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Volume 82, Number 20 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

October 18 - 24, 2012

Double the Love: Nonprofit meals provider to grow BY LINCOLN ANDERSON God’s Love We Deliver is embarking on an ambitious project to more than double the size of its Soho headquarters building at Spring St. and Sixth Ave. When completed, the $22 million project would allow the organization to cook and deliver twice as many meals as it currently does to individuals afflicted with H.I.V./AIDS, cancer and other serious ill-

Courtesy Pier 40 Champions

A view of how Pier 40 could look under a new plan proposed by the Pier 40 Champions coalition. Two 15-story towers — either for residential or commercial office use — would be built on land just east of the pier, but still within the Hudson River Park.

Leagues toss a change-up on Pier 40 buildings idea BY LINCOLN ANDERSON The notion of constructing housing on Pier 40 to raise revenue for the cashstrapped Hudson River Park has met stiff resistance from some quarters — including from many Lower West Side residents and, most notably, Assemblymember Deborah Glick, whose district includes the pier. Now, a coalition of the area’s youth sports leagues, which heavily use the crumbling West Houston St. pier — and which also support residential use on it — are “putting on a shift,” to use a baseball term. Their idea is still to construct new buildings in the park, not on Pier 40 itself, but instead in the open area between the pier

and the Hudson River bike path. That area technically is within Hudson River Park. A rezoning would be needed to allow the towers’ construction since the area’s zoning is manufacturing, from its days as a working waterfront. The towers’ height is pegged at roughly 15 stories, and was based on the height of the nearby Morton Square apartment complex, which is around that tall. Due to the cramped space in front of Pier 40, the buildings would be narrow, only about 99 feet wide. These towers would have less square footage than the towers seen in renderings in an earlier study for Pier 40 done this

past spring by HR&A and Tishman. That study, also commissioned by the local youth sports leagues, found that adding 600 to 800 market-rate units on Pier 40 would generate high revenue for the park but with low impact when compared to other possible uses, like entertainment or destination retail. One rendering in that earlier study showed residential towers massed along the pier’s northern edge. Called Pier 40 Champions, the new coalition includes P3, Downtown United Soccer Club, Greenwich Village Little League and Gotham Girls soc-

nesses. The new, five-story building would sport a rooftop garden for vegetables and herbs that would be used in the food the group delivers to its clients. Volunteers — including possibly even residents from a 14-story luxury tower planned on an adjacent site to the north — would tend the rooftop

Continued on page 21

N.Y.U. trustee’s company did hire goons for demo BY SAM SPOKONY A spokesperson for a company owned by Daniel Straus, an N.Y.U. Law School trustee, has now admitted that the company did in fact have “security” attend an anti-Straus demonstration that was led by a student group and the company’s striking union workers. The students — members

Continued on page 20

5 1 5 CA N A L STREET • N YC 10013 • C OPYRIG H T © 2012 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

of New York University’s Student Labor Action Movement, or SLAM — continue to claim that during their protest against Straus on Sept. 11, the supposed security (which they instead derided as a group of “antiunion thugs”) harassed them with threats of violence and homophobic slurs.

Continued on page 5

EDITORIAL, LETTERS PAGE 16

CHURCH O’CHEESE PAGE 12


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October 18 - 24, 2012

Faculty foes throw Bleecker blowout over N.Y.U. plan BY TEQUILA MINSKY Musicians against mega-development rocked out at the Poisson Rouge on Wed., Oct. 10, to raise funds to fight N.Y.U.’s 2031 superblocks expansion project. The evening featured a lineup of stellar musical performances, with headliners John Zorn and Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore. A highpoint of the benefit at the Bleecker St. club was the set by the 11-piece Tribecastans, which included a hurdygurdy, jaw harp, accordion, washboard, a bevy of horns, a slew of strings and various exotic instruments, all played by extraordinarily accomplished musicians. Janine Nichols sang “Pretty Soon There’ll Be Nothing Left for Everybody.” Tribecastans frontman John Kruth read an N.Y.U.-specific version of “Purple People Eater,” adding, “Please don’t eat my street; please don’t eat all the cherry trees that I love so much every spring.” Gordon Gano of The Violent Femmes fiddled with the multigenre ensemble, then sang the Femmes’ “Blister in the Sun.” The music got people dancing and laughing. But it was no laughing matter that brought the crowd to the Poisson Rouge.

A lawsuit against N.Y.U.’s expansion plan on its South Village superblocks was recently filed by 11 groups, including N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. N.Y.U. FASP member Mark Crispin Miller, professor of media, culture and communication, helped organize the benefit, which raised funds for legal fees, as he put it, to “put a stop to this destructive, environmentally calamitous process that’s destroying the city we all love.” “N.Y.U. does not rock — N.Y.U. rolls,” he told the concert crowd. “It rolls its students; it rolls its faculty; it rolled the City Council. We’ve got to stop this.” In July, the full City Council approved the N.Y.U. 2031 plan with only one dissenting vote, by Charles Barron. N.Y.U. is scheduled to give a presentation about the restrictive declaration and agreements controlling its construction plans on the superblocks at a Tues., Oct. 23, meeting of Community Board 2’s Arts & Institutions Committee, starting at 6:30 p.m., location to be determined. Check the Community Board 2 Web site for more information. Photos by Tequila Minsky

Jeff Greene from the band Tribecastans at the “Save the Village” concert played everything from a hurdy-gurdy to three flutes at the same time — whatever it took to raise funds to fight the N.Y.U. 2031 development plan. The accordian player doubled on piano.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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SCOOPY’S

NOTEBOOK SCARY BID HEARING: A date has at last been set for a hearing on the proposed Broadway-Soho Business Improvement District. Scheduled on Halloween, Wed., Oct. 31, at 10 a.m. in the City Council Chambers at City Hall, it’s technically an “oversight” hearing, according to Kelly Magee, communications director for Councilmember Margaret Chin. “There will not be a vote at the hearing,” Magee explained. “Depending on the hearing, a date will be set for a legislative hearing, which will start the 30-day clock for people to log their opposition. From there, there would need to be a vote in the full Council, if we get that far.” We assume that, during the 30-day comment period, people can also “log their support” for the BID — though somehow we suspect the numbers will be skewed toward opposition. MARQUETA MEDIATOR GLEASON: We thought the struggle over whether or not to create an AsianLatino City Council district in Lower Manhattan was contentious — that is, until we attended the Districting Commission’s hearing in Harlem a couple of weeks ago. The auditorium of the Schomburg Center on Malcolm X Ave. was packed with East Harlem residents furious over the commission’s plan to sever off part of El Barrio in District 8, specifically La Marqueta, the sacred heart of the neighborhood. Redistricting is done every 10 years to balance out populations based on Census tract variations, but as more than one resident called out incredulously, referring to La Marqueta, “No one even lives there!” The beloved market is the Uptown version of the Essex St. Market, but with a deeply Latino flavor, not the multicultural feel of the Lower East Side vendors hotbed. As the crowd’s chanting of “Save East Harlem!” reached deafening levels, the commission members left the stage for several minutes. Out of nowhere, former City Council candidate Pete Gleason jumped up at the front of the auditorium and tried to get people to settle down. Raising his arms, he tried to yell over the crowd’s din, “These forums are set up to give you a limited amount of time… .” It wasn’t really working, so he scrambled up onto the stage and continued from there, but a police officer came up and politely told him to exit stage left, which he did. Maybe Gleason’s attempt at mediation did help a bit — or maybe it was the residents’ threats that the commissioners had better get their butts back out there — but they eventually did emerge to retake their seats. Anyway, Councilmembers Chin and Rosie Mendez were both there to testify in favor of keeping the district lines as they are now. Mendez said the alternative scheme offered by the

Photo by Scoopy

Construction workers protested against the preliminary redistricting plan for East Harlem's Council District 8 outside a hearing two weeks ago.

“Unity Map” — to cut off her district at Houston St. all the way across to the East River — would remove a substantial amount of low-income residents from her district, which wouldn’t help it keep its minority population. Chin said she also opposed the alternative redistricting map because it would cut Battery Park City and part of the Financial District, which have a growing population, out of her district. We also saw West Village politico Frieda Bradlow seated patiently in the audience. She had testified at the Districting Commission’s previous Manhattan hearing, advocating for the need to “unify the historic Village district,” which today is split between Districts 1, 2 and 3, weakening its cohesiveness and power to fight off unwanted development projects. Asked, during a lull in the uproar, if she was going

to testify this time, Bradlow just smiled and said she didn’t know if she’d get the chance. Speaking afterward, Mendez said she, too, worried what might happen to La Marqueta — which one speaker called “the jewel of the Puerto Rican community.” Mendez said she was concerned if La Marqueta was shifted into what she called a “supermajority white district,” like the ones currently represented by Councilmembers Dan Garodnick or Jessica Lappin, that people would no longer care about it or recognize its significance. “If they need a garage, they might put it there,” she said. As a kid growing up in Williamsburg she had a connection to La Marqueta, since her great-aunt who lived in El Barrio and chewed tobacco would buy it there, and would take her along when Mendez would visit her.

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October 18 - 24, 2012

POLICE BLOTTER Murder suspect caught

Pickpocket pinched

Police have collared the prime suspect in a fatal shooting outside a Lower East Side barbershop two weeks ago. Joshua Nunez, 21, of Bushwick, was arrested on Monday, and has been charged with murder and criminal possession of a weapon, police said. Nunez allegedly shot Nolita resident Charles Fernandez, 29, after an argument between the two men quickly escalated outside the Jose Beauty Salon and Barbershop on Forsyth St. on Oct. 6.

A West Village pickpocket apparently likes getting a little touchy feeling with his unsuspecting victims — but he and a friend ended up in handcuffs after they tried to make off with a man’s cell phone on Fri., Oct. 12. Roldan Nelson, 44, began following a 47-year-old man after he saw him walk out of the Monster bar on Grove St. around 11 p.m., police said. Nelson continued to stalk the man as he walked west on Christopher St., and began trying to talk to him. The man told officers that, after Nelson got no response from him, Nelson then started putting his arms around him several different times. The victim told cops he then felt a tug on his pants, and quickly realized that his cell phone had been snatched from its beltclip holder. By the time the victim looked up again, Nelson had fled the scene. But when police canvassed the area shortly after, they found Nelson with the stolen phone in his possession and arrested him for grand larceny. Nelson was sharing his spoils with Joel McCray, 47, at the time, and police also busted McCray when they found a crack pipe in his pocket.

Heads up! Sometimes it’s best not to use your head to defuse the situation. Thomas Mulcaire, 40, was arrested for assault on Sat., Oct. 13, after witnesses reported he head-butted a 41-year-old man during a dispute at a West Village bar. The vicious strike, which landed around midnight inside La Villette at 10 Downing St., left the victim with a large cut above his eye and he was sent to New York Downtown Hospital for treatment.

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Puzzling iBurglary try Police are investigating a burglary attempt at the Apple store on Prince St., which took place early Mon., Oct. 15, and didn’t result in any property actually being taken. Officers responded to a call stating that someone had broken the 103 Prince St. store’s front windows and attempted to enter around 2 a.m., but the perpetrator had already fled the scene by the time they showed up. While they could find no information to identify the apparent burglar, officers did discover a pair of 14-inch bolt cutters sitting near the store’s smashed windows.

Burglar overdid it Police nabbed a burglar who got too greedy during his romp through a Greenwich Village apartment building on Tues., Oct. 9. Herstan Stanford, 19, entered the 25 Minetta Lane building around 9 p.m. by climbing the rear fire escape, cops said. After rummaging through a sixth-floor apartment, he stepped into the hallway and decided to check out each floor on his way back down. But a 32-year-old resident of the building spotted Stanford and called 911 as the burglar was still searching for potential grabs. Police quickly showed up and busted Stanford on the building’s second-floor landing, charging him with burglary.

Bat attacker arrested

Sat. Oct. 20th

10:00am to 4:00PM

The man suspected of brutally beating a 33-year-old woman with a baseball bat in Christopher Park has been arrested, police said. Johnny Blanding, 48, was busted on Wed., Oct. 10, according to court documents, for the crime that took place around 11:30 p.m. on Sat., Oct. 6, and has been charged with assault and criminal possession of a weapon. Blanding and the woman argued on the night of the incident in the park at Christopher St. and Seventh Ave. South, according to the police report. He then walked away, came back several minutes later with the wooden bat, and allegedly

hit her in the head with it twice. The attack left the woman with a fractured skull and jaw, and she was immediately taken to Bellevue Hospital, where she had to have screws and bolts placed in her head, according to court documents. Blanding was arraigned on Oct. 11, and is next scheduled to appear in court on Nov. 8.

Drinks are on you! Some women just convince hapless men to buy them drinks during their night out — but one cunning female tried paying for her liquor with a credit card she’d just stolen from another woman in the bar. Thalia Gomez, 19, was arrested for grand larceny on Wed., Oct. 10, around 10 p.m. after attempting to use the card she had just swiped from a 39-year-old woman while she was in the bathroom, police said. A bartender for El Cantinero, at 86 University Place, had gotten wise after noticing Gomez’s sneaky tactics, and reported the crime while the teen thief was still enjoying her free drink.

Subway snatcher In yet another reminder of why you shouldn’t nap on the subway, police arrested a crook who snatched a cell phone and cash from the pocket of a dozing L train rider early on Sun., Oct. 14. Lorde Young, 38, noticed the sleeping man as their train pulled into the Eighth Ave. stop, at W. 14th St., around 6:30 a.m., and quickly fished the items out of the straphanger’s pocket before turning to make his escape. The problem was, a police officer on the station platform saw the whole thing, and chased after the thief as he stepped out of the train. Young slipped away at first and fled topside, leading the officer on a westbound foot chase, but was eventually apprehended at the corner of W. 14th St. and Ninth Ave. In addition to being busted for grand larceny, he was slapped with a charge of resisting arrest.

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October 18 - 24, 2012

5

N.Y.U. is mum on looking into Straus ‘goon squad’ Continued from page 1

Photo by Sam Spokony

Theresa Ross Whitaker, a registered nurse who is on strike from a Healthbridge Management nursing home in Stamford, Conn., spoke to fellow strikers and N.Y.U. students at an Oct. 11 protest against HealthBridge and CareOne C.E.O. Daniel Straus, who is an N.Y.U. Law School trustee.

manual labor.” The students made a YouTube video of their Sept. 11 protest that apparently shows Petrozzella to be in attendance, alongside friends of his who took photos and later posted them on Facebook. In the video, the counterprotesters are shown taunting and verbally threatening a SLAM member who was handing out leaflets outside the opening reception at the Straus Institute. The students also claim they saw Petrozzella and several of his cronies at another SLAM rally on Sept. 19, at which they say he videotaped the protesters before sneaking away. Tim Hodges, a CareOne spokesperson, originally denied the company’s involvement in hiring the alleged thugs. “As to the absurd accusation that our company hired people to intimidate demonstrators at the Sept. 11 rally, nothing could be further from the truth,” Hodges wrote in a Sept. 19 statement to this newspaper. He also claimed, at that time, that the only people present at the rally besides students and S.E.I.U. members were other legitimate employees of CareOne and Healthbridge, who Hodges said had come to show their support for Straus. But on Monday, after this newspaper informed him of SLAM’s evidence linking Petrozzella — and, indirectly, Straus — to the hiring of the counter-protesters, Hodges reversed course and said that CareOne and HealthBridge had in fact brought “security” to the Sept. 11 protest. “Our experience has been that strikers have been less than respectful to the neighborhoods in which they have picketed,” Hodges wrote in an e-mailed statement. “Our concern that they would bring this behavior to N.Y.U., coupled with uneasiness about the ongoing ruthless S.E.I.U. tactics and the actions of some within the S.E.I.U., led us to believe that it was prudent to have security for the HealthBridge and CareOne employees exercising their right to

free speech in a counter-protest.” SLAM continues to call for N.Y.U. President John Sexton and Law School Dean Richard Revesz to investigate SLAM’s claims against Straus and to pressure him to deal fairly with

New York University and Community Board 2, Manhattan Present 22 N D A N NUA L

Last week, SLAM announced it had found evidence apparently revealing that an indirect associate of Straus’s CareOne nursing home company was involved in hiring the alleged thugs, one of whom reportedly threatened a student protester by saying, “Either you’re gonna leave by yourself or you’re gonna be carried out.” An N.Y.U. spokesperson declined to answer this reporter’s question of whether the university will investigate the students’ claims regarding Straus’s involvement in the matter. “The university is not a party to this labor dispute, [and] has no input into how either side is managing its PR campaigns to convey its views,” the spokesperson wrote in an e-mailed statement, while stressing that the principle of peaceful and lawful protest is “crucially important” at N.Y.U. “And we caution all parties to take the steps necessary to ensure that [that principle] is upheld and to avoid any actions that might be seen to undermine it,” the statement added. Straus has served on the Executive Committee of N.Y.U. Law School’s board of trustees since 1998, and is one of the school’s major donors. In 2009, he endowed the Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law & Justice, at 22 Washington Square North, with an ongoing annual gift of $1.25 million. Straus is also an owner of both the CareOne and Healthbridge Management companies, which own dozens of nursing homes in New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Employees of CareOne and Healthbridge — all members of the 1199 Service Employees International Union, also known as United Healthcare Workers East — have been on strike for months, some for more than a year. The workers maintain that Straus dealt unfairly by asking the union to sign a contract that eliminated six paid sick days and a week of vacation for many workers, froze pensions and required many workers to pay at least $6,000 more per year for family healthcare coverage. SLAM has since joined the S.E.I.U. workers in their protests against Straus outside N.Y.U. buildings, mainly around Washington Square, where several of the university’s Law School buildings are located. The students and workers claim that their Sept. 11 protest was disrupted by a group of about 25 “anti-union thugs” disguised as counter-protesters, who they say harassed protesters with threats of violence and homophobic slurs. SLAM found Internet evidence linking the alleged thugs to Mark Petrozzella, a reality TV personality with connections to the C.E.O. of National Labor Consultants, a Staten Island consulting firm that was hired by CareOne earlier this year. Petrozzella apparently facilitated the hiring of counter-protesters — the same people the CareOne spokesperson referred to as a security team — by posting a job advertisement on his Facebook page on Sept. 6. Petrozzella’s online post stated that any men and women who applied would be paid $100 cash to “work” from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sept. 11, with transportation provided and “no

his workers. An N.Y.U. spokesperson stressed that “the students’ right to express their views peacefully and without fear of intimidation must be unambiguously respected,” but did not address whether the university would investigate the alleged harassment of protesters or take any other action at this time. In a Sept. 19 statement, an N.Y.U. Law School spokesperson called Straus an “upright and honorable person,” but there was no direct mention of Straus in the statement the university sent to this newspaper on Monday. “It’s clear that we’re getting to [Straus], because he’s had to respond so frequently,” said Caitlin MacLaren, a SLAM member who helped organize the group’s most recent protest alongside S.E.I.U. outside the Law School board of trustees meeting on Oct. 11. “The fact that [CareOne and HealthBridge] care enough to send people to our school and threaten students just shows that all of this actually has an impact. But I think it’s hard for them to believe that students actually care about this.” On Sept. 26 the National Labor Relations Board, the federal agency that investigates unfair labor practices, sided with the striking workers and affirmed a judge’s earlier ruling that ordered CareOne to rehire the workers under their previous contract and compensate them for lost wages. But the board’s order is not self-enforcing, and the N.L.R.B. will have to persuade a federal court to enforce that order.

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Photos by Tequila Minsky

Daughter of ‘Chin’ weighs in Rita Gigante, daughter of notorious mobster and Village resident Vincent “Chin” Gigante, recently published her memoir, “The Godfather’s Daughter: An Unlikely Story of Love, Healing and Redemption.” She held a book-signing at Sullivan Street Tea & Spice, at 208 Sullivan St., last month. However, when an employee was opening up on the morning of the

event, he found that someone had used extra-strength glue to seal the front-door padlock shut. He reported the criminal mischief, and when police arrived they found that two unlit fireworks were taped to the shop’s windows, with cigarettes attached to them. Two Bomb Squad officers responded to the scene, dealt with the fireworks and made sure the shop was safe to open.


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October 18 - 24, 2012

SPURA vote unanimous; Task force picks contentious BY LESLEY SUSSMAN On Thurs., Oct. 11, the City Council, in a historic 48-to-0 vote, approved the longdelayed Seward Park Urban Renwal Area redevelopment plan. Less than a week later, representatives of the city’s Economic Development Corporation and its Department of Housing Preservation and Development appeared before Community Board 3’s Land Use Committee to begin the next phase of the process — the drafting of a request for proposals (R.F.P.) document for the massive project. The R.F.P. will outline the city’s criteria for development of the 1.65-million-square-foot SPURA site at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge and is expected to be made available to potential developers in early January. In an agreement worked out between the city and C.B. 3, a joint task force must first be formed to help craft the R.F.P., review proposals once they have been submitted and have a role in the final selection of a developer. The task force will be comprised of five C.B. 3 representatives, Councilmembers Margaret Chin and Rosie Mendez, Borough President Scott Stringer and two members from local stakeholder groups. The Tues., Oct. 16, meeting, at Project Renewal, 333 Bowery, was filled with fireworks as several C.B. 3 Land Use Committee members objected strenuously to the choice of five Board 3 members who will serve on the community task force. The two community stakeholder slots still remain unfilled. Leading off the criticism was committee member Damaris Reyes, executive director of Good Old Lower East Side (GOLES), a community group that has continued to strongly advocate for 100 percent affordable housing on the SPURA site. “The lack of geographic, ethnic and racial diversity on this task force really troubles me,” Reyes said. “Although they’re good people, it’s made up mainly of Grand St. folks and no one from north of the site — especially low-income Latinos who live in public housing projects. It’s really not a fair representation of the community. I urge you to reconsider this because we need different points of view on this task force.” C.B. 3 Chairperson Gigi Li made the appointments, and defended them at the meeting. “These were not decisions I took lightly,” Li said. “What I was looking for in appointees

A rendering created by city agencies for a presentation this past March at Community Board 3 showing how the area south of Delancey St. might look once developed under the SPURA plan.

was familiarity in working with the city and the complicated technical details of the R.F.P.s, and putting together a solid team that is able to carry out the vision that this board has for this project. “I chose individuals I had conversations with who I thought could help move the process ahead and were able to commit the time required,” Li said. “There is also geographical diversity. With the limited number of seats there were different variables that went into consideration, and the people I have now make a good team moving forward.” The five C.B. 3 representatives named to the task force are Li, former board chairperson Dominic Berg, Lisa Kaplan, Karen Black and a seat shared between Linda Jones and David McWater, the board’s Land Use Committee chairperson. Meanwhile, in two related developments, Mayor Bloomberg, who must officially sign off on the SPURA plan, issued a statement on Fri., Oct, 12, indicating his support of the City Council’s

vote, which took place the previous day. “Seward Park has long had the potential to bring new jobs, new housing and new retail options to one of New York City’s most vibrant neighborhoods,” the mayor said. “Today, we know that that potential will be realized. After nearly half a century of sitting dormant, this piece of real estate — some of the most valuable underdeveloped land anywhere — will finally be transformed. Thanks to a historic and unprecedented community planning process, the plan that is moving directly reflects the input of residents, community members and other stakeholders.” Also on Friday, Councilmember Chin’s office released a statement that took sharp aim at the Coalition to Protect the Lower East Side and Chinatown — an alliance of neighborhood groups pushing for 100 percent affordable housing on the SPURA site and which is angling for representation on the new SPURA task force. The coalition held a Chinatown press conference earlier in the day at which its members were highly critical of Chin, accusing her of having caved in to the city by agreeing to 50 percent affordable housing on the sprawling site instead of the 100 percent figure the coalition and other local activist groups are advocating for. Chin called the coalition’s remarks “outright lies” and said the group was “grossly misrepresenting” her position regarding affordable housing on the site. The statement from her office went on to say, “We condemn materials distributed in Chinese at the press conference today that refer to the councilmember in extremely derogatory language.” “The Coalition does not speak for this community,” Chin retorted. “They are not even from this community. I have spent my entire life in Chinatown and the Lower East Side,

and I have dedicated my life to fighting for resources for this community. I am nobody’s puppet. “I am not pushing anyone's agenda,” she added. “SPURA is a huge victory in the history of the Lower East Side. We now have 500 units of permanent affordable housing and a commitment to build more affordable housing at a lot on Spring St. “Over the last 20 years, I have continued to grow and fight for my community. I am very proud of this accomplishment,” Chin continued. “The Coalition has grossly misrepresented the facts when its comes to SPURA and they should apologize to our community for their actions." At the Oct. 16 C.B. 3 Land Use Committee meeting, aside from the objections raised about the choice of board members for the new task force, concerns were also aired about a confidentiality agreement that task force members must sign, as well as about the city’s fast-paced development schedule. David Cort, a representative of E.D.C., said he wants the R.F.P. to be completed by January. “Responses will be due in the spring. Then the evaluation process begins,” he said, adding, “Preference will be given to those proposals that include a local partner.” Alicia Posner, another E.D.C. official, said that concerns that the timeframe is too short to attract responsible developers — especially with the holiday season coming up — were “hypothetical.” “We have an opportunity here to keep the momentum going,” she said. “Yes, it’s an aggressive timeline, but I think we can meet it.” Land Use Committee member Herman Hewitt, meanwhile, told city officials he was “concerned” about the confidentiality agreement that would prohibit task force members from sharing some information about their deliberations. He was supported by fellow committee member Lisa Kaplan, who said, “There has to be a higher level of sharing information.” A representative of H.P.D. said the confidentiality requirement was necessary. He explained that members of his department were legally bound not to release information about which developers were under consideration. “We’re expanding our normal procedure by sharing our information with the task force,” he explained. “We expect them to respect the same confidentiality.” Several days earlier, at the Oct. 11 City Council vote, it took councilmembers less than an hour to pass the long-awaited SPURA plan. The unanimous vote came after more than 45 years of inaction on the property because community residents and the city were unable to reach agreement on how best to develop the site. SPURA consists of five vacant plots of city-owned land between Delancey and Grand Sts. that are now largely occupied by several open-air parking lots, and includes some adjacent property as well. The huge swath of land became available after thousands of homes and businesses once located there were bulldozed in the name of urban renewal. The newly approved plan calls for a 60/40

Continued on page 13


October 18 - 24, 2012

Squadron is a green warrior but is fighting a losing battle BY SAM SPOKONY Some might say it’s become a Sisyphean struggle for state Senator Daniel Squadron. Since taking office in 2009, Squadron — who is 32 and represents the state’s 25th district, covering the East Village, Lower Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn — has consistently been one of the Senate’s most outspoken members on environmental issues. And he’s now become that house’s leader on those issues, according to E.P.L./ Environmental Advocates, an Albany-based nonprofit that annually ranks lawmakers based on their legislative contributions to environmental protection. The organization awarded Squadron a score of 81 this year, the highest in the state Senate and the only one above 80, after he sponsored 10 environmental bills during the last legislative session, which ended in June. But Senate Republicans, who currently hold a 33-to-29 majority, have blocked every one of those bills, along with a number of others that Squadron has co-sponsored. In fact, Senate Republicans were so vehement — and, subsequently, effective — in their opposition to environmental protection that their average legislative score was only 33, according to E.P.L./Environmental Advocates. The Senate’s total average score was 45. “I wish I could say there’d been more robust debate on those bills,” Squadron said in an interview last week. “But the fact is that the most important environmental issues of the day are being defeated without discussion, simply because the Republican leadership isn’t interested in having a debate.” Squadron’s currently stalled environmental bills deal with issues including the creation of state energy efficiency standards for both appliances and building design; comprehensive accident prevention planning regarding petroleum spills and leaks; the establishment of a small business and household pollution prevention program; the phasing out of pesticide use on state property; conservation of freshwater wetland areas; and stiffer enforcement of state environmental law regulations and policies. In addition, one of the bills he is sponsoring seeks to amend and strengthen an earlier bill on pollution from idling heavy-duty vehicles that passed the Senate in 2010. The amendment would make it a violation for heavy-duty vehicles to idle for more than three minutes. Like the other bills, it remains held up in committee. Squadron expressed pride at being named the year’s top scorer on those issues, but continually stressed the frustration of playing what has become a veritable second fiddle to the Democrat-led Assembly, which has been vastly more successful in passing environmental protection bills. The Assembly’s average score this year, based on the E.P.L./Environmental Advocates rating system, was 75. Its Democrats scored an average of 89 — and the highest scorer, Jeffrey Dinowitz of the Bronx’s 81st District, received a 97.

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State Senator Daniel Squadron at the opening of a rooftop garden for East Village public schools last week.

“In the end, I was disappointed that the highest score in the Senate was 81,” Squadron said, adding that he sometimes wonders about the root of his counterparts’ inability to compromise on big environmental issues. “I think there’s no question that there’s a general fear of having these conversation,” he explained, “but it can be tough to tell whether the Republican Party is simply that far out of the mainstream, or if it’s the special interests funding them that make it impossible. But either way, the conclusion for New Yorkers is the same.” Squadron has also actively joined the fight against hydraulic fracturing — more commonly known as hydrofracking — in New York, as natural gas companies seek to install wells throughout the Upstate area. The issue still hangs in limbo, as Governor Andrew Cuomo has not yet decided what course to take on allowing or disallowing companies to begin drilling. Squadron noted that a Senate bill requiring health studies of hydrofracking has not yet been allowed to come up for a vote. In addition, he appeared in a recent short documentary by “Gasland” director Josh Fox advocating against hydrofracking in New York, citing studies and industry documents that purportedly show the practice is unsafe. Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, Assemblymembers Robert Sweeney and Barbara Lifton and state Senator Liz Kreuger are also featured in the documentary, entitled “The Sky Is Pink.” In the film, Squadron targeted gas industry lobbyists and tactics that are used to hide hydrofracking’s dangers. “There’s no question that if people hadn’t talked about this, and cared about this, it would’ve happened,” Squadron said. “It would’ve happened under cover of night, and the first time we would’ve heard about fracking in New York would’ve been at the first crisis.”

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Study seeks new uses for forgotten park buildings BY SAM SPOKONY Two community advocacy organizations have forged a partnership aimed at redesigning and revitalizing several underused buildings in public parks on the Lower East Side. Asian Americans for Equality and The Hester Street Collaborative believe that their concept has the potential to create space for sustainable arts and cultural programming, as well as provide economic generators, such as job creation and opportunities for local businesses. The groups are planning a study that will explore possible new uses for three buildings — the abandoned bathroom facility on the Allen St. pedestrian mall at Delancey St., a storage space at the southern end of Sara D. Roosevelt Park near Stanton St., and another building in Seward Park — which all currently provide little to no value to the surrounding community. “It’s an ambitious idea, but we’re in a neighborhood that has a lot of space needs,” said Dylan House, a program manager for H.S.C. “There just aren’t a lot of resources right now for nonprofits, community organizations or programming for seniors and youths, and these buildings present an opportunity to meet those demands.” The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation has already allocated $1 million specifically for capital improvements to the Allen St. building, and the city Parks Department matched that amount with its own allocation for the overall project. A Parks spokesperson did not address how involved the agency will become as AAFE and H.S.C. move forward on the plan, but said that Parks “looks forward to seeing the results of their study,” and added that the agency already has a good working relationship with the two organizations. House explained that there are still many answers to be found, especially in terms of identifying other sources of financial support for what — once the study is complete — will certainly be an expensive effort to

redevelop and subsequently maintain the three buildings. “The biggest question is how you can fund spaces like that, and how they can operate sustainably in the economic climate we’re in now,” he noted. “A lot of government-funded resources have closed over the last couple of years. But there are still a lot of nonprofits to work with, and one of the real challenges of our study will be to see how the city and nonprofits can come together to find an operating model.” A timeline for the proposed study has yet to be solidified, but AAFE and H.S.C. are already taking steps to understand what local residents are looking for in potential new community centers. House and an AAFE representative spoke briefly at a Community Board 3 meeting last Thursday to keep the board abreast of the plans. He also mentioned that both groups will attend the “It’s My Park Day” event in Sara D. Roosevelt Park on Sat., Oct. 20, to survey residents and inform them of the upcoming study. AAFE and H.S.C. also have plans to include urban planning students from New York University or Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute in a portion of the study, although nothing has been finalized. House said that, if those particular plans come to fruition, students would likely focus on a specific aspect, such as site analysis or other research. House also noted that AAFE and H.S.C. have had preliminary conversations with City Councilmember Margaret Chin, who he said expressed support for funding some of the potential construction on the S.D.R. Park building that is part of the study. All three of the buildings were constructed in the 1930s, and are owned by the Parks Department. The S.D.R. Park building is currently being used as a storage space by Parks, and House explained that another challenge of the study will be to figure how and where to relocate the materials stored there.

Clockwise from above, a building in Sara D. Roosevelt Park on Grand St. that is currently being used for storage space; a building in Seward Park; a closed restroom building on the Allen St. Mall at Delancey St.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Pizzapalooza fills church hall with cheese-’n’-crust faithful Photos by Tequila Minsky

Pizza purveyors proudly showed their wares at the charity event as the hungry hordes dug in. Gran Daisy’s savory slices are actually known as pane.

BY TEQUILA MINSKY At the stroke of 6 p.m. on Oct. 10, the hungry hordes stampeded into the Church of St. Anthony’s parish hall on Sullivan St., where more than 33 traditional and artisanal pizza purveyors provided slices at a dollar apiece. What a bargain! There were thin-crust and deep-dish selections and gluten-free, vegan and cheeseless pizzas available. Slices with sausage and pepperoni flew into the boxes the hungry were given as they amassed their meals. And there was an array of other types of pies and toppings — from white pizza with cheese only, to one offering heaped with a combo of squash, olives and raisins, and many other creative and quirky variations. The ’za came from the Village, the

Lower East Side, Brooklyn and beyond. The pizza gobblers washed down their slices with Fizzy Lizzy soda or Ferrarelle mineral water. The line to get into the pizzapalooza stretched around the corner onto Houston St. and all the way onto Thompson St. The event didn’t end until all the $1 pizza ran out. New York City’s biggest pizza party raised a lot of dough. Named “Slice Out Hunger,” the fast-food fest collected $12,000 for City Harvest, New York’s premier food-rescue organization. City Harvest accepts perishable and prepared foods, safely stored, from licensed food businesses, as well nonperishable foods, and delivers them to food kitchens and food pantries.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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SPURA plan includes possible site for a new school • The city will reserve 15,000 square feet of Site 5 until 2023 in case a public school is needed there in the future.

Continued from page 8 mix of residential and commercial space. It will create 1,000 units of housing on the site. Half of these units will be permanently affordable housing for low-, moderate- and middle-income households, with 10 percent of these units set aside specifically for low-income senior citizens. Low-income units at SPURA will be open to individuals with an annual income of income less than $34,000. Families with an annual income of less than $49,000 will also be eligible for affordable units at the SPURA site. Ten percent of the units will be reserved for moderate-income individuals making up to $75,000 annually, or families making up to $107,000 annually. Another 10 percent of the residential units will be reserved for middleincome individuals making up to $95,000 annually, or families making up to $136,000 annually. The new development will also have 15,000 square feet of publicly accessible open space, and allow for the expansion and relocation of the Essex Street Market to a new site, which has the potential to double the number of small businesses currently operating at the market. The massive plan was more than two years in the making and came about only after a series of tough political compromises between the city and C.B. 3, along with the active participation of Councilmembers Chin and Mendez. Some other highlights of the plan include:

• Additional affordable housing will be made available at a lot adjacent to 21 Spring St. • Former SPURA residents who were displaced by the area’s demolition will receive priority for housing in the new development. • If the current Essex Street Market is forced to relocate to the south side of Delancey St., its vendors will be given first opportunity for comparable square footage. Rent schedules and planned increases for existing vendors will be commensurate with their rent at the time of the move. • Fifty percent of those hired for all new permanent jobs on the site will come from the community, specifically, low-income people in need of employment. The goal is to retain 40 percent of these hires for at least nine months. • There will be stringent requirements to enforce retail diversity and limit or exclude big-box stores like Walmart. At last Thursday’s City Council vote, Council Speaker Christine Quinn lauded Community Board 3 as well as local activist groups for their efforts in overcoming major differences that

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made redevelopment of the parcels impossible for so many years. “This was 45 years in the making,” Quinn said, “and I want to thank the long list of community activists and organizations that worked long years on this and making it possible.” The speaker also praised Councilmembers Chin and Mendez for their “hard work in working out a compromise between community groups and the city. They both drove a very hard bargain, and they were good, loud voices for the needs of the community,” Quinn said. City Council Land Use Committee Chairman Leroy Comrie and Councilmember Stephen Levin also congratulated Chin and Mendez for their efforts in helping craft a compromise between community groups and the city. Comrie noted that the two councilmembers persuaded the city to increase the number of housing units from 900 to 1,000, and to provide more affordable housing on a site on Spring St. He added that Chin also won an agreement to set aside space on SPURA for a new public school if it is needed. The Land Use Committee chairman quipped that Chin “may be small but she’s stronger than all of us.” Chin, who spearheaded the modification of the City Planning Commission’s original SPURA proposal, told councilmembers, “Today’s vote to approve development of the SPURA site is truly history in the making.” She also thanked Mendez and the various local community groups for all their efforts —

especially Community Board 3. “Your hundreds of hours of hard work helped us put together a comprehensive, compromise plan,” she said. “It’s not 100 percent affordable housing on the site, but 50 percent is not bad.” Mendez, meanwhile, said, “Thanks to Margaret’s help we did it. We kept going forward with it and never forgot the former site tenants. This will be a reality for them.” She added, “This vote means that hundreds of affordable housing units will be coming to an area of manifest need." There were surprisingly few local residents on hand for the historic vote, and among those residents who were seated in the gallery above the Council Chambers reactions to the vote were mixed. A member of GOLES — which supports developing the site with only affordable housing — who asked that her name not be used expressed disappointment at the outcome. “I think we could have done better,” she said. “I think we’ll just have to wait and see how the R.F.P. process plays out. On a more positive note, former SPURA site tenant Tito Delgado told this newspaper, “I’m grateful for the vote and a chance to return to the place that I was evicted from.” Also expressing enormous satisfaction with the vote was former C.B. 3 Chairperson Berg. “It’s absolutely amazing that after 45 years we were able to put this all together and see the plan passed,” he said.


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October 18 - 24, 2012

Under an interim use for Pier 42, near Montomery St., five artists will be sought to create installations in and around the currently vacant pier.

Vacant L.E.S. pier to become a temporary art park BY SAM SPOKONY Now that the city’s plan to redevelop Pier 42 into a new East River waterfront

park is officially in the works, local community groups are teaming up with a major Downtown arts organization to establish a

series of temporary art and design installations at the pier next summer. The proposal, called Paths to Pier 42, seeks to utilize the mostly vacant 8-acre Lower East Side space, near the intersection of Montgomery and South Sts., before millions of dollars’ worth of demolition and construction start on the pier. The initiative may also include the use of other available space along the waterfront between the Brooklyn Bridge and East River Park. Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, the firm hired by the city to design the new park, has said that it hopes to have a master plan for the pier’s capital improvements in place by next March, but the actual work obviously will not begin until some time after that. With that fact in mind, the Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance — a collaboration between several community organizations, including the Hester Street Collaborative, the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council and CAAAV: Organizing Asian Communities — is now working with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council to develop a competitive process for the project. Five artists or designers would be selected to create communitybased installations on and around Pier 42 during a portion of the interim period. While Paths to Pier 42 is still in preliminary stages, the proposal is quickly gaining traction, notably with the city Parks Department. A Parks spokesperson said that the agency supports the concept, and will be working with the L.E.S. Waterfront Alliance and L.M.C.C. as the groups do community outreach for the interim plans in the coming weeks. Melissa Levin, L.M.C.C.’s director of cultural programs, said the Paths to Pier

42 team hopes to send out a request for proposals (R.F.P.) to artists by mid-November, and that an independent jury will be assembled to select the winning ideas. But she added that the R.F.P. is still being developed, and it hasn’t been decided yet whether only New York City-based artists will be considered, or if others from around the country — or other countries — will be able to submit proposals. Whatever the case, Levin explained that the primary goal of Paths to Pier 42 will be to provide programming and exhibits that are relevant to residents of the area around the pier. “We’re looking for artists and designers who will really engage the site and the community,” she said, “and especially to use specific assets and challenges found within that community to create something that’s responsive to the local audience.” Representatives of CAAAV and the Hester Street Collaborative passed out fliers describing the proposal at Community Board 3’s Parks, Recreation, Cultural Affairs, Landmarks and Waterfront Committee last Thursday. According to a diagram on the flier, the Paths to Pier 42 team is considering using all of the pier’s available space — including the interior of its vacant pier shed — for various purposes that would complement potential art installations, such as a pop-up park with moveable furniture, a barbecue area with picnic tables, or a space set aside for food trucks. Levin said that the artists and designers for next summer’s project will hopefully be chosen by January, and that the decision will be followed by a series of community meetings at which local residents will be able to give input on what they’d like to see in the temporary installations.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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From left, Nancy Kogel, Pete Dolick, Fran Luck and Bill Koehnlein held up a jumbosized copy of the petition outside Tower Brokerage’s office before presenting a letter addressed to landlord Bob Perl requesting a meeting.

Activists keep up the pressure for Firestone feminist apartment BY TEQUILA MINSKY On Sept. 23, a memorial for Shulamith Firestone, the feminist visionary and author of “The Dialectic of Sex,� was held at St. Mark’s Church. Firestone died at the end of August. She was a member of the radical Redstockings group, a second-wave feminist and a longtime East Village resident who lived at 213 10th St. for 30 years. Feminists at her memorial suggested continuing Firestone’s legacy by creating a “feminist-in-residence� opportunity at her apartment, if the landlord would agree to offer the apartment below the market rate. Fran Luck, executive producer of the “Joy of Resistance� multicultural feminist radio program on WBAI, lamented how changes in the neighborhood, particularly the rents, can no longer nurture the inspiration and inventive thinking of someone like Firestone. On the afternoon of Wed., Oct. 10, Luck and others were on E. 10th St. outside Tower Brokerage, landlord Bob Perl’s office, with an enlarged copy of a petition signed by a bevy of renowned feminists. “I’ve seen the hub of creativity, Allen Ginsburg, jazz musicians of the ’70s — but it’s not happening now because you have to make at least $75,000 to live here in the Lower East Side,� Luck said. The key cause of the loss of this creative nexus is lack of affordable housing, she added. “We want feminist work to continue; we still need women doing this work,� she stressed. The petition states that currently the average rent in the East Village is $2,100, which is pricing out the creative spirits that gave the neighborhood its unique character. The petition further notes that sister feminists and Shulamith’s friends and admirers would like to continue her legacy by making

feminist work possible in the neighborhood, but need affordable rent. The petition urges Perl to work with the core signers to create a “Shulamith Firestone Memorial Apartmentâ€? that would, in perpetuity, remain below the market value, not exceeding $1,000, and be reserved for a feminist-in-residence, such as an artist or scholar. MNN TV producer Nancy Kogel and Bill Koehnlein of the Brecht Forum delivered a letter addressed to Perl asking for a meeting to discuss the request. Perl was not present, but another Tower employee in the office accepted the letter. “This apartment would be reserved for a woman who is making an important contribution to the feminist movement that is not well remuneratedâ€? the petition reads. “Candidates for residence in such an apartment would be vetted by a committee of feminists drawn from the list [of signers] and would meet the same standards as any other tenant — with the exception of paying a lower-than-market-rate rent.â€? However, in an interview on Monday, Perl said he stands by his earlier statements in this newspaper, in which he said he opposed the idea, and that every time a famous person dies in New York his or her apartment shouldn’t be made “a shrine.â€? “My real estate taxes have risen 2,000 percent since I’ve owned that building,â€? said Perl, who purchased the property in 1993. “There’s no room to subsidize their specific goals. I contribute to charities in this neighborhood, and I’m not going to give a lifelong donation to a group that shows up — and no one even had the courtesy to introduce themselves to me. ‌ I can’t believe this story still has legs.â€?

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Sarah Zenis, 97, led Greenwich House poetry workshop OBITUARIES BY ALBERT AMATEAU Fellow poets and friends of Sarah Zenis met last week to celebrate the life of their beloved mentor, who presided at Greenwich House’s poetry workshop every other Tuesday for the past 20 years until she died on Sept. 11 at the age of 97. There was lots of laughter as her friends recalled her irrepressible and adventurous spirit. A member of The Lambs Club, she used to lead performances of poetry and song at senior centers and assisted-living residences all over the metropolitan area. “She expected us to do everything; we recited poetry and those of us who sang or danced would perform. It was really a riot, like a vaudeville show,” said Rebecca Lepkoff. Famous for her Lower East Side street photography from the 1930s and ’40s, Lepkoff was a member of the poetry workshop and a fellow trouper with Sarah for the past 12 years. “I’m a year younger than Sarah. I met her in my dotage and hers too. I used to dance with Martha Graham in the 1930s,” Lepkoff said. “She was an impresario, a heavenly person,” said Max Nemerovsky, 92. “She took us to St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Temple Emanu-El, all over town. Sarah and I both

had Russian backgrounds. Our parents were born there, but I was born in China,” Nemerovsky said. Sarah was born in Lynn, Mass., on Jan. 10, 1915, and started writing poetry in high school. She told The Villager a few years ago that she graduated during the Depression and began working as a bookkeeper. In a poem that begins, "I knew I was there./Footprints scraped on worn pavements,/Dented into deep ridge,/Painful wisps of grass," she remembered the house in Lynn where she was raised. She came to New York in 1954, began working for an importer of textiles from China and took a course with Ruth Lisa Schechter, a poet she admired. A resident of W. 79th St. across from the Museum of Natural History for 50 years, Sarah became close friends with her neighbors. “She lived next door to me and I met her one morning on my way to work,” said Anne Nadell. “Her door was open and she invited me into a sitting room with pink walls. She taught me about Shakespeare, about love and life; she looked after me and I looked after her,” said Nadell, who organized the Oct. 9 memorial. “She used to say, ‘I tell ya man, I did it. I traveled the world,’” Nadell recalled. And travel the world she did, touring Tokyo, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Bangkok in 1969 with her employer. Father John Sheehan, a fellow Lambs

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Sarah Zenis at a poetry workshop at Greenwich House in October 2008.

Club member with a big tenor voice, was also among Sarah’s performing companions. “I don’t remember if I met Sarah at the Lambs Club or at a JASA [Jewish Association for Services for the Aged] event,” he said. Andre Da Silva, 38, an actor, recalled meeting Sarah when he answered an ad in 1998 offering a 1973 Olds Cutlass Supreme for sale. “She didn’t want to sell it to me because she thought I was too young. I had to bring my father to say it was all right,” Da Silva said. “It was her favorite car but she stopped driving it in 1997. It was my favorite car too. We used to drive out to Sayville, Long Island, go to thrift shops. I had to sell it last year, but she said it was all

right. She was my mentor, the grandmother I never had. She always wanted us to be the best versions of ourselves,” said Da Silva through the sobs he strove to suppress. Susan Ealy, a neighbor, met Sarah five years ago and recalls entrancing conversations about poetry in Sarah’s pink parlor. Jim Sullivan, another neighbor, recalled gatherings of fellow tenants in Sarah’s rosyhued sitting room during their campaign to compel the landlord to repair the elevator. “She was the only family I every had,” Sullivan said. Muriel Mandell, a Village resident who used to write for the old Brooklyn Eagle and the Patterson, N.J., Morning Call, was another regular at the Greenwich House workshop. “It was an incentive to write poetry,” she said. Abe Vigoda, the actor (remember Tessio in “The Godfather”?), recalled meeting Sarah around 1960 at La Martinique, a dance hall on W. 57th St. “I paid $1.35 admission and asked her for a dance. We became friends,” Vigoda said. “Sarah called me three weeks before she died,” said Anthony Cilione, director of the Greenwich House Senior Center. “ ‘I have a lot of ideas for the fall,’ she said. She was always full of ideas. Last year, she told me she wanted to start a high school poetry contest. I dreaded the amount of work it would take, but she went right ahead. We got Stuyvesant High School involved and it was a huge success, for Sarah, for Greenwich House and for the students,” Cilione said. “She was really all about the fellowship of poets and that’s why we have to try to keep the workshop going,” he said.

Donald Suggs, activist, journalist, 51; Pumped up H.I.V. prevention BY TROY MASTERS Donald Suggs, who spent a lifetime engaged in progressive causes, died of a heart attack on Oct. 7 at age 51. A former associate director of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) and program director at Harlem United, an AIDS organization, Suggs was a founder of People Using Media to Do Prevention, or the PUMP project, which taught young people from neighborhoods devastated by H.I.V. how to produce prevention videos. Better World Advertising, which manages H.I.V. messaging campaigns targeting L.G.B.T. and people of color communities, grew out of the PUMP effort. Suggs also worked on prevention education projects internationally –– from Puebla, Mexico, to Santo Domingo and Bani in the Dominican Republic. As a journalist, Suggs was a senior editor at the Village Voice, and a con-

Donald Suggs, left, and his longtime partner, Jeremy Hess.

tributor to The New York Times and the Advocate, among other publications. As a board member at Manhattan Neighborhood Network TV, he was instrumental in bringing “Gay USA” into the fold there. Suggs was an East Village resident. He is survived by his longtime partner, Jeremy Hess, and his son, Luis Ramirez.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Photos by Sam Spokony

School roof is East Village’s newest learning lab The Earth School, an alternative K-to-6 public school at 600 E. Sixth St., unveiled its new 2,400-square-foot rooftop garden last Friday. The garden, which will allow kids to learn about the growth of fruits, vegetables and flowers, was conceived and planned by Fifth Street Farm, an East Village-based nonprofit group. Above, Earth School students joined in a ceremonial ribbon-cutting alongside (back row from left to right) 9/11 Memorial architect Michael Arad, who designed the garden, state Senator Daniel Squadron, Borough President Scott Stringer and Councilmember Rosie Mendez. On opposite page, after celebrating the opening, students tended and watered the plants. The rooftop garden includes beds of vibrant flowers, as well as potato plants, kale and mustard greens.

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October 18 - 24, 2012

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October 18 - 24, 2012

Leagues toss a change-up on Pier 40 buildings idea Continued from page 1 cer. They have been working with architects at WxY Studios to come up with a sense of how residential — or possibly also commercial office use — might work at Pier 40. While the earlier Pier 40 study, done by high-powered planning consultants, cost six figures, this one cost only $25,000. This new plan — and other concepts and proposals for Pier 40 and for the park’s funding — will be presented at a special Pier 40 forum held by Community Board 2 on Mon., Oct. 29, at 6:30 p.m. at P.S. 41, 116 W. 11th St.

CASH BUT LOW IMPACT The aging pier needs $30 million in roof repairs and more than $100 million in long-term repairs for its pilings, money the Hudson River Park Trust doesn’t have. The Trust recently decided that, over the next five years, it will only make cheaper, temporary repairs on the pier, in hopes that a viable, long-term plan will emerge. The key for Pier 40 Champions is that any revenue-raising plan preserve the pier’s existing sports fields, and that the leagues’ use of the fields not be interrupted during construction. Locating the towers just to the east of the pier — in the area currently used as a parking turnaround — would seem to accomplish that.

The Pier 40 Champions plan features an elevated running track that would circle the pier’s courtyard, which would continue to be occupied by a massive artificial-turf playing field equal in size to two regulation-size soccer fields.

JOGGING ON ANOTHER LEVEL

FEWER BUILDINGS ON PIER Under the Pier 40 Champions scheme, buildings wouldn’t be added on Pier 40, but instead removed from it. Specifically, slightly less than half of the three-story pier shed that currently encircles Pier 40 would be demolished. (The pier shed is, in fact, made up of eight buildings connected by expansion joints. Three of these buildings would be removed.). Razing some of the pier shed buildings would open sight lines and create new park areas, such as at the pier’s southwest corner, which offers the pier’s best river view. The thinking is that this corner would be programmed like Rockefeller Park at Chambers St. — people could lie on the grass, throw a frisbee or casually kick a soccer ball, but not play organized team sports. In an added benefit, Pier 40 Champions contends, by siting the housing off of the pier rather than on it, construction costs would drop, the reasoning being it’s cheaper to build on land than over water. Beyond revenue from the new residential or office buildings, revenue would also be generated — as it is now — by parking, to be located in the remaining shed structure on the pier’s western and northern sides. Stackers would possibly be used to maximize use of the parking space. There would also be opportunities for “limited retail” on the pier, such as a cafe or juice bar on the ground-floor level.

An overview of the Pier 40 Champions plan, showing where new park areas would be opened up by removing sections of the current pier shed that rings the 14.5-acre West Houston St. pier.

‘PERFECT FOR A SCHOOL’ In addition, Pier 40 Champions thinks a school could work in the pier shed section that fronts on the West Side Highway. A few years ago, efforts for a Pier 40 school faded after the city’s School Construction Authority balked at its being over the water. But if a school was in the pier shed’s eastern section, students wouldn’t have to

cross water to get to it, making Pier 40 Champions think S.C.A. might O.K. it. The outside-the-box Pier 40 plan also offers an alternative cycling route: The Champions design shows a ramped path curving in toward Pier 40 and rising to its mezzanine level, then dropping back down to reconnect with the straightaway. This ramped path would bridge over the pier’s West Houston St. entrance, so the bikers would be separated from car traffic.

Also, the top inner rim of Pier 40’s shed structure would be preserved — at least enough to create a 15-foot-wide running track with a soft surface that would ring the pier’s central courtyard. Inside the courtyard, the existing playing field space, equal to two regulation-size soccer fields, would be preserved. A smaller, rooftop, children’s sports field would be added on the pier’s southern side. Tobi Bergman, president of P3 (Pier, Park & Playground Association), said the Champions plan achieves the group’s main goals. “It would preserve the fields, with no interruption of use, even during construction,” he said, “and provide income to the Hudson River Park Trust, without overburdening the park with tourists, shopping and traffic. “It’s sort of like Brooklyn Bridge Park, where the residential is being built on the other side of the park,” he noted. That outer-borough park is generating revenue from housing. Like Hudson River Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park is intended to be financially self-sustaining. The elevated jogging track, for one, could be very popular, Bergman predicted. “It’s interesting running because you’re watching kids playing baseball or soccer,” he said. “You’ve got interesting views of the river. My guess is that this would become a major attraction of the park.” In addition to a rezoning, a legislation change to the Hudson River Park Act would also be needed to allow the towers, Bergman said. As for the Trust’s response to the plan, Bergman said, “I think they’re excited about it.” The Champions opted not to do a financial study for it, though, leaving that for the Trust to do.

Continued on page 35


October 18 - 24, 2012

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God’s Love We Deliver plans to grow larger in Soho Continued from page 1 garden. In addition to its open rooftop, the new God’s Love We Deliver building would have setbacks and these would also sport garden plots. The existing G.L.W.D. building’s distinctive red brick would be replaced by a grayish surfacing called “church stone.” Its loading dock on Spring St. would be enclosed, making things quieter for neighbors as the trucks load up with food deliveries. The current roof would be removed and new footings added to accommodate the additional stories. Although the exterior of the northbound Spring St. subway entrance would be spruced up as part of the work, G.L.W.D. officials said the M.T.A. has told them there would be no need to close the entranceway — not even for a single day. The organization hopes to start the project next April and complete it within 14 to 16 months. G.L.W.D. would temporarily relocate during the construction period, allowing it to continue its operations without any break in services. G.L.W.D. officials laid out the plan in detail to The Villager on Monday morning. The story was embargoed from publication until later that evening, when fashion designer Michael Kors presented a $5 million gift to G.L.W.D. at its gala. Kors’s is the largest single donation in the organization’s history, in recognition of which, G.L.W.D.’s Soho headquarters will be named The Michael Kors Building. G.L.W.D. started 26 years ago at the height of the AIDS crisis. The group purchased its Soho building from the city at auction for $535,000 in 1993. Originally an M.T.A. garage, the structure had most recently been a library for the blind and was vacant before G.L.W.D. took it over. This year G.L.W.D. is on track to deliver 1.1 million meals in New York City, as well as Hudson County and Newark. In addition to providing food to people with AIDS and cancer, G.L.W.D. also feeds individuals afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and kidney and cardiovascular health issues. The group has a veritable army of 8,000 volunteers who help pack and deliver the nutritious meals. A key part of the organization’s mission is to never have a waiting list for its services. Also, the group provides food not only to the affected individual, but, in the case of a sick parent, for example, the children will also get the free meals, the reasoning being that a parent’s debilitating illness impacts the whole family. If a senior gets a meal from G.L.W.D., his or her caregiver receives one too. However, in the last five years, the group’s operation has grown by 60 percent, creating a major strain. “Our kitchen is too small,” said Karen Pearl, G.L.W.D. president and C.E.O. “Our delivery area is too small. We have converted four offices into freezers and refrigerators.” Three years ago the organization started searching for a solution to allow it to continue fulfilling its mission as it continues to grow. The decision was made to expand at the current Soho site. However, some had advised G.L.W.D. also to build residential apartments on top of its location as a way to provide revenue. What G.L.W.D. ultimately decided to do instead was to sell some of its air rights to a developer who is building a new 14-story tower to the north — on a parcel composed of a vacant lot and a vacant, one-story, former Sleepy’s mattress store. This deal, which is still being finalized, would create an “operational endowment” to help G.L.W.D. weather the period when it has to relocate to a swing space during the reconstruction project. G.L.W.D. has been fundraising for the project for the past year and a half, and Kors’s gift now brings the total to $20 million. G.L.W.D.’s board has committed to a campaign to raise a total of $25 million, which will also cover the operational endowment. In an unusual twist, the open-space requirement of the adjacent planned apartment building will be fulfilled by G.L.W.D.’s garden rooftop. To access the social-service

Courtesy God’s Love We Deliver

A rendering of how God’s Love We Deliver’s Spring St. building would appear after a planned $22 million vertical expansion project.

organization’s garden rooftop, the residents would cross G.L.W.D.’s third-floor rooftop, then take an elevator up to the fifth-floor rooftop. G.L.W.D. officials don’t know if the residents will actually want to volunteer in the organization’s garden rooftop — though they hope they will — but this access will be provided to meet the open-space requirement. However, because the G.L.W.D. property carries a restriction for community use, the organization must apply for what’s known as a “minor modification” to allow the neighboring residents to access the rooftop garden. This application will first be checked by the City Planning Commission to ensure that it’s in order. Then Community Board 2 will weigh in on the application, after which it will return to City Planning for a verdict. As opposed to a sevenmonth long ULURP review, this process will only take 45 days. G.L.W.D. intends to begin the process later this month. The project that G.L.W.D. plans is 41,000 square feet. G.L.W.D. could, however, develop up to 66,000 square feet on its own property, but instead plans to sell 19,000 square feet of air rights to the adjacent development project. At the going rate of $200 to $300 per square foot, this would mean $3.8 million to $5.7 million for G.L.W.D. Pearl and Lee Silberstein, a P.R. representative representing G.L.W.D., said the developer of the adjacent property, QT Soho Realty, LLC, could, under current zoning, construct a building up to 17 stories tall, even without using any of G.L.W.D.’s air rights. But, they said, the developer instead is planning to build only 14 stories — though the building would be bulkier thanks to the added air rights. “It’s fair to say that they’re trying to work with God’s Love,” Silberstein said of the developer. “I think they recognize the value of the organization.” “From the very beginning they saw this as a partnership,” Pearl said of QT Soho Realty. Of the developer keeping the apartment building at 14 stories, instead of going up to 17 stories, she added, “I think they were very conscious of wanting to be a good neighbor to us.” The G.L.W.D. property is zoned for residential, commercial and community-facility use. However, prior to its sale in ’93, the property was restricted forever to community use. In addition, certain types of community facilities were banned at the location — such as schools, religious facilities or doctors’ offices — because Soho residents opposed uses

that would bring in a lot of people. Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, is charging that the air rights transfer might violate the property’s restriction. The residential project site is also within the proposed boundaries of the South Village Historic District that G.V.S.H.P. has been pushing for the city to designate. According to Pearl and Silberstein, if the air rights were used to build above the G.L.W.D. property, then, yes, they would have to be used for community-facility purposes. But if the air rights are transferred, they said, they can be used residentially, for example. On the other hand, they said, if G.L.W.D. wanted to add residential units on top of its own property, that plan would, in fact, have to go through a lengthier ULURP review. “People had proposed putting residential on top of our own building,” Pearl said. “But our board made the decision that that’s not what we’re here for — to run apartments — that we’re here to cook and deliver nutritious meals.” Plus, the air rights sale to the adjacent property would provide revenue to help G.L.W.D. continue its communityminded mission, so is in keeping with the spirit of the deed restriction, Pearl noted. On Oct. 1, Berman wrote a letter expressing his concerns to Amanda Burden, chairperson of the City Planning Commission, and Robert Tierney, chairperson of the Landmarks Preservation Commission. “The latest planned 14-story building at 180 Sixth Ave. is particularly concerning for a variety of reasons,” the preservationist wrote. “It would replace several one-to-four-story buildings, some of which (already demolished) were nearly 200 years old. It is surrounded largely by three-to-six-story buildings, which it would tower over precipitously. It utilizes development rights from the God’s Love We Deliver building at 170 Sixth Ave., a formerly city-owned property given to this invaluable social service agency with the stipulation that it only be used for a community facility/social service. The utilization of its development rights for a private luxury residential development seems to contradict the terms under which this public resource was given away, and its comportment with those terms should be thoroughly reviewed.” Berman said his group is researching to determine whether the air rights transfer is permissible for a residential project.


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October 18 - 24, 2012

EDITORIAL Back to Pier 40 With the state Legislature back in session, the effort to find a solution for Pier 40 is gearing up once again in earnest. As we report this week, a coalition of local youth sports leagues, working with an architect, has proactively created an innovative and potentially workable design to both preserve the pier’s sports fields and current uses while generating revenue for Pier 40 and the entire Hudson River Park. Also, David Gruber, the new chairperson of Community Board 2, has decided to take the bull by the horns and hold a forum later this month at which ideas for the pier and for raising funding for the park can be presented to the community and discussed. Both the new Pier 40 Champions plan and the C.B. 2 forum are encouraging. It’s critical to have community involvement and buy-in on whatever happens with Pier 40 and with Hudson River Park, in general. Right now, the youth sports leagues are the constituency that most heavily uses the massive West Houston St. pier and that is most invested in and concerned about the pier’s survival. So it’s fitting they’re trying to take the lead on the issue and steer the conversation. The Champions plan has a lot to like. It preserves the pier’s central courtyard playing field. It adaptively reuses three-fifths of the existing pier shed, while actually opening up more of the pier to park use. It maintains the pier’s parking, a popular amenity for Downtown residents that provides steady income for the park. The plan’s major element, however — two new buildings — is not actually on the pier, but located on parkland just east of it. It’s a twist on a design scenario done earlier this year by consultants that proposed putting 600 to 800 units of housing directly on the pier. Although the buildings in the Champions plan are still 15 stories tall, their square footage is 50 percent less than that in the earlier study, so there would be about half as many apartments. The Hudson River Park Trust is crunching the numbers to see if the Champions plan can work financially, in terms of supporting the park, and we’re eager to see the figures — as well as the response by the larger community to this plan. C.B. 2’s Gruber deciding to hold a forum on Pier 40 and Hudson River Park on Mon., Oct. 29, is a smart move. Gruber tells us he plans to invite Madelyn Wils, the Trust’s president, to the forum, as well as Douglas Durst, chairperson of Friends of Hudson River Park — who recently proposed his own alternative idea for a high-tech campus and parking, but no housing, on Pier 40. Others on the invite list are Assemblymembers Deborah Glick and Richard Gottfried, state Senate Democratic nominee Brad Hoylman and state Senator Daniel Squadron. Tobi Bergman will present the Champions plan. Residential use for the pier was pushed hard earlier this year by the Trust, but there simply wasn’t sufficient community education and involvement about the initiative. There’s no question Pier 40’s situation is dire and urgent, but this is a major project that can’t be rushed through without more broadly involving local residents — and Gruber is correct to recognize that fact and address it. Good things will come from making this process more community-inclusive, as it should be. In addition, next month, the first community outreach meeting on a Neighborhood Improvement District proposed for the blocks bordering Hudson River Park will be held. This is another idea that can help the park raise funds — through small tax assessments on property owners — to improve the park and surrounding blocks. It’s difficult — often incredibly difficult — to reach consensus on development projects in Greenwich Village and the Lower West Side. But the stakes here are too high to do otherwise.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR L.E.S. Pathmark is worth the trip

Money from women’s bodies

To The Editor: Re “L.E.S. Pathmark to close: Residents are distraught” (news article, Oct. 4): Not only is the Pike Slip Pathmark’s closing tragic because it leaves the community bereft of a large, reliable outlet that’s been in the neighborhood for decades, but their circular sales are usually the lowest in town. It is the exact opposite of Woody Allen’s joke about the woman at a Catskills hotel who complains that their food isn’t good and also that their portions are small. Not only was that store spacious, clean, well-stocked and well-kept, but also, depending on the week, it offered the lowest prices for many brands. And, it’s the only store I know of in Manhattan with a parking lot. I’m not the only one who went down there on alternate-side cleaning days. And many times I’ve taken the M15 there and back — as have many others who board the bus loaded with Pathmark bags. I hope that our legislators trying to correct this situation realize that the termination of Pathmark’s Cherry St. store is a tragedy that reaches wider than the immediately surrounding residential community.

To The Editor: Re “Youth leagues go to bat against strip club near Pier 40” (news article, Oct. 11): First, strip clubs are not about sex. They are about commerce. They are about the selling of human flesh (most always women’s flesh) for profit. This kind of commerce is a multibillion-dollar business. From porn to trafficking of girls and women — it’s on that continuum. Sex is potentially an elegant and passionate way to be close to another human being. But this is different. Second, this kind of business turns women into commodities for the temporary assuaging of the loneliness of men. The owners profit, but leave both men and women more isolated than before. What part of that is being a “good neighbor”? Third, men have never had the experience as a young girl of discovering for the first time the existence of this kind of desperate bartering over a women’s body. Believe me, it is a pretty disheartening glimpse at relationships across gender. And we do notice that it’s our bodies that are targeted. Personally, I wouldn’t want this anywhere near where young girls walk. Fourth, sometimes it’s O.K. to take a position based on a moral assessment. It really is.

Billy Sternberg K Webster

The Village Moral Majority To The Editor: Re “Youth leagues go to bat against strip club near Pier 40” (news article, Oct. 11): Regarding zealot Paul Fox’s concern’s about, oh my God, a strip club opening on Clarkson St. and the West Side Highway, it’s none of his business what consenting adults do legally inside a club. That club has been there for years and its location is hardly “the heart” of his community. The river’s edge has always been more like the groin. If Mr. Fox wants to protect his precious children from exposure to a salacious environment, he should move his family to Pakistan or Saudi Arabia where women are kept in their proper place or shot.

Another useless antigun law To The Editor: “Politicians call for emergency Senate vote to pass gun laws” (news article, Oct. 11): New York has been the leader in useless antigun legislation since 1911, when the Sullivan Act, named after Tammany Assemblyman Tim Sullivan, was passed, primarily to prevent poor immigrants from obtaining the means of self-defense. Tim Sullivan died some years later, found dead on a train track after escaping from an insane asylum to which he had been committed. His successors, including the current mayor, are pretty much cut out of the same cloth. Peter Caroline

Carl Rosenstein a.k.a. The Angry Buddhist

Continued on page 24

IRA BLUTREICH


October 18 - 24, 2012

23

The education of a New York public school parent NOTEBOOK BY MICHELE HERMAN I tackled an interesting educational project the other day: I cleaned out the bookcase where both my kids have ritually shoved their schoolwork every June, vast forgotten wads of composition books and loose leaf and folders. We’re talking two kids, K through 12, which means 26 combined school years. Why now? Because our last child has entered his last year in the New York City public schools, a system around which all our lives have been organized for nearly two decades. We have put an enormous amount of trust and faith and energy into this system and I wanted to take a last look at some of the more tangible things it gave my kids in return. So on a sunny Saturday I heaved bales of paper to the living room floor and began sorting, thinking about this great and muchmaligned experiment known as public education, and trying to decide if my kids’ three schools — P.S. 3, I.S. 289 and Stuyvesant High — educated them well. First, I cleared the underbrush, tossing all the Spanish and math homework; it may have done its job, but no one was ever going to refer to this dry, unrevealing stuff again. Then I saved the hilariously earnest journal entries and personal reflections (“My Life From My Birth to My Toddlerhood”), even though it meant yanking reams of paper out of composition books and spiral notebooks. All outward signs pointed to steady progress on the march from kindergarten to 12th grade, from fine motor skills to abstract thinking: a floppy composition book with dotted lines filled with penmanship practice, marble books filled with each boy’s preteen diatribes against his brother, a typed analysis of an abstruse Borges poem called “We are the time, we are the famous.” The question of whether the Department of Education did a good job led me to a dozen thornier questions, such as, compared to what — my own 1970s suburban education? an imaginary ideal world? every other large, free education system ever devised by humans? a quarter-of-a-million-dollar private education? How much of their education occurred at our dinner table and among their peers and either had nothing to do with the D.O.E. or was held back by its inanities? I thought about what it means to learn, to become educated. Certainly, I thought, as

I reluctantly placed handouts about the Silk Road and about genetically modified foods in the “toss” pile, it means mastering a large body of skills and absorbing a wide body of knowledge, a framework for how the world works and changes and how humans have operated within it. But staring at all this work my kids did, I realized how hard it is to know which lessons will stick, which bodies of knowledge will work their way deep into kids’ psyches or fingers or intellect or ethics. Here are some of the things I hoped for my kids when they entered the system: that they would emerge confident and unafraid, able to argue a point and make sense of a mystery and place a current event in context. Sure, I wanted them to understand the importance of parabolas and the Geneva Conventions, but I also hoped their schooling would teach them intangibles, like humility and compassion and the art of apology and bouncing back from failure. I wanted them to have open minds and — a trait that seems ever more valuable and elusive, especially in an election year — to learn to disagree without rancor. You can waste a lot of energy bemoaning the failings of the D.O.E., and I certainly have, and you can fight to make it better and more humane, as I have also done. But as I relived my kids’ years in school and remembered all their teachers (many of whom we are still in touch with), I have to say yes, the system served our kids well. I can’t speak for the D.O.E. as a whole, which struggles with problems too myriad to fix in a school day or a school year or maybe a lifetime, and only some of them of its own making. But here in School District 2, considered one of the more functional pockets of the system (along with that scary district in Queens that always outperforms everyone), I think there is much more right than wrong. Sure, it’s a mess. The union protects bad teachers in its efforts to protect good ones, classes are overcrowded, high-stakes testing takes up way too much time and energy. Everyone is overworked and exhausted and some staff members have more integrity and intelligence and creativity than others. But yes, I believe my kids came out well educated and, just as important, motivated to keep learning. In the middle of my pile-making, I had an epiphany: As long as there is public education, there will be hand-wringing about its failure and bitter controversy about how to fix it, and THIS IS O.K.; this is part of the process. It will always be toiling against impossible odds, this Member of the New York Press Association

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system that takes all comers, a system clogged with all their personal and societal baggage and their hormones, a system filled with mensches and boors and budding sociopaths, the gifted and the academic grifters, and, at the upper echelon where my kids spent their high school years, the frighteningly unexamined Olympics mentality, where kids willingly sacrifice sleep and well-being to win an extra point on a test so that they can go to a prestigious college and win more points. Maybe it’s the sentimentality of my impending loss, but I’m feeling that ultimately it’s a beautiful thing, this monstrous system, at least our little corner of it. I’ve definitely seen the Peter Principle at work. I’ve seen bureaucrats who practically plug their ears if you suggest a creative solution to a problem. I witnessed one teacher who didn’t even pretend to teach on open classroom day when the parents were watching. But more often I’ve seen kind, decent, smart, hard-working teachers and staff. I never thought I’d find myself paraphrasing Mitt Romney, but the D.O.E. is people. The one thing the system

never felt was the first thing you might expect it to be: bureaucratic. We’ve had no trouble getting access to our sons’ teachers. I always felt that their teachers knew and understood them, and I trusted that a lot of grownups in the building had their backs. At the end of the afternoon I had many piles. A freshly fallen snow of perforated paper bits lay atop the rug. One of my favorite relics in the “keep” pile was a recipe written in careful cursive. This was from Alan’s fifth-grade restaurant, an annual miracle that my older son was lucky enough to be part of. The kids chose recipes, worked out the math of cooking for the whole school, budgeted, shopped, cooked, set up and decorated the gym, took orders, made change, served, cleaned up the mess, tallied the profits and chose charities to donate them to. The unassuming teacher, who never had much to say at our parent-teacher conferences, taught generations of classes by his own example that sometimes it’s worthwhile to take on a big, messy, time-consuming project, because it will teach all the kids that they are all capable of greatness of one kind or another.

Photo by Milo Hess

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Beefy, the skateboarding bulldog, whose fame on the Web preceeds him, was shredding through Union Square Park recently with his buddy Patrick Clemens on their way to an event at Petco on 17th St.

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October 18 - 24, 2012

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from page 22

Hey, this is the Village! To The Editor: Re “Youth leagues go to bat against strip club near Pier 40” (news article, Oct. 11): OMG, how New York has changed. I have seen the West Side go from Sodom and Gomorrah to a very nice residential scene. I would call it a positive development. However, enough is enough for crying out loud. I have never been inside the West Side Gentleman’s Club but in almost 40 years I have never heard of any problems either. As far as I know, they have been a very good neighbor. It scares me when hyper-moralists start beating the drums against sin and sex. Kids have grown up in the West Village for generations and have turned into outstanding citizens with this business in their neighborhood. I do not see why these current kids are any different. If there are specific issues about the club then deal with them as you would with any other business. But trying to run them out of business or out of the neighborhood after all of these years is wrong in my opinion. Lawrence White

Left out of the loop by LUNGS To The Editor: Re “Harvest kicks it up a notch” (photo): I’d just like to correct a mistaken impression. The 6B Garden’s Harvest festival is an independent event of decades-long standing. It is organized entirely by the garden members. LUNGS merely reprinted our program information. It is a wonder that they did not reach out during the many months of planning. Roger DeGennaro DeGennaro is events committee chairperson, 6B Garden

Police in unmarked cars To The Editor: Could someone please explain to me how the police are allowed to ride around casually dressed in unmarked cars,

making traffic stops? Perhaps I’ve missed something along the way, but I was taught in school that those are the type of situations used in China, the former Soviet Union and other police states to maintain an atmosphere of paranoia. I suppose it’s all right, though, because not only do we have bike lanes and pedestrian malls, but our streets are clean, and our trains run on time. Jerry Wade a.k.a. Jerry The Peddler

We were betrayed on N.Y.U. To The Editor: Re “11 groups file suite against N.Y.U. plan for its superblocks” (news article, Sept. 27): I too applaud the lawsuit against those who betrayed the community’s trust. As someone who testified against the Sexton plan at both the City Planning Commission hearing and the City Council hearing, and who heard copious and reasoned testimony against the plan from neighbors, faculty, merchants and other residents, I continue to be appalled at the charade of pretended interest on the part of our elected (and appointed) representatives. We were betrayed by people who were supposed to represent our interests (Councilmembers Chin and Quinn), and the depth and cynicism of the betrayal are still stunning. One can also only wonder whether this is part of a larger scheme for developers to acquire NYU properties at fire-sale prices after gutting a living, breathing community, with its small amount of public land and green space and playgrounds, in favor of empty buildings, empty promises, architectural mausoleums and below-grade, air-raid shelters purportedly to be used as classrooms. I can only applaud the courage of the faculty members (N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan) who have chosen to speak out against this monstrous plan, and hope that the lawsuit has a just outcome. Rhoma Mostel

E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

Photos by Tequila Minsky

Pedestrian pebble-ization The southern crosswalk at Bleecker St. and Seventh Ave. has been shortened by more than one lane thanks to a newly installed “neckdown.” One Village resident using a walker, asked what he thought of the crossing, replied, “My cat would like it.” It’s true, the pebbled, outcropping jutting from the corner does resemble kitty litter, a little bit.


October 18 - 24, 2012

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VILLAGER ARTS &ENTERTAINMENT God Forsaken Wright’s tragicomic crime drama plays with time and space THEATER GRACE

Written by Craig Wright Directed by Dexter Bullard Through January 6 At the Cort Theatre 138 W. 48th St. (btw. 6th & 7th Aves.) Tues.-Thurs. at 7pm; Fri., Sat. at 8pm; Wed., Sat. at 2pm; Sun. at 3pm Tickets: $32-$132 To order, visit telecharge.org or call 212-239-6200 Photo by Joan Marcus

Kate Arrington, Michael Shannon, Ed Asner, and Paul Rudd in “Grace,” written by Craig Wright and directed by Dexter Bullard.

BY DAVID KENNERLEY Plays challenging the existence of God have been around for eons. Yet “Grace,” by Craig Wright (“Mistakes Were Made,” “Six Feet Under”), serves up a dizzying spin on the genre. In a fascinating production directed by Dexter Bullard, this inquisition takes the form of a tragicomic crime drama that plays with time and space. Not that it’s a whodunit, since in the opening moments we witness the carnage, in reverse, as if someone pressed the rewind button, leaving no doubt as to the shooter’s identity. The rest of the story is presented in flashback, detailing the chain of events over two months that led the killer to go berserk. In keeping with the metaphysical space-time conceit, the set (designed by Beowulf Boritt) of a generic rental condo on the Florida coast is actually two apartments in the same space. We see tenants in both abodes at once, often about to collide with each other. Which of course they inevitably do, both emotionally and physically. If that’s not enough, the living room is placed on an enormous turntable that revolves so slowly it takes a while to notice. An outer ring, which supports the front door and sliding glass doors to a bal-

cony, revolves in the opposite direction. A ceiling fan spins overhead. In one apartment are Steve (the evercharming Paul Rudd, taking a break from his spectacular comic film career) and his pretty wife, Sara (Kate Arrington), who have just moved from Minnesota to open a new chain of gospel-themed hotels. The couple is fervently religious, praising Jesus every chance they get.

We see tenants in both abodes at once, often about to collide with each other. Which of course they inevitably do, both emotionally and physically. A typical prayer: “Keep carrying us forward, Lord, always forward, deeper and deeper into your grace. Amen.” Which is all the more creepy since we know they’re about to take a nasty fall from grace.

And that they are literally going around in circles. Next door is Sam (Michael Shannon), who is recovering from a horrific car wreck that killed his fiancée and left him disfigured — half his face is still covered in a protective mask. A no-nonsense computer whiz for NASA, Sam was not religious before the tragedy and it’s no surprise he doesn’t believe in God now. Another nonbeliever is Karl (Ed Asner), a crusty old exterminator originally from Germany who stops by each month. Having endured atrocities during the Second World War when he was a boy, how could God possibly exist for him? Like their rotating apartments, their worlds continue their inexorable spin, where perspectives are altered and beliefs are realigned. Steve and Sara suffer setbacks that cause them to lose faith in Jesus, while Sam and Karl have epiphanies that make them reconsider the possibility of a higher power. Does the elaborate, high-concept approach to telling and staging the story work? Sadly, the conceits employed are more cryptic than illuminating — and not seamlessly executed. Plus, the shifts from comic to tragic can be jarring. It’s the

commitment of the top-notch performers that helps smooth over the bumps. Rudd is every bit as appealing onstage as in his films, imbuing Steve with an irresistible mix of devotion and determination. He might be a Jesus freak, but he’s one we don’t mind spending time with. Until, of course, all hell breaks loose. In his first stint on the boards in nearly a quarter-century, Asner does not disappoint as the garrulous crank who isn’t afraid to bare his soul. The strongest of the bunch is Shannon, in his Broadway debut, who is alternately witty and chilling as Sam. His wry, one-sided phone conversation with Apple tech support, ramping up in frustration and intensity, had the audience laughing in recognition. Sara’s transition from bright-eyed believer to cold-hearted traitor seems too abrupt, though it may be the fault of the script rather than Arrington’s portrayal. So does the inventive yet uneven “Grace” finally reveal if there is a God, if He controls our destiny and if one religion is superior to another? Yes and no. Perhaps we can look to a solution offered by the wise exterminator, delivered with caustic flair by Asner: “Mind your own business and everything works out.”


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October 18 - 24, 2012

BOOYAH : Halloween is for kids! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

SCREAMIN’ GREEN HALLOWEEN For the first time, World Financial Center’s annual family-friendly, eco-themed autumnal afternoon of adventure takes place outdoors. Watched over by a 30-foot scarecrow and witch, the Plaza and waterfront will be transformed into a Halloween Village. At the Costume Swap, exchange last year’s trick-ortreat guise for gently used and ready-to-wear ones that will come in handy at 3pm’s closing ceremony: The Ghosts and Goblins Parade. Prior to that, kids can listen to spooky tales told in verse, at the Poets House Tent. Outside, they’ll join wandering puppets and marching bands — and receive fair trade organic treats and temporary tattoos of pumpkins and ghosts. Before those prizes are claimed, though, there will be games to play — including a vertical spin on the old bobbing for apples tub, and a challenge to tack the face onto a pumpkin (no donkey tail-pinning at this party!). Ghoulish little gamers can also test their skill at the Gourd Roll (an obstacle course where you navigate your gourd using a small broom) and try to toss a Spider in the Brew (only three chances to get that beanbag creepy crawly into the giant tractor tire cauldron). The Ghost Farm is a giant communal art installation waiting for contributions (a ghost of your making). Give those specters something to dance to by playing the Musical Spider Web (made of gongs, pipes, bells and washtubs). In the Screamin’ Green Screen Photo Booth, have a photo taken wearing your newly crafted Green Halloween costume and email it, tweet it or post it on Facebook. Free. Sat., Oct., 27, from 12-3pm, at World Financial Center Plaza (220 Vesey St.). Free valet bicycle parking will be provided by Transportation Alternatives. For event info, visit worldfinancialcenter.com/screamingreen-halloween or call 212-945-0505.

PARTY & PARADE, AT THE SCHOLASTIC STORE It’s a safe bet that more than one Harry Potter will be marching in Scholastic’s Halloween Costume Parade — an annu-

Photo courtesy of Arts Brookfield

How about a little air, Scarecrow? This year, Screamin’ Green Halloween is an outdoor affair.

al event that invites kids to strut their spooky stuff in a procession that snakes its way around the block. Literarythemed costumes are encouraged, but plain old goblins, princesses and ghouls are also welcome! Afterwards, head back to the Scholastic Store — where a makeshift mad scientist’s lab allows you to make take-home monster-blood! Spin the “Wheel of Misfortune” to receive a spooky prize (celebrating 20 years of R.L. Stine’s “Goosebumps”). The free phantasmagoric fun happens at 3pm on Sat., Oct. 27 (appropriate for ages 3 and up). Return the next day (if you dare), for the store’s Halloween Party. Transformed into Scholastic Haunted Headquarters, partygoers will first cut loose by stretching out their skeletons (courtesy of instructors from Karma Kids Yoga). Then, after a mini-class from Gymboree, the band Bari Koral plays live music as little monsters brew bubbling potions, bowl for mummies, gorge on snacks and treats, decorate monster cupcakes and parade around in a “Costume Conga” line! Plus, when you least expect it, Clifford the Big Red Dog will make a special appearance! Sun.,

Oct. 28, 3-5pm. Tickets are $20 per child (price includes one accompanying adult and a $5 gift card to the store; additional adults, $10 each). To reserve a spot, call 212-343-6166 or email thescholasticstore@scholastic.com. Both events take place at 557 Broadway (btw. Prince & Spring Sts.). Regular store hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-7pm and Sun., 11am6pm. For info, visit scholastic.com/sohostore.

SPOOKY BOOK AUTHORS, AT BOOKS OF WONDER On Tues., Oct. 23, from 6-8pm, the Books of Wonder “Spooky Middle Grade

Reads” program invites you to meet Nikki Loftin (author of “The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy”) and Claire Legrand (author of “The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls”). Adam-Troy Castro will also be on hand, to read from “Gustav Gloom and the People Taker.” Fans of “Coraline” and “The Books of Elsewhere” are sure to enjoy this dark adventure fantasy, in which unhappy little Gustav and his new neighbor Fernie venture into the Gloom mansion and discover a shadowy world of mystery. Books of Wonder’s scare-inducing author readings continue on Thurs. Oct. 25 (6-8pm), with a group of (lucky?) seven whose ranks include Libba Bray (“The Diviners”), Dan Krokos (“False Memory”) and Kate Milford (“Broken Lands”). On Sat., Oct. 27 (12-2pm), the afternoon of “Haunted Halloween Fun” features in-the-flesh appearances from Karina Wolf (“The Insomniacs”), Michael Leviton (“My First Ghost”), Leo Landry (“Trick or Treat”), Melissa Iwai (“Hush, Little Monster”) and others. On Sun., Oct. 28 (1-3pm), guests for the “Thrills & Chills for Middle Graders” program include Gitty Daneshvari (“Ghoulfriends Forever”), Natasha Lowe (“The Power of Poppy Pendle”) and Elizabeth Cody Kimmel (“Legend of the Ghost Dog”). Free. At Books of Wonder (18 W. 18th St., btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves.). Regular store hours are Mon.-Sat., 11am-7pm and Sun., 11am-6pm. For more info, call 212-989-3270 or visit booksofwonder.com.

Image courtesy of Penguin Young Readers Group Photo courtesy of The Scholastic Store

Special guest Clifford visits the Scholastic Halloween Party, on Oct. 28.

“Gustav Gloom” author Adam-Troy Castro will appear (in the flesh) at Books of Wonde, on Oct. 23.


October 18 - 24, 2012

27

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THE ELI YAMIN BLUES BAND Tribeca Performing Arts Center’s annual Spotlight series kicks off with the Eli Yamin Blues Band performing spiritual, classical, bebop and bluesinfused selections from their debut CD (“I Feel So Glad”). For this Oct. 26 gig, the ensemble will feature violinist and vocalist Mazz Swift along with longtime band members Bob Stewart on tuba, LaFrae Sci on drums/vocals — and on piano and vocals, founder Eli Yamin (of whom Wynton Marsalis said, “I learn from Eli every time I see his work.”). The Spotlight series continues on Nov. 9, with singer/songwriter Jonathan Spottiswoode’s band (Spottiswoode & His Enemies). On Dec. 14, it’s the Brooklyn-based four-piece “reductionstutter-funk band” Aabaraki. New York’s top African-American comics are featured in headliner Sherrod Small’s “Best Black Show Ever,” on Feb. 15. On March 1, hear what the merger of traditional jug band energy, amped-up lap steel guitar and Chicago-style blues harp sounds like — when the eight-piece Hudson Valley band Spuyten Duyvil performs.

Photo by Ben Kimmerle

We got ‘em on the spot: See the Eli Yamin Blues Band, on Oct. 26.

April 12’s show features The Brooklyn Women’s Chorus — and on May 10, the Spotlight series concludes with “Laughs for Mom,” a comedic pre-Mother’s Day celebration featuring stand-up Joe Matarese’s autobiographical recollections of his dysfunctional Italian family (which, given the show’s theme, might go light on mom jokes purely as a onetime courtesy). Adrienne Iapalucci and

Paul Virzi are also on the bill. The Eli Yamin Blues Band performs on Fri., Oct. 26, 8pm. At BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (199 Chambers St., btw. Greenwich Ave. & West St.). Tickets: $15 ($10 when you purchase a Spotlight FIVE subscription). To order, call 212-220-1460 or visit tribecapac. org/spotlight.htm. Also visit tribecapac. org and eliyamin.com.

HIGH LINE OPENS STUDIOS Tired of staring at art in a gallery or museum only to fruitlessly ponder what its creator was thinking? Go straight to the source, by taking a free self-guided tour of West Chelsea art studios. This year’s installment of the “High Line Open Studios” event doesn’t promise definitive answers to your questions about

Continued on page 28

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SPECIAL GUEST APPEARANCE BY SPIDER-MAN

DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!

16 ier 16 port . PPier aapo SSeeaport reeetet Seapor Sttreet outh Street SSouth www.circlelinedowntown.com w ww.ci circl rclelined elinedowntown.com | 212.742.1969 212.742.1969 21 Must be 21 years of age or older with valid ID

Photo by Jacob Cohl • TM & © 2012 Marvel & Subs.

Go ahead and look: Ian Mack’s studio, at 526 W. 26th St. (#723).


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October 18 - 24, 2012

Just Do Art! Continued from page 27 the meaning of a particular piece…but it does afford the rare opportunity to interact with artists in the very space where their work is created. What began in 2000 as a grassroots movement by a group of four artists housed in the West Chelsea Arts Building has evolved into an annual event whose 2012 installment will see more than 70 artists open their studios up to the public. In addition to gaining insight into the creative process, art lovers, collectors, dealers and visitors who fall for a particular piece will have the ability to purchase that work before it makes its way to a gallery wall. The free self-guided tour takes place daily, 12-6pm, from Fri., Oct. 19 through Sun., Oct. 21. At the West Chelsea Arts Building (508-526 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). A map listing 10 West Chelsea arts district buildings housing the participating studios will be provided. To preview the tour, visit highopenstudios.org.

AMORE OPERA PRESENTS: THE PASQUALE SAGA Amore Opera’s ambitious double bill boldly reinterprets two comedies composed by Gaetano Donizetti (“Olivo e Pasquale” and “Don Pasquale”) as a sort of singing “Godfather” saga — by transplanting the action to 1800s Sicily and casting the Part II titular character as a quick-tempered crime boss operating undercover as an oil exporter trying to marry off his strong-willed daughter while clashing with his younger brother (the benevolent and humane Pasquale). Years pass, and the aging Don finds even more frustration when again mixing Cupid with coercion (by planning another marriage, this time for his nephew). Deception, disguises and hilarity ensue! Directed by Nathan Hull, the two productions run in tandem from Oct.

Photo courtesy of Amore Opera

Amore Opera delivers two comedic tales, both by Gaetano Donizetti.

19-Nov. 4. At The Connelly Theater (220 E. 4th St., btw. Aves. A & B.). For specific performance dates/times and to purchase tickets ($40, $30 for student/ seniors), call 866-811-4111 or visit amoreopera.org.

THEATER: 2 FROM THE SEA Director Beth Skinner and composer/musician Edward Herbst — whose Triple Shadow company creates visual theater through live music, real-time video projections, masks, puppetry and dance — has been presenting at La MaMa E.T.C. for 20 years. Their latest La MaMa incarnation, “2 From the Sea,” is composed of two solo adaptations of plays whose themes are based on stories of the sea. Adapted from a radio play by Dylan Thomas, “Holiday Memory” features Seamus Maynard subbing for the author

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(shades of “A Child’s Christmas in Wales”) by regaling the audience with a wistful childhood recollection of a day at the seaside. His tale is accompanied by an original musical score for harmonium, mandolin and toy piano, intertwined with traditional Celtic songs performed by Edward Herbst. Set in the Aran Islands, John Millington Synge’s “Riders to the Sea” takes place during the October 31/ November 1 Gaelic harvest festival of Samhain (which heralds the beginning of the dark season). In the hands of Triple Shadow, it’s a time when the boundaries between the living and dead thins. Solo actor Mari Andrejco plays Cathleen, who leaves a light in the window to guide the departed home and sets places at the table for her six brothers, father, and grandfather, all lost at sea. The music, composed and performed by Herbst, includes traditional Irish songs. Oct.18-Nov. 4. Thurs.-Sat. at 7:30pm, Sun. at 2:30pm. At La MaMa E.T.C. (74A E. 4th St., btw. Bowery & 2nd Ave.). For tickets ($18, $13 for students/seniors), call 212-475-7710 or visit lamama.org. Also visit tripleshadow.org.

Continued on page 29

Photo by Edward Herbst

Seamus Maynard, in “Holiday Memory.”

Photo by Edward Herbst

Mari Andrejco, in “Riders to the Sea.”


October 18 - 24, 2012

29

Just Do Art!

Logo courtesy of Ax Wound

Slashing genre expectations: See “Ax Wound.”

Continued from page 28

AX WOUND: GENDER AND THE HORROR GENRE Writer and “Ax Wound” founder Hannah Neurotica host this reading and open mic for horror and feminist-themed work (partially in solidarity with the Halloween season, partially in celebration of the magazine’s new issue). Founded with the mission to create a dialogue about gender in the horror, slasher and gore genres (which typically reinforce patriarchal values), “Ax Wound” has found a hungry audience among both feminist horror fans and general interest genre enthusiasts. Following a reading of excerpts from the latest issue, Neurotica will lead a discussion on what it means to be a feminist horror fan, artist, filmmaker and writer. Mon., Oct. 22, 7pm. At Bluestockings Bookstore (172 Allen St., btw. Stanton & Rivington Sts.). The suggested donation is $5 (but at Bluestockings, you’ll never be turned away because of empty pockets — so just show up!). For info, visit bluestockings.com, hannahneurotica.com and axwoundzine.com.

MUSIC: PIT STOP PLAYERS PRESENT “PARANORMAL ACTIVITIES” Always heard but seldom (if ever) seen, the identity of a Broadway pit musician is shrouded in mystery. Normally, a Pit Stop Players concert affords them the opportunity to step onto the stage and reveal themselves to the world. But this is no normal gig from

the 14-member chamber ensemble (who’ve collectively played in pit orchestras for over 120 Broadway productions). “Paranormal Activities” is a Halloween-themed concert in which the group will perform in costume — thus, ironically, concealing their true selves. Audience members are encouraged to help increase the air of mystery by also showing up in costume. Conductor and composer Joshua Rosenblum, who presides over the fun, assures that the evening will have its dark side as well: “This is a collection of great scary music,” says Rosenblum of the creative content. Selections will include Louis Levy’s theme from the film “Sabotage,” George Lessner’s “Ride of the Headless Horseman” (from the Broadway production of “Sleepy Hollow”) and the world premiere of Rosenblum’s “Zombies Eating Pie.” The Players assume no responsibility for restless dreams — but they do promise that your nightmares will have a killer soundtrack. Mon., Oct. 29, 7:30 pm, at the DiMenna Center for Classical Music, Benzaquen Hall (450 West 37th St., btw. Ninth & Tenth Aves.). For tickets ($25, $15 for students), purchase cash only at the door or visit smarttix.com. For info on the Pit Stop Players, visit rosenblummusic.com or facebook.com/pitstopplayers.

ICE THEATRE OF NY BENEFIT GALA No strangers to multitasking while navigating a razor-thin edge, this upcoming Benefit Gala from Ice Theatre of New York — a figure skating ensemble that’s been integrating the sensibilities of contemporary dance, music and art

Photo by Nicholas Prout

Dressed to kill…and make music: The Pit Stop Players.

since 1984 — entertains while raising funds for a good cause. All proceeds will help fund ITNY’s New Works and Young Artists Series — an outreach program for NYC public school children, as well as its 2012-2013 season's artistic programming. “Dare to be Debonair” sees ITNY welcoming special guest Richard “Mr. Debonair” Dwyer (one of the most popular performers in the history of show skating and a Guinness Book of World Records holder for Longest Professional Skating Career). Other featured performers of equally impressive accomplishment include Tai Babilonia, Dorothy Hamill, Linda Fratianne and JoJo Starbuck. The ITNY company will perform pieces from its repertory, including works from NYC dance choreographers. Mon., Oct. 22, 7pm (cocktail reception to follow). At the Chelsea Piers Sky Rink (21st & West Sts.). Single benefit tickets are $350 and up. For performance only, $25. To order, call 212929-5811 or email itny@icetheatre.org. Also visit icetheatre.org for info on the 2012-2013 season.

Photo by Vicki S Luy

Great skating, for a good cause: Former Olympic Champion Tenley Albright and Richard Dwyer.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 Come see and be seen and Celebrate the Night of Nights! Costume Parade & Live Bands Miracles & Monsters HOT FOOD AND HOT ENTERTAINMENT

Bandstage on E. 10th St at 4:30pm

DOORS OPEN 7:30pm ALL TICKETS $20

Theater for the New City 155 1st Ave. at East 10th St. for Info call (212) 254-1109 Tickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net Also at www.facebook.com/theaterforthenewcity


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October 18 - 24, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION PS FORM 3526 1. Publication Title: The Villager. 2. Publication number: USPS 0578-930. 3. Filing date: 10/1/12. 4. Issue frequency: weekly. 5. No. of issues published annually: 52. 6. Annual subscription price: $29. 7. Mailing address of known office of publication: NYC Community Media, LLC, 515 Canal St., Ste. 1C, New York, NY 10013. Contact person: Jennifer Goodstein, Tel: 646 452 2506. 8. Mailing address of headquarters: NYC Community Media, LLC, 515 Canal St., Ste. 1C, New York, NY 10013. 9. Names and addresses of Publisher and Editor and Managing Editor: Jennifer Goodstein, NYC Community Media LLC, 515 Canal St., Ste. 1C, New York, NY 10013, Publisher; Lincoln Anderson, 515 Canal St., Ste. 1C, New York, NY 10013, Editor and Managing Editor. 10. Owner: NYC Community Media, LLC, 515 Canal St., Ste. 1C, New York, NY 10013. 1l. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: Jennifer Goodstein, 305 W. 98th St., Apt. 7GN, New York, NY 10025; Les Goodstein, 305 W. 98th St., Apt. 7GN, New York, NY 10025. 12. Tax status: (for completion by non-profit organizations only). 13. Publication title: The Villager. 14. Issue date for circulation data below: 09/27/12. 15. Extent and nature of circulation: first number: avg. no. of copies each issue during preceding 12 months; second number: no. copies of single issue nearest to filing date. a: total number of copies (net press run): 3037; 3025. b: paid circulation by mail and outside the mail. b(1): mailed outside–county paid subscriptions: 113; 108. b(2): mailed in-county paid subscriptions: 1994; 1907. b(3): paid distribution outside the mails including sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other paid distribution outside USPS: 0; 0. b(4): paid distribution by other classes of mail through the USPS: 0; 0. c: Total paid distribution: 2107; 2015. d: free or nominal rate distribution by mail and outside the mail. d(1): free or nominal rate outside-county: 0; 0. d(2) free or nominal rate in-county: 30; 30. d(3): free or nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS: 0; 0. d(4): free or nominal rate distribution outside the mail: 625; 630. e. total free or nominal rate distribution: 655; 660. f: total distribution: 2762; 2675. g: copies not distributed: 275; 350. h: total: 3037; 3025. i: percent paid: 76; 75. 16. Publication of Statement of Ownership is printed in the October 18, 2012 issue of this publication. 17. Signature and title of Publisher, Jennifer Goodstein, October 1, 2012. Vil: 10/18/12 ELI HALILI JEWELRY AND DESIGN LLC, A DOMESTIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/21/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 250 Mott St., NY, NY 10012. General Purposes. Vil: 10/18 - 11/22/2012

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AC 332 W 84 COMPANY, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/17/12. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/9/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/18 - 11/22/2012

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by PMMR, LLC d/b/a Subject to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 188 Suffolk Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 10/11 - 10/18/2012

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 386 PAS OWNER LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/21/12. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/13/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William Macklowe Company, 126 E. 56th St., NY, NY 10022, Attn: William Macklowe. DE address of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/18 - 11/22/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BERKLEY PUBLIC ENTITY MANAGERS, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 30 S. 17th St., Ste. 1450, Philadelphia, PA 19103. LLC formed in DE on 3/29/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/18 - 11/22/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF IC 1411 BROADWAY MANAGER LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 9/12/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/18 - 11/22/2012

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Marina Gourmet Deli Inc. d/b/a Marina Gourmet Deli to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 246 East 23rd Street New York NY 10010. Vil: 10/11 - 10/18/2012 LOGOS PROPERTIES LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/20/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mark M. Altschul, 18 E. 12th St., #1A, NY, NY 10003-4458. General Purposes. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 CHOPITA LLC, A DOMESTIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/12/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 844 2nd Ave., NY, NY 10017. General Purposes. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ADVANCED LITIGATION STRATEGIES, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/06/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 30 East 39th Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 100162555. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GROW WELLNESS ACUPUNCTURE PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 16 E. 40th St., Fl 2, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: practice the profession of acupuncture. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NNC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/20/12. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Florida (FL) on 3/28/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Frank Simone, Esq., Frank Simone, PA., 701 Brickell Ave., Ste. 1550, Miami, FL 33131. FL address of LLC: 8200 NW 33rd St., Ste. 300, Miami, FL 33122. Arts. of Org. filed FL Secy. of State, 500 Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL 32399. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RC21, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/18/11. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MEDICAL RECORDS EXCHANGE, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/25/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 335 Bowery, NY, NY 10003. LLC formed in DE on 5/31/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NEXT LEVEL PARTNERS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/14/12. NYS fict. name: Next Level Partners Holdings, LLC. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in FL on 8/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. FL and principal business addr.: 2338 Immokalee Rd., Ste. 415, Naples, FL 34110. Cert. of Org. filed with FL Sec. of State, 2661 Executive Center Cir., Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF N&A BAKE SHOP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/10/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 330 W. 55th St., Apt. 1B, NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/11 - 11/15/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DAVID ORTIZ CELEBRITY GOLF CLASSIC, LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/4/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process to principal business address:The LLC, 150 W. 28th St. Suite 1003 NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 REISER PROPERTIES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 09/14/2012. Off. Loc.:NewYork Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to THE LLC, 151 East 79th Street, Apartment 4, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 RW CANE L.L.P (“LLP”) filed a Cert. of Registration with the Department of State of NY on 8/21/2012 under the name CW Law Group L.L.P. The location of the principal office will be in the County of New York. The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) has been designated as agent of the LLP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served on the LLP to245 Park Avenue, 24th Floor, NY NY 10169.The purpose of the LLP is to practice law. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MBS GROUP HOLDINGS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/21/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 424 Madison Ave., Ste. 400, NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PEREG VENTURES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/21/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Ruth Fisher, Roth Law Firm, 295 Madison Ave., 22nd Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BEACON 86TH STREET PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Beacon Hospitality Partners, LLC, 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 840, NY, NY 10170. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AADAUTO LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/19/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o August DiRenzo, 10 E. 70th St., #8B, NY, NY 10021. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 SANCHO HOLDINGS LLC, A DOMESTIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/27/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Elisabeth M. Kovac, Esq., 90 Park Ave., Fl. 18, NY, NY 10016. General Purposes. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JASPER B 250 LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/28/03, Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it maybe served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 599 Broadway, 5th FL, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SKNYC PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/4/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 147, Sherman, CT 06784. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 99 EAST 7TH STREET REALTY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12, SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 10l, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form, on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 318 EAST 6TH STREET REALTY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served, SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave, NY, NY 10011, DE off. addr., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012

NOTICE OF QUAL, OF 318 EAST 11TH STREET REALLY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eight Ave. NY, NY 10011. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover. DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 267 EAST 10TH STREET LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE. 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 156 SULLIVAN STREET REALTY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may he served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 120 MACDOUGAL STREET REALTY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 155 WEST 46 OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 3/21/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10001, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101. Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012


October 18 - 24, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF QUAL OF 33 BEEKMAN GROUND LESSEE LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/9/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 148 HENRY DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/12/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Bluestone Group, 40 Rector St. Ste. 1500, NY, NY 10006. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF IN AN HOUR, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/1/12. Office location: NY County. SSN designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 400 E. 71st St., Apt 18D, NY, NY 10021. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CAIOLA PRODUCTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/12/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 316 E. 63rd St., Ste. 1A, NY, NY 10065. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NO ONE CARES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/9/11. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Christopher Jonns, 15 Broad St., Ste. 2820, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SAGG RECORDS INDEPENDENT MUSIC LABEL LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/2/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 528 E. 79th St., Unit 2D, NY, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TMG DISTRIBUTION SERVICES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/oTrident Media Group, LLC, 41 Madison Ave., 36th Fl., NY, NY 10010. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 18W11, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/5/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Korsant Partners, 350 Park Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MIX MODEL MANAGEMENT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/30/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 175 Varick St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LLC formed in DE on 7/10/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKYE GLOBAL MANAGEMENT LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/31/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 117 E. 72nd St., Apt. 12, NY, NY 10021, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/04 - 11/08/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF HARD EIGHT TRADING LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/13/04. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Joseph M. Laub, Gould & Ratner LLP, 222 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 800, Chicago, IL 60601. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF HARD EIGHT FUTURES L.L.C Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Illinois (IL) on 3/6/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Joseph M. Laub, Gould & Ratner LLP, 222 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 800, Chicago, IL 60601, also the address to be maintained in IL. Arts of Org. filed with the IL Secretary of State, 501 S. Second St., Rm. 351, Springfield, IL 62756. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JERSEY MIKE’S MAIDEN LANE LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 08/15/12 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Peter Cancro, 2251 Landmark Place, Manasquan, NJ 08736. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HAYES CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/4/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 1500 Lexington Ave. Suite 18A, NY, NY 10029. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF HOME SERVICE WORLD LLC App for Authority filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/6/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/22/12. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to business address: P.O. Box 4668, #46073, NY, NY 10163. DE address of LLC: 1675 So State St., Ste B, Dover, DE 19901. Cert of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE located: P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF LEARNVEST PLANNING SERVICES, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/22/12. Princ. office of LLC: 113 University Pl., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10031. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Attn: Dept. of Corps., 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Registered investment advisory firm that provides phone and email based support for a subscription based fee. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ONECK TOV 993 LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/6/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 515 W. 42nd St., NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JUNTO LABS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/16/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kiril Kirilov, 33 W. 19th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PRESTIGE WORLDWIDE HOLDING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/17/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: John McDermott, 33 W. 19th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RENAISSANCE KALEIDOSCOPE RF FUND LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/31/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/24/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Renaissance Technologies LLC, 800 Third Ave., NY, NY 10022. DE address of LLC: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 874 Walker Road, Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF EAST 138TH STREET GP LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/7/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Alembic Community Development, 11 Hanover Square, #701, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HIGHER MISSION, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/28/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 465 CAPITAL ASSOCIATES LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/17/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 161 Bowery, 7th Fl., NY, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VALEJA LLC Arts of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 60 Riverside Blvd., Unit 1706, NY, NY 10069. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ANOVA TECHNOLOGIES - SMG HOLDINGS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/13/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in IL on 8/29/07. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the IL and principal business address: c/o Leonard J. Gambino, 222 S. Riverside Plaza, Ste. 2100, Chicago, IL 60606. Cert. of Org. filed with IL Sec. of State, 501 S. 2nd St., Rm. 351, Springfield, IL 62756. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/27 - 11/01/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 2130 ACP BOULEVARD INVESTORS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/23/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. #4, Dover, DE 19101. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SYDLING WNT MASTER FUND LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/07/12. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: Daryl Dewbrey, 1285 Ave. of the Americas, 13th Fl., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Daryl Dewbrey, 1285 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10019. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE DOUG CAMERON EXPERIENCE, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Doug Cameron Experience, LLC, 145 West 30th Street, New York, NY 10001. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAKOWER LAW PLLC Arts. of Org. was filed with SSNY on 8/3/12. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: C/O THE LLC, 747 3rd Ave. 32nd Fl., New York, NY 10017. Purpose: to engage in the practice of Law. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUXLIFE REALTY LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/31/11. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 104 Forsyth St, #12A NY, NY 10002. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LBNY MANAGEMENT, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/13/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 521 Fifth Ave., 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10175. Purpose: any lawful activities. Latest date 12/31/2057. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 M & O ASSOCIATES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 07/30/12. Off. Loc.: New York County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 161 W. 61st St., NewYork, NY 10023. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 STEVE E. BLATZ ARCHITECT PLLC, A DOMESTIC PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Steve E. Blatz, 1 Union Square West, Ste. 506, NY, NY 10003. Purpose: Architecture Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WEST SEATTLE REALTY HOLDINGS, L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/29/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/24/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012

NAME OF LLC: EL TORO INTERACTIVE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/29/12. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Jason Feingold, 636 Broadway, Ste. 1000, NY, NY 10012, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ZIMMER PARTNERS GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/05/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/04/12. Princ. office of LLC: 7 W 54th St., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 3 FACES FILMS, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/08/2012 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 119 Payson Ave NYC, NY 10034. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice is given of the formation of Kelly & Curtis, PLLC by the filing of the Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on August 17, 2012. Office Location: New York County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Ronald J. Nelson, Esq., PC, at 161 Washington Valley Road, Suite 207, Warren, NJ 07059. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/201 MEA SUCATO WRITING, LLC, A DOMESTIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/3/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Mea Sucato, Esq., 9 W. 31st St, Apt 37C, NY, NY 10001. General Purposes. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LE BILBOQUET NY, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/21/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 521 Fifth Ave., 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10175. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JAJA 168 LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/7/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 78 Canal St, 2/F, NY, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/20 - 10/25/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ENCHANTED HILL LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/30/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Att: Darren Berger, c/o Kane Kessler, 1350 Ave of the Americas, 26th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LANCASTER HOPE LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/10/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 174 E. 104th St., NY, NY 10029. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF LANA LUFT LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/25/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 1/17/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF LONG RIDGE OFFSHORE SUBSIDIARY HOLDINGS, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/1/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 2/29/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Kevin Bhatt, 1120 Ave of the Americas, 18th Fl., NY, NY 10036. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/13 - 10/18/2012

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October 18 - 24, 2012


October 18 - 24, 2012

A driver did an amazing job snugly parking his 30-foot moving van on narrow Eldridge St., with just a foot of space in front and behind the van.

A hotel maid in Calgary, Alberta, overworked and underpaid. The writer was visiting his mother in an extendedcare facility.

Here’s to the working class CLAYTON BY CLAYTON PATTERSON My goal with these photos is to give some positive exposure to those hard-working people who make our life easier, but whose existence is given hardly more notice than a passing shadow. As someone who grew up at the bad end of the working class, I have never lost my love and respect for the struggling class. My mother was a nurse’s aide. My father was very eccentric, did not fit into the norm of the community, and I am not really sure how he earned a living. I have never tried to disconnect from or hide my roots. In fact, I have a deep spiritual connection to the working class and the people I grew up with. So many of the kids I grew up with had a tough time adjusting to high school, as I did. It was our first real encounter with the middle class. A good number of my friends ended up quitting school. For the most part, the kids who succeeded moved up the blue-collar ladder and became tradesmen, cops, fi remen, correction offi cers. The studious and bright ones became teachers, nurses, librarians. In some ways my struggle was more difficult than the other kids’ was because I never felt I fit into the norm. I thought differently than 99 percent of the people I encountered. I had no desire to follow the path that was

expected of our group, and — who knows why? — I always felt I was put on this earth for a special reason. If I had to give a simple answer for what saved me from going down the path of ruin and destruction, I would say it was two people. First, there was Mrs. Goddard, a teacher who introduced me to art. And second, there is Elsa Rensaa, my partner, who was instrumental in steering me out of the bad end of the working class, and she always had faith in my abilities, my dreams, visions, high ambitions. If you asked me, “What lesson could a youth from a troubled and disadvantaged background learn from your accomplishments and body of work?” I would point to my massive and historically relevant photo/video archive. I would explain that anyone could do what I did. First, I do not pretend to be a photography expert. I have always used moderately priced, easyto-use, commercially available equipment. My color prints were done at a one-hour photo lab. The family who ran that business took pride in their work and were passionate about quality. What makes my archive special is I did it. Just stay the course, no different than filling a glass of water one drop at a time. Just do it and eventually you will have a significant body of work. One of my greatest blessings in life is the rich and diverse Lower East Side archive that I have been able to build.

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Photos by Clayton Patterson

A Filipino washroom attendant at the Alberta College of Art in Calgary.


34

October 18 - 24, 2012

Sound off! Write a letter to The Editor Don’t be a Village idiot!

Read The Villager and East Villager


October 18 - 24, 2012

Leagues kick around a new idea for buildings at Pier 40 GLICK: ‘AN EARNEST ATTEMPT’ Continued from page 20

WILS: ‘CREATIVE, INTUITIVE’ Madelyn Wils, the Trust’s president, saw the proposal last Wednesday night at a meeting of the Greenwich Village Little League. “My impression is that it’s a very innovative way of looking at this issue,” she said. “I give it an ‘A’ for creativity, and it’s also very intuitive. “What we’re going to do is look at the numbers,” Wils said, “because the two buildings are half the size of what we studied putting on the pier that might be successful. We have to have some cost-estimating done. We need enough revenue to repair the pier and pay the Trust rent. We need to discuss it with our board members and city and state, and look at the numbers, and we’ll do this as quickly as we can. “We’re interested in working with the community,” she said, though adding in the same breath, “Pier 40 is a very expensive issue.”

‘TEAR DOWN THIS WALL’ Wils also noted approvingly that the Champions design makes the “experience of access to the pier much more gratifying” by taking down part of the pier shed along West St. “It’s a three-block wall now,” she said disapprovingly of the pier shed. “It doesn’t look like a park.” Wils stated she isn’t sure whether there will be a special session of the state Legislature in November or December at which possible changes to the Hudson River Park Act could be considered. “But we need to be prepared,” she said. Asked if the Trust still thinks residential use is the best option to save Pier 40 and provide funding for the full 5-mile-long park, Wils clarified, “We are not trying to build residential. We are trying to save Pier 40 and get revenue for the park. It should be the least impactful use with the most revenue.” Asked if building between the bike path and Pier 40 would be cheaper than building on the pier, she said, “The permitting is easier and it will take less time to do it on the esplanade. Time is money, so you’d save some money by doing that.” Last month Wils announced that Pier 40 is now officially “in liquidation mode.” The Trust will make temporary repairs to the massive structure for the next five years, but after that, the cost of fixing the pier will exceed the potential for revenue the Trust can hope to collect from it.

CLOSURES POSSIBLE IN ’13 More immediately, the Trust is set to start a “phased shutdown” of the pier. “We’ll look at starting to close down the second and third floors of the southern portion of the pier during the next year, as our engineers tell us,” Wils said.

Assemblymember Glick has repeatedly said she won’t support a legislative change to allow residential use on Pier 40. Of the Champions plan, she said, “It’s an earnest attempt to accommodate the use promoted by the Trust, even though the use is not allowed by zoning or the park act. Obviously, with only 60 acres of real parkland [in Hudson River Park] versus 330 acres in Riverside Park, the adaptive reuse of Pier 40 is more appropriate than huge residential developments — whether it’s on the pier or on the esplanade.” Assemblymember Richard Gottfried, who represents Hudson River Park north of 14th St., on the other hand, supports the Pier 40 residential option as the best way to save the pier and provide money for the entire park’s operation.

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GOTTFRIED: ‘MAYBE AN OPTION’ “The Pier 40 Champions proposal is creative and seems to resolve several issues,” Gottfried said. “It may well should be added to the list of options to consider. I’d want to hear what people from the community around Pier 40 think of it.” In addition to Bergman, other leading members of the Champions offered their views of why this could be the best chance to save the pier as they know it, a place thousands of kids from local youth leagues enjoy playing sports. “Being without the fields at Pier 40, even on a temporary basis, is not an option,” said IsaacDaniel Astrachan, a DUSC board member. “This is a realistic vision for Pier 40. Given the state of disrepair of the pier, the status quo is not viable.” John Economou, president of Greenwich Village Little League, said, “To sit back idly and not actively look to save Pier 40 would be turning our backs on the community and our children.” Rich Caccappolo, past G.V.L.L. president, said, “The game-changer is the realization that there are 99 feet between the bike path and the pier, which means that a significant structure might be able to be built on land, not on the pilings.”

FOCUSED ON FUTURE Daniel Miller, another G.V.L.L. past president, said, “We strongly believe that by allowing high-income development that demands a high price per square foot in rent, we can expand the pier’s current footprint without generating unwanted and unrelated foot traffic from inappropriate development like retail or entertainment. Our focus is on our children, and our children’s children. I want to walk by Pier 40 in 50 years, granted with the aid of a cane, sit down on a park bench that not only has a great view of the Statue of Liberty, but also of a youth soccer match or baseball game, and feel good that we accomplished something special many years ago.”

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Sat

Oct 20

Flatbush Food Coop

Brooklyn

Sun

Oct 21

P.S. 29, Cobble Hill

Brooklyn

Sat

Oct 27

Manhattan

Sun

Oct 28

Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, UWS Grand Street, LES

Sun

Oct 28

Access Self Storage, LIC

Queens

Manhattan

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36

October 18 - 24, 2012


Villager,10/18/12