August 27-September 9, 2015

A thief with excellent taste was caught and arrested after stealing over $16,000 worth of duds from a high-end men’s clothing store in Soho, police say. Sometime during the night on Sun., Aug. 16, the suspect, 36, entered Marcella at 32 Grand St. He snatched 39 dress shirts, 21 pairs of socks, 10 ties, including bow ties, 11 dress pants, seven custom suits and 19 suit blazers.

ADE

88 Fulton Street (Corner of 33 Gold St.) New York, NY 10038 212.587.8930 | 212.587.8935

DANDY THIEF CAUGHT

ROCKEFELLER PARK

ACE

De l i v 1 0 $ Min.

The scene of the crime: an office at 69 Walker St. in Tribeca. On Fri., Aug. 21, two MacBooks, worth $3,922, are on a desk in the offices of Monthly Gift when the employees leave for the weekend. On Mon., Aug. 24, when a female employee, 29, returns to work, the laptops are gone. She told police that while the office was not locked, the entrance is and a key card needs to be swiped to get inside. Several employees have key card access. Police say there was no forcible entry and the windows were locked. Police are planning to check out the key card scanner, which records card swipes.

A Long Island woman enjoying coffee and conversation at a Soho bar noticed the patron next to her had purple-tipped long black hair — but not that she might have stolen her wallet. The woman, 66, was having coffee with a friend at Fanelli Cafe at 94 Prince St. at 3 p.m. on Wed., Aug. 5, police say. When she got up to pay, she realized that her credit card, debit card and $50 from her wallet were gone. The woman had her purse on the back on her chair the whole time while at the cafe. She told police that a woman — whom she described as around 20, 5’7” and 130 pounds — had sat at the READE STREET table next to her and ordered fries. Fifteen minutes later, WASHINGTON MARKET the woman cancelled her order and took PARK off, the victim told police. CHAMBERS STREET Whoever stole the stuff took one of the cards and hopped over to the Victoria’s Secret and then the Apple W A R R E N S T R E E T store in Soho and made $765 worth of purchases. TERR

Freeery!

MISSING MACBOOKS CASE

THE PURPLE-HAIRED PICKPOCKET

LAN

Authentic Thai & Vegetarian

MON DIEU — WALLET SNATCHED A French tourist’s wallet was stolen at a Financial District Starbucks, but the victim didn’t realize until she went to buy a MetroCard, police say. The woman, 44, had her wallet stolen at the Starbucks at 195 Broadway on Fri., Aug. 21. She then went to the Rector St. (1) station at 4 p.m., when she discovered her $60 wallet with various credit cards, and an unspecified number of Euros and French passport was gone. She told police that unauthorized charges on her credit cards had been made.

A thief got away with almost $3,000 worth of pricey travel gear — most with a camouflage pattern on it — from a Tumi store in Soho, police say. The suspect waited until the luggage shop at 102 Prince St. had closed at 7 p.m. on Tues., Aug. 11 to grab several bags, a wallet and laptop sleeves. The police responded to an alarm that went off at around 9:20 p.m. The officer found the front display window unlocked with no damage. A female employee, 25, told police that the store manager had locked the store up for the night.

ESP

After a long day of work, a 39-year-old woman

Two suspects assaulted and robbed a man in the Seaport last weekend — even taking the Air Jordan sneakers he was wearing. The 23-year-old from Staten Island was walking on Peck Slip toward Front St. at 3:30 a.m. on Sun., Aug. 23, police say, when one of the men approached him and said, “Hey! Hey!” The victim was distracted. The suspect’s accomplice then grabbed the victim from behind while the other man punched him in the face, causing cuts to the victim’s right check. Police say the two men then stole around $500, the victim’s chain and shoes as well as his iPhone 6.

BURGLAR PREPARES FOR THE JUNGLE

RIVER

HOUSE BURGLAR NETS 18 GRAND

MUGGERS TAKE VICTIM’S SNEAKERS

When the police searched the area, the suspect was found and then arrested near the corner of Thompson and Spring Sts. All of the clothing was recovered. The suspect was charged with third degree burglary, a felony, and is being held on $10,000 cash/$25,000 bond, according to the New York State Unified Court system.

NASSAU STREET

TEEN GANG MUGS IN FIDI A gang of teenagers attacked and mugged a man on his way to work at 4:45 a.m. on Wed., Aug. 5 in the Financial District and then did the same thing in Downtown Brooklyn an hour later, police say. In the first incident at 33 Gold St., the five men — described as around 16 to 18 years of age — surrounded a man, 41, then punched him in the face and robbed him. They stole his $50 watch, $60, ID, yellow cab license and several credit and debit cards, police say. They then fled south on Gold St. Police say at around 5:40 a.m. at the Borough Hall train station, the same modus operandi was used — the teens surrounded a man, 32, assaulted him and then snatched his cell phone and wallet. Neither victim received medical attention, according to police.

returned at around 8:45 p.m. to her apartment in Soho and found it ransacked — a thief getting away with $18,299 in jewelry and electronics, police say. An open window, which leads to the fire escape, was too tempting for a thief, who used it to gain access to the apartment on Prince St. near MacDougal St. on Fri., Aug. 21 sometime during the day. The suspect snatched up pricey jewelry, including a $700 Tiffany necklace, a Longines watch worth $2,500, a $3,000 heirloom necklace, a $2,000 Tiffany wedding ring and a $7,500 Tiffany engagement ring. A $2,500 MacBook and $99 Apple TV were also stolen.

BROADWAY

PANHANDLER SLAMS VICTIM A 59-year-old man was viciously attacked after he refused to give money to a panhandler in the Financial District, police say. The man, who lives in Queens, was walking to the train on Fri., Aug. 14 when the panhandler approached him a little after 3 p.m. near West Broadway and Park Place, according to police. He ignored the panhandler, who then proceeded to pick up the victim and slam him on the ground, police say. The victim suffered cuts to his face, elbow, ankle and wrist. The man then handed over $100 and some foreign currency to the mugger, 45. But the panhandler wasn’t finished — he took the victim’s glasses and broke them before fleeing the scene, police say. While conducting a canvass of the area, police caught and arrested the suspect and recovered the victim’s money. This is the second recent panhandler attack in the Financial District. In a separate incident in July, another man was punched after he didn’t give money to a panhandler.  

BY DUSI CA SUE M ALESEVI C The Battery Park City Authority last week announced a new head for the neighborhood’s parks after the controversial ouster of Tessa Huxley as its leader last month. Huxley, 62, who apparently is being forced out, will continue temporarily as executive director of the Battery Park City Parks Conservancy, which she steered and led for 27 years. The authority, which oversees the conservancy, promoted Bruno Pomponio to director of parks operations and he will become the park leader after Huxley’s departure some time this fall, according to the Aug. 18 release. Anthony Notaro, chairperson of Community Board 1’s Battery Park City Committee, said he has known and worked with Pomponio and that “he is an excellent person for the job.” However, Notaro does not see him as a replacement for Huxley, whose position is executive director and who helmed the conservancy. Pomponio will be director of operations, Eric “T” Fleisher is the director of horticulture and Abby Ehrlich is the director of parks programming along with her longtime deputy Craig Hudon. When asked about the difference in titles, authority spokesperson Kevin McCabe said in an email, “The leadership team we now have in place is the perfect combination to continue the important work of B.P.C. Parks.” He did not respond to a request to speak with Pomponio and Huxley, who has made no public comments since news of her departure broke at the end of July. Notaro questioned what the actual structure of the conservancy and the strategy going forward. “It is not clear the future of the conservancy is,” he said

August 27-September 9, 2015

5


Tribeca chef makes Food Network at age 13 BLUE NEST EVENTS’

Continued from page 1

Not just with food, either. Recently, she took his Metamucil and made little gummies with it. Early on, she would freeze things, such as grapes, he said. “I really like science,” said Lee, who is going into the eighth grade at Brearley School, the private all-girls school on the Upper East Side. She cited an ice cream shop in Seattle that makes the desert to order with liquid nitrogen. “I always thought that was, like, super cool,” she said. “I want to do something with that because I like science and I like food, so why not combine them? ” Lee is also a huge fan of the Food Network, watching several shows — “Chopped,” “Cupcake Wars,” and anything with Alton Brown, like “Cutthroat Kitchen.” She saw “Rachael vs. Guy Kid’s Cook-off” and said, “I was like, I need to be on the Food Network!” She filled out an online applica-

tion and went to a casting call for a teen tournament on “Chopped.” “I really wanted to be on the show,” she said. Lee was chosen and it was her first time on television. Her episode, which has already been filmed, has Lee and three other teens grappling with vegan chicken, big butternut squashes and okra, according to the Food Network. “I was really nervous to compete,” she said. “Also, I was worried about having the cameras everywhere. Because you’re cooking and the cameras are like there, right there, they’re in your face while you’re cooking. They’re there when you’re plating.” Lee, who also plays volleyball and softball, isn’t sure she wants to be a chef when she grows up and is leaning toward studying medicine. She is excited for her episode, which will air Tues., Sept. 8 at 10 p.m., but there will be no party that night — Tuesday is her first day of school.

TRIBECA HARDWARE

& TOOL RENTAL 154 Chambers St. • 212.240.9792 TRIBECA HARDWARE Mon. - Fri. 7am - 7pm

& TOOL RENTALSat. 9am - 9pm • Sun. 10am - 6pm

BIGGEST FAN

Downtown Express photo by Dusica Sue Malesevic

Allison Lee at home and filming an episode of “Chopped,” which airs Sept. 8. She said she was nervous because “you’re cooking and the cameras are like there, right there, they’re in your face while you’re cooking.”

“Blue Nest Events complements my creative spark, with flawlessly executed events to make our hotels shine!” CHRIS R. – GLOBAL HOTEL SALES DIRECTOR

Play, Learn, Make New Friends! Classes - Indoor Playspace Salon - Birthday Parties - Boutique

Play, Learn, Make New Friends! Photo courtesy of “Chopped.” Classes - Indoor Playspace !sdneirF weN eSalon kaM- Birthday ,nraeLParties ,yalP- Boutique ecapsyalP roodnI - sessalC euqituoB - seitraP yadhtriB - nolaS

Play,Learn, Learn,Make MakeNew NewFriends! Friends! Play, Classes - Indoor Playspace Classes - Indoor Playspace Salon - Birthday Parties - Boutique Salon - Birthday Parties - Boutique

Play, Learn, Make New Friends! Classes - Indoor Playspace Salon - Birthday Parties - Boutique

bluene stevents.com

Receive $10 off your next haircut!

CHRIS IS A BIG FAN OF BLUE NEST EVENTS. AND SO ARE WE.

(Mention Downtown Manhattan Guide!)

Play, Learn,Receive $10 off your next haircut! New Friends! ffo 01$ eviecMake eR

KIDVILLE DISTRICT !tucriah txen rClasses uoy • Indoor FINANCIAL Playspace • Salon Manhattan Guide!) (Mention Downtown

Check our plants & garden supplies! 154 Chambers St. 212.240.9792 Mon. - Fri. 7am - 7pm Sat. 9am - 9pm | Sun. 10am - 6pm Check our plants & garden supplies!

6

August 27-September 9, 2015

nwotnwoD noitneM( )!ediuG nattahnaM

40 Gold Street (Between Fulton and John) 212.566.2020 Learn more at kidville.com/fidi

Birthday Parties • Boutique

Receive$10 $10off off KIDVILLE FINANCIAL DISTRICT Receive 40 Gold ! Street (Between Fulton and John) your next haircut your TCInext RTSIDhaircut LAICN!A NIF ELL212.566.2020 IVDIK (Mention Downtown (Mention )nhoJ dnaDowntown notluF neewteB( teertS dloG 04 Manhattan Guide!) Learn more at kidville.com/fidi Manhattan Guide!) 0202.665.212 idif/moc.ellivdik ta erom nraeL

Receive $10 off KIDVILLEFINANCIAL FINANCIALDISTRICT DISTRICT KIDVILLE your next haircut! 40 Gold Street (Between Fulton and John)

DowntownExpress.com

capitalone.com/small-business-bank Persons are not affiliated with Capital One® and are solely responsible for their products and services. © 2015 Capital One. All rights reserved.

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

7


SPURA spark — finally construction is underway BY YANNIC RACK Most of the blocks that make up the $1 billion Seward Park redevelopment project currently underway on the Lower East Side have been dormant for almost five decades. But last month, construction work finally began on the first two sites, between Delancey and Grand Sts., after the developers closed on the construction financing at the end of June. The 1.65-million-square-foot project, dubbed Essex Crossing, will add 1,000 housing units to SPURA, the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, over the next decade and also create a new home for the historic Essex Street Market, as well as a shopping and entertainment corridor along Broome St. Isaac Henderson, a senior project manager at L+M Development Partners, one of the companies that make up Delancey Street Associates, the consortium created to build the entire project, gave a progress report to Downtown Express in an interview last week. He said the first two of ten sites are now commencing “full-speed ahead” at the southeast corner of Delancey and Essex Sts. (Site 2) and the northwest

corner of Clinton and Grand Sts. (Site 5). “It’s basically a nine-year construction period, but a large portion of it starting right now,” he said. Both of the building sites will have around 200 rental apartments each, with half of these affordable (the same is true across the entire project), and also house a range of commercial tenants. At Site 2, a 24-story building, a Regal movie theater will share space with the new and bigger home of the Essex Street Market, as well as the “Market Line,” a 20,000-square-foot food-oriented market space. “For the last four or five weeks we’ve been in the process of doing soil removal and beginning the foundation work there,” Henderson said. He also revealed that the new Essex Street Market, which is getting up to 10 new tenants and is slated to open in 2018, won’t have its own subway entrance inside the building as previously hoped. “There’s a subway station right now, it’s going to remain in the same location,” Henderson said of the Delancey-Essex stop. “But the subway will not have direct access to the market. Financially, it wasn’t feasible for everybody to make

Continued from page 8

Downtown Express photo by Yannic Rack

Construction work last week on the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area.

that happen. “At the end of the day, you’re still going to see that there’s a giant, exciting new market right off the subway,” he added. “And hopefully that will entice people to go in.” In addition, at Site 5, there will be a number of retail uses that haven’t been finalized yet, most likely a gym and a

supermarket, according to Henderson. Right now, the developers are still in the process of beginning early foundation work and completing the demolition of the last remaining building on the project site. Henderson said that over the next few weeks, they would complete the Continued on page 9

razing and then proceed with foundation and construction work in September. The two sites are part of the project’s first of three phases, which encompasses 1 million square feet, or roughly half of the overall development. Phase one also includes a 55-unit building where apartments will be for sale, with one-fifth of them affordable, according to Henderson. “We’re looking to close and acquire the property [from the city] in early to mid-December and begin work fullspeed ahead during that period of time,” he said. This new building, slated for Site 1, currently a small parking lot at the northeast corner of Broome and Ludlow Sts., will also be the home of a Splitsville bowling alley and a “cultural facility,” yet to be determined. The Pittsburgh-based Andy Warhol Museum originally planned to occupy the 10,000-square-foot space but bowed out of the project earlier this year. “We’re currently looking for a replacement,” Henderson said. The last site where construction is

let’s do something together at TRINITY WALL STREET

All Are Welcome All events are free, unless noted. 212.602.0800 trinitywallstreet.org

TRINITY CHURCH Broadway at Wall Street ST. PAUL’S CHAPEL Broadway and Fulton Street Trinity Episcopal Church Parish Center 2 Rector Street The Rev. Dr. William Lupfer, Rector The Rev. Phillip A. Jackson, Vicar

set to kick off this year is number 6, the easternmost lot at the northeast corner of Broome and Clinton Sts. “That’s going to be 100 units of affordable senior housing, and we hope to begin construction on that in late September, early October,” Henderson said, adding that they are also hoping to attract a medical facility to the building.

8

August 27-September 9, 2015

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

Network, which holds a lease on the building for another five years. But the buildings on the four lots that make up phase one will all be open long before 2024, the prospective completion date for the last of the developments. “Roughly in the next 30 to 36 months, all those buildings should come online,” Henderson said.

Chinatown travel agent indicted for fraud A Chinatown travel agent was indicted for allegedly swindling and stealing around $45,000 from customers — targeting the Chinese community, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. announced Tuesday. Vivian Cheng, a 46-year-old Queens resident, has been charged in New York State Supreme Court with several counts of grand larceny in the third and fourth degrees, scheme to defraud in the first degree and one count of petit larceny. Cheng owns Bestway Travel — also known as First Chamber and

Broadview Logistics — at 12 Pell St. in Chinatown. According to prosecutors, Cheng had several ways to scam people out of their money. In one scheme, she is accused of purchasing one-way tickets for travelers who had paid for a round trip. Prosecutors said the victims were often elderly and were unable to board their return flights, effectively stranding them. They often had to pay additional fees to get back home. In one instance, the district attorney says Cheng charged more than $60,000 in plane tickets without the

permission of the cardholder. Sometimes Cheng did not purchase the tickets at all, but still took payment for the flights, according to the indictment. “Victims of the alleged scheme — which included elderly individuals, adult children returning to China to visit sick parents, and families traveling together — were unable to go on their planned trips or stranded abroad with no way of returning home,” Vance said in a statement. He recommends travelers get e-ticket numbers and keep payment documents in order to avoid fraud.

education SUNDAYS, 10-11am

• For children

The Gospels, Times, Journal, and You

ages 3 months

Parish Center Join in a discussion of the editorial pages of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the assigned Gospel for the day. Led by the Rev. Dr. Mark Francisco Bozzuti-Jones.

to 5 years • Ongoing enrollment • Now offering financial aid!

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1-2pm

trinitypreschoolnyc.org

Life Talk Trinity Church, Manning Room Bring your lunch to this lively discussion of God, politics, love, and life. Led by the Rev. Dr. Mark Francisco Bozzuti-Jones.

community THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 5-7:30pm

Fundraiser for Haiti Schoolchildren St. Paul’s Chapel Come for music, raffles, beer, wine, and appetizers! All proceeds support students in Haiti. $25 in advance; $35 at the door. Details at trinitywallstreet.org/haitischolarships

DOWNTOWN an Episcopal parish in the city of New York

The rest of the sites, three of which are north of Delancey St., are not scheduled for construction until 2017. Site 9, the current home of Essex Street Market, north of Delancey St., can’t be developed until the market has relocated to its new home. Similarly, Site 10, the northernmost lot in the project area on Essex St. currently houses the Community Health

VOICES

worship SUNDAY, 8am & 9:15am St. Paul’s Chapel · Holy Eucharist 8pm · Compline by Candlelight

MONDAY—FRIDAY, 8:15am Trinity Church, All Saints’ Chapel Morning Prayer

SUNDAY, 9am & 11:15am Trinity Church · Preaching, music, and Eucharist · Child care available

MONDAY—FRIDAY, 12:05pm Trinity Church · Holy Eucharist

DAILY, 12:30pm St. Paul’s Chapel · Prayers for Peace

MONDAY—FRIDAY, 5:15pm Trinity Church, All Saints’ Chapel Evening Prayer Watch online webcast

A new semi-pro choir Schedule an audition today at

trinitywallstreet.org/downtownvoices

August 27-September 9, 2015

9


Stores are close to opening at Fulton Center

Downtown Express photo by Tequila Minsky

Strategic Response Group officers were quickly on the scene after the shooting at the federal building.

BY YANNI C RACK The new Fulton Center, which has been serving straphangers in Lower Manhattan for almost a year now, is set to finally become a shopping destination as well. Although the hub has been open since last November, the glassy storefronts of the center’s four-story atrium are still locked and void of life. But last week representatives from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and Westfield, the company that manages the retail leasing there and at the World Trade Center, said that shops will start filling the Fulton space in the fall and continue through 2016. A spokesperson for Westfield, which also manages the leasing at 3 and 4 World Trade Center nearby, wrote in an email that the center will have more than 20 stores, ranging from retail and service providers to eateries and full service restaurants. That means the businesses can soon get to work on earning back some of the whopping $1.4 billion the project cost the M.T.A. “Westfield is not yet paying rent to the M.T.A., but is covering the substantial operating expenses that would otherwise fall to us,” Adam Lisberg, a spokesperson for the authority, said. “Thus, we’re confident Westfield is working to open the retail as soon as possible, which will benefit everyone.” Lisberg noted that Westfield was in advanced stages of leasing activity, subtenant design and fit out work, expecting the first openings in the fall. Westfield won the lease for the center’s 180,000-square-foot retail in 2013 and will manage

the space for at least 20 years. Back then, the Downtown Express reported that none of the 150 businesses that were displaced by the project would get first dibs on the new space. Billy Baldwin, for example, owned a shop called Cookie Island at 189 Broadway until the construction pushed him out in 2005, forcing him into bankruptcy. Around noon on Thurs., Aug. 20, some workers appeared to be starting work on getting the commercial space ready. One door on the first floor was open, revealing a largely gutted room. Ryan Somlai was one of the few Downtown Express photo by Yannic Rack. passengers walking through the station. He works as a consultant for an This empty storefront in the Fulton subway center might finally be filled office technology company on near- by a shop come this fall. by John St. and said he was looking forward to the businesses moving in.  travelling and using the Fulton St. station a lot,” he “It might be nice,” he said. “I like this, I mean it’s said. air-conditioned, it’s got bathrooms and water founMarc Kremer, who was also passing through, tains. That’s definitely a plus. It’s not as hot as other agreed. “I think tourists would prefer somewhere a subway stations.” little more stately,” he said. “This will be for people Somlai added that he used the hub every day to who are on the go and just need something quick.” accompany clients to different parts of the city and Kremer said he didn’t use Fulton Center regularly, that he thought New Yorkers would be more drawn but added that he wouldn’t be interested in the stores to the station’s stores and eateries than tourists. “I and restaurants there anyway. “I would rather shop think it’ll be a hit among people like me who are somewhere that’s not a subway entrance,” he said.

Varick St. murder Continued from page 1

shooter, Kevin Downing, 68, of Fort Lee, N.J., was dead at the scene. Detectives, plainclothes officers and dozens of Strategic Response Group officers, as well as police and emergency vehicles, quickly converged on the scene Aug. 21. According to reports, Downing harbored a 15-year grudge over being fired from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which has an office on the building’s eighth floor. He had protested vainly that he was canned for being a whistleblower after arguing that the bureau’s moving its regional office to New Jersey was a waste of taxpayers’ money.

Downing had no connection to Camara, a father of four. A representative of a whistleblower-advocacy group quoted by the Times, described Downing as “obsessive” about his case. Authorities ruled out any connection to terrorism. This Monday, there were at least four Homeland Security police officers guarding the building’s Varick St. doors, while the Houston St. entrance, through which the gunman had entered, remained temporarily closed. They were still “cleaning it up,” according to the officers.

www.burnerlaw.com

Join us for breakfast as we discuss

Estate Planning and Medicaid Basics September 8 at 10:30 AM

Greenwich Village Bistro 13 Carmine Street, New York, NY 10014

— LINCOLN ANDERSON AND TEQUILA MINSKY

September 25 at 10:00 AM

Petite Abeille 401 East 20th Street, New York, NY 10010

IN PRINT OR ONLINE

W W W. D O W N T O W N E X P R E S S . C O M

10

August 27-September 9, 2015

(212) 867-3520

DowntownExpress.com

RSVP at (212) 867-3520 or by e-mail at burnerlaw12@gmail.com DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

11


SeaGlass Carousel starts spinning in Battery Park Continued from page 1

the park’s latest attraction. It was where, at the park’s southeastern entrance on Peter Minuit Plaza, the long-awaited SeaGlass Carousel spun into life for its first round at 1 p.m. The three women ranging in age from 26 to 33 laughed when asked if they had come with kids. “I’m obsessed with carousels and the ocean, so you combine them together and it’s pretty cool,” Christina said. Inside the steel and glass pavilion that now sits in the middle of the park, 30 exotic fish were bobbing up and down, glowing in softly changing colors and carrying children and adults of all ages around in a circle. The $16-million carousel is a project of The Battery Conservancy, which manages the park together with the city, and had been in the making for over a decade. “We didn’t really know what to expect,” Warrie Price, founder and president of the conservancy, said opening day. She was glancing over the waiting crowd, which she said had already started to form two hours before the opening. “It’s fabulous, I’m unbelievably happy. We went from this incredible conceptualization and enormous amount of work — because it’s a very sophisticated mechanism —to letting go of it and letting people enjoy it,” she told Downtown Express. Ground was finally broken on the project in 2010, almost a decade after it had been conceived in the aftermath

Warrie Price, president of The Battery Conservancy.

12

August 27-September 9, 2015

Seaport Museum gets Sandy Money

Downtown Express photo by Yannic Rack

A few of the carousel’s fish. Continued from page 12

Downtown Express photos by Yannic Rack

Sharon Arang with her son, Ari, 4, inside the SeaGlass Carousel. There were long lines Aug. 20 for the opening.

of the Sept. 11 attacks. The turntable on which the fish in the carousel are mounted and moved was installed in 2012, but Hurricane Sandy brought havoc to the park just two months later. This May the fiberglass fish were finally installed on the carousel platform and it is now open daily from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. every month except January and February. Last Thursday, the line quickly stretched all the way to the park entrance 200 feet away. Standing a little ways behind the birthday party were Paul and Paulette Begley from Seattle, who were visiting their children in the city for a week and had brought their two-year-old granddaughter Olyvia to try out the carousel. “Our kids have been following it in the paper for a few weeks,” Paulette Begley said. “It’s fabulous, it looks like you really feel like a fish.” Inside the carousel, the seats around the outer part of the platform were mostly left empty. “They all want to ride on the ones that go up and down,” one of the operators explained. The fish all whirl around clockwise but only 18 of them move up and down as well, by up to two and a half feet. Visitors can choose from butterfly-

fish, an imposing angelfish, a Siamese fighting fish, yellow lionfish, as well as triggerfish, wrasses and a blue discus. They range in size from seven to 14 feet but every single one can hold an adult and a small child. After their three-and-a-half-minute ride was over, Sharon Arang, who lives in Battery Park City, said, “We’re very excited. I told my kids it’s a privilege to live down here, and today we wanted to be tourists.” “It was really fun,” said nine-yearold Sofia, the oldest of her three children. But Ari, 4, who rode with his moth-

to come back at night, maybe with my husband, without the kids.” “What are you talking about?” her middle one asked, visibly alarmed. The conservancy’s Price thinks the carousel will attract even more people in the future, when the rest of the park is back in full operation. Currently, there are construction sites on two sides of the SeaGlass pavilion. “As soon as we get all this open,” she said, “what you would hope is that

someone could let their kids just run in the woodland, to just play while they’re waiting to get on the ride. And there we’ll have a playground next year. Over time, I think there’ll be a lot more here for families to enjoy.” She quickly darted off to remind one youngster not to play on the planted green strip near the line. When she returned, a look around brought a smile to her face. “This is our inspiration, this is our project, and we’ve worked on it for 11 years. And look how amazing it is!”

The South Street Seaport Museum received $10.4 million in much needed federal money this month to repair damage from Superstorm Sandy three years ago. On Aug. 13, the museum and U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler announced the funds, which come in the form of a grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Nadler said the allocation was important in “securing the longterm health and prosperity of the museum.” “After Hurricane Sandy, we fought to secure the necessary emergency funding to help New York recover,” Nadler said in a statement. “Lower Manhattan was badly hit by the storm and the Downtown community continues

to struggle to rebuild.” Almost three years ago, on Oct. 29, 2012, the Seaport Museum was inundated with up to seven feet of salty water — destroying elevators, escalators, electrical equipment as well as the heating and cooling system, according to the release. “We’ve been working for more than two years to secure funding for Sandy recovery,” Captain Jonathan Boulware, the museum’s executive director, said in a statement. “This grant is a strong step in the right direction for the Seaport Museum.” In 2013, Downtown Express reported that the Seaport Museum needed around $22 million for all the repairs.

Do you remember when ______________ happened downtown? ...We do. Visit Our Archives At Downtownexpress.com

er, thought it was a little scary. Arang said she didn’t mind the admission price of $5 per person, but added that it was “pretty steep.” “It’s a treat,” she said. “I don’t think it’s something that we’ll be doing on a daily basis.” Accompanying her were a neighbor, John Ryan, and his two kids, Jake, 8, and Lily, 5. “They loved it,” Ryan said of his children. “I want to come back at night. I get the feeling that’s the real show.” “Definitely,” agreed Arang. “I’d like Continued on page 13

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

13


TRANSIT SAM Thurs., Aug. 27 – Wed., Sept., 2 ALTERNATE SIDE PARKING RULES ARE IN EFFECT ALL WEEK Battle at the Meadowlands means more traffic on Manhattan streets! The Giants and Jets face off in a pre-season match 7 p.m. Saturday at MetLife Stadium. About 75,000 fans turned out last year, so a crush of drivers will take to the Lincoln Tunnel, sending more down to the Holland Tunnel. All Manhattan-bound lanes of the Brooklyn Bridge will close midnight Friday to 7 a.m. Saturday. A brief respite from the closures Saturday and Sunday nights, and then it’s back to all Manhattanbound lanes closed 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday through Thursday nights. In the Lincoln Tunnel, one tube will close 11 p.m. Thursday to 5 a.m. Friday. During the same time, one New York-bound lane and one New Jersey-bound lane will close in the Holland Tunnel. The Lincoln clo-

sure will send traffic down to the Holland, which will itself be slow for the lane closure. Expect delays into Canal St. On West St./Route 9A, one southbound lane will close between West Thames and Vesey Sts. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday and Friday. Road closures ahead for Lower Manhattan construction this week, including: Fletcher St. between Front and South Sts., Thames St. between Greenwich St. and Trinity Pl., and Dutch St. between Fulton and John Sts. Avenue D between 12th and 13th Sts. will also close. The Pace University dormitory opening this weekend will mean slowdowns on John St. between Broadway and Nassau St., Fulton St. between Dutch and William Sts., and William St. between Beekman and Spruce Sts. as students move into housing 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Stone Street Pedestrian Mall will close Stone St. between Hanover Sq. and Broad St., and Mill Ln. between Stone and South

William Sts. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day this week. Email your traffic, transit and parking questions to transitsam@ downtownexpress.com. Check www. GridlockSam.com and follow me @GridlockSam for the latest traffic news, and for info about my new book, “Street Smart: The Rise of Cities and The Fall of Cars.”

IN PRINT OR ONLINE

W W W. D O W N T O W N E X P R E S S . C O M

Lower Manhattan Specialists in Co-Op Transitioning

“We Specialize in “We Specialize in Lower Manhattan co-op Lower Manhattan co-op Transitioning & Luxury Condos” Transitioning & Luxury Condos” Dixon Chow

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson ph 212.688.1000 x 579 cell 917.363.2857 Dchow@crrnyc.com

Dixon Chow Jason Hernandez

Real Estate Salesperson Licensed Licensed Real Estate Salesperson ph 212.688.1000 ph 212-688-1000 x 416 x 579 cell 917.363.2857 cell 646-752-0669 Dchow@crrnyc.com Jhernandez@crrnyc.com

Charles Rutenberg LLC

3024 QUENTIN ROAD • BROOKLYN NY 127 East 56th St, New York, NY 10022

Jason Hernandez

Licensed Real Estate Salesperson ph 212-688-1000 x 416 cell 646-752-0669 Jhernandez@crrnyc.com

Charles Rutenberg LLC 127 East 56th St, New York, NY 10022

718-339-0700

“Expert knowledge of buying and selling process” “Expert knowledge of buying and selling process” Bi-lingual - Mandarin and Cantonese Bi-lingual - Mandarin and Cantonese Over 13 years experience Seaport and Financial District real estate Over 13 years experience Seaport and Financial District real estate

STONEYCREEKCREMATION.COM

SILVER BUFFET PACKAGE

$

45

PER PERSON

*MINIMUM 50 GUESTS

Cold Display WHEATBERRY SALAD BRUSCHETTA CHICK PEA SALAD TORTELLINI PESTO PASTA WITH SPINACH AND FETA CHEESE PASTA PRIMAVERA FRIED EGGPLANT STACKS MOZZARELLA CAPRESE OLIVE SALAD

Stoney Creek Cremation & Burial Society is an alternative to costly funeral home and cemetery services and merchandise, allowing us to leave a more meaningful, healthier, greener society to those we leave behind. Join our Society today and know you have chosen to leave a footprint for the future. For those wishing to preplan their final contribution to society, if paid in full today we will include the cost of the crematory.

Pasta

choose any two

PENNE ALLA VODKA BAKED ZITI CAVATELLI AND BROCCOLI RABE LINGUINE ALLE VONGOLE RIGATONI BOLOGNESE

Entrees

choose any three

CHICKEN MARSALA CHICKEN PARMIGIANA CHICKEN FRANCESE CHICKEN SCARPRIELLO SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA EGGPLANT ROLLATINI PORK SCARPRIELLO VEAL PARMIGIANA

Salad

choose one

CAESAR SALAD TRADITIONAL GARDEN SALAD ORGANIC MIXED GREEN SALAD

Choice Of Vegetables choose one

BROCCOLI W/ GARLIC & OLIVE OIL STRING BEANS & BABY POTATOES ASSORTED MIXED VEGETABLES ROASTED POTATOES YELLOW RICE

Dessert choose one

SHEET CAKE ASSORTED ITALIAN COOKIES & PASTRIES COLOMBIAN COFFEE, DECAF, & TEA

Monday through Friday & Sunday Evening Saturday Evening add $10.00 per person Must Choose Either: Wine, Beer and Soda $10.00 per person or Open Premium Bar $20.00 per person Price does not include tax and service

($995 Society’s Service Fee)

101 CITY ISLAND AVENUE | BRONX, NY 10464 | TELEPHONE: 347-680-3865 | EMAIL: SCAVELLOP@AOL.COM Acting as a for profit organization. Crematory fee is not included, death certificates and disposition permits not included in service fee.

14

August 27-September 9, 2015

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

15


Talking Point

Can you believe sweet summer smells in N.Y.C.?

Take Battery Park City over —— please PUBLISHER

Jennifer Goodstein EDITOR

Josh Rogers REPORTER

Dusica Sue Malesevic ARTS EDITOR

Scott Stiffler EXECUTIVE VP OF ADVERTISING

Amanda Tarley

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Jack Agliata Allison Greaker Jennifer Holland Jim Steele Julio Tumbaco ART DIRECTOR

Michael Shirey GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Andrew Gooss Chris Ortiz PHOTOGRAPHERS

Milo Hess Jefferson Siegel PUBLISHER EMERITUS

John W. Sutter

PUBLISHED BY

NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC ONE METROTECH CENTER NEW YORK, NY 11201 PHONE: (212) 229-1890 FAX: (212) 229-2790 WWW.DOWNTOWNEXPRESS.COM NEWS@DOWNTOWNEXPRESS.COM Downtown Express is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech Center North, 10th Floor, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201 (212) 229-1890. The entire contents of the newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2015 Community Media LLC. PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue.

Member of the New York Press Association Member of the National Newspaper Association

© 2015 Community Media, LLC

16

August 27-September 9, 2015

B Y D A NIE L S Q UADRON Over the last 40 years, Battery Park City has gone from a concept to the extraordinary neighborhood we see today. Walking the neighborhood’s streets and parks, visiting its schools, restaurants and offices, talking to its residents, no one could argue that the change is anything less than dramatic, in just about every way. Except for one thing. The governance of Battery Park City is largely unchanged. It still has the same structure it had when it was a start-up development project. But it is a development project no more. So much has evolved in Battery Park City. It is time for its governance to evolve too. Currently, the Battery Park City Authority board is appointed by the governor, and confirmed by the State Senate. Of the six board members, only one is a local Battery Park City resident. As we’ve seen from many of the controversies over the years, that system, and the dynamic it creates, just doesn’t work. This year alone, there’s been real community concern surrounding Downtown Little League ballfield permitting, the operation of North Cove Marina, and the sudden departure of the long-serving Battery Park City Parks Conservancy head [See related article, P.5]. In part, this is indicative of a board structure that was not designed for community engagement. In fact, this type of controversy at B.P.C.A. is nothing new. As far back as 2010, Community Board 1 was calling for a stronger local voice in decision-making. It is not just decisions within the community. In 2009, the state swept B.P.C.A. funds, using authority money to close a statewide budget gap.

That’s why, along with my elected colleagues, I’ve long supported more B.P.C. resident appointments on the board — and voted against otherwise qualified non-resident appointments solely for that reason. But even bigger than that, we have an opportunity to move towards city control of B.P.C. Did you know that the city has an option to take over governance of Battery Park City? This presents a unique opportunity to reform decision-making and integrate local voices. City control leads to more local accountability, and can better reinforce structures for community dialogue. My call for the city to exercise its option is not new, nor is it in response to today’s short-term controversies. I first called for this structural change when a different board and administration were running the authority. Fortunately, city control wouldn’t need to be developed from scratch. I’ve worked with colleagues to get city control at Governors Island and Brooklyn Bridge Park. At both, we insisted on local community and elected official representation. Though I don’t always agree with each controlling entity’s actions, these structures have forced robust community engagement before decisions are made. If the city does exercise its option, it must first commit to more local representation on the board. At Governors Island, that means the state senator, assemblymember, and community board each get an appointment. At Brooklyn Bridge Park, the City Council and borough president get an appointment as well. Under city control, the B.P.C. managing entity would also be more structurally aligned with the city’s community board system, and required to follow city procedures and processes.

Daniel Squadron

City control can also better ensure that surpluses generated from B.P.C. PILOTs (payment in lieu of taxes) are not raided to close unrelated budget caps. That can’t be how state and city budgets are balanced. With residents and local small businesses being priced out, Lower Manhattan is also facing a critical affordability crisis. Excess funds under city control are more likely to be used to support and increase affordability in and near Battery Park City. B.P.C. is a real success story, and much of that credit belongs to the Battery Park City Authority. For decades, it has accomplished a great deal as a developer. But, as with all successful construction, once it is done, the equipment and scaffolding are taken away, revealing something newly built. That change from builder to built has not been reflected in the authority’s governing structure. The community has a great opportunity here, and should work with the city to make it a reality. Daniel Squadron is the state senator for the 26th District, which includes Battery Park City.

Letters S O U T H B R ID G E M A S S APPEAL To The Editor: I am writing in rebuttal to the comments made in a recent article concerning Mass being said in the community room at Southbridge Towers (news article, Aug. 13 – 26, “Mass exodus at Southbridge: Church services end”). There is a statement in the article saying that the service in the community room has become a “Mass of convenience” for the residents.

There are many people, seniors, middle-aged and young children who attend Mass, at S.B.T. I recently started to attend Mass there and will admit that while it is convenient I also found it to be personal, comforting and bonding. I came to regard my fellow attendees on a more friendly level, I found Father Hayes and Father Mark, when saying Mass, were directly speaking to each and everyone of us. Their sermons were said and done on a more one-on-one basis,

sermons that we actually listened to and applied to our everyday lives. They communicated with all of us in a manner that made us feel like we actually belonged to a close-knit family. The volunteers at the Mass made the service relaxing and welcoming. I am not quite sure why anyone feels that they should have a say in where Continued on page 17

DowntownExpress.com

BY LENORE SKENAZY Summer in New York is nothing if not pungent. So pungent that there are certain smells that conjure up a New York August the way the smell of crayons whisks you right back to first grade. “I used to work in Flatbush and in the summer the fish store kept its door open,” recalls Megan Perlleshi, a mom of two who has since moved to Long Island. Every time she neared the shop she would literally sprint out into the street until she was past the miasma. The aroma? “Fish and garbage.” It is a city summer combo others remarked upon, too. For marketing consultant Amanda Hass, it is the smell of dying flowers that she associates with the Upper East Side in August. “Most residents are gone to their summer places,” Hass says. So the bodega flowers wilt right along with the rest of us, giving off a sad scent. By contrast, Hass added, the open windows to hot laundry rooms give the air a fresh Clorox smell that makes up for the funereal flora. Rain in the city summer also has a special smell. “Warm rain on hot asphalt in Brooklyn is a memory I’ve carried with

me my whole life,” says media strategist Liz Polay-Wettengel, who now lives in Massachusetts. Business editor Patrick Rizzo, still here in Gotham, is specific in the type of rain that brings him back: the sudden sun shower. And then there are all the foods smells on steroids the minute the mercury hits 90. Walk by a greengrocer and the peaches are positively seductive. They make you want to eat healthy. There are also the smells that make you want to eat charred meat — lots of it, immediately, even if you are a vegan with a history of heart issues. “Walking through the park on the West Side Highway in that huge multi-racial area of picnics, smelling delicious barbecue from all of the world…” That smell sends transit worker Mike Ecker into a tizzy. The sticky sweet smell of candied nuts does it for Tatum Barrows, a high-school grad from Long Island working in the city for the summer. For Martin Kleinman,

author of The Home Front, it’s “the wild scallions that grew along the fence to the V.A. Hospital in Kingsbridge.” He’s right — neighborhoods have their own smells. “The smell of anisette toast wafting from the Stella D’Oro Bakery as you whiz through Riverdale on the Major Deegan Expressway” remains a local scent memory for Stacey Gordon and legions of Bronx dwellers. At the other end of the city, lifelong New Yorker and clown entrepreneur (yup!) Michael Fandal recalls growing up in Coney Island, seven seconds from the beach. “Summers included ocean air, rich and invigorating, and the smell of morning cold beach sand beneath the Boardwalk.” There were also Nathan’s hot dogs and fries, overflowing litter cans, and stylish women in their summer dresses, all wafting their particular perfumes, which mingled with the whiff of coffee whenever anyone opened the door of a Dunkin’ Donuts, and chlorine whenever you walked by a public pool. Cut grass and freshly turned dirt send Michael Virgintino back to childhood in the Bronx, where he helped his dad tend their small yard and otherwise was

constantly playing baseball on park fields. Writer Nancy Mattia claims it is car exhaust that brings a smile. When she was growing up in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, Vito the Ice Cream Man would drive down her street on summer nights. “Because I lived down the bock, I would pass the back of his truck first with its engine running.” Hence the association of exhaust fumes with joy. And then there is the city scent that stands above — or really, below — them all. The one you smell without even descending the stairs. New Yorkers have likened it to “someone getting a perm in the sewer under a slaughterhouse,” “the armpit of Satan” “inside the stomach of a sick animal” and perhaps most aptly, “a warm metallic smell with hints of urine.” Some day in some far off town you may catch a whiff of something similar and be instantly transported back to the New York City Subway on a sizzling summer day. May that memory be sweet. Or at least tolerable.

erosity to us and is always mindful of us and our needs.” Telling people to watch services on TV, just doesn’t cut it.

Three hundred sixty-six people in Battery Park City think everything is wonderful? They do not see the traffic on South End Ave. engorged by tourist buses and block-long trailer trucks? They do not ride the M20 bus that is totally unreliable? They do not notice the arbitrary decisions that Brookfield Place (tata) is allowed to make to create a “junkyard” atmosphere outdoors juxtaposed to its overpriced shops indoors? Did students interview only other students perhaps or, at least, was it only-millennials-need-reply to this survey? The problems in Downtown neighborhoods cannot possibly be captured in a survey as unreliable as this, and the results are so superficial that taking them seriously makes your newspaper look silly.  The project makes Community Board 1 look silly as well. One major source of dissatisfaction in ALL the Downtown neighborhoods cited is Goliath developers, like prehistoric monsters, stomping roughshod over citizens’ rights by usurping space that only Goliath developers can afford. That is more complicated than “more night life.”

Lenore Skenazy is a keynote speaker and author and founder of the book and blog Free-Range Kids.

Letters Continued from page 16

anyone should attend Mass. The service at S.B.T. is done in a reverent atmosphere where all the attendees feel like we are where we belong. Convenient, absolutely. Needed, absolutely.  The people who are in wheelchairs, who are too old or too sick or incapacitated to walk elsewhere to attend Mass are so devastated by this.  If the people who feel that watching Mass on TV is an option then shame on them. Being at Mass in person is what makes everyone feel good about attending and receiving holy communion by a priest, and not by a surrogate. What difference does it make where Mass is held and where anyone should pray? Why should the opinions of a few people change something that has been working well for many years? Lorraine Fittipaldi

To The Editor: I was shocked and dismayed to learn that the Catholic Mass celebrated every Sunday inside Southbridge Towers comDowntownExpress.com

munity room has been suspended since 7/31/15. There are a variety of lame explanations, from the 8/2/15 Sunday Daily News article, which quotes the Archdiocese spokesperson, Joseph Zwilling that “A Mass in an apartment building was not appropriate”; someone quoted in Downtown Express says that “It became a Mass of convenience, not a Mass of necessity.” I’m sure Pope Francis, “The Pope of the People” will be very disappointed to learn of this decision.  Although, the Church of St. Andrews, as well as Our Lady of Victory are mentioned as the preferred houses of worship in our community, we are a neighborhood that is continuously under construction.  It is difficult to navigate broken streets, and traffic for people without walking challenges. Last winter, while most of N.Y.C. was snowbound, Sunday services were conducted with regularity at our beautiful newly renovated community room in Southbridge. In fact, if you look at the capital campaign web page for Our Lady of Victory Church, it says ”we should remember that God will not be outdone in His gen-

Robin Warshay

QUE S T I ON ABLE S UR V E Y To The Editor: Re: “Survey shows some satisfaction, but also garbage problems” (news article, Aug. 13 - 26): You do your industry no favors by publishing the thinnest of information as splashy news. What criteria were used in interviewing people for their neighborhood “satisfaction”?  Is it definite that those interviewed actually live in and spend time in the neighborhoods their answers supposedly represent?  What age groups were interviewed?  Were “the students” appropriately monitored for their work?  I have huge reservations about these conclusions spread with great showiness over two pages of your newspaper that Catherine McVay Hughes chooses to accept as what “Community Board 1 needs.” 

Dolores D’Agostino   August 27-September 9, 2015

17


ELECT

DENNIS GAULT & TERRI CUDE DEMOCRATIC DISTRICT LEADERS

World Trade Center

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 10 “We Pledge To Serve The People… …not the Real Estate Developers”

Prostate Cancer Deadline Downtown residents/workers must register for compensation by

October 21

st

(you must have been diagnosed with prostate cancer after 9/11/05)

70 Other Cancers have been linked to the WTC toxic dust.

You must register within 2 years of your diagnosis

ENDORSED BY: Jenifer Rajkumar,

Robert “Bo” Riccobono,

Democratic District Leader

Faculty Against the Sexton (NYU) Plan*

Paul Newell,

Tom Goodkind,

Democratic District Leader

founder & conductor, TriBattery Pops, volunteer community band*

Alan Gerson,

Downtown Express photo by Milo Hess

Eyes of the beholder “Saw something screwy near the South Street Seaport yesterday,” Downtown Express photographer Milo Hess wrote to us. He was of course referring to this photo he sent us, and not the ongoing development battle in the neighborhood. The robot-looking face with screws for eyes is by the Titanic Memorial T:8.75” Lighthouse at Fulton and South Sts.

former City Councilmember

co-Chair NoHo Neighborhood Association*

Sara Jones,

Chair, LaGuardia Corner Gardens*

Ray Cline,

Georgette Fleischer,

Resident Chair, Bleecker Area Merchants & Residents Association (BAMRA)*

* = For Identification Purposes Only

Co-Chair, South Village Neighbors*

Jim Stratton,

former chair, Community Board 1*

Founder & President, Friends of Petrosino Square*

Pete Davies,

Founder, Downtown Action Coalition*

Jeanne Wilcke,

Micki McGee,

Stan Ries, co-Chair,

Sean Sweeney,

NoHo Neighborhood Association*

Director, SoHo Alliance*

Mark Crispin Miller,

Michele Campo,

Faculty Against the Sexton (NYU) Plan*

Chair, Bowery Block Association*

Village Reform Democratic Club

* UNIQUE MECHANICAL - DO NOT RESIZE *

YOU CAN’T TAKE YOUR EYES OFF GAS SAFETY FOR ONE SECOND.

Call Attorneys Barasch McGarry Kreindler & Kreindler

1-877-WTC-0911

18

August 27-September 9, 2015

Gas safety starts at home. So make sure your burners are turned off when you’re not using them. Always store combustible items far away from those appliances. Don’t step, sit, lean or place any objects on gas pipes or equipment. And, if you do smell gas (think: rotten eggs), leave the area immediately and then call 911 or 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633). Gas safety involves everyone. To do your part, read all our tips at conEd.com/GasSafety.

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

19


Getting by with a little help from strangers

LIFE DOWNTOWN BY VICTORIA GRANTHAM We helped our friends move recently from a suburban community in New Jersey to a more rural area in New York. (By “we” I mean I paid for the pizza lunch and lounged in the pool with the kids while my husband Jay and his best friend sweated through their clothes lifting a piano, several dressers, and multiple couches.) Our friends told us about the amazingly warm and personal reception they received when they schlepped the first portion of their stuff to their new house the previous weekend. One neighbor brought a delicious homemade pie, while another delivered a heartfelt handwritten note expressing excitement and offering assistance. What? I felt like I’d been transported into the movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” or something. I thought about what it might be like if/when we move from one apartment to another. I couldn’t really envision the welcome wagon rolling out for us. Come to think of it, I’ve never stopped to extend a formal pie and card-filled howdy to a new neighbor myself, so it’s karma, perhaps. But mainly it’s because we live in buildings with hundreds of other people and people come and go all the time. Making a big deal of every new occupant would be a fulltime job. The realization though caused me to reflect on what

E PR

SE

S NT

:

Kidville is an all-in-one enrichment center for newborns all the way up to six year-olds right in the heart of the Financial District. In their two-story, air-conditioned facility, they have pretty much everything you need to care for your little

20

August 27-September 9, 2015

“Banana Man,” the always upbeat fruit vendor on W. Broadway near Park Pl.

New York City dwellers actually do for each other. There are a lot of small town expressions of love and kindness occurring in this big city of ours every day. Here are some I’ve experienced: I encountered an angel who rescued us from the rain and ourselves. One morning after the usual circus of barely con-

trolled chaos, I finally got the three of us (me, plus my then one- and four-year-olds) out of the apartment and onto the street — in a torrential downpour. I had grabbed an umbrella, but it was the size of a Frisbee and, needless to say, insufficient. I was anxious as I was about to be late for a meeting in Midtown and both kids were crying. Trudging ahead in the downpour I must’ve looked bleak — like someone seriously considering quitting (which I was) — because a small woman with a jumbo family-sized umbrella came up on my side and said, “I just dropped my kids off. I’ll take you wherever you’re going.” She committed to us without knowing our destination, or what she was getting herself into, but she made her unconditional offer nonetheless and I accepted. She walked the five blocks with us to the boys’ daycare. When we arrived we hugged. I looked down to unlock the gate and by the time I looked back up she’d disappeared. I’ve been helped by strangers on the subway more times than I can count. Allow me to complain for a moment before I launch into my moment of gratitude: Why oh why don’t we have a subway system that uniformly accommodates wheelchairs, strollers, etc.? I couldn’t even begin to speculate what possible acceptable answer there is, but at least we help each other cope with it. When I used to take the kids by subway to school in FiDi we’d get out at Rector — a stop without elevators. On an almost daily basis Continued on page 21

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT one. “Our goal is to provide a true community base for all FiDi families, a home away from home” said Sadia Brangan, Kidville’s “mayor.” With amazing classes run by dedicated and enthusiastic teachers with at least a 4-to-1 student-teacher ratio, a highend boutique with discounts for members, a salon staffed with a stylist with more than thirty years of experience, award winning birthday parties, and a pre-school alternative program that focuses on learning through play and sensory exploration — Kidville is the town you wish your kid could grow up in!

THURS, AUG. 27

Activities AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER. 9, 2015 LONG-RUNNING ART TIME: Nelson A Rockefeller Park, Battery Park City; (212) 267–9700; bpcparks.org; Thursdays, 10:30 am– noon, Now – Thurs, Oct. 29; Free.  Young artists are introduced to paper, clay, paint and other supplies.  ART AND GAMES: Nelson A. Rockefeller Park, Battery Park City; bpcparks.org/event; Thursdays, 3:30–5:30 pm, Now – Thurs, Oct. 29; Free.  Create a fun project, make friends and play games. For children 5 years and older.  ARTS ISLAND OUTPOST: Governors Island, Outside Building 14; Nolan Park; (212) 274–0986; cmany.org; Saturdays and Sundays, 12 pm to 4 pm, Now – Sun, Sept. 27; Free.  The whole family will enjoy making artwork inspired by Governors Island. Participants create works with natural materials found on the island, including rocks, recyclables and more. Hosted by the Children’s Museum of Art. 

ART AND PLAY: Robert F. Wagner Park, Battery Park City; (212) 267–9700; bpcparks.org; Mondays – Wednesdays, 10 am–noon, Now – Wed, Oct. 28; Free.  Preschoolers drop-in and play with other toddlers, in this interactive play time on the grassy lawn. Sing and hear stories too. 

BASKETBALL CLINIC: Nelson A. Rockefeller Park, Battery Park City; bpcparks.org/event; Mondays, 3:30–5:30 pm, Now – Mon, Oct. 26; Free.  Staffers teach children of all ages the basics of the sport. No classes May 25, September 7 and October 12. 

CRAFTING HOUR: 165 William St, Tribeca; 212-732-5182; kidzcentralstation.com; 11 am – noon; $10 An hour of craft activities around a weekly theme such as spring, nature or transportation. Suitable for boys and girls ages 18 months through 5 years accompanied by their caregivers. Advanced registration required. BABY LAPTIME: Battery Park City Library, 175 North End Ave; (212) 790-3499; nypl.org; 11:30 a.m.; Free. Babies and their caregivers can enjoy simple stories, lively songs and rhymes and meet other babies in the neighborhood. For children 0-18 months.

YOUNG SPROUTS GARDENING: Nelson A Rockefeller Park (Children’s Garden), Battery Park City; (212) 267–9700; bpcparks. org; Tuesdays, 3:15 – 3:45 pm, Now – Thurs, Oct. 29; Free.  Little ones 3 to 5 years old learn about simple gardening projects. Space limited first come, first served.  PLAYTIME: Teardrop Park, Battery Park City; bpcparks.org; Wednesdays, 3:30–5:30 pm, Now – Wed, Oct. 28; Free.  Staffers teach children the value of play and create fun projects in drawing, sculpting and murals. For children 5 and older. 

BABY LAPTIME SEE THURS, AUG. 27.

TUES, SEPT. 1 PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Battery Park City Library, 175 North End Ave; (212) 790-3499; nypl.org; 4 p.m.; Free. Listen to stories picked out especially for preschoolers. Older and younger siblings welcome. BABY LAPTIME

FRI, AUG. 28 SOCCER CLINIC: Nelson A. Rockefeller Park, Battery Park City; bpcparks.org; Tuesdays, 2:30– 3:15 pm; 3:30–4:15 pm and 4:30–5:30 pm, Now – Tues, Oct. 27; Free.  Children learn the fundamentals of the game and preschoolers have fun kicking, running and being part of a team. Drop in. For ages 3 to 11 years old. 

(212) 790-3499; nypl.org; 4 pm; Free. A librarian shares lively picture books, finger plays and action songs with children 12-36 months and their caregivers.

CLAY WORKSHOP: Cannon’s Walk, 207 Front St.; 10 am – noon; Free.  Join with clay artist Joe Vena for a hands-on sculpture class. Crafting Hour; 9:30-10:30am SEE THURS, AUG. 27.

SAT, AUG. 29 DRAWING IN THE PARK: Pier A, Battery Park City; 212-267-9700; bpcparks.org; 10 am – noon; Free. Sketch and paint the Hudson River and parks with an artist/educator. Materials provided. South Cove.

SEE THURS, AUG. 27.

WED, SEPT. 2 TODDLER MUSIC WITH IRKA MATEO: American Indian Museum Heye Center, Bowling Green; (212) 514-3704; americanindian.si.edu; Free. Learn about Taino culture through stories, song & movement. Ages 18 months - 4 years. TODDLER STORY TIME: 10:30 am See Mon, Aug. 31.

SUN, SEPT. 6 SUN, AUG. 30 BIG CITY FISHING: Pier 25, Hudson River Park at N. Moore St.; hudsonriverpark.org; 1-5 pm; Free. Summer program for those as young as five who are eager to learn both how to fish and about the Hudson River environment. Rods, reels, bait and instruction all provided.

BIG CITY FISHING SEE SUN, AUG. 30.

TUES, SEPT. 8 BABY LAPTIME SEE THURS, AUG. 27.

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME SEE TUES, SEPT. 1.

MON, AUG. 31

WED, SEPT. 9

TODDLER STORY TIME: Battery Park City Library, 175 North End Ave;

TODDLER STORY TIME: 10:30 am

love by singing potassium’s praises. On W. Broadway just off of Park Pl., there’s a fruit vendor known neighborhood-wide for his upbeat attitude. He’s the diametric opposite of the famed Soup Nazi from “Seinfeld.” He sings his trademark tune, “banana, banana, potassium, potassium” without fail and often accompanies it with a jig. My kids are crazy about him and they do a version of his routine at home. His spirit and unique zeal reminds me of Roberto Benigni, the guy who created “Life is Beautiful” and accepted his Academy Award in the most

memorable and enthusiastic way possible — by scaling chairs and applauding the audience. I feel so fortunate to have someone teaching my kids about the power of a positive attitude in such a vivid way on a daily basis. It may not be Mayberry, and the welcome wagons don’t take a conventional shape and arrive at the same time, but we have heart.

SEE MON, AUG. 31.

Help from strangers Continued from page 20

ADDRESS: 40 Gold Street, New York, NY 10038 YEARS IN BUSINESS: 9 PHONE: 212-566-2020 WEBSITE: www.kidville.com BEST KNOWN FOR: Children, Education, and Fun!

DowntownExpress.com

someone would see me with the stroller, two kids, three lunches, backpacks, etc. facing down the dozens of stairs and take mercy on me. People of all sorts have stopped to help me lug my kids and our stuff up those stairs — men in business suits rushing to meetings, older women, non-English speaking tourists, teenagers. I never once had to ask. Seeing how many people are willing to step up and help is truly unbelievable and inspiring. A cop stopped traffic when my kid DowntownExpress.com

had a meltdown mid-street crossing. All parents have experienced the dreaded toddler tantrum, but there’s a particularly unnerving urban version that involves the strong-willed toddler thrusting his body onto the asphalt while traversing the street. I have experienced this once — right as the light was changing. Thankfully, a tuned in cop was standing nearby and intervened. He stopped traffic and helped me haul my mini menace to the curb. It was a major relief and I’m eternally grateful. The Banana Man showers us with

Victoria Grantham, a writer and communications professional, is raising her family in Tribeca. August 27-September 9, 2015

21


EFFICIENT CARE TRAINING CENTER EFFICIENT CARE TRAINING CENTER

40 Hour Instructor Development Course

GRAND OPENING

Instructors: Tom Flynn & Bob Loveridge We have NYS DCJS mandated Security Guard Training Courses: Jacket • 8 Hour Pre-Assignment Training Course Name • 16 Hour On the Job Training Course • 8 Hour Annual In-Service 4C 6 x Specialty Courses: • Fire Guard Prep Class

HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING New to our Jamaica Campus Home Health Aide Training 5.69

EFFICIENT CARE TRAINING CENTER Su Futuro Empieza AHORA! Cada curso tiene que necesitas paraestar certificado se ofrece diario. (Cursos de Dia y de Noche)

Instructores con experiencia Assistimos en buscar trabajo

Su Futuro Empieza Ahora!

Home Health Aide (Day and Evening Courses) Experienced Instructors Job Assistance Provided

• OSHA 10 • OSHA 30 •CPR / AED

Asistente de salud domiciliaria

YourFuture Future Starts NOW! Your Starts NOW! Every course you need to be certified is offered daily.

a division of

Day and Evening Courses• Experienced Instructors 54-06 Myrtle Avenue, 2nd Fl. 168-25 Jamaica Avenue JOB Assistance Provided • Se Habla Espanol

Jamaica, NY 11432 Ridgewood, NY 11385 168-25 Jamaica Ave., 54-06 Myrtle Ave., 2nd Fl.718-609-1674 718-307-7141 Jamaica, NY 11432 Ridgewood, NY 11385 718-609-1674 718-307-7141 EXCLUSIVE! Accessible by Accessible by FJE M andBECOME Q58, Q55, B52,A TRAINLTO and Q24, Q56

B26, B54

SECURITY GUARD INSTRUCTOR 40 Hour Instructor Development Course

Instructors: Tom Flynn & Bob Loveridge SECURITY GUARD TRAINING

We have NYS DCJS mandated Security Guard Training Courses: • 8 Hour Pre-Assignment Training Course Become a NY State Certifi ed Job Security Guard Today! • 16 Hour On the Training Course • 8 Hour Annual In-Service

8 Specialty HR. Pre-assignment Courses: • Fire Guard Prep Class OSHA 10 Job • OSHA 30 •CPR / AED 16 HR. •on the Training Fireguard Prep CARE TRAINING CENTER IDC - (InstructorEFFICIENT Development Course)

Su Futuro Empieza AHORA! Jamaica Ave., paraestar certificado se ofrece diario. 54-06 Myrtle Ave., 2nd Fl.Cada168-25 curso tiene que necesitas Jamaica, NY 11432 Ridgewood, NY 11385 Asistente de salud domiciliaria a division of 718-609-1674 718-307-7141 (Cursos de Dia y de Noche) Accessible by L M and Q58, Q55, B52, B26, B54

22

August 27-September 9, 2015

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

Accessible Instructores con by experiencia J Ebuscar trabajo Assistimos Fen and Q24, Q56 August 27-September 9, 2015

23


Katz Moving has a stellar reputation for excellence in the moving industry.

Check out our 5 Star

Customer Reviews

Please mention “Community Media” when placing your move. Katz Moving will donate 5% of your move to The Ali Forney Center

855.692.5289

katzmoving.com

47-47 Austell Pl., Long Island City, NY 11101 • NYSDOT #T-38598 • USDOT #2280679 Terms and conditions apply, can't be applied with any other offer, offer expires on 3/31/2015. Must mention "community media" when calling.

TM

SERVING THE DOWNTOWN COMMUNITY FOR OVER 10 YEARS

OPEN HOUSE N O

R E S E R V A T I O N

FiDi CAMPUS:

Wednesday, September 30th 5:30-6:30 PM

2 Gold St. NYC 10038

2 3 A C 4 5 J Z

R E Q U I R E D

TriBeCa CAMPUS:

Monday, September 21st 5:30-6:30 PM

53 Beach St. NYC 10013

Montessori Certified Teachers Full and Half Day Classes for Children 2-6 Years Yoga, Art, Spanish, Performing Arts After School Programs: Tae Kwon Do, Organic Cooking, Meditation & Mindfulness, Latin Dance & Rhythm, Yoga & Gymnastics, Storytelling, Russian

1 2 3 A C E

WE’RE EXPANDING! (212) 334-0400 administration@montessorimanhattan.com

24

August 27-September 9, 2015

www.montessorimanhattan.com

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

25


26

August 27-September 9, 2015

DowntownExpress.com

DowntownExpress.com

August 27-September 9, 2015

27


Do You or Does Your Child Need Health Insurance? Apply for enrollment all year long

for these New York State-sponsored health insurance programs

Child Health Plus

Free or low-cost monthly premiums For children under 19 who live in New York State. There are no copays for care or services. Coverage may be free or as little as $9 per child per month based on income and family size. Benefits to keep kids healthy and on the go • Well-child care and checkups • Immunizations • Prescription drugs • X-rays and lab tests • Diagnosis and treatment of illness and injury • Dental and vision care • Hospital inpatient and emergency care • Speech and hearing care • and much more!

Medicaid

No monthly premiums! Medicaid Managed Care is for children and adults who live in New York State and who meet certain income and disability requirements. Benefits for you and your family • Checkups • Well-child visits • Preventive care • Immunizations • Women’s health and pregnancy care • Treatment for illness or injury • X-rays and lab tests • Hospital, emergency, and urgent care • Prescription drug coverage (copays may apply) • Dental care • Eye exams and glasses • Speech and hearing therapy (limits may apply) • and much more!

It’s easy to apply - all year long!

Apply for Child Health Plus and Medicaid Managed Care offered by Fidelis Care through NY State of Health: The Official Health Plan Marketplace, at www.nystateofhealth.ny.gov. A Fidelis Care Representative can help you complete an application form. Call 1-888-FIDELIS (1-888-343-3547). To learn more about applying for health insurance, including Child Health Plus and Medicaid through NY State of Health: The Official Health Plan Marketplace, visit www.nystateofhealth.ny.gov or call 1-855-355-5777.

1-888-FIDELIS | fideliscare.org (1-888-343-3547) •

28

August 27-September 9, 2015

DowntownExpress.com

Profile for NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA

DOWNTOWN EXPRESS, AUG. 27,2015  

DOWNTOWN EXPRESS, AUG. 27,2015

DOWNTOWN EXPRESS, AUG. 27,2015  

DOWNTOWN EXPRESS, AUG. 27,2015