Issuu on Google+

The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

October 17, 2013 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 20

D.O.T. green-lights ‘slow zone’ to calm East Village traffic By LiNCOLN aNDERSON

T

hat was fast! The city’s Department of Transportation has approved the implementation of a “Tompkins Square/ Alphabet City Slow Zone” next year. And, the year after that, the West Village’s streets, as

We turn

well, are reportedly set to get the lower speed limits and other traffic-calming measures that create the so-called slow zones. Community Board 3 member Chad Marlow, who originally proposed the idea to D.O.T., broke the news last Fri., Oct. 11.

Special anniversary Section

SLOw ZONE, continued on p. 14

Pages 15 - 50

A (family) tree grows in Greenwich Village By BOB KRaSNER

E

very couple has a story, but some of those tales last longer than others. The 70-year marriage of Frank and Natalie Rosenberg is notable not just for its longevity (though, really, there should be a prize for that) but for the legacy that they will leave behind. On Sept. 15, family and friends danced the night

away at the Manhattan Penthouse, at 80 Fifth Ave., in celebration of a union that was set in motion back in 1920, when Frank was born in Corona, Queens, the youngest of seven. Natalie followed five years later in Brooklyn. They married when she was just 18 and went about creating a family. Two sons, Marty and Hal, and one daughter, Sara. FamiLy TREE, continued on p. 6

80!

Carters come back to 6th St., site of historic Habitat project By HEaTHER DuBiN

F

ormer President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, brought their Southern charm to the East Village last Thursday to commemorate 30 years of Habitat for Humanity service. Housing has been a priority for Jimmy Carter, who has dedicated his post-presidential career to en-

suring this basic right for thousands of families in need. The couple celebrated the 30th Annual Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter Work Project last week with a return visit to a building called Mascot Flats, at 742 E. Sixth St., between Avenues C and D, which was the project’s first site. Before holding a press conference, the Carters met with 12 of the original

tenants who still live in the 19-unit building, in the apartment of Don Kao. In 1984, the Carters embarked on a renovation of the six-story building with local homesteaders and Habitat for Humanity. Built in 1902, the East Village tenement no longer had a roof, and fit in well amid the CaRTERS, continued on p.4

Punks have fun with fumetti............................page 3 Soho BID ‘secretly’ O.K.’d................................page 13 Ye gods! It’s Comic Con!...page 11

Getting down and dirty at La Plaza...............page 56 www.TheVillager.com


PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

Tuesday was another beautiful day during this summer-like fall. For Jerry Solon, Hudson River Park near Canal St., was the perfect place to hang out —literally — on this sculptural structure. Despite a sign stating “No hanging or climbing,” the graphic designer / coffee company C.E.O. said a lot of people use it for pull-ups and other exercises. He also uses the nearby large granite blocks to do push-ups.

How a child learns to learn will impact his or her life forever. Progressive Education for Two-Year-Olds – 8th Grade

Open House | City and Country Wednesday, November 13, from 6-8pm

Please visit www.cityandcountry.org for information and application materials. 146 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 Tel: 212.242.7802

2

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Photos by Scoopy

Fun with fumetti: Celebrating the work of John Holmstrom and the legacy of Punk magazine — plus the recent acquisition of the Punk magazine archive by Yale University — Boo-Hooray is staging a show of the original artwork from Punk’s “Mutant Monster Beach Party.” Known as a fumetti, the comic starred the faces of the CBGB / Max’s Kansas City punk scene in a “cinematic narrative,” with photos shot out at Coney Island. Holmstrom directed the action and drew on the photos — voice bubbles, Debbie Harry “walking on a cloud,” etc. — which were shot by Roberta Bayley. Appearances are also made by Legs McNeil, Joey Ramone, Andy Warhol, Chris Stein, Arturo Vega, Bob Gruen, John Cale, David Johansen and Joan Jett. In the end, it didn’t sell that well, but it was obviously a lot of fun to make. At the opening reception last Friday night at Boo-Hooray, at 265 Canal St., people were talking about the new CBGB movie. “I thought it was fun,” said the photographer Godlis, who documented the punk scene during its heyday. “There’ll be another, better CBGB movie down the line — and this is the one that’s out now. It’s just a movie. I endorse it — even though I’m not in it. Roberta Bayley should have been in it.” Everyone then left the gallery with Holmstrom to go watch “CBGB,” even though it seemed like most people had already seen it a couple of times already.

John Holmstrom in front of “an outtake” of Debbie Harry on the beach at Coney Island.

Rock photographer Bob Gruen, left, and Supla of Brothers of Brazil, from São Paulo, enjoyed the “Mutant Monster Beach Party” show. Supla played at The Box last Sunday night. His music is called punkanova, as in punk mixed with bossa nova.

Penny mecca: Unfortunately, the former Barnes & Noble at the corner of Eighth St. and Sixth Ave. isn’t being replaced by another bookstore. (Hey, there’s always the guys out on the avenue with their tables of fine used literature.) The new tenant will be TD Bank, and if any

One of the doctored photos from the fumetti, featuring Blondie’s Debbie Harry and “surfer dude” Joey Ramone.

bank is going to occupy the spot, TD has a strong point in its favor. Not only are they open seven days a week, but they have penny machines. Yes, you can take your tons of saved-up pennies and pour them into a special machine, after which you get a receipt you take to the teller, who gives you bills. And the machine even lets you guess beforehand how much money it will be. Cheap thrills!

COPIES & MORE SINCE 1982! 331 East 9th Street, New York, NY 10003 212-473-7833 • Fax 212-673-5248 www.sourceunltd.com

I N THE HEART OF G REENW I CH V I LLA G E — Recommended by Gourmet Magazine, Zagat, Crain’s NY, Playbill & The Villager —

COPIES • COLOR PRINTS FAX • RUBBER STAMPS LAMINATING • CD • DVD VIDEO DUPLICATION UNIQUE GREETING CARDS STATIONARY SUPPLIES

“Gold Medal Chef of the Year”. — Chefs de Cuisine Association Northern italian Cuisine • Celebrating Over 30 Years

69 MacDougal St. (Bet. Bleeker & Houston St.) 212-673-0390 • 212-674-0320 Open Mon. - Sat. 12-11pm • www.villamosconi.com

TheVillager.com

“It’s Worth The Trip Down The Street!” October 17, 2013

3


Carters come back to site of historic Habitat project CARTERS, continued from p. 1

Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter at the press conference on E. Sixth St. during which they talked about the Mascot Flats project 30 years ago, which really brought widespread notice to Habitat for Humanity for the first time.

to devote 1,000 hours of manual labor — half on the building’s construction, and the rest on another project.   “We managed to put 1,000 hours on that building,” she said. “So did a lot of people.” Rosalynn Carter, 86, was introduced by her husband as, “the boss of my work camp…who has been bossing me around

80 years of serving Manhattanites. (Not me— The Villager!) Congratulations!

Gale Brewer! Democrat for Borough President

PAID FOR BY FRIENDS OF GALE BREWER 2013, 57 W. 84TH ST. (212) 531-2013

GABVillagerAnniversary1.indd 1

4

October 17, 2013

10/12/13 5:15:33 PM

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

Photo by Heather Dubin

blown-out, abandoned buildings in the neighborhood in the ’80s when it was infested with drugs and crime. The Carters were reflective as the two reminisced about the experience, and the powerful affects of helping people build their own homes. Jimmy Carter, 89, recalled jogging over to look at the site and finding it a “horrible mess.”  While he has worked as a Habitat volunteer for 30 years, and been to about 85 different building sites, he dubbed Mascot Flats his most memorable. “You could stand on the second floor, if you could get up there, and you could look up and see the sky,” he recalled. “The garbage was more than knee deep. And there were fires where people were living, and cooking up food and dope.”  He Carter also mentioned that the buildings’ 370 windows were all broken and without frames.   “That’s what we had to start with, and it took us two years to finish it,” he said.  In a follow-up phone interview, Ann Rupel, 60, an original homesteader and president of the co-op board at Mascot Flats, claimed each tenant was required

Jimmy Carter heading to his black S.U.V. after the press conference.

now for 67 years.” He noted she was initially reluctant to swing a hammer at the site.   “Before we got here, I told Jimmy that I was not going to do any hammering,” she recalled. “The only thing I’d ever done was put a nail in the wall to hang a picture up.” The former first lady spent her first day at Mascot Flats pulling linoleum up off the floor with some other women. Later that day, a man brought them some flooring with instructions from the former president to nail it in. Her earlier protest was for naught, and with a laugh, she exclaimed, “After 30 years, I’ve become a very accomplished carpenter.” The Carters also spoke of how building homes across the world — Habitat for Humanity is in 75 countries — is a stabilizing force for families.   “We’ve seen their lives transform,” Jimmy Carter said. Under the program, a house — which is built and purchased by the families — becomes a point of pride, and a vehicle for change. Improvements in education, healthcare and safety are much more obtainable in a better home environment, they said. “It’s almost always emotional when you meet someone who’s never had a home, or who’s never ever dreamed of having a home,” Rosalynn said. “Then you give them a home, and we always cry when we give them the keys.”  She referenced an original tenant named Jessica who was a dishwasher when they first met her at Mascot Flats.  “Next time we came back, she was an apprentice in the carpenters union, she had learned a trade,” Rosalynn said. Habitat for Humanity also fosters new work experiences. For example, in a project in Nicaragua, participants made bricks and tiles for the houses, and then profited from doing the same thing for other villages.

The Carters’ international work has included the Philippines with 14,000 volunteers at their largest site yet. They built 293 homes in only five days.  Also, the Carters have been in Haiti, where they constructed 300 homes in what had been the epicenter of the 2010 earthquake.   “The homes are now beautiful,” the former president said. “It’s an oasis in the middle of a still-devastated country.” “It’s been a labor of love for us, as you can tell. We’re very proud to be here,” he added. Kao, a medical research writer, and Rupel, a musician who is also an original Mascot Flats resident, both addressed the crowd and expressed their gratitude to the Carters. Each raised a child in the building.  Kao, 62, is the director of Project Reach, a youth program, and disclosed he has been living with AIDS for almost 30 years. The building has been instrumental in his life. When he was sick, he needed someone to carry him three flights up to his apartment.  “All of that couldn’t have happened, and I couldn’t have been here today, in part, without that building behind me,” he said. “It allowed me to care of myself, take care of my health and run an organization.”  Meanwhile, Kao added that “prices have skyrocketed” in the neighborhood, and that the property next door “sold for almost $2 million and set the price for all around.” He said he had the Carters to thank for his being able to remain in the neighborhood.  This naturally led to the topic of gentrification when it came time for reporter questions. When asked about it, Jimmy Carter said, “It cuts both ways.” However, he did say gentrification — in the sense that he understood the word — was good. He noted that the second year Habitat for CARTERS, continued on p.5

TheVillager.com


y p p a H

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

mascot Flats tenants accepted a plaque from Habitat for Humanity commemorating the renovation project 30 years ago. at right in front row is ann Rupel and in the middle row center is Don Kao, both original homesteaders from when the building was renovated by Habitat for Humanity in 1984.

CaRTERS, continued from p. 4

Humanity was at Mascot Flats, people in the neighborhood cleaned up empty lots and planted community gardens there. “Once you build some decent homes that people actually own, it gentrifies every neighborhood,” he said. He noted he has not returned to a former work site where upkeep is an issue. “People are so proud of their own homes that they bought, and worked on for hundreds of hours, and paid for full price to let anybody do any damage to it,” he said. The apartments at Mascot Flats were not given away. As Jimmy Carter stated, Habitat for Humanity only gives away “love and compassion.” He thought the people who first moved in paid $30,000 for an apartment, which they could have turned around and sold for almost six times the price. “We put a restraint on the homes here as they sold, so Habitat would have partial ownership, and could use that money to build more homes,” he said. However, another original tenant, “Doc” Aroyo, recalled that the purchase price for his apartment was $50,000, though the mortgage was interest-free. When asked about the national mortgage crisis, the former president advocated for regulations to control banks. “We do need a very strict law to be passed to prevent that profiting off of innocent borrowers who are given a loan that the bank knows they can’t repay, just

TheVillager.com

so the bank can make a profit by reselling the mortgages,” he said. According to him, these protections were partially in place through a law passed a few years ago, but Congress is blocking the law from implementation by withholding funds. “The average person making a loan to buy a house doesn’t have any lobbyist in Washington to protect his or her interests,” he said. “But the rich folks that are benefiting from this, they have lobbyists to protect their interests, and I think this changed dramatically in the last 30 years,” he said. Carter said he also feels there has been a lowering of expectations in the States, and a “stalemate” in social mobility. As for Congress, and its current standstill, he had a few words of advice and a recommendation that its members all go work for a day on a Habitat site, where cooperation is key. “We respect authority, and when we have a building superintendent or house leader, everybody that works on the Habitat site pays attention to instructions for the well-being of everybody,” he stated. “And secondly, there’s no distinction whether you’re Christian, Muslim or Jew, Democrat or Republican, man or a woman — you’re all working for the same goal.” The Carter Project was also in Oakland, San Jose and Denver last week. The rest of the sites include Queens, Staten Island and Union Beach, N.J. There were 1,000 volunteers in New York to renovate and repair 15 homes damaged by Hurricane Sandy last year.

h t 8nn0iversary

A

to The Villager from

COREY JOHNSON

Democratic Nominee District 3 City Council WWW.COREY2013.COM October 17, 2013

5


A tree grows in the Village, a very big family tree FAMILY TREE, continued from p. 1

PHOTOS BY BOB KRASNER

Frank went from being a salesman to owning his own printing business. Meanwhile, Natalie went from being a teacher and then a guidance counselor to her calling as a psychotherapist. The family expanded as the kids got married and found their way. Marty and the Rosenbergs’ son-in-law Ken Abbott (Sara’s husband) joined Frank in the printing business, where they developed one of the first typesetting programs for the Mac computer. Called “Ready Set Go,” it is still being used today. Sara is a social worker. Hal is a  psychotherapist. Marty left the printing business to become a science teacher. Formerly the head of the science department at Edgemont High School, Marty was once voted the best science teacher in New York State. The kids had kids of their own, providing the Rosenbergs with grandchildren. Then grandchildren had kids, and now the infants Kyle and Alice have the distinction of knowing their great-grandparents.  The couple have lived in their two-bedroom apartment in Greenwich Village since

Front row, from left, Rachel Makings, Laura Lynch, Kyle Lynch, Natalie Rosenberg, Frank Rosenberg, Jeanette Rosenberg, Alice Rosenberg, Sara (Rosenberg) Abbott. Back row, from left, Phil Makings, Karen Menzie, Eric Menzie, Nancy Kramer, Hal Rosenberg, Adam Rosenberg, Marty Rosenberg, Ken Abbott.

Tr av el To The Pa sT. No flighTs required. Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

At the Metropolitan Pavilion, NY, NY

Buy tickets at:

www.thegenealog yevent.com

genealog y event the

6

October 17, 2013

1968. They’ve watched their neighborhood “change gradually,” they said, and have always loved the Village. They note that the area has become “bigger and denser” and that “the A&P became the Food Emporium and now, a Halloween shop.” The Rosenbergs’ bridge club is still on every Monday, and each day at 5 o’clock, one can find them at home sharing a cocktail with their friends. Another great grandchild is due in December. But age has forced some changes — 93-year-old Frank no longer walks to work. And they’ve transitioned from the nightclub to the health club. Natalie laughingly noted, “We used to go to Reno Sweeney’s, but now we go to aerobics at the 14th Street Y.” 

Natalie and Frank Rosenberg in their Greenwich Village apartment. They are willing to share their home generously on special occasions, such as the time they let about 100 guests attend a gay wedding in their living room.

Congrats Villager on 80 years of giving us Outstanding News!!!

TheVillager.com


POLICE BLOTTER L.E.S. drug ring busted Following a nearly two-year investigation by narcotics officers, including one who was deep undercover, police busted a Lower East Side drug ring that allegedly pushed crack cocaine to public housing residents, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced on Oct. 15. Eleven members of the group were charged with major drug felonies, after the investigation — which was also aided by the D.A.’s Office — revealed the inner workings of the operation. The ring centered on sales of both small and large amounts of crack to people around Jacob Riis Houses, a New York City Housing Authority development between E. Eighth and E. 13th Sts. along Avenue D. The group’s alleged leader, Dwayne Mitchell, 35, stands accused of buying huge, wholesale quantities of crack from a supplier, Sabed Rahman, 29, who was also arrested. The two men reportedly had regular meetings to exchange the drugs and stacks of cash, including some meetings at a Midtown Starbucks, the D.A. said. Mitchell and Rahman are both charged with first-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance, second-degree conspiracy, criminal sale of a controlled substance at or near school grounds and third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance. In addition, Mitchell is charged with second- and third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance, and third-degree money laundering. The nine other people arrested, ranging in age from 29 to 44, were all charged with second-degree conspiracy, while four were hit with additional drug sale and possession charges. According to court documents, the group did its business through a network of cell phone calls, using code words like “chicken,” “donuts” and “food” to refer to drugs or money. Statements from the alleged crack ring’s members also reportedly show that they spent massive amounts of cash on Mercedes-Benz luxury cars and other pricey status symbols. “Drug dealers have no place in public housing,” said Vance. “For years, these criminals are alleged to have run a large-scale drug operation out of the Jacob Riis Houses on the Lower East Side, a pocket of our city already struggling against crime and violence. Thanks to the heroic work of an undercover officer who managed to infiltrate this organization at its highest level, the drug dealing stops today.”

Dirty dancing Police arrested Jaime Vitagliano, 32, after she allegedly stole a man’s wallet and cell phone while dancing with him at a nightclub

TheVillager.com

in the Meatpacking District early on Sun., Oct. 13. The man, 23, told cops that he and Vitagliano were getting hot and heavy on the dance floor at Tenjune, a club on Little W. 12th St., around 3:15 a.m., when he felt her put her hands into his pants pockets. And instead of a happy ending, he got a sad surprise when he realized what she was really up to, after which Vitagliano reportedly ran out of the club and jumped into a cab near the entrance. But the man followed in pursuit, flagged down a couple of officers and pointed her out before she could slip away. Vitagliano was charged with robbery, grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property.

ID wasn’t ‘standard’ Police arrested Ashley Bete, 37, when she was caught carrying a fake identification cards after a disgruntled exchange at a bar in the Standard Hotel early on Sat., Oct. 12. Employees called police around 2 a.m., after Bete apparently refused to pay her $169 bill at the Standard Biergarten, which sits below the Highline on Washington St., between Little W. 12th and W. 13th Sts. questioned, Bete allegedly gave the officers both a fake driver’s license and a fake Social Security card. She was charged with two counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument.

All the wrong stuff Police arrested Jimmy Hall, 50, in a West Village subway station for alleged weapon and drug-related offenses on the morning of Oct. 9. Officers said they found Hall around  6 a.m., as he was lying on the floor of a southbound E train at the W. Fourth St. subway stop, obstructing the path of commuters trying to enter and exit the train. When he was approached and questioned, Hall reportedly refused to provide his name of identification and tried to walk away, so he was stopped and searched. Officers said they found Hall was carrying a razor blade, two alleged crack cocaine rocks, a glass pipe with alleged crack residue and two forged MetroCards. Hall was also said to have resisted arrest by flailing his body and arms while cops were trying to handcuff him, as he reportedly said, “Oh no, I’m not gettin’ arrested.” Hall was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance, criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of a forged instrument and resisting arrest.

Sam Spokony October 17, 2013

7


Ruth maleczech, 74, a founder of avant-garde troupe OBITuARY By aLBERT amaTEau

R

uth Maleczech, a co-founder of Mabou Mines, the renowned experimental theater group based in the P.S. 122 arts complex in the East Village, and a leading performer in the company, died peacefully in her sleep on Sept. 30. She was 74. She had stage-four breast cancer and had moved a few weeks ago from her longtime home on Bank St. in the West Village to a ground-floor apartment in Brooklyn to be near her son, Lute Breuer, according to her daughter, Clove Galilee. “Ruth was our mentor and our mother,” Galilee said. “She was an uncompromising artist who devoted over 50 years of her life to the theater as a performer, director and mentor.” Together with her partner, Lee Breuer, the director Joanne Akalaitis, the composer Philip Glass and the actor David Warrilow, Maleczech was a founding

member in 1970 of the avant-garde theater troupe that took its name from a site in Nova Scotia that Glass was thinking of buying. The name appealed to the founders because “it sounded like a band.” Maleczech, who at the time of her death was working with her daughter on “Imagining the Imaginary Invalid,” a new version of Moliere’s “Imaginary Invalid,” directed more than a dozen Mabou Mines productions, including “Imagination Dead Imagine” by Samuel Beckett in 1984 and “A Song for New York” in 2007, a response to the World Trade Center attack. Mabou Mines productions are mounted on various Off and Off Off Broadway stages, but the company’s home base since the early 1980s has been in the cityowned P.S. 122 complex on First Ave. at E. Ninth St. The city is currently renovating the former school building. The company’s first permanent stage was at La MaMa E.T.C. on E. Fourth St. after Ellen Stewart, La MaMa’s artistic director, saw Mabou Mines’ four-hourlong “The Red Horse Animation.” Later, Joe Papp invited the company to play at the New York Shakespeare Festival.

New York University and Community Board 2 Present the 23rd Annual

Children’s Halloween Parade Thursday, October 31, 3:00 - 6:00 pm

Parents and Children (ages 3-12) gather by the Washington Square Arch at 3:00pm. Free trick-or-treat bags, games, and rides await the children on LaGuardia Place at Washington Square South after the parade. Sponsored by

8

October 17, 2013

Bedford Barrow Commerce Block Association • Bob and Elaine Schneider • Con Edison • Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce • Kaufman Children’s Dental Office • Kmart • Lucille Lortel Theatre • McBurney YMCA • NoHo NY BID • NYU Administrative Management Council • NYU Bookstores • NYU Parenting Club/Office of Alumni Relations • Sky Management Corporation • Village Alliance

Ruth maleczech in a photo posted on the mabou mines Facebook page.

Maleczech performed in more than 20 Mabou Mines productions between 1970 and 2009, many directed by her partner and co-founder Lee Breuer. In 2007 she played Lucia Joyce, James Joyce’s daughter, in a play directed by Sharon Fogarty, artistic co-director of Mabou Mines. Maleczech also created roles in many other Off Broadway and regional theaters. Fogarty, who was artistic director of the Daedelus Theater Company in residence at the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center on Suffolk St. on the Lower East Side, also worked on Mabou Mines productions in the 1990s. “At one point, Ruth said, ‘You know business, right?’ The next thing I knew, I was company manager,” Fogarty recalled. “That’s the kind of company it was. You could find yourself doing things you didn’t think you could.” However, Fogarty found that managing the Mabou Mines company and directing the Daedelus Company at the same time became unsustainable, and Maleczech and Breuer invited her to direct all her projects at Mabou Mines. “Ruth turned to me and said, ‘So what do you want to make?’ It was an intimidating question, but I’d just read a biography of Nora Joyce, James Joyce’s wife, so I suggested a piece about Lucia, their daughter. They went for it because of the Beckett connection. Lucia was in love with Beckett,” Forgarty recalled. Since the mid-1980s, Beckett has been a Mabou Mines favorite. Shakespeare is another challenge that the company and Maleczech have taken on. “Lear,” a female version of “King Lear,” was developed in the late 1980s with the men’s roles played by women

and the women’s roles played by men. Maleczech played a matriarchal Lear in mid-20th-century American South. The finished production in 1990 received unfavorable notices by mainstream media. But the late Ross Wetzsteon, the Village Voice theater critic, hailed the production, and Maleczech’s performance in particular, as a cultural landmark. Maleczech remained faithful to the avant-garde vision and took bad notices with pride. She preferred to consider herself a performer and theater-maker rather than an actor. She joined Actors’ Equity in 1989 only in order to play in Jean Genet’s “The Screens” at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis. In a written tribute, her daughter and son said, “Despite her success and renown in the world of experimental theater, Ruth remained an approachable artist who deeply appreciated the work of others. She made herself accessible, encouraging, mentoring and guiding countless theater artists in the ways of Downtown theater, helping them navigate and carve out a place in the New York scene.” Her daughter, a director and choreographer, recalled growing up on Avenue A and later on St. Mark’s Place where the family lived before moving to Bank St. Ruth Sophia Reinprecht was born in Cleveland, the daughter of Yugoslav immigrants, and was raised in Phoenix, Ariz., where her father, a steelworker, had moved the family because of his health. Ruth changed her name in 1969 to a variant of her mother’s maiden name. Ruth took her first steps on stage in a school play at the age of eight. When she was 16 she went to Los Angeles where she enrolled in the theater department at U.C.L.A. She then went to San Francisco, an important new theater center, where she studied with Herbert Blau at the Actor’s Workshop, and then with Ronnie Davis at what became the renowned San Francisco Mime Troupe. There she met the troupe’s founding director, Lee Breuer, and became his partner. The couple went to Paris where for about six years they earned a living dubbing films. More importantly for Maleczech, they met Jerzy Grotowsky, the Polish director and theorist whose ideas greatly influenced her. Maleczech also went to East Berlin to observe rehearsals and attend performances of Berthold Brecht’s Berliner Ensemble. Mabou Mines hopes next year to mount “Imagining the Imaginary Invalid,” which Maleczech and her daughter had been developing. A memorial for Ruth Maleczech is planned for a date to be announced.

TheVillager.com


We parents of the Village, lower Manhattan, and southern Chelsea would like to say:

Thank you Assemblymember Deborah Glick for supporting the city's children and families. Deborah Glick: Found 75 Morton Street and pushed state to sell and city to purchase it for a schoolRooms To Learn Town Hall PS3 2007

Supported & advised grassroots parent effort against overcrowding, resulting in school space at Foundling School, Hudson Square, & NYU, as well as 75 Morton Held Town Hall hearing on renewal of Mayoral Control of schools; voted against Mayoral Control after hearing parent opposition Gave testimony, wrote to state officials, and published editorials opposing charter

co-location; excessive testing; & diversion of funds from class size reduction 75 Morton St. Rally 2008

Arranged parent meetings with prominent city and state officials to protest overcrowding

Opposed NYU expansion and reduction of playgrounds Joined parents protesting proposed teacher layoffs

75 Morton St. Rally redux 2009

Opposed selling off public park land to private residential developers, defending the preservation of our open spaces and Villagers' right to our share of tax-funded park dollars to preserve our public infrastructure.

We are grateful and look forward to many more years of partnership! Irene Kaufman co-founder, Public School Parent Advocacy Committee; BP Stringer School Overcrowding Task Force; former Pier 40 parent: Greenwich Village Girls Basketball, Pier 40 Greenwich Village Little League

Shino Tanikawa president, Community Education Council District 2; former officer, D2 Presidents Council; former PTA PS 3 and Clinton School for Writers and Artists; co-founder, Public School Parent Advocacy Committee; CB2-CEC2 75 Morton Task Force Tina Schiller Former PS 234 Overcrowding Committee; PS 234 SLT Michael D. Markowitz, P.E.CB2-CEC2 75 Morton Task Force;

Ann Kjellberg co-founder, Public School Parent Advocacy Committee; former SLT PS 41; BP Stringer School Overcrowding Task Force; BP Community Task Force on N.Y.U.; Pier 40 parent: DUSC, Greenwich Village Little League; Greenwich Village Girls Basketball Tamara Rowe Community Education Council D2; former president, Presidents Council, D2; PTA PS 3 and Clinton School for Writers and Artists; co-founder, Public School Parent Advocacy Committee Keen Berger CB2 Social Services & Education Committee; former Chair of School Board, D2; Democratic District Leader

Tricia Joyce Former PS 234 Overcrowding Committee; PS 234 PTA

former Community Education Council D2; co-founder, Public School Parent Advocacy Committee; BP Stringer School Overcrowding Task Force; Pier 40 parent: DUSC, Greenwich Village Little League

NYS Assembly Speaker Silver’s School Overcrowding Task Force

Rebecca Daniels former president, Community Education Council D2;

PS 3 Parent Action Committee

Brokers Partnership for the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation; Chair, founder Greenwich Village Committee for the Celebration of Children (Bleecker St. Playground Halloween Parade)

Denise Collins Social Services & Education Committee CB2; Robert Ely Chair, CB2's Environment, Public Health & Public Safety Committee

Joan Hoffman parent, Greenwich Village Girls' Basketball; parent activist

Heather Campbell CB2 SLA Committee; PS 41 Parent Advocacy Committee

PARENT ACTIVISTS:

Lisa Donlan President, Community Education Council D1

Paul Hovitz, Susan Crowson, Annette Evans, Vicki Arbitrio TheVillager.com

Affiliations for identification only

October 17, 2013

9


OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICES HAPPY 80TH ANNIVERSARY TO THE VILLAGER! Kaiken Cabernet Sauvignon Argentina 2010 750ML

Pinot Grigio Portobello Venezie 2011 750ML

Zinfandel L de Lyeth Sonoma County 2006

750ML

Pinot Noir Cono Sur Chile 2010

750ML

7.99

5.99

Malbec Padrillos Argentina 2011 750ML

8.99

2011

750ML

5.99

Bordeaux Couer De Verdet

6.99

2011

750ML

Cotes du Rhone Perrin Reserve

2008

2010

7.99

10.99

We have wine to meet all tastes and all budgets. Our enormous selection of wine under $10 is the finest in New York City. We always have brand-name liquor at bargain prices too! Our knowledgeable sales staff is available to assist with your selections, both large and small. Come in and let us welcome you to New York’s greatest wine and liquor superstore, where everything is on sale every day. Shop with us and save with us. You’ll be glad you did!

Montepulciano D'Abruzzo Feudi D'Albe

7.99

2008 750ML

Discover our great values, low prices, incredible selection and huge inventory. Warehouse Wines offers warehouse values and warehouse quantities each and every day. Since we buy big, you always save big. We try harder bottle-by-bottle, to bring our customers the best values.

Los Vascos Cabernet Sauvignon Chile 750ML

Marques de Caceres Rioja Crianza

750ML

8.99

Muscadet Sevre et Maine Sauvion 2012

750ML

Chenin Blanc Man Vintners South Africa 2011

750ML

6.99

6.99

Dievole Rosso di Sangiovese

8.99

2008

750ML

5.99

Saronga Chardonnay South Africa 2010

4.99

750ML

Yellowtail Pinot Grigio or Shiraz-Grenache 1.5ML

11.99

Vinas del Eden Malbec - Bonarda Argentina 2011

750ML

4.99

Sauvignon Blanc Black Birch Mountain Marlborough 2010

750ML

La Vieille Ferme Cotes du Ventoux Rouge 2010

750ML

8.99

5.99

Sauvignon Blanc Vicar's Choice New Zealand 2009

750ML

5.99

WAREHOUSE WINES & SPIRITS 735 Broadway

Phone 212-982-7770 Fax 212-982-7791

Mon-Th 9am-8:45pm Fri & Sat 9am-9:45pm Sunday noon-6:45pm

WarehouseWinesAndSpirits.com

Yes, We Deliver

Credit card purchases in store only. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical errors. Prices effective through October 24, 2013.

10

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Fantasy and comic lovers had their costumes going on — The Joker, Green Lantern…and, umm, the Chicken Chicks? — at Comic Con at the Javits Center last week.

We Wish The Villager a very happy 80th Anniversary and thank the publishers and staff for all your dedicated work on always reporting the news fairly to the community. We look forward to reading you every week and keeping up on all the community events and breaking news.

Thanks Villager for 80 years of the best Community News Ever!!!

346 Bleecker Street (Corner West 10th)

212-807-7566 Open 7 days a week

Yours, Jimmy and Rocio Sanz TheVillager.com

We Accept Medicare.

Monday-Friday 9am-9pm • Saturday 9am-7pm • Sunday 10am-5pm

October 17, 2013

11

Photos by Milo Hess

Superheroes and — Pow! Bang! — super costumes


Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER

Times and tech change, but The Villager’s still here

EDITORIAL

JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

EDITOR IN CHIEF

In an age of shrinking print media, community weeklies are still holding their own. Especially now, it’s important to be a known entity, and The Villager definitely is one. The Villager has a tremendous 80-year tradition of community journalism, which we have endeavored to highlight in this week’s special anniversary section — though, in truth, I feel like it really needs to be a book if not an encyclopedia. Looking through all the old back issues, one can see how many stories remain the same — the need for parks and schools, concerns over various quality-of-life issues and, yes, over New York University’s expansion. In The Villager’s early years, every time N.Y.U. purchased another townhouse on Washington Square it was duly noted. I still can’t believe it, but a few years ago, I actually read most of The Villager back issues — not necessar-

LINCOLN ANDERSON

ARTS EDITOR

SCOTT STIFFLER

REPORTER

HEATHER DUBIN

CONTRIBUTORS IRA BLUTREICH TERESE LOEB KREUZER JEFFERSON SIEGEL JERRY TALLMER

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR TROY MASTERS

Senior Designer MICHAEL SHIREY

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS ARNOLD ROZON CHRIS ORTIZ

SENIOR VP OF ADVERTISING / MARKETING FRANCESCO REGINI

RETAIL AD MANAGER COLIN GREGORY

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ALLISON GREAKER MIKE O’BRIEN ANDREW REGIER REBECCA ROSENTHAL Julio tumbacO

CIRCULATIONS SALES MNGR. MARVIN ROCK

PUBLISHER EMERITUS JOHN W. SUTTER

Member of the New York Press Association

Member of the National Newspaper Association

The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 0042-6202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2011 NYC Community Media LLC.

PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR

The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue. Published by NYC Community Media, LLC 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, NY, NY 10013 Phone: (212) 229-1890 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2012 NYC Community Media, LLC

12

October 17, 2013

ily every page in-depth, but scanning — a lot on microfilm, starting back with April 13, 1933. Obviously, that was a time before computers and Facebook, before TV even. For the past decade, the Internet has been revolutionizing journalism — and our lives. Today, we have smartphones more powerful than huge computers in the ’80s. When The Villager began in the Great Depression, Walter Bryan, the paper’s co-founder, made it a cause to turn out as many residents as possible for big sings in Washington Square. The Villager promoted contests for the neighborhood’s best window flowerboxes. In the 1950s and ’60s, the paper took on a more political edge as reform Democrats came to power through the Village Independent Democrat club. One of them, Ed Koch, became New York’s mayor. Mike Armstrong kept the paper humming along for 15 years, up through the early ’90s, when Tom and Elizabeth Butson took it over. Tom had been a top New York Times editor, and it was honor to work with him and Elizabeth.

Lincoln Anderson.

I also learned a lot from my former colleague Albert Amateau. A former editor dubbed him the “Dean of Community Journalism,” and the title was so apt. John W. Sutter then took over the paper, and I enjoyed working with him as we would break down the latest N.Y.U. plan or Pier 40 request for proposals (R.F.P.). John firmly believed in the mission of community journalism. Jennifer Goodstein, our new publisher, brings great enthusiasm and a real commitment to improv-

ing the company’s business side. She understands The Villager’s history and tradition. Yet, she also wants to push the paper in new directions. Our commitment to our core mission — reporting the news, covering the community and the arts, writing independent editorials — remains steadfast. We’ve covered, and been impacted by, major stories: 9/11, the 2004 Republican National Convention, Hurricane Sandy. Unforgettable. I’m very proud that The Villager has won the Dorman Award — as New York State’s best community weekly — three times since 2001. Incredible — 80! Who knows what the future holds, regarding local stories and journalism itself? All we know is that, with the help of our readers, we’ll keep doing our best to cover what matters — and also what intrigues and entertains — and keep striving to put out a paper that people want to read, and to support. Here’s to 100! Anderson is Editor in Chief of The Villager

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Senators stymie women’s agenda Competition for D’Agostino To The Editor: What has happened to Governor Cuomo’s 10-Point Women’s Agenda? It still seems to be languishing in our state Senate. It didn’t pass, despite a majority of Democrats, because the Independent Democratic Caucus (I.D.C.), headed by Senator Jeff Klein teamed up with Republican Dean Skelos, who squashed women’s reproductive health. As we all know, in the last week of the regular legislative session, the Assembly passed the omnibus 10-Point Women’s Equality Act (A 8070) and the Senate introduced the 10 points as separate bills, but passed only nine — omitting reproductive health. This means that, so far, there is no “same as” legislation that can advance to the governor’s desk and become law. There is still time to get the Senate to pass the omnibus bill or the Assembly to pass the 10 separate bills…but the clock is running out on these bills. The deadline is Dec. 31, 2013. We women all need to contact our state senators and Andrea Stewart-Cousins, head of the Democratic Conference, as well as Senate Majority Coalition co-leaders Republican Dean Skelos and Democrat Senator Jeffrey Klein and urge them to return to Albany and get this done for us! Mary L. Jenkins

To The Editor: Re “Is frozen yogurt smoothing my relationship with D’Ag?” (notebook, by Michele Herman, Oct. 10): Mrs. Green’s, a new supermarket, is coming to Hudson and Bank Sts. It’s replacing what was a drug store, Duane Reade, at the 99 Bank St. co-op building. So D’Ag can an-

ticipate other competition very close to its Bethune St. location. I know a lot of people who use D’Ag as a deli to fill in on items they need. I’m hoping Mrs. Green’s brings D’Ag down to earth in its pricing. We’ll see. Elaine Young  LETTERS, continued on p.14

IRA BLUTREICH

Have they killed the American Dream?!

TheVillager.com


Secret vote on the Soho BID was some tricky business TALKING POINT BY Sean Sweeney

W

TheVillager.com

The speed and secrecy with which the longdelayed BID was approved represents, to many, a low point in political cynicism and vindictiveness. Another point residents fought for was equalizing the BID tax that co-op and condo residents would pay. Originally, condo owners were to be charged $1 a year, but co-op residents would be assessed hundreds of dollars. Also, initial incentives for attracting

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

ith no public announcement or fanfare, after three years of delays and hunkersliding on the issue, this past week City Councilmember Margaret Chin suddenly and unexpectedly persuaded her Council colleagues to approve a controversial business improvement district on Broadway in Soho — less than a month after her re-election in a hard-fought Council race. The speed and secrecy Chin employed to get the long-delayed Broadway Soho BID approved so immediately after her primary election represents, to many, a low point in political cynicism and vindictiveness, even by New York City standards. The contentious BID proposal was delayed for three years due to vigorous opposition from residents and small businesses, who asserted that a BID was unnecessary, as well as an additional tax they could ill afford.   After all, retail business and rents are booming in Soho, especially along the Broadway corridor, which commands some of the highest retail rents in the city. Why is an added tax needed to “improve” it? Moreover, the tax to fund the BID’s effort at cleaning the litter left behind by the throngs who shop at the groundfloor retail chains will substantially be paid for by rent increases levied on the independent, small, creative businesses on the upper floors — hardly fair. Assemblymember Deborah Glick and state Senator Daniel Squadron, agreeing with a unanimous community board vote and several newspaper editorial boards, did not support the BID, while Chin remained its biggest booster. Yet, paradoxically, Chin and the BID steering committee, led by real estate giant and prominent Chin campaign contributor Newmark & Co., have not publicized passage of the BID that they have been championing since 2010, keeping the public in the dark. In another odd — and undisclosed — development, on Sept. 3, just one week before her primary election, Chin drew up an unsigned memorandum of understanding between herself, the BID committee and a few undisclosed residents. The document partially in-

corporated many of the demands Soho activists had pushed for — presumably to be used later as Chin’s defense that the Soho community wants and accepts her BID. For the record, nothing has changed: Many Soho residents and businesses continue to oppose this real estate-driven scheme.   Furthermore, since Chin was trounced in Soho in the primary election, some believe the speed with which she requested the BID vote after years of delay was retribution for her defeat at the polls there. In short, it appears that Chin couldn’t wait to pass her pet project soon enough after her election, so she took precious time off her campaign to ensure that the BID would be approved immediately after her primary victory, despite dawdling on it for three years. Clearly, she wanted passage of the BID but cynically sat on it until after she was re-elected, fearing the BID’s passage would hurt her at the polls. Seeing how Soho voters rejected her at the polls, this was her swift vengeance. Many of the points that Soho activists fought for were incorporated into the memorandum of understanding, and this, they believe, is a victory and vindication of their hard-fought efforts, despite their belief that the BID is still not needed. For example, the Broadway Soho BID will have a 50 / 50 representation of residents and business owners on the BID board of directors — the first for a BID in New York City. Generally, only one resident is permitted on a BID board.

Local residents who oppose the Broadway Soho BID hope it doesn’t do anything further to “put Soho on the map” for tourists.

yet more tourists to Soho were dropped from the BID’s mission. Instead, the BID’s services will now basically be restricted to sanitation and security. In addition, the overall tax assessment on businesses was reduced from $750,000 to $550,000. Pete Davies of the Broadway Residents Coalition said, “Our goal has always been to solve the problems that big retail brought to Broadway in Soho. Many in the neighborhood have worked long and hard to make the Soho BID proposal a more fair plan. When the government grants a BID the authority to tax, that action carries great responsibility. Those behind the BID have made many promises for Broadway and now they have their work cut out for them.”  After delaying a vote for years, the Council’s Finance Committee, last Wednesday morning, suddenly voted on the BID — apparently with no notification whatsoever to any landlord or stakeholder. From there, the bill immediately went right to the City Council that very same afternoon, where it was approved. After the city’s glacial pace on the BID the last three years, why was this done

in such secrecy, with no transparency and, basically, behind closed doors, with the public kept in the dark? A Council holding a public meeting where the public is not invited nor informed is in sharp contrast to the numerous meetings on the BID over the past three to four years.  In August, at a debate between Chin and Jenifer Rajkumar hosted by The Villager and Downtown Express, Chin was asked during the “lightning round” — “Broadway Soho BID, yes or no?” After several seconds of delay, Chin responded, “It’s passing.” Also, the recent M.O.U. was involved in was devoid of the names of residents who Chin claims support the proposal and who will serve on the BID’s board of directors. It appears the Council was given a tabula rasa, a blank document, to approve. In other words: Pass the bill based on a blank M.O.U., the signatories of which we shall provide later. Last week, we asked Chin’s Office to supply the names of the residents whom she claims will serve on the board of directors, but got no response as of this week. It doesn’t bode well for Soho’s acceptance of the plan. Sweeney is director, Soho Alliance October 17, 2013

13


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR LETTERS, continued from p. 12

What about park air rights? To The Editor: Re: “10 years later: Meatpacking District would have been minced meat without landmarking” (news article, Andrew Berman): The Meatpacking District’s low-rise character alone makes the landmarking an utter triumph for all involved. Berman makes a salient point in regard to accepting what preserved areas become, so long as they are preserved, and remain open to the sky. It is crucial. Often the conversation and opposition revolve around trying to prevent, across the board, what will be presumed to happen to an unprotected area, rather than the far more important

“getting the protections in place.” Things will change, and they must be allowed to, but preventing overdevelopment in this manner automatically prevents a huge swath of negative possibilities. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation is nothing short of heroic. On the Hudson River waterfront, I continue to believe we must convince Governor Cuomo to reject signing S5824. Giving away air rights is no different than losing a landmarking battle or a variance fight. It is exactly the same as putting housing on the pier, something we all (almost all) opposed. It is asking developers to come in and rescue the park. It is giving them what they want, in the end. No difference if it’s on the pier, in the park or on West St. We lose. Patrick Shields

Dog shooting gnaws at him To The Editor: Re “Word up! Artists reopen gallery in ‘novel’ fashion” (news article, Oct. 3): I can’t believe anybody would willingly share the same oxygen as the dog-killer Tom Otterness. He adopted an innocent shelter dog, tied it to a fence and shot it dead for “art.” Alexandra Dixon

Back in the saddle again To The Editor: Regarding the bike ad that ran under “First, Citi Bike; Next…Citi Arch?” (news brief, Oct. 3):

Times have changed. The uncredited man on the bicycle used to be one of the most recognized faces in the world: Gary Cooper, two-time Oscar winner and the most represented actor on the American Film Institute’s 100 Most Inspiring Movies of All Time. He’d be recognized if he were riding a horse. Bill Doody

E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

D.O.T. green-lights a ‘slow zone’ for East Village SLOW ZONE, continued from p. 1

14

October 17, 2013

COURTESY TSP3A / TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

That morning, Margaret Forgione, the agency’s Manhattan borough commissioner, wrote to Marlow announcing that D.O.T. has greenlighted the idea and that it would be put into effect by next year. “For each slow zone application,” Forgione wrote, “D.O.T. considers a myriad of factors, including, but not limited to: crash rate (relative to the rest of the borough), size of the zone, zone boundaries, transit density, community support, and institutions of priority within the zone (schools, daycare, senior centers, etc.). Upon reviewing your application, we are happy to report your zone was selected for implementation.” Marlow is also the founder of the Tompkins Square Park & Playgrounds Parents’ Association. The Villager broke the story about Marlow’s slow-zone proposal a little over half a year ago, back in April, when the newspaper printed a talking point by him about it. Per Marlow’s talking point: “The slow zone program, in short, takes a well-defined, relatively compact area, and reduces its speed limit from 30 miles per hour to 20 miles per hour, with further reductions to 15 miles per hour near schools. These newly reduced speed limits are then promoted and enforced through the use of traffic-calming measures, such as specialized signage at zone entry points, painted speed limit information on streets and the selective use of speed humps (relatively flat, elongated speed bumps that are designed to be traversed at 15 to 20 miles per hour).” Shortly after receiving Forgione’s letter last Friday, Marlow told The Villager, “I am beyond grateful to the Department of Transportation for approving the Tompkins Square / Alphabet

City Slow Zone. I am equally filled with gratitude for all of the community groups, elected officials and members of Community Board 3 whose support for the proposal was instrumental in making it a reality. Most of all, I find myself thinking of my father, Richard Marlow, and how something positive has finally come out of the years of terrible pain and suffering he endured after being hit by a speeding, drunk driver in 1995. I dedicate this effort to his memory.” According to StreetsBlog, there were 74 applications for slow zones. Fifteen were selected, to be rolled out over the course of the next three years.  “In what is an especially high honor,” Marlow said, “the Tompkins Square / Alphabet City Slow Zone is in the highest priority group, and is set for being rolled out in 2014.” According to StreetsBlog, also set for 2014 rollout are slow zones in Norwood in the Bronx, Clinton Hill / Bedford Stuyvesant and Brownsville in Brooklyn, and Jackson Heights, Queens Neighborhoods earmarked for slow zones in 2015 include Sunnyside Gardens / Woodside and Sunnyside in Queens; Crown Heights, Brooklyn; Parkchester in the Bronx; and the West Village. In addition, traffic-calming measures are scheduled the year after that for Midland Beach in Staten Island; Brooklyn Heights and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn; Westchester Square in the Bronx; and Hudson Heights in Manhattan. As for whether slow zones will be fast-tracked or parked in a new administration, it’s likely the former, since the predictive next mayor Bill de Blasio is a fan. “De Blasio loves slow zones,” Marlow said. “He called for tripling the number of them during the campaign.”

An analysis of car accidents involving bicycle and pedestrians from 2005 to 2009 by Transportation Alternatives, culled from New York State Department of Motor Vehicles data.

TheVillager.com


80

s n r Tu

A special Villager supplement Pages 15 to 50

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

15


Join in! The tradition continues, but with a new look By Jennifer Goodstein

T

he more things change, the more they stay the same. A well-worn phrase, but one that rings true as we celebrate The Villager’s 80th anniversary. Combing through the newspaper’s archives, we see headlines from the past eight decades that could be ripped from today’s paper. The Villager has reported on world-class artists, colorful political figures, brilliant scholars, celebrated war heroes and ordinary citizens, including those who protest every few years against changes to Washington Square Park, city planning board decisions, schools, wars, rent increases…well, you get the picture. We have a rich history of serving a community committed to preserving the dynamic and unique landscape we simply call “The Village.” In the age of Twitter, blogs, Facebook and other media — which deliver news in 100-calorie snack-pack portions — we enjoy the luxury of producing a weekly paper. Having the time to investigate stories and deliver fully fleshed-out reports makes The Villager stand out from the competition. In step with 80 years of tradition, we promise to continue delivering the thoughtful and thought-provoking news that is important to our readers — residents and businesses alike — both in print and online. Our dedicated readers may have noticed our new look, logo and even a new (old) Scoopy. Our creative team and Editor in

Chief Lincoln Anderson drew inspiration from the past to move us toward a more portable style that crosses print, online and mobile platforms. We want our content to look great regardless of how it is delivered to the reader. O.K., maybe the more things change, the more things change. The Villager Web site and its social media are abuzz during the week between print editions as a virtual town square for readers to share their thoughts and opinions about the latest breaking news. If you have not checked out TheVillager.com, please do so. Feel free to join in the discussions, debates and (for all the Scoopy fans) gossip. To our subscribers, thank you for supporting The Villager over the years. Your subscriptions help keep the paper alive. Your news tips, opinion pieces and talking points add color to the paper and help reflect the concerns of those living in the Village. We hope you enjoy the new look of the paper! To new readers, welcome. You are living and working in one of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the world. If you want to keep up on local issues, news and goings-on, please look for our subscription ad on Page 63. Join in, become part of community. Yes, shameless promotion, but we know we are THAT good. Come on, join in, because being part of a neighborhood matters! Goodstein is publisher, NYC Community Media (The Villager, Downtown Express, Gay City News, Chelsea Now and East Villager)

Publisher Jennifer Goodstein.

The Villager’s look has gone through changes before as seen in these front pages from summer 1989. In June, the Village Reform Democrats Club — formed as a breakaway “pro-Koch” faction of the Village Independent Democrats — refused to endorse Ed Koch for mayor, partly over the city’s plan to dock a prison barge, the Bibby Venture, at Pier 40, and also because they felt a “need for V.R.D.C. to better reflect the needs of its Village constituents.” Meanwhile, in July, police cleared the massive Tent City out of Tompkins Square Park.

16

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

17


New York University, an institution both in and of the city, is committed to giving back to New York. Our work in the classroom and in the community is only possible thanks to the leadership and vision of so many others.

NYU wishes to salute

Thank you for 80 years of passionate, dedicated stewardship over the neighborhoods which we call home.

18

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Through changes, Bryans’ baby is still going strong BY Albert Amateau

T

he Villager began 80 years ago on April 13, 1933, four years after Wall St. crashed and a few years into the Great Depression. Through the lean years and the New Deal, through the years of World War II, the weekly newspaper chronicled the struggle to save The Village and Washington Square Park. The rise of political reform, the preservation of the Jefferson Market Courthouse, the dawning of gay and lesbian consciousness, the transformation of the waterfront, the epoch-changing terror of Sept, 11, 2001, the harrowing paralysis of Superstrom Sandy — all have been in the pages of The Villager from a neighborhood point of view. The Villager changed along with the times, often a step ahead and occasionally a step behind. The first front page had a drawing from 1916 “Bruno’s Garret — Which is no More,” a two-story rooming house on a West Village corner. Nostalgia was a given for The Villager’s founders, Walter Gregory Bryan and his sister, Isabel Bryan. Walter Bryan, who started his newspaper career in 1883 as a carrier boy for the Fulton, Missouri, Sun, went on to work as a reporter for the Kansas City Times, served as business manager of the St. Louis Star and then promotion director of the Chicago Tribune. He organized The Bryan Organization, a newspaper marketing firm in 1912 and at the same time joined the Hearst Organization as publisher of the Atlanta Georgian and then the New York American. Walter was a joiner and an organizer — a Mason, a Shriner, a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the American Order of Pioneers and an organizer and associate director of the New York State Boone Family Association — who traced their ancestry to Daniel Boone. His sister, Isabel, was a publicity and advertising manager for several companies. After a stint as head of the English department at William Woods College in Fulton, Missouri, she eventually became the office manager for the Bryan Organization. She was known as one of the best woman copy editors of her day. The lead article on the paper’s first front page was about the annual meeting of the Washington Square Association in the Fifth Ave. Hotel. Two items noted the legalization of 3.2 beer, the first crack in Prohibition: Peter Gilmore celebrated the opening of his play in the Cherry Lane Theater with a beer party during intermission; and “Hoppy News” was a headline on The Villager’s editorial page. Another item said the night court session of the Jefferson Market Courthouse disappointed spectators who expected to be entertained by a parade of beer drunks: “For the

TheVillager.com

Walter Bryan.

first time in months only six cases were taken to hospitals for over-indulgence and these were found to be suffering from ‘smoke’ or third-rail whiskey” — whatever that is. Also in the debut edition, a short circuit under the seats damaged a southbound streetcar on Sixth Ave. at Waverly Place but the 30 passengers boarded the next car without delay. A street car on the Eighth St. crosstown line collided with a cab at Christopher and West Sts. but no injuries were mentioned. Two New York University undergraduate magazines suspended publication “because of recent financial difficulties.” A year later, Walter wrote that the paper was intended to catch the voice and the spirit of the Village. He implied that the paper was responsible for people recognizing the Village as “a community of both color and conservatism … of substance and charm, happy home life … high educational, artistic and musical standards … of alert business development, in short, an unusually desirable section in which to study, play, live and make a living.” Governor Herbert Lehman, former Governor Alfred E. Smith and Greenwich House founder and Director Mary K. Simkhovitch were among those who sent anniversary greetings. Walter died in 1941 and Isabel carried on until her death in 1957. Her sister, Merle Bryan Williamson, took over at the age of 83. William Honan, a former New York Times reporter and New Yorker writer, was on The Villager staff from 1957 until 1960. In an interview a few years ago, Honan recalled Merle Williamson as a gallant woman who knew nothing about newspapers.

Isabel Bryan.

“She ran a Holiday Inn in Missouri and became The Villager publisher on sheer courage,” he said. Up to that time, The Villager took the political path of least resistance and supported the powers that were — namely the Tamawa Democratic Club and its leader Carmine DeSapio, said Honan. But in 1959, Honan convinced Jim Bledsoe, the assistant publisher, to back the reformers, including Mayor Robert Wagner, ex-Governor Lehman and ex-Governor W. Averill Harriman, and oppose DeSapio, Tammany Hall’s reigning chief and the Village’s Democratic district leader. “We went to Merle and told her what we wanted to do,” Honan said. “She was 85 years old but she was from Missouri where the Prendergast machine ran Kansas City. She said, ‘Well boys, you better do it right. If you don’t, you’ll be stretched out in a church and people will be saying how natural you look.’ If her sister were still running the paper, it would never have happened,” Honan said. After Merle died in 1961, her son, Bill Williamson, took over and Jim Bledsoe remained assistant publisher for several years. In the 1970s, the finances of The Villager were uncertain, and various investors — “angels” is a better word to describe them — helped the paper survive. Bill Bowser, a West Village activist who died in 2001, wrote for the paper about Village history and neighborhood news under three bylines: William Bowser, William Patton and David Linder. Royce Rowe, who worked for ABC News, took the helm of a foundering ship in 1973,

according to Miriam Bockman, a former Village resident and Greenwich Village Democratic district leader. “I came to help Royce out a couple days a week, but there were so few of us and so much to do that it became full time,” Bockman said in an interview five years ago. “We were on University Place in the Albert Hotel building. It was picturesque but the place was terrible. The roach problem was significant. If Scoopy the cat were still around then he would have had a field day eating insects.” Rowe’s partner in The Villager was Martin Shaer, who owned real estate on Grove and Hudson Sts., according to Robert S. Trentlyon, the publisher at that time of the Chelsea Clinton News and The Westsider. Trentlyon acquired The Villager and ran it for a year or two. Michael Armstrong, publisher of the Brooklyn Phoenix, came into the picture next. “I bought it in 1977 from Royce Rowe,” said Armstrong. “It had about five owners in the 1970s before I came in,” he said. Under Armstrong’s tenure, The Villager editorial office moved several times before settling in the East Village. In those days the Villager gave Off Off Broadway theater awards, arts coverage was The Villager hallmark and the East Village was the cultural center of the readership. “We moved from 13th St. just off Fifth Ave. to Seventh Ave. South above Sweet Basil’s, which had been the old Tamawa Democratic Club,” Armstrong recalled. “Then we moved to E. Fourth St. near LaMaMa’s theater.” GOING STRONG, continued on p. 22

October 17, 2013

19


MAX

20

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


The front page of The Villager’s inaugural issue featured lots of stories but no reporters’ bylines.

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

21


Through changes, Bryans’ baby is still going strong GOING STRONG, continued from p. 19

BROOKLYN COLLEGE LIBRARY ARCHIVES / PHOTO BY BILL BIGGART

But in January 1992, the economic climate was too tough and Armstrong closed the paper. Nevertheless, six months later, Tom Butson, a retired New York Times assistant news editor, and his wife, Elizabeth Margaritis Butson, a former marketing vice president at Philip Morris, bought the paper and resumed publishing, saving it from vanishing from existence. In the next seven years, the Butsons transformed a moribund paper into a thriving community weekly, Tom Butson as editor and Elizabeth Butson as publisher. At age 19, Tom Butson had left his native New Zealand, where he was working as a reporter for The Truth, a weekly paper he later described as “a political scandal sheet.” He looked for newspaper work in London but learned that the Thompson papers in Canada were hiring, so there he went to work for the Thompson paper in Guelph, Ontario. By the time he was 28 he was assistant managing editor of the Toronto Star. He ran photos by Elizabeth Margaritis — who at the time was working as a photojournalist — in the paper, and they married in 1967. He joined the Times in 1968, working on the Week in Review section of the Sunday

In November 1985, activists protested against the advent of cruise missiles at New York University’s Loeb Center on Washington Square South.

paper and as assistant news editor of the daily main news section. Three years after purchasing The Villager, the Butsons acquired a second local paper, Downtown Express, covering Tribeca and Lower Manhattan. Tom Butson’s declining health prompted the sale in 1999 of The Villager and Down-

town Express, the latter at the time a bimonthly, to John W. Sutter, who had recently sold a chain of Long Island newspapers he had been running for 10 years. In 1995 Sutter had moved to Tribeca. The Villager’s Sept. 11, 2001, issue was a few days late, but its coverage of the

World Trade Center attack and the impact on the community was complete. In 2002, The Villager won 13 editorial awards for 2001 from the New York Press Association, including seven first-place prizes, as well as the Stuart Dorman Award for Editorial Excellence, the association’s top prize honoring the state’s best community weekly paper. The Villager also won the Dorman Award in 2004 and 2005. In mid-2002, Sutter acquired LGNY, a biweekly newspaper covering the gay community, relaunching it as the weekly Gay City News. In late 2006, Sutter started another weekly paper, Chelsea Now, covering the thriving Chelsea area. In August 2012, Jennifer Goodstein acquired Community Media from Sutter, renaming it NYC Community Media. Goodstein previously worked at MetLife where she led e-business strategy and IT investments online service. Under Goodstein — who has brought her computer savvy, marketing skills and business expertise to the company — NYC Community Media continues going strong. All four of the news group’s papers continue to win awards in NYPA’s Better Newspaper Contest at the press organization’s annual spring convention.

Congrats V illager! Since 1933, you are still going strong & always a unique voice for our community! THE VILLAGE REFORM DEMOCRATIC CLUB Village Reform Democratic Club • 25 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

22

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


(212) 989 - 6444 www.davesnewyork.com Ave of the Americas & 16th St.

B13 Washed Denim Work Dungaree $33. B151 Liteweight Cotton Work Pant $38. B11 Washed Cotton Duck $40. B01 Double Front Cotton Duck $44. B342 Ripstop Cotton Cargo $45.

501® Button Fly Washed $45. 501® Shrink-to Fit® $45. 514™ Slim Straight $40. 511™ Skinny $40.

B07 Denim Logger Jean $40.

#874 Original Work Pant $24 Sizes 44-50 $27

NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

A man smoking a pipe and children competed in a chalking contest in Washington Square Park in November 1966.

#85-283 Loose Fit Double Knee $28

Sizes 44-50 $31

#873 Washed Slim/Straight $28

#10875 Classic Work Moc Toe #9016 Classic Dress Beckman

50th Year — Good Products — Good Prices — Since 1963

Greenwich House Salutes Speaker Christine Quinn

Friend and Supporter of the communities we jointly serve • Senior Centers • Mental Health Services • Arts Education www.greenwichhouse.org

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

23


An editor’s notebook: Looking (and moving) east, BY Michael A. Armstrong

N

BROOKLYN COLLEGE LIBRARY ARCHIVES

ewspapers are living things and those who love them measure success by endurance. Over 80 years, through cultural, political and economic upheavals in its community — not to mention the leadership of a few dozen different editors and publishers over the decades — The Villager continues to be an important institution in one of the city’s most distinctive communities. The leading Page One stories in the very first edition produced by Walter and Isabel Bryan on April 13, 1933, included a report about the arrival of George Bernard Shaw in New York (“He poses for photographs but has little to say to reporters”) and a report of the annual meeting of the Washington Square Association at the Fifth Avenue Hotel (“The Associaiton plays a highly important part in all civic matters pertaining to the district…”). Other headlines were “Held in Robbing (Gene) Tunney’s Pal,” “Street Car and Taxi Crash” and “Illness May Prevent ‘Jimmy’s’ [Walker] Wedding.” Walter and Isabel Bryan probably turned over in their proverbial graves many times during the 15 years of our stewardship. At the time we took charge of The Villager in 1977, the genteel community they had so lovingly covered was altered — not so completely in physical terms, but certainly in demographic and cultural terms. As I have explored the streets of the Village and environs over recent years, I see continuing change that is every bit as overwhelming as that which occurred since we left The Villager ourselves. I’m sure Editor Lincoln Anderson will probably be able to say the same thing himself in another 10 years. As Villager editor and publisher between 1977 and 1992, I also represented community weeklies in New York City as regional director of the 200-member New York Press Association. We were proud to match up our Villager newspaper against publications from

Former President Jimmy Carter visiting the Lower East Side in 1984 for a project with Habitat for Humanity, which renovated abandoned buildings on E. Sixth St.

all across the state, as we often won best-instate awards year after year for coverage of local government, education, arts, business and individual writing honors. One reason we were so good was that we had plenty of raw material to work with. We covered a historic community with a strong sense of its past and a determination to preserve the best of it against inappropriate development or over-commercialization. Tensions between residential and commercial interests, a sometime-callous (or indifferent) municipal government, huge institutional forces, and the insatiable appetite of people to live and play in the Village, regularly presented new, fresh opportunities to bring out the best in reporters. So did an active political scene, thanks to the Village Independent Democrats and the upstart Village Reform Democratic Club — and the

Congratulations! to The Villager on 80 Years!

Keep up the good work!

ARMSTRONG, continued on p. 25

Congratulations to The Villager on 80 years of outstanding community reporting! Assembly Member

Deborah J. Glick

Dick Gottfried

Tel: 212-674-5153 / Fax: 212-674-5530 glickd@assembly.state.ny.us

October 17, 2013

many buildings that might have been lost. The legalization of loft living to provide working space for artists led to the transformation of Soho, proof of how some unintended consequences have a bitter bite. And we reported on the insatiable push that brought artists and outliers into conflict with developers and gentrifiers that moved our coverage area into the East Village. Wonder if anyone remembers Adam Purple and the Garden of Eden? Or if any “survivors” of the Tompkins Square Park riots still live in the East Village? Among the most severe tragedies reflected in our Villager pages was an emerging awareness of the scourge of AIDS and H.I.V. The difference in Village life before and after

Assemblymember 853 Broadway, Suite 1518, New York, NY 10003

24

clientele of the Lion’s Head. Issues included zoning changes, sidewalk cafe permits, landmarks challenges, various N.Y.U. expansions, and countless quality-oflife concerns. We saw and reported the transformation of commercial streets, e.g. Christopher St., Eighth St., University Place, Sixth Ave., Broadway, Third Ave., just to name some. We covered the demise of Westway in our early years, reported on the gentrification of the West Village and turmoil at Westbeth, and chronicled the argument over whether to permit removal of those curious elevated rail tracks that have since become the High Line park. The West Village owes a debt of gratitude to real estate entrepreneur Bill Gottleib, who fathered more restaurants than anyone we know, and whose unique business practices resulted in the preservation of

242 West 27th Street New York, NY 10001

tel. 212-807-7900 fax 212-243-2035 www.assembly.state.ny.us/gottfried GottfriedR@nysa.us

TheVillager.com


AIDS, Off Broadway plays, awards and ‘going daily’ ARMSTRONG, continued from p. 24

TheVillager.com

Even after Westway’s defeat, Villagers still had plenty to protest about on the waterfront. In 1989, above, they rallied against a plan for PATH train ventilation towers on the waterfront south of Christopher St. From left, Bill Hine (back row, fourth from left), Larry Selman, Ben Green, representing Assemblymember Bill Passannante, Miriam Lee of the Village Homeowners’ Association, Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, then a mayoral candidate, Bob Oliver (partially obscured by raised hand) of the Federation to Preserve the Greenwich Village Waterfront & Great Port, Judy Seigel of the Morton Street Block Association, Vern Fry and Artie Strickler.

week. We did that year after year thanks to creative and energetic writers, many of whom were learning the craft of journalism and experiencing their first published work. Dozens of professional awards over

Armstrong and his community newspaper publishing company acquired The Villager in 1977 and sold it in 1992 to three of the company’s shareholders, Thomas and Elizabeth Butson and Nancy Flowers.

BROOKLYN COLLEGE LIBRARY ARCHIVES

AIDS could be compared to the difference in city life before and after 9/11. Not only did the Village become a center of commerce for the gay and lesbian community as its members emerged from the shadows of city life after Stonewall, it also became ground zero for advocacy for gay (and then lesbian) rights and the source of support for those afflicted by the disease and public education about it. The Villager had several homes over the years of our tenure. Finding ourselves in an office building on Fifth Ave. at the start, we quickly relocated to a more appropriate, accessible second-floor space over Sweet Basil’s on Seventh Ave. South. In the mid’80s, rising rents and an expanding coverage to the east brought us to a storefront on E. Fourth St., a location that was particularly compatible with our expanded coverage of Off and Off Off Broadway and experimental theater. Speaking of that coverage, we took great pride in our annual Villager Theater Awards, the inspiration of our prescient theater editor, John Patterson. The ’80s was a time of great ferment in the artistic community with dozens of productions taking place every year in some of the most raw spaces. “Experimental” was definitely the word for many of the short-run presentations, but much worthy work went unheralded in the media, so we began to cover the scene. And we created the Village Theater Awards to honor the best of it, an awards program that was as much a celebration of the scene. Thank you, Art D’Lugoff and the Village Gate, for providing us a home for these celebrations for four straight years. As for some of our special Villager moments, we fondly remember the first years of the Village Halloween Parade, when celebrants wound their way through neighborhood streets west of Fifth Ave., and The Villager staff contingent was one of the most exuberant. Then there was the 50th anniversary of the founding of The Villager, celebrated at the Salmagundi Club with Mayor Ed Koch there to participate in the fete. Years later, people still talked about our Year-End Open House where Councilman at Large Henry Stern worked the crowd to sell his N.Y.C.-branded neckties. (I think I still have mine somewhere). Elections are about making choices and choosing sides. We endorsed someone in virtually every race, but the choice that stands in my memory is that of Reverend Jesse Jackson in the New York presidential primary. My favorite photo of all time shows Jackson carrying a framed copy of the editorial in a pre-Election Day parade, And yes, he won the primary. Early in our tenure, The Villager staff rose to an unusual challenge as we went “daily” when a bitter strike shut down the citywide

the years testify to their outstanding skills. Photographers Jeannie Black and Bill Biggart (who tragically lost his life while reporting at the World Trade Center site) were among those who consistently provided us with first-class photography to document the news. Other great photography came from Brian O’Donoghue and Stacy Rosenstock. Connecting the past to the present was the faithful volunteer work of Evelyn Patterson, whose “Way Back When” tidbits from earlier Villagers were part of every week’s edition. And, of course, there was Frank Cass, who regularly serviced our 80 newsstand outlets with the latest weekly edition. It would be appropriate to list the names of all my editorial colleagues here, but there’s not enough space. Some of them were: Chris Archer, Rob DeRocker, Mike Tomasky, Marianne Baker, John Patterson, Jeff Trachtman, Jon Ciner, Eileen Blair, Eric Goldstein, Andrew Jacobs, Betsy Herzog, Ken Godwin, Lillie Wright, Jim Sheehan, Steve Hart and… .

newspapers in August 1978. We published four days a week for several weeks until other strike newspapers came in to fill the void. It was wonderful to see us virtually alone on Village-area newsstands, selling out most days. Interestingly, that experience was a precursor to today’s intense Internet publishing schedule, as reporters and photographers came back to the office after covering a meeting, wrote their stories, and saw them in print on the stands 12 hours later. There were some special Village people we covered. Vesuvio Bakery’s Tony Dapolito, as chairperson of Community Board 2, was perennially our number one news source and pro bono journalism instructor, patiently explaining the civic lay of the land to successive generations of Villager reporters. There was Ruth Wittenberg, the venerable West Village landmark activist, who, in the midst of contentious approval process for the replacement building for the infamous Weather Underground site, converted tension to humor by describing it a building with “a little indiscretion.” Ellen Stewart, the trailblazing LaMaMa theatrical entrepreneur, made us so welcome when we moved The Villager editorial offices to E. Fourth St. Newspapers are a business, too, and advertisers are the lifeblood of publishers. We are grateful for the consistent support of some of the most community-minded businesses from our times, including Crossroads Wine & Liquor, Mad Monk, Jefferson Market, Balducci’s, Sazarac House, Art Kaiser, Sweet Basil, Minetta Tavern, Garvin’s, Garber’s Hardware, Caring Community, Greenwich House and, of course, many others. Thank you, Sally Markman and George Fiala, for working this side of the street for many years. An editor’s job is to take the available words and photos and turn them into a package that readers want to receive week after

SINCE 1933

THE VILLAGER HAS COVERED PEOPLE AND EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY SO UNIQUE. ON ITS 80TH BIRTHDAY THE VILLAGER CONTINUES TO BE A STRONG INDEPENDENT VOICE IN THE VILLAGE AND ITS SURROUNDING NEIGHBORHOODS. OUR BEST WISHES TO THE NEW PUBLISHER JENN GOODSTEIN AND THE VILLAGER STAFF

ELIZABETH BUTSON PUBLISHER 1991 -99

JOHN SUTTER PUBLISHER 1999-2012

October 17, 2013

25


nyc parks department

Above, in April 1934, a ceremony was held for the children’s garden in Tompkins Square Park. Below, in 1986, Adam Purple walked on the former site of his Garden of Eden after the city razed it for affordable housing. The green oasis covered 15,000 square feet between Forsyth and Eldridge Sts. near Stanton St. With planting beds in Zen-like concentric circles, it featured corn, cucumbers, tomatoes, asparagus, raspberries and 45 trees. “It was a work of art — an earthwork, a work of art that was also ecologically based,” Purple told Amy Brost in a 2006 interview. Now in his early 80s, Purple mentors young activists at the Time’s Up! bike garage in Williamsburg.

BROOKLYN COLLEGE LIBRARY ARCHIVES / PHOTO BY BRIAN O’DONOGHUE

26

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


PHOTOGRAPH ŠHARVEY WANG

adam Purple overlooking his Garden of Eden, with the world Trade Center in the distance.

Turn your enthusiasm for nurturing young children into a career? Start your own business? Join a professional network of home-based, licensed child care providers?

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

27


NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

it was great to be a kid in Greenwich Village on July 7, 1935, because you could cool off in the washington Square fountain, which doubled as a swimming pool. as the aerial photo below shows, buses were still driving through the park back then. after motor vehicles were finally kicked out of the park, it got a major redesign, with construction starting in 1969.

Congratulations Villager! “Let all with something to say be free to express themselves. The true and sound will survive. The false and unsound will be vanquished.” - Fred S. Siebert

ARTHUR Z. SCHWARTZ Advocate for Justice & Democratic District Leader 212.285.1400 • aschwartz@afjlaw.com

www.afjlaw.com 28

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

Above, an aerial view of Washington Square Park in March 1935, looking north. Below, 33 years later, at the signing of the contract for the park’s redesign in March 1968, with city Parks Commissioner August Heckscher (pointing) and Tony Dapolito a.k.a. “Mr. Parks” of Community Board 2 (next to Hecksher’s right elbow).

  



TheVillager.com

       October 17, 2013

29


Through the eras, The Villager has always been there By JOHN w. SuTTER

I

t’s been just over a year since I sold The Villager and its sister newspapers to NYC Community Media. After 25 years of publishing newspapers — I owned another Long Island group for 12 years before The Villager and Co. — I am still totally immersed in the news as a voracious reader. To the best of my recollection, I was the ninth owner of The Villager, although there may have been another owner or two in the turbulent 1970s: Isabel and Walter Bryan (1933-41); then Isabel Bryan alone (1941-57); followed by Isabel’s sister Merle Bryan Williamson (1957-61); her son, Bill Williamson (1961-73); then Royce Rowe, Bob Trentlyon, Martin Shaer (all in the mid-’70s); Michael Armstrong (1977-91); Tom and Elizabeth Butson (1992-99), myself (1999-2012); and now Jennifer Goodstein (2012 to present). “The paper was often a step ahead of its readership, occasionally a step behind,” as Al Amateau, one of The Villager ’s great writers, neatly summed up the changing epochs and leadership of The Villager over the years. The Villager has had a colorful history and weathered many storms. It was founded in the depths of the Depression, went under at least twice, was resurrected by Tom and Elizabeth Butson, and survived 9/11, the Great Recession and Hurricane Sandy.

!

EE

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 2, 2013 12PM - 3PM 11 EAST 3RD ST

FR

EAST VILLAGE TEXTILE & ELECTRONICS RECYCLING EVENT

John w. Sutter.

But it has always faithfully documented the life and pulse of our cherished neighborhoods. Nothing made me happier when I was running The Villager than to have readers come up to me and tell me how important the paper was to them. It was particularly satisfying when people who had lived in the Village for decades would tell me that they thought they knew the Village until they started reading The Villager. I’d like to send a special shout-out to three people: Bill Honan, Lincoln Anderson and Jerry Tallmer. Bill Honan, who edited the paper in the late 1950s, took on Camine DeSapio and the Tammany machine and went on to help Ed Koch get elected mayor. Bill, who had a distinguished career at the New York Times, put The Villager firmly on the path of hard-hitting and quality journalism. To Lincoln Anderson, who has edited The Villager since late 1999, I cherished working with you. Lincoln has the pulse of our neighborhoods, a vast trove of sources, and a love and a passion for community journalism. I eagerly await his stories every week. And to Jerry Tallmer, who helped found the Village Voice and has been covering the arts in our great city for over a half century, you write like an angel. My heartfelt congratulations to The Villager on its 80th anniversary. It is our hometown paper in the big city.

TEXTILES -AND-

ELECTRONICS RECYCLING

B/T BOWERY & 2ND AVE

Special collection at FABnyc’s Load OUT!

WHAT TO DROP-OFF:

C O L L E C T I O N

Congratulations to

The Villager on its 80th anniversary

DAY

TEXTILES Clean and dry clothing, paired shoes, bedding, linens, hats, handbags, belts, fabric scraps 36"x36" or larger. Textiles will be sorted for reuse or recycling through Wearable Collections. No: rugs or carpeting*

E-WASTE Computers, monitors, fax machines, copiers, televisions, DVD players, VCRS, radios & stereos, telephones, digital cameras, printers, scanners, keyboards & peripherals, cell phones, remote controls, tape players, answering machines, electric typewriters, game systems, pagers, and batteries (AA,AAA,C,D,etc.) E-Waste will be safely recycled by LES Ecology Center. NO: home appliances, microwaves, stoves, refrigerators, air conditioners* E-Waste Recycling Question? Visit Lesecologycenter.org or call 212.477.4022

QUESTIONS? RECYCLE@GROWNYC.ORG OR CALL 212.566.4472

Assemblyman

Shelly Silver If you need assistance or have questions about community issues or legislation, please contact my office at (212) 312-1420 or email silver@assembly.state.ny.us.

CO-SPONSORED BY GROWNYC’S OFFICE OF RECYCLING OUTREACH AND EDUCATION, A NYC DEPARTMENT OF SANITATION FUNDED PROGRAM.

30

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Gaslight & G2 the Meatpacking District’s original bar and lounge, would like to congratulate The Villager on their 80th anniversary. For 18 years The Villager has recommended Gaslight & G2 as the best bar in the Meatpacking District and a great place for special events. We have enjoyed a wonderful relationship throughout the years.

Private banquettes, overstuffed handmade furniture, and ornate tin ceilings envelope you as the DJ spins. Great for private parties: 20-600 people

“One of the world’s best bars.” Photos by Laila Miroku

— BESTBARS.COM

Available for Private Parties, Holiday Events, and Corporate Meetings The World Famous Gaslight is open 7 days a week, 365 days a year DJ nightly - Never a cover 1 p.m. - 4 a.m. Never closes early

G2

Gaslight • 400 West 14th St. @ 9th Ave. / G2 • 39 9th Ave. @ West 14th St. • (212) 807-8444 Free party planning service for all events and bookings email matt@gaslightnyc.com or call Matt at 917.449.9400 TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

31


’30s

1933: The Villager is born with a “guaranteed circulation of 25,000.” An early issue is the spotty service on “Sixth Ave. surface line,” apparently streetcars, and the slacker drivers who only want to get back to “the barn.” 1935: Parks Commissioner Robert Moses proposes a $2 million redesign of Washington Square Park that would close it to traffic and reroute buses around the square. A rectangular reflecting pool would replace the park’s historic fountain. The Washington Square Association and residents of hotels and upscale apartment buildings oppose the plan, not wanting buses to run near their homes. A Save the Square Committee is formed to ensure no “radical changes” are made to the park. Noise is a problem, especially roller skaters and barking dogs in the evening. Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia implements a noise-abatement program. It works. Organ grinders are also targeted. 1936: Scoopy makes his appearance, and starts his column. Scoopy mania sweeps the Village. A competition elicits many ideas for names — Peter, Gossip, Furbelow, Catapault (“if it is lively”), Villy, Villa, Newsy, Lino (as in linotype), Copycat, or Copy for short, Extry, Dead Line — but Scoopy wins. 1937: Sixth Ave. trolleys are removed, to The Villager’s relief. One thousand people attend the newspaper’s third anniversary at Wannamaker’s department store on Broadway. 1938: Construction starts on the Sixth Ave. I.N.D. subway through the Village.

1939: Hundreds gather to watch the last train trips on the Sixth Ave. El, slated to be torn down. The Villager subsequently launches a campaign to name the intersection of Sixth and Greenwich Aves. and Eighth St. “Village Square,” but it never catches on.

’40s

1941: Walter Bryan, co-founder of The Villager, dies. The Washington Square Association protests a plan for four playgrounds in the square, feeling they “will be a detriment to peace” and reduce property values. 1942: America enters World War II. Twenty-two historic buildings, said to be “among the nation’s most valuable landmarks,” are reported to be on a list of buildings that have been photographed and recorded and could be rebuilt if bombed. 1945: World War II ends. General Dwight D. Eisenhower rides victoriously under the Washington Square Arch while touring the city. 1946: Protests over plans by the Board of Education to demolish the historic Sullivan-MacDougal Gardens for a new trades high school. 1947: Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village open. New York University announces plans for a new four-and-a-half-story law center on Washington Square South. Twelve thousand sign a petition against the project. 1949: The Whitney Museum announces it will leave W. Eighth St. for Uptown.

’50s

1951: N.Y.U. Law School building is completed. Residents don’t think it’s so bad. 1953: Washington Square Southeast Slum Clearance Report is made public. Renewal area targets area between Washington Square South, Mercer and Houston Sts. and Broadway. Patchin Place is picked for new P.S. 41, but dropped quickly after opposition. 1954: Board of Estimate approves slumclearance project. Wannamaker’s closes. 1955: Plans are announced to bisect Washington Square Park with a depressed, four-lane roadway to link Fifth Ave. with a proposed widened West Broadway. The Washington Square Association favors the plan. N.Y.U. gets three future superblocks designated south of the square. A congressional committee deems the university’s plan legal. 1956: A $13.75 million urban renewal project for the Cooper Square area is announced by Planning Czar Moses for the area between East Houston St., St. Mark’s Place, Third Ave. and the Bowery. The 21-acre project is supposed to look like Stuyvesant Town. 1957: Construction begins on Pier 40 at West Houston St., a $12 million project. Joining the community’s protest, Tammany’s Carmine DeSapio, the powerful district leader, calls for the park to be closed to traffic. 1958: The Villager runs a front-page editorial against a road through the park. Thirtythousand Villagers sign a petition to close the park to traffic. 1959: The idea is raised to convert the old Jefferson Market Courthouse on Sixth Ave. to a library.

beth, the former Bell Labs. Koch is elected to Congress. Greitzer wins his Council seat.

’60s

1962: The Lower Manhattan Expressway Project is proposed. Devised by Moses, the $140 million, 2.4-mile roadway along Broome St. to link the Manhattan and Williamsburg bridges to the Holland Tunnel would displace 2,300 families in Little Italy and cut off Chinatown. City agrees to community alternative plan for Cooper Square. 1963: Loft law introduced to protect loft dwellers. 1964: Landmarks preservation legislation for the city is proposed. Residents protest loud coffee houses on MacDougal St. 1965: Eight years after it was built, Pier 40 is no longer in use for shipping as the city’s maritime industry has dried up. District Leaders Ed Koch and Carol Greitzer support using the pier as a recreation site for half the year. The Greenwich Village Historic District’s proposed boundaries are released. N.Y.U. announces plans to build the 12-story Bobst Library on Washington Square South, designed by Philip Johnson. “Tall cube would keep sun from Wash. Sq.,” a Villager headline reads. N.Y.U. wants a 40-foot strip of West Broadway to make the building wider. 1966: Koch writes talking point in The Villager raising fears N.Y.U. will ring the square with a “12-story master plan.” 1967: “Selfish” hippies are accused of adding to the East Village’s litter problem. 1968: The city approves a zoning variance to create 360 units of artists’ housing at West-

’70s

1970: Weathermen’s “bomb factory” on W. 11th St. blows up. More than 1,000 youths rally in the Village to protest a “police stepup in the harassment of homosexuals.” Mayor John Lindsay’s plan for “festival piers” is shot down by West Siders. 1971: A floating methadone clinic at the Christopher St. Pier provokes the community’s ire. 1973: Koch runs for mayor. Community Board 2 vetoes a dog run at Houston and Mercer Sts. and bedlam breaks out at meeting. Women’s House of Detention is razed. 1974: West Village Houses open as an affordable Mitchell-Lama co-op. There are too few takers, so the buildings later became rental. 1977: Koch inaugurated as mayor. 1978: Printing unions of city’s dailies go on two-week strike. Villager goes daily to meet readers’ need for news.

’80s

1980: C.B. 2 O.K.’s Mercer-Houston Dog Run. Westway project, a four-mile, $1.2 million, sunken, six-lane highway in a tunnel along the West Side waterfront, is still alive. 1982: Ruling that Westway planners didn’t investigate landfill’s harmful effect on striped bass is death blow for reviled project. Eighth St. residents say they’re bothered by late-night shows of the “Rocky Horror Picture Show.”

1984: Operation Pressure Point, a police initiative using community help, targets East Side drug dealing, which has grown out of control with open-air markets. 1985: The Third Ave. Tenants, Artists and Businessmen’s Association protested N.Y.U.’s planned high-rise dorms on two lots at Ninth and 12th Sts. Future Councilmember Margarita Lopez arrested at protest after chaining herself to a crane. 1987: Greenwich Village neighbors mourned the death of Lisa Steinberg, 6, a P.S. 41 student who was beaten to death by her adoptive parents. 1988: Department of Corrections plans to moor a 400-man, $19 million prison barge at Pier 40.

’90s

1991: Two months before his election to the City Council, Tom Duane announces he is H.I.V. positive. Duane said he wanted to set an example that people with H.I.V. could be productive and be good citizens. 1994: Squatters fought plans by Lower East Side Coalition Housing Development Inc. to rehab five abandoned buildings on E. 13th St. “They treat the whole neighborhood like a radical Romper Room,” a member of the housing group sneered of the squatters. 1995: Squatters evicted from three cityowned buildings on E. 13th St. 1996: Reconstruction project begins on Route 9A and adjacent bikeway along the Lower West Side waterfront. Abe Lebewohl, owner of 2nd Ave. Deli, is shot and killed

near the deli in a case still unsolved. 1997: Greenwich Village Little League and Downtown United Soccer Club sue the state to get fields on Pier 40. East Village poet Allen Ginsberg, a Beat icon, dies. 1998: C.B. 2 approves the Hudson River Park Act, creating the 5-mile-long waterfront park.

’00s

2001: World Trade Center is destroyed by terrorists, killing more than 2,750 people. 2002: City sells remaining 13 squatter buildings in the East Village, for $1 apiece, to the squatters. 2003: Mayor Bloomberg bans smoking in bars. Hudson River Park’s first section, in Greenwich Village, opens. Also in Hudson River Park, plans for the world’s largest oceanarium, among others, pitched for Pier 40 meet community opposition, and are then dropped amid a weak economy. As an interim measure, a huge artificial-turf playing field is created in the pier’s courtyard. Parents and kids love it — and a youth sports mecca is born. Gansevoort Market Historic District is designated. 2006: Christine Quinn becomes the first female and first openly gay City Council speaker. Washington Square renovation plan is approved — fountain to be moved 23 feet east to align with arch. 2008: Bloomberg, with Quinn’s help, engineers the legislative extension of term limits. A plan for a “Vegas on the Hudson” destination-entertainment complex — with Cirque du Soleil and the Tribeca Film Festival — at

Pier 40 sparks opposition. The idea finally sinks after the Hudson River Park Trust won’t extend the pier’s lease term.

’10s

2010: With $1 billion debt, St. Vincent’s Hospital closes. The Villager drops “Koch on Film” column over ongoing dispute over his ticket reimbursements. 2012: City Council O.K.’s N.Y.U. 2031 plan to add 2 million square feet of development to two university-owned South Village superblocks. Community groups sue to stop the project. Study commissioned by youth sports leagues shows residential is most lucrative use with lowest impact for Pier 40. Hudson River Park Trust claims impartiality on the matter. Superstorm Sandy blacks out Downtown Manhattan for several days and inflicts major damage after the E. 14th St. Con Ed plant is flooded. 2013: Koch dies at age 88. C.B. 2 O.K.’s conservancy for Washington Square. Youth leagues’ pitch for luxury high-rise towers near Pier 40 sinks due to lack of political support. State Legislature approves sale of Hudson River Park air rights across the highway. Quinn receives the endorsement of the city’s major daily newspapers in her historic bid for mayor, and is seen as prohibitive favorite. Yet Bill de Blasio, with “tale of two cities” campaign, wins Democratic mayoral primary. Corey Johnson beats Yetta Kurland in a nasty primary to succeed Quinn in the Council. Washington Square renovation’s last phase slated to finish by year’s end.

We are pleased to welcome David B. Samadi, MD Hudson Square Connection congratulates our neighbor,

The Villager

for keeping us “in the know” for the last 80 years

to Lenox Hill Hospital as Chair of the Department of Urology and Chief of Robotic Surgery.

Villager

“you don’t look 80”

Recognized internationally as a pioneer in robotic surgery for prostate cancer, Dr. Samadi brings an innovative approach to the treatment of prostate cancer, prostate health and men’s health at North Shore-LIJ

For Manhattan Youth Bob Townley Manhattan Youth Founder

Learn more about Dr. Samadi and Lenox Hill Prostate Cancer Center. Visit lenoxhillhospital.org/roboticoncology.

Health System’s Lenox Hill Prostate Cancer Center. As part of the health system, Dr. Samadi and his patients have access to our award-winning resources and facilities.

For an appointment, call (212) 365-5000.

www.HudsonSquareBid.com 32

October 17, 2013

485 Madison Avenue, 21st Floor, New York, New York 10022

Downtown Community Center | After-School | Downtown Day Camps Pier 25 | Downtown Basketball League

TheVillager.com

17254g

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

33

File:17254g LH Samadi Ad- THE VILLAGER MANHATTAN 10/3/13 insertion Size: 9.875” x 5.6375”


PHOTO BY JOHN PENLEY

The High Times Soul Assassins Band playing at the “Free the Weed” rally at Washington Square Park in 1989. From left, Abby, Kimona 117 and Steve Hager.

34

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Open 7 Days A Week y Monday thru Wednesda 10am - 9pm urday Thursday, Friday & Sat 10am - 10pm Sunday 12pm - 6pm

FREE TASTING

Congratulations to The Villager Celebrating Phone Orders • (212) 213-0021 80 Years! Online Orders • MortonWilliamsWine.com Mionetto

Belvedere Vodka

49

ay Thursday, Frid & Saturday Evenings

$

750 ml Bottle

Tussock Jumper Malbec

Prosecco Brut

99

9

8

750 ml Bottle • 2011

Svedka Vodka .........................................

21 $1199

$

750 ml Bottle • 2011

Kendall Jackson Chardonnay ................................

99

750 ml Bottle • 2007

Da Vinci Chianti Riserva ....................... 750 ml Bottle • 2011

Layer Cake Malbec .......................................

750 ml Bottle • 2012

Pinot Grigio

6

$ 99

$ 99

1.75 Liter Bottle

Min. $75

Cavit

Mark West

7

MANHATTAN DELIVERY!

$ 99

California Pinot Noir

$ 99

FREE

750 ml Bottle

1.75 Liter Bottle

18 $1299 $

99

750 ml Bottle

999 $2199

Oyster Bay Sauvignon Blanc ........................... 750 ml Bottle

La Crema Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ..................................

313 East 23rd Street • Between First and Second Avenue

$

Sales Valid Friday, October 18 - Thursday, October 24, 2013

How to stay plugged in during a storm. Our outage map keeps our nine million customers in the loop during an emergency. Whether you’re on your computer or your smartphone, visit conEd.com to find the map, report a loss of power and get an estimated restoration time. You can also get storm safety tips and more. Whenever you have a power problem, always let us know. In the meantime, stay connected to Con Edison by giving us your updated contact information at 1-800-75-CONED and by following us on Facebook or Twitter.

CLIENT: conEdison

JOB#: 04856_2PUBLICATION: Bronx Rpt, Times, Bk Cour, Crrb Lfe, AD: AO AE: NM PREV OP: PREV MACHINE: Timothy Cozzi BLEED: SAFETY: DATE: 8/14/13 - 2:30 PM CREATED: 6/27/13 - 6:55 PM FILE NAME: 04856_CON_9p75x5p375_

TheVillager.com STUDIO#: TMC MACHINE: freelance04 TRIM: 9.75 x 5.375 m2a.indd FONTS: Helvetica Neue 75 Bold

October 17, 2013

35


From politicians to punks, people love The Villager!

I love The Villager. I read it online. Even the Pet Set — it’s hilarious.

The Villager is one of our city’s crown jewels. Its hyperlocal news and arts coverage and independent-minded editorials are an antidote to a lot of the homogenized media elsewhere in New York. And where would any of us be without a weekly dose of Scoopy’s? Brad Hoylman State senator, former chairperson of Community Board 2

36

October 17, 2013

Gale Brewer City councilmember, Democratic nominee for Manhattan borough president

The Villager has an especially deep-rooted awareness of our community that helps it tell our local stories right, quickly and well! No newcomer or corporate media can compete with such an indispensable East Village treasure! Many thanks and congratulations on your 80th! Ayo Harrington Community Board 3 member, president of the All the Way East Fourth St. Block Association, co-president Coalition for a District Alternative (CoDA), member of Loisaida United Neighborhood Gardens (LUNGS), former member of the social-justice, a cappella singing group Sweet Honey in the Rock I really love The Villager. And my wife loves it as much as me — she’s always picking it up.   Godlis Legendary punk photographer

The Voice has turned into such a piece of s--- that The Villager is like Hemingway. And Scoopy is a pretty good little gossip column. It’s about real Village people. The Voice started thinking of themselves as a national paper and they lost touch with New York, and The Villager has always been New York.   John Holmstrom Founding editor of Punk magazine, underground cartoonist, writer

TheVillager.com


The Villager is not only an outstanding source of local news coverage, it is also a formidable advocacy tool for local activists. When I needed citywide and national press attention to shame the Parks Department into taking the Tompkins Square Park playground rat problem seriously, my press outreach started with The Vil-

lager. When I wanted to raise funds for a seriously injured local resident, The Villager helped me reach out to the community. To kick off my effort to protect East Village pedestrians from speeding motor vehicles by creating a Slow Zone, I wrote a Villager talking point. And when I needed to communicate to the crusties community that they needed to rein in their unlawful behavior or risk a potential crackdown, The Villager enabled me to send that message, again through a talking point. I could not have succeeded in each of these efforts without the help of The Villager. Chad Marlow (holding $18,000 crowdsourced check for injured florist) Founding member of Tompkins Square Park & Playground Parents’ Association (TSP3A), Community Board 3 member

The Villager has provided substantive, bottom-up, community-based journalism for our communities on the West Side. Who doesn’t open up to Scoopy’s every week to get the latest local flavor on the Lower West Side? I wish everyone on the team a happy 80th birthday and many, many more to come. Congratulations to Jennifer, Lincoln, Scott, Paul, Troy and the rest of the NYC Community Media family. Corey Johnson Community Board 4 chairperson, Democratic nominee for City Council District 3

Best Wishes to our favorite hometown paper in a big city. Mary and Bob Pascale

Thank You Villager!! Judson Memorial Church owes many debts to The Villager for all of its 80 years. You have joined us in the battle to keep the village a village and the city a city. You understand the ravages of gentrification as well as we do. You published my piece on NYU: Too Big Not to Fail." You joined us in the funeral procession (thank you, Lincoln) for Harry Ketoukas when we let his empty rolling cart, decorated with Christmas lights, lead us. You published my embroidered obituary of Harry, one of the last octogenarians with purple hair and sparkling eyes left on our fair streets. In addition to seeing a good story when you see it, you tell us about the people with the cats and the evictions and the great senses of humor. You know how important a chess club is to a block. You did remarkable journalism (in a tough situation where most of the information was hidden or oblique) around the last Washington Square Park Renovation. You know a community leader when you see one and you have made sure everybody knows Doris. Best of all, and I say this as the other "Mom and Pop" Independent book seller, with a Baptist and United Church of Christ franchise behind it, you answer my calls and return my emails. It is good to do business with you.

Donna Schaper Senior Minister Judson Memorial Church

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

37


We won the battle for the square, but now are we BY CAROL GREITZER

W

ell, we’re all getting older. But while some of us gripe with our peers about our ailments, the newest octogenarian, The Villager, keeps going, as sprightly and energetic as ever. For this article, The Villager asked me about cars parked in Washington Square Park. I don’t remember such parking, though, of course I do remember cars driving through the park, and Fifth Ave. double-decker buses using the park as a turnaround. And I particularly remember the night (about 11:45, 1962 or ’63) when Ed Koch and I symbolically pushed the last bus out of the park. Perhaps The Villager has the photo in its archive. I can’t find it, though I know it exists. Getting the buses out of the park was probably the last chapter in the fight to keep the park closed to traffic — a fight whose many battles made the front pages of The Villlager quite often back then. All of which leads me to set the record straight on one aspect of that fight. I’ve noticed lately that people — elected officials included — attribute the leadership to Jane Jacobs. Jane, of course, participated in that effort, as did most activists in the community. But though she was undoubtedly the leader in the fight to keep Robert Moses from designating (and ultimately bulldozing) part of the West Village as a Title I urban renewal area, and though she was the acknowledged leader and inspiration

Step up and support a good cause 10% of Proceeds

Benefit the Fight Against Breast Cancer

38

October 17, 2013

Carol Greitzer, as a city councilmember in the 1970s, in Washington Square Park.

in the campaign to stop the Lower Manhattan Expressway (a.k.a. the Broome St. Expressway,) from being built, she was not the leader in the Washington Square fight. That title indisputably belongs to Shirley Hayes, a park mother who, with Edith Lyons, back in the ’50s organized other mothers and started the loud — and, yes, sometimes strident — protestations about the cars, the fumes, the dan-

gers of allowing cars and buses in the middle of a heavily used park. Once this campaign began to steamroll and look as if it had a chance to succeed, several other people (mostly men) formed their own group so as to present a more “respectable” approach to city officials, in contrast to Shirley’s stridency, which was what aroused their interest in the first place! My goal is to make sure Shirley’s role is not forgotten. She didn’t raise money; you won’t see her name inscribed on some piece of park furniture, but she did something of major impact. Without her leadership and persistence, Washington Square Park would not be the place it is today. At the very least, there should be a plaque recognizing her efforts, like the plaque on the fence at Jackson Square acknowledging the Armani contribution to improvements at that park. In the end, many Village groups united in obtaining park improvements, as chronicled over the years in The Villager’s coverage of park news, right up to the recent Oct. 3, 2013, issue, which featured an article on the park’s new conservancy. Perhaps an authentic history of the park could be compiled from the clips of these 80 years of your coverage. Or would you rather hold out for 100 years? In reflecting on these past events it occurs to me that we’ve evolved, but not necessarily for the better. Back then, with three distinct political forces — an active Republican club, Carmine DeSapio’s Tamawa Club and the emergPARK, continued on p. 39

Heels For Healing™ help stomp out breast cancer with a fruit bouquet featuring heel-shaped pineapple dipped in pink chocolate

212-571-7555 143 Duane Street | New York, NY 10013

212-982-7200 100 St. Marks Place (8th St.) | New York, NY 10009

EdibleArrangements.com In the United States; during the month of October 2013, 10% of the purchase price from our breast cancer products will be donated to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. (“NBCF”). NBCF uses the proceeds to save lives by increasing awareness of breast cancer through education and by providing funding for free mammograms for needy women. NBCF is at 2600 Network Blvd., Ste. 300, Frisco, TX 75034 or online at www.nbcf.org <http://www.nbcf. org> . This charitable sales promotion is being conducted by Edible Arrangements International, LLC, 95 Barnes Rd., Wallingford, CT 06492. Edible Arrangements is not compensated for conducting this promotion. No portion of the purchase price is tax deductible. HEELS FOR HEALING™ and MAKE LIFE A LITTLE SWEETER™ are trademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. © 2013 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All rights reserved. NATIONAL BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION, INC. and BREAST CANCER SOCIETY OF CANADA are trademarks of their respective owners.

TheVillager.com


at risk of losing it again? PARK, continued from p. 38

ing Village Independent Democrats — we managed to get together, albeit heatedly, on community issues. Now, there are four women, well-intentioned though they may be, who appear to be in charge of the park, working officially with a park employee. A major problem with conservancies is that there are no ground rules. Conservancies pop up suddenly, but with some connection to the Parks Department commissioner; they are said not to be really in charge — yet they have a status denied to other park users. There are hundreds, even thousands of people who feel passionately about this park, but now are confused about their role and the conservancy role. If there’s a problem, who does one go to? The conservancy? The community board? The Parks Department? Our elected officials? It doesn’t have to be this way. Other cities enjoy a closer relationship between the public and park managers. Many cities have monthly meetings where people can tell park officials how they feel. Baltimore has a public advisory council; Minneapolis has direct election of park commissioners;

Chicago is currently querying citizens as to what they like and don’t like about their parks and how they want park funds to be spent. Chicago, incidentally, pays for parks in a unique way, one we might learn from. There is a Chicago Park District, an independent taxing authority that raises money exclusively for parks. Chicago is said to spend more per capita on parks than any other city in this country. New York City, by contrast, spends less than one half of 1 percent of the budget on parks, even while acquiring more acreage to manage. Bill de Blasio, who seems likely to become our next mayor, has said that he wants to empower individuals and to involve communities. The Villager can celebrate the start of its ninth decade by asking our next mayor whether he might implement these and similar ideas to give all park users more of a say about their parks. So happy birthday! Let’s blow out the candles and make a wish. Greitzer was a New York City councilmember from 1969-91, representing the Village and other Downtown areas. Prior to that she was the Village’s Democratic district co-leader with Ed Koch.

Hey Villager! Congrats on turning 80! When it comes to community news, you know how to get to the MEAT of the matter.

O. OTTOMANELLI & SONS PRIME MEAT MARKET OF GREENWICH VILLAGE

CoNgrAtulAtIoNs to thE VIllAgEr oN turNINg 80!

THE HEART AND SOUL OF GREENWICH VILLAGE HOSPITALITY SINCE 1902 103 Waverly Place, New York, NY 10011 212-777-9515 www.washingtonsquarehotel.com

Congratulations to our Hometown Newspaper

THE VILLAGER For 80 Years of Excellent Community Coverage

Crown roasts of Lamb or Pork Fresh: Turkey • Duck • Pheasant Capon • Squab • Goose • Quail • Wild Turkey • Rabbit • Suckling Pig • Fresh Ham • Smoked Turkey • Filet Mignon • Spiral Cut Ham • Smithfield Hams • – Oven Ready Prime Rib Roasts – It’s a real pleasure at this holiday time to say “thank you” as we wish you a full year of happiness and success.

Other people may promise. We at O. Ottomanelli & Sons meat your demand.

O. OTTOMANELLI & SONS NEW YORK’S FAMILY MEAT MARKET 212-675-4217

285 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10014 TheVillager.com

Washington Square Square Association, Inc. Association, Inc. a civic organization since 1906 a civic organization 1906 For membership or othersince information Please call (212) 677-6783 www.washingtonnyc.org

For membership or other information Please call (212) 677-6783 October 17, 2013

39


Tried to make a go of running paper, but it was tough By ROyCE ROwE

I

guess I can take credit, or blame, for saving The Villager from extinction. I bought the paper in about 1973 or 1974 from owners Ed McDougall and Jack Raymond. Ed was an executive at the American Banker magazine, and Jack was a former New York Times reporter who had gone into public relations. They had bought The Villager in about 1970, and found they couldn’t devote enough time or money to make it a success. I had been urged to buy the paper by a friend who worked

for the Dow Jones News Service while I worked for the Wall Street Journal. By this time I had gone to work at WNBC-TV, and was the producer of weekend news programs. Working weekends at NBC left me free to work at The Villager on Mondays and Tuesdays. After I had made a deal with McDougall and Raymond, my potential partner backed out. I foolishly went ahead, however, hoping to find other partners, and also hoping to find people so filled with community spirit that they would help put out a useful neighborhood weekly for little or no monetary compensation. By far the biggest “volunteer” was William Bowser, who later became

congratulazioni per il tuo 80th!

HOW S RS! W A E E Y

HAVE A HAPPY & S AFE COLUMBU DAY! congratulations on your S80th!

IS!! IT

EIGH TY

ET

H 4T W. 172

CHOCOLATES HAND DIPPED DAILY

S

TR EE T( BET W

) EEN 6TH & 7TH AVE.

40

October 17, 2013

W NE

K, NY 100 14

L

R YO

well-known for creating the garden across from St. Vincent’s Hospital where the old Loew’s Sheridan Theater had stood. Bill wrote an enormous number of well-informed pieces under his own name, and a series of pieces about neighborhood history under the pseudonym William Patton. On the business side, a young lady, Francene Turken, worked diligently selling advertising, receiving only a small commission. I was able to pay a small, but regular wage to Miriam Bockman, who took charge of advertising and production. We were able to breathe enough life into the paper to increase the pages, but at considerable expense. We were never successful in attracting large advertisers like supermarkets, which could buy one or two full pages a week. We did get an occasional full page from Greenwich Savings Bank. The Villager was becoming an editorial success, but remained a business failure. At some point I sold the paper outright to Martin Shaer, a real estate broker who managed some sizeable apartment buildings on Hudson St. Marty made a good effort, but couldn’t make a go of it either, and after about a year defaulted on the debt he owed me, and said I could take the paper back. I still needed a partner, so offered Marty 20 percent of a restructured ownership, and sought other partners who could put in new money, including Jack Meserole, a book designer who lived on 11th St., and Tom Barbour, an actor who lived on Perry St. We struggled on for another year, but still couldn’t stem the losses. So we sold the paper to Michael Armstrong, who seemed to have made a success of a community paper he had started in Brooklyn in 1972. He brought new energy to the paper, but ran into serious problems, as I did.

TheVillager.com


MAKE 8th STREET YOUR

HALLOWEEN

HEADQUARTERS!

ONLY IN THE VILLAGE WILLYOU FIND YOUR ALTER EGO 8th STREET GIFTS

46 W 8th St

DA VINCI SHOES

37 W 8th St

GOODWILL THRIFT SHOP

BROOKLYN LIBRARY ARCHIVES / PHOTO BY BILL BIGGART

Mayor Ed Koch gave the thumbs-up at a Gay Pride March in the 1980s. Koch, who died in February at 88, got his political start with the Village Independent Democrats, beating Tammany boss Carmine de Sapio to become Democratic district leader. Koch then served two terms in Congress, followed by three terms as New York’s outspoken mayor. After leaving office, he continued to live in the Village. Donning another cap, he contributed his weekly “Koch on Film” reviews to The Villager.

ECONOMY BEST VISION & HEARING We Want You To See Clearly Now! serving the community since 1958

K TO BAC OL O H SC IALS C E SP

Includes full comprehensive eye exam & fittings for contact lenses

SEN DISC IOR O AVA UNTS ILAB LE

212-243-4884

www.visionandhearing.net

223 West 14th (between 7th and 8th Aves.) New York, NY 10011

TheVillager.com

MIND BOGGLER

43 W 8th St

MONK THRIFT SHOP

175 Macdougal St

MOUNTAIN SIDE CRAFTS

51 West 8th St

RICKY’S

44 E 8th St

SEARCH & DESTROY

25 St Marks Pl

TRASH AND VAUDEVILLE

4 St Marks Pl

UNCLE SAM’S ARMY NAVY

37 W 8th St

VILLAGE PARTY STORE

13 E 8th St

& dozens of other fun and funky boutiques on 8th Street and St. Marks Place.

OPTOMETRIST ON PREMISES Wednesdays from 11 - 6 pm Starting on September 18th

46 W 8th St

PLAN YOUR HALLOWEEN SHOPPING SPREE!

VISIT VILLAGEALLIANCE.ORG TO SEARCH OUR DIRECTORY OF SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS. October 17, 2013

41


7_7_05

7/7/05

14:13

NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

Villager ad

Page 1

In October 1934, men — hopefully with jobs — relaxed on benches around Union Square’s Independence Flagpole.

WE’VE GOT THE CORNER ON THE MEAT MARKET

AND VILLAGER, FOR 80 YEARS YOU’VE HAD OUR BACKS!

LOCATED IN THE HISTORIC GANSEVOORT MEAT MARKET 859 Washington St. (Corner of W13th St.) • 212 929- 0655

NOW OPEN IN DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS, 201 NORTH 3rd St. 42

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

Circa 1912, kids were competing in potato races in Tompkins Square Park. in the 1980s, potato races had been replaced by the pitched tents of a sprawling Tent City for the homeless.

GARBER HARDWARE Villager... you

nailed it for 80 years! Keep on hammering for another 80 years!

Garber Hardware has been serving the West Village

and Manhattan since my grandfather’s grandfather opened our store in 1884. My family continues to take pride in our long standing commitment to our neighborhood and its residents, as well as the myriad other customers from around the world that have found their way to our uniquely wonderful store. Anyone can tell you that “Garber’s has everything,” but you should really come down for a visit and see for yourself!

-Nathaniel Garber

PHOTO BY JOHN PENLEY

TheVillager.com

710 Greenwich Street • 212-929-3030 • www.garberhardware.com

October 17, 2013

43


PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

2013/14 Season Family Series

Cover illustrator Caswell kept ‘close to the ground’ By Suzan Mazur

Sun., Oct 27, 2013 at 1:30 PM, $25 Lock up your lettuce! Protect your parsley! Rescue your rutabaga! A floppy-eared bunny with mysterious habits is staking out its place in Theatreworks USA’s spine-tingling new musical co-written by Tony-nominated playwright Charles Busch and based on the best-selling books by James & Deborah Howe. Ages 5 & Up 199 Chambers St. NYC 10007 | Phone: 212.220.1460

www.tribecapac.org Ryan-NENA Community Health Center RIGHT IN THE LOWER EAST SIDE www.ryancenter.org

Accepted Health Plans:

Comprehensive Services:

• Medicaid/Medicare • Adult Medicine • Child Health Plus • Pediatrics • Family Health Plus • Women’s Health • Family Planning Benefit Program • Dental Services • HealthPlus-Amerigroup • HIV Care • HealthFirst • Mental Health • Fidelis • Eye Care • MetroPlus • WellCare • Specialties • Affinity • Cancer Screening Services • Neighborhood Health Providers • WIC Program • ADAP If you are UNINSURED we offer: • 1199/SEIU Assistance enrolling in health • Cigna insurance or • HIP Affordable sliding fee scale • Aetna and low cost pharmacy plan And more...

“Health Care is a rig ht, not a privilege.” 279 East 3rd Street New York, NY 10009 (212) 477-8500 A satellite of the William F. Ryan Community Health Center

44

October 17, 2013

“It was an ant with a crumb twice its size in its jaws slowly making its way over the twigs. It occurred to me that if I was that little ant, the shrubbery would look like a great forest, and so with my face close to the ground, I tried to view the scene as my minute energetic acquaintance was observing it. In a moment the twigs became great fallen trunks, the dried spruce shrubs turned to gigantic trees with twisted branches and I was looking into a forest out of the depths of which a band of Nibelungs laden with gold and silver treasure, and even Wotan himself, might have come.” Edward C. Caswell, “Artist Draws the Narrowest City Dwelling,” The Villager (1933) Before the West Village became one of America’s financially richest zip codes, a neighborhood of noisy outdoor eateries, Madison Ave. shops and streets cordoned off by TV crews, it was a quiet place to live, a culturally rich community, one that Edward C. Caswell (1879-1963) delightfully illustrated for decades. Throughout the 1930s and ’40s, Caswell’s drawings appeared regularly on The Villager’s front page. It was in the bound volumes of old issues at The Villager’s Canal St. office where, last year, I had my first glimpse of the range of Caswell’s fascinations. Caswell wrote an occasional column for the paper as well. And he was a book illustrator, traveling to Europe in the 1920s, capturing Florence, Amsterdam and Budapest with pencil and pen and ink. I was intrigued when some of these illustrations popped up in the local flea market. My favorite are the artist’s portraits of the West Village streets, of the interiors and exteriors of the homes of its residents, like poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, who lived in New York’s narrowest house, a Dutch house — once “a maltster’s, a cobbler’s and a candy factory.” There is scant information about Caswell’s life. Why? I wondered. Looking through the microfilm at N.Y.U.’s Bobst Library for his many covers of The Villager, it was clear to me that Caswell’s drawings were personal. He put his “face close to the ground,” knew the people, the art clubs and studios, the lanes and gardens he drew. In 2006, Peter Duveen organized a show of the artist’s life and work at the Museum of Brooklyn Art and Culture in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Duveen noted that Caswell’s career “embraced newspaper work, advertising art and book illustration.” He told me Caswell started out at a studio in the Ovington Building on Fulton St. before moving to the Chelsea Hotel in the 1930s.

Duveen also said Caswell helped establish the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibition. The Villager, in fact, features Caswell’s drawing of the outdoor art exhibition on its May 4, 1933, front page with an accompanying story saying that it was the show’s third year, and that it was the first such event of its type in America. It was the Depression and the article notes the umbrella organizing group was the Artists’ Aid Committee. Five hundred artists displayed their work to 20,000 visitors. Duveen asked if I’d be on the lookout in the Bobst microfilm for Caswell images of Bank St. where Duveen grew up — near the townhouse of “Auntie Mame,” i.e., Mrs. Tanner, playwright Patrick Dennis’s real aunt who lived at 72 Bank and inspired the character. Unfortunately, I could find no Auntie Mame in the Caswell trove.

A self-portrait by Edward C. Caswell.

Caswell wrote of the struggle of Edna St. Vincent Millay, whose house was on Bedford and Commerce Sts. near the Cherry Lane Theatre, to have the city rename Commerce St. “Cherry Lane.” The city refused. Caswell also mentions in his column that actor John Barrymore once lived in the little Dutch house, and that Millay wrote her opera with Deems Taylor, “The King’s Henchman,” in the top-floor studio. When Caswell visited in the 1930s, the 8-foot-wide house was home to Mrs. Robert W. Lewis. He wrote that it was decorated with “rich and mellow” antique mahogany furniture and near the fireplace was a Victorian chair that “[G] randfather Lewis took around the Horn during the gold rush of 1850.” New York’s narrowest house bears a red plaque with the dates Millay lived there (1923-24) and her famous quote, “My candle burns at both ends.” Across the street is 81 Bedford St. where late C.I.A. Director Richard Helms conducted his MKULTRA mind control experiments (no red plaque there).

TheVillager.com


Caswell’s drawing of Jefferson market Courthouse, from The Villager’s august 1933 front page.

Taking over The Villager was a dream come true for us both By ELiZaBETH maRGaRiTiS BuTSON

W

hen The Villager was founded in 1933, during the Great Depression, it promised to be an independent voice in the community. The Villager has an impressive track record. It is well and alive and winning top journalism awards. The past 50 years have been challenging to the newspaper business. Many famous newspapers have disappeared and others through unavoidable mergers lost their independence. The Villager also had its share of ups and downs. After a strong run for 20 years, the Williamson family sold its interest in The Villager. Some rocky years followed. In 1992, Tom and I were asked to take over The Villager. I was the publisher and Tom was the editor. This was a labor of love for us. Tom had already been diagnosed with cancer and we had both opted for early retirement. Taking over The Villager was hardly a retirement project. It was a journalist’s dream come true. It gives me great pleasure to see The Villager grow and continue its excellent coverage of events in our community. There is no other community in the city that has so much going on, all the time! Politics, education, music, innovative theater and dance, local sports, community gar-

TheVillager.com

dens, great restaurants — it all happens right here. And yes, there are more opinions per square inch in the Village than any other place in the world. The Villager covElizabeth margaritis Butson. ers it all with a strong, independent and balanced voice. Its commitment to high journalistic standards is recognized. Every year, The Villager receives prestigious editorial awards from the New York Press Association in a statewide competition that covers more than 200 papers. My warmest congratulations to its new publisher, Jenn Goodstein, for this very special 80th birthday. And my heartfelt thanks to the small, enthusiastic core group that helped us relaunch The Villager, starting in 1992. Thank you, Michael Haberman, Lincoln Anderson, Josh Rogers, Claude Solnik, Al Amateau, Traci Kampel, Ed Lewis, Doris Diether, Loren Granville and Colin Gregory. You are the best.

   

Congratulations  to   The  Village   For  80  years  of  service  to   The  Greenwich  Village   Community.   Parishioners  and  Staff   Shrine  Church  of  St.  Anthony   of  Padua   West  Houston  and  Sullivan  St.            New  York  NY  

Congratulations to the Villager on your 80th!

felicitações! complimenti! pagbati!

Our Lady of Pompeii REV. WALTER TONELOTTO 25 CARMINE & BLEECKER STS., GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY 212-989-6805 Scalabrini Fathers and Brothers at the service of American, Italian, Filipino and Brazilian Communities. Catholic Elementary School staffed by the Apostles of the Sacred Heart. www.ourladyofpompeiinyc.com • contact@ourladyofpompeiinyc.com Join us on Facebook and twitter: "ourladyofpompeii"

October 17, 2013

45


BROOKLYN COLLEGE LIBRARY ARCHIVES / PHOTO BY BETSY HERZOG

Riot police faced off with squatters and anarchist protesters in Tompkins Square in the 1980s. The protesters demanded that the sprawling Tent City in the park remain until the city housed the homeless. There were frequent clashes with police, the biggest being the 1988 riot over a curfew for the park. under mayor Dinkins the Tent City was evicted and the park closed for renovations.

HAUNTED HIGH LINE HALLOWEEN Saturday, October 26 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM On the High Line, Between West 13th and West 18th Streets Come in costume for a free day of family-friendly fun celebrating the High Line’s spooky past. Treats · Face Painting Live Music · Spooky Characters Haunted Trains · Much More! MetLife Foundation is a Supporting Sponsor of High Line Kids.

46

October 17, 2013

www.thehighline.org

Hip Hip Hooray!!! Villager, you don’t look a day over 79 !!! Still going Strong!!! Showing all EPL & Euro Football as well as all NFL & US Sporting Events. Giant 8-Foot Screen!

304 Bowery, New York • (212) 253-7030 • www.slaintenyc.com

Peter McManus Cafe Bar & Grill

The McManus Family Tradition (Est. 1911)

Yankees did it, Mets did it, Serena did it,

Villager you keep on doing it!!!

Serving Fine Food & Drinks For Four Generations * Lunch and Late Night Dinners *

152 Seventh Avenue (at 19th Street, NW Corner) • 212-929-9691

TheVillager.com


24 /7 Op en

Congratulations to The Villager on 80 years of service.

We are also proud to serve the LGBT community.

Quality urgent care in a New York minute

NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

212.962.6600

www.emcny.com

Downtown: 200 Chambers St, NYC Midtown: 521 West 42nd St, NYC

a man waits for a customer at his union Square shoeshine stand in 1934.

L IKE

C O L UMBUS , D IS C OVER Famous Dylan Thomas Watering Hole

White horse Tavern 567 Hudson St. NYC * 243-9260

Don’t get locked out...

The Villager W HY W E A RE & O NE OF Colin THE Cowboy aren't out to the pasture yet!

read The Villager for another 80 years!

Keep on riding THE V I LLA GE ! another 80 Years!

Monday -Friday 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

B EST B A RS

H A VE

A H A PPY

IN

A ND S A FE ONE

!

DOWNTOWN MUSIC PRODUCTIONS mimi stern-wolfe, artistic director

Christ & St. Stephens Church 120 West 69 St. SUNDAY NOVEMBER 3, 2013 3PM

The Battle of the Breast: Survivors of the BIG - Music -

- Poetry -

“C”

Suggested Donation: $ 20, $ 15, $12 (Seniors, Students, Unemployed) Information: dmpmimi@verizon.net 212 477 1594 TheVillager.com

Safes Opened & Repaired • Combination Changes Electronic Safes • Burglar & Fire Safes Specialists In Electronic & Mechanical Security Systems Master Key Systems For Entire Building Designed & Maintained Architectural Hardware • Panic Exit Hardware Bell & Buzzer, Electric Door Opener Systems Card Access Control Systems • Push Button Combo Locks Fire Exit Locks & Alarms • Mortise Locks Dead Bolt Locks • High-Security Lock Cylinders Pick-Proof Locks • Keys Made While You Wait

56 7th Ave S, New York, NY 10014 (212) 645-2858 www.greenwichlocksmiths.com October 17, 2013

47


Inside the infamous House of D: Where today a lush BY Reed Ide

M

ost people living in Greenwich Village have no idea that just a few short decades ago a 12-story fortress-like prison for women dominated the skyline and the ambience of the neighborhood’s heart. Massive in its architecture, the prison controlled the street life around it. Women in their cells would sit near their barred windows and call down to their husbands, boyfriends or pimps on the sidewalks below. The language was always loud, often angry and colorful. Depending on their point of view, and the proximity of their apartments to the prison, residents either found this an enormous public entertainment or an equally large public nuisance. The building served as a women’s prison from 1932 until it was closed in 1971. Forty years ago this month, Mayor John Lindsay appeared at the spot where W. 10th St., Greenwich Ave., Christopher St. and Sixth Ave. all converge. On that brisk October Tuesday in 1973, wielding a sledgehammer, he struck a fateful and fatal blow to the infamous Women’s House of Detention. By the spring of the following year the building was

48

October 17, 2013

This photo from 1938 shows how the Women’s House of Detention once towered over the intersection of Greenwich and Sixth Aves., which also featured the Sixth Ave. El.

but a memory. A colorful, often disturbing era passed into the history books, where, as much of the minutiae of the past, it lies, for the most part forgotten. It was, however, one

of the more important events in the shaping of our contemporary Village streetscape. The building’s demise did not come easily. In the months before Lindsay’s swing of the hammer, Greenwich Village was in a bit of an uproar over its fate. The great majority of people were squarely in favor of demolition. But a vocal minority persisted in keeping the debate alive as they struggled to save the building for conversion to senior citizen housing. Hearings before the Landmarks Commission and the city’s Board of Estimate, and the Village’s own Community Board 2 took on circus-like atmospheres as irate citizens opposed to demolition shouted their way to publicity, venting their anger in ways that often led to removal and even arrests. As editor of The Villager, I watched it all unfold, and wrote about most of it. A few weeks ago, I sat in the Jefferson Market Garden that occupies the site of the old House of Detention. It was the day before the equinox. The sun was bright overhead; the thermometer hovered around 80. From my bench next to the rose garden I looked across the central lawn to the small greenhouse. Just beyond that, in my mind’s eye, I could see the short alley that led to the prison’s side entrance. In my memory’s ear, I could hear Lucille Chasin, telling the city’s Landmarks Commission that the building is, “part of the cityscape, not a weed to be removed from a garden at the whim of ladies in sneakers.” I could hear Dorothy Ryan: “It would seem that the ‘haves’ of Greenwich Village continuously dictate to the ‘have-nots’ what they should not have! … This building can be put to good use for desperately needed facilities for our senior citizens” Sitting there, I remembered another sunny

warm day at summer’s end in 1973. It was late in the afternoon, the Friday of Labor Day weekend. I was walking home from the Villager office. As I passed that short side entrance alley by the prison, I noticed that the chain-link gate was open. A car was parked in the alley. The side door was open. I walked in, and with no one to stop me I entered the abandoned prison. Whoever belonged to the parked car was nowhere in sight. A row of office rooms stretched across the front of the building. In one, intake records were strewn on the floor. I picked one up. A young woman of 27. Divorced. Two children. Attempted suicide. “Very composed,” wrote the psychologist in the space for his remarks. “States she will return to prostitution for it’s the only way she knows to make money in the amount she wants.” Fragments of other human beings lay there on the dusty floor of the deserted detention house. “Tense, angry, feels unjustly arrested … frightened about being called down to diagnostic … inflicted cuts on her wrists on two occasions … charged with felonious assault over fight with her girlfriend.” The awesome oppression and hostility, still palpable in the building, startled me. On the second floor, at the end of a long dark corridor, I found the prison chapel, its heavy velvet drapes masking the reality of the barred windows. Scraps of hymnbooks littered the floor. Near them, a paperbound book of the prophet Isaiah, opened to Chapter 43. Underlined in red were the words, “Fear not for I have redeemed thee. I have called you by name; you are mine.” On the third floor was the laundry room. Ironing boards lined one entire wall, while great huge washing machines and large pressers occupied the rest of the room. On upper floors, the cells were still furnished. They measured just 4 feet by 8 feet. As conditions worsened, many cells were used to house two women. Those contained their bunk beds, mute testimony to the manner in which the city treated persons awaiting trial, not yet convicted of any crime. Another floor revealed the kitchen with its great gas stoves and three walk-in refrigerators. Administrative memoranda lined the corridors of floors. “All inmates admitted with head or body lice are to receive their first treatment in the receiving room.” … “Effective August 1, 1970 any inmate receiving an infraction will automatically lose her commissary privileges.” Small wooden tables and mirrors in one room told of the beauty salon it once was. An X-ray table still stood in one upper-floor room, and dentist chairs and chemistry lab equipment quietly disintegrated in others. In one room, 10 or more file cabinets stood, unlocked, open to anyone (like myself) who HOUSE OF D, continued on p. 49

TheVillager.com


garden blooms, a sad women’s prison once loomed HOUSE OF D, continued from p. 48

TheVillager.com

An overhead view of the Jefferson Market Garden, which was created on the site of the former House of Detention.

They suffered. They failed. And sometimes they triumphed. Always, they had — somewhere inside them — hope. For me, this wonderful space today remembers those women by being a garden of hope.

PHOTO BY BILLY THOMAS, COURTESY NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

happened by. Abandoned, they contained the detailed records of women incarcerated there, who — let us remember — were not yet convicted of any crime. Intimate details of their lives — unprotected, unrespected, just left behind as collateral damage in the slow death of the building. On the top floor of the House of Detention were rooms used for recreation, and off those rooms were four rooftop terraces, also for recreation. But even in recreation the inmates were unable to escape the excruciating regimentation of prison life. A sign hung on the wall of one of the rooms: “Attention ladies. Slow records will be played if you do not dance. Dancing will end slow records.” With my handful of administrative memoranda, religious booklets, inmate records and other materials I had found, I made my way from the roof to the ground floor. I was eager for sunshine, fresh air and freedom. But the Women’s House of Detention had one more thing to show me. I arrived on the first floor and headed toward the side entrance door. I arrived there to discover, much to my horror, that the heavy metal door was closed – and LOCKED! I was alone inside the prison fortress. All these years later, I remember thinking, “Rats.” Not as in, Damn it all I’m in a mess now. But rather as in furry creatures that would nibble at my fingers if I were to spend the night in this horrible place. Checking the two main doors to the outside proved futile. I went from office to office on the Greenwich Ave. side of the building. Each of them had a window. But each window had a mesh cage bolted to the outside of the window frame to contain individual air conditioners. It was well past 5 p.m. Today, I can still conjure up those first rumblings of panic. The shadows seemed to grow. The air became more chill. Those rats became more real! The reader might well ask at this point, “Why didn’t you simply raise the window and shout to a pedestrian to flag down a police car, or call the police?” All these years later I lack the definitive answer to that question. The truth, I believe, comes in two parts. First, at the age of 25, I think I absolutely dreaded having the story circulated around Greenwich Village that the youthful, yea even callow, editor of The Villager had so foolishly entered that building without telling a single soul what he was doing — had not even put a note on the windshield of the car parked by the side entrance! The embarrassment, I am sure, would have seemed too much to bear at the time. Second, I may well have not wanted to have anyone, especially anyone official, know I was removing material from the prison. I was indeed taking out individual

records of former inmates. And I was removing administrative material and professional evaluations as well. Abandoned property? Perhaps. Perhaps not. During my walk through the building I had already begun to structure an article for the newspaper (an article I actually did write and publish the following week), and that article depended on the materials I had gathered. At any rate, I continued, in my callow way, what must seem a Quixotic quest. I returned to the offices and opened a window in one of them to see how the mesh cage was attached to the building. Firmly bolted. I looked at several more, until I came upon one that was extensively rusted on the bottom. Alas, a workshop was not at hand. No pliers, no hacksaws were in evidence. Somewhere on that floor, I did manage to find a short length of pipe. I returned to the rusted cage. Using the pipe, I pounded and pried at the mesh, which slowly gave way to my efforts. I was able to break through enough to begin to roll back the mesh, creating a small opening in the bottom of the cage. Hope is made from such moments! I have no idea today how long I worked thus. I remember it as interminable. Visions of those rats were my constant motivation. There did come a moment, finally, when I believed I had created a large enough opening in the bottom of the cage to be able to lower myself through. And then, good reader, what do you think I did? I called out to a passerby! Man? Woman? I don’t remember. A startled person for sure. I handed them the papers I had collected and then lowered myself through the bottom of the cage, reached for the scaffolding pipe in front of me, and jumped to the ground. The back of my shirt tore on the ragged cage, and my back was scratched in a few places. But I was otherwise unharmed. And free! Shaken, but free. Across 10th St. two men, Don Taylor and Bob McGrath, owned the Patchin Place Emporium. They were friends of the newspaper, two people I could confide in who would not tell my story like town criers. I made my way to their shop. They got me cleaned up and even sewed up the long tear in my shirt. They lived upstairs from the shop and had also created a wonderful rooftop deck and garden. Better yet, I am happy to say they were both great believers in the healing power of gin. They closed the shop, and took gin bottle, tonic and ice bucket to the roof. There my holiday weekend got its proper beginning. Today, whenever I walk past or in the Jefferson Market Garden, I think of what once was there. I know that most people see only a beautiful oasis there. All the women imprisoned behind those bars during the 40-year life of the building experienced brokenness, despair, folly and desperation in their lives.

Ide was editor of The Villager in 1973 and 1974. He now enjoys a lakeside retirement in Massachusetts where he continues to write travel articles, and is a substitute teacher in local schools.

October 17, 2013

49


SIGHTS

OF THE

SEASON Fall Foliage Cruise

Experience the splendor of the season with lots of local flavor! Hornblower, City Winery and Jacques Torres Chocolate are coming together to host a relaxing tour of the beautiful fall foliage along the Hudson River. Be treated to stunning views, fall-inspired cuisine and tasty treats from our partners aboard the Hornblower Hybrid.

FEATURING Exclusive on-board wine tastings from City Winery

Delightfully delicious chocolate samplings from Jacques Torres Chocolate

DETAILS Date: Oct. 26 & Nov. 2, 2013 Leaves from New York Pier 40, 353 West Street Boarding time: 10:30 AM Price: $159.00 per person *Tax, service charge and landing fee additional

For tickets call 212-366-4465 or visit info.hornblower.com/fall or email: hybrid@hornblower.com Š NY-6905-10/12

50

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Go Ape, with Karloff, Lugosi and Lon Chaney, Jr. The good, the bad, the downright hairy: 1932-1954 BY TRAV S.D. (travsd.wordpress.com)

Yes, It’s “based on the Poe story” but, on the other hand, no, not really. The only thing the film shares in common with the original story is the event of a body being stuffed up a chimney by an ape. The movie version concerns Bela Lugosi as one “Dr. Mirakle,” who appalls the people of Paris by exhibiting a “gorilla” — which is alternately portrayed by an actual chimpanzee and a guy in a gorilla suit, often in different angles during the same scene. Even worse, Dr. Mirakle preaches the heinous doctrine of evolution! And did you notice how he happens to resemble an ape? Worse than all of this, he is performing an evil experiment, kidnapping maidens and injecting them with ape blood, which kills them. Then he very shockingly dumps them into the river. The crimes are eventually solved by a medical student with a microscope. The next victim, in an amazing coincidence, was to have been his girlfriend. The movie is as beautiful to look at as the other Uni-

TheVillager.com

IMAGE COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX

MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE (1932)

IMAGE COURTESY OF MONOGRAM PICTURES CORP.

I

f you’re at all like me, this Halloween season you’ll be asking the question: What are the best ape-related classic studio era horror films for me to watch, not including “King Kong” or its sequels “Son of Kong” and “Mighty Joe Young” — which are GIANT ape movies, a different species of horror film altogether? Not to worry! I got your answer right here!

Comedy, mystery and an all-star cast jazz up this 1939 dark house parody.

This 1940 low-grade cheapie is Boris Karloff’s low-water mark.

disguises himself as an ape — the better to kill people and take their spinal fluid in order to create a cure for “paralysis.” Oh, there is a set-up. He has been working on this cure for 25 years, after failing to cure his own wife. Now he lives THE GORILLA (1939) next door to a young girl he would like This one is more of a comedy/horror to cure. And an ape has conveniently esfilm/murder mystery. Seems largely a caped from a nearby circus. Karloff kills parody of the old dark house mystery, him and apparently makes a costume of “The Bat.” The all-star cast features the  its dead body. Anything for science! Just Ritz Brothers (as detectives), Bela Lu- generally tedious and bad.  gosi, Patsy Kelly (as a perpetually fretting maid) and the omnipresent Lionel THE APE MAN (1943) Atwill. And a guy in a gorilla suit.

versal horror films of the time, if you can forgive the absolutely daffy element of how the ape itself is represented.

 

THE APE (1940) A low-grade cheapie — one of the very few times that Boris Karloff sank as low as Lugosi was capable of falling. In this one, Karloff plays a doctor who

Directed by the wonderful William Beaudine, this is merely the penultimate level of badness — Ed Wood being the gold standard. We begin in medias res: a sister (who happens to be a ghost hunter) finds her long missing brother (Bela Lugosi), whose research has caused him

to become an ape creature. He is now searching for the antidote. We next proceed to watch the half-man/half-ape Lugosi, who, with the aid of a supernaturally well-behaved full ape assistant, must steal the “spinal fluid” from still living victims for his antidote — a process fatal to the victim. The other characters are the requisite policemen and reporters, Lugosi’s colleague and his wife. The movie is surprisingly dull for such a delicious set-up. And, truth to tell, what would be so bad about being a half-man/halfape, anyway? So bad you’d kill for the antidote? Why not just come out in the open, gaining fame for your discovery in the process, and get the entire scientific community to work on the antidote while you accept lucrative banana endorsements? Ah, but this is the world of fantasy. There is also a funny coda. This APES, continued on p.52

October 17, 2013

51


The Golden Age of Ape-Related Horror Films APES, continued from p.51

BELA LUGOSI MEETS A BROOKLYN GORILLA (1952)

mysterious man who periodically pops up through the story tells us in the end, that he is the screenwriter!

RETURN OF THE APE MAN (1944)

Despite the unprepossessing title, which we used to make fun of when we were kids, this is, I have to say, objectively the BEST of all the ape horror movies. It was written and directed by Curt Siodmak, who wrote the classic “The Wolf Man” and numerous other major horror titles. It’s a pretty solid story; only the ti-

IMAGE COURTESY OF REALART PICTURES, INC.

BRIDE OF THE GORILLA (1952)

IMAGE COURTESY OF MONOGRAM PICTURES CORP.

Was the first one such a smash hit they needed a sequel? This movie has nothing to do with the original, however. Bela Lugosi and John Carradine are scientists working on the problem of suspended animation. They get it to work on a homeless man they have frozen. Realizing that it works, they launch an arctic expedition to find intact frozen cavemen — and, astoundingly, they find one! They bring the caveman back to the lab and thaw him out. But the caveman can’t talk to relay what he knows. Lugosi decides to transplant part of a modern brain into his head. Carradine refuses to participate — it will be murder to do so. Lugosi tricks him (with an electric floor plate that paralyzes him but somehow allows him to talk) and takes his brain. The caveman runs amok in the city and commits some murders. Authorities chase him back to lab. Caveman kills Lugosi, but then dies in fire. He should have stayed in bed!

Despite its convoluted plot, this 1943 film spawned a sequel the following year: “Return of the Ape Man.”

This 1952 stinker put the brakes on the celluloid presence of comedy team Mitchell & Petrillo (NOT to be confused with Martin & Lewis).

tle is unfortunate. Siodmak’s original title was “The Face in the Water” — which is unmemorable, but at least doesn’t cheapen the story. The same sexual themes at the back of most horror films (nearly all of them, now that I think of it) are foregrounded in this film. Raymond Burr  is a fairly brutish plantation overseer in South America. He bemoans the fact that he doesn’t have slaves to do his work. He is indifferent to the death of one of his workers. He knocks up a native girl and ignores the situation. Then he kills the boss so he can take his wife. The mother of the pregnant girl puts a spell on him

to turn him into a creature, the titular gorilla. Much like Jekyll & Hyde or The Wolfman, he begins to transform, and he keeps hearing “the call of the wild.” By the end of the film, he is ready to abandon his bride and take to the jungle completely. But the misguided girl follows him. In the end, the local sheriff (Lon Chaney, Jr.) and a doctor shoot Burr as he is carrying the bride through the treetops. The film is marred by its low budget. The gorilla outfit is just yet another Halloween party grade costume. But the spine of this story is quite good. I’m waiting for the re-make starring Benecio Del Toro!

Dare I say, William Beaudine’s masterpiece? I’m guessing the inspiration was the runaway smash hit, “Bride of the Gorilla.” Jerry Lewis impersonator Sammy Petrillo and his partner Duke Mitchell are stranded on a desert island with a bunch of natives and Bela Lugosi, who plans to turn them into gorillas. At one point, Mitchell does transform. Petrillo is able to recognize him when he manages to sing his signature song (“Indeed I Do.”). Anyway, it’s all okay. It turns out to have all been a dream. When last we leave the boys (a comedy team that never made another film), they are doing their act in a jungle-themed nightclub.

Dishonorable Mention: GORILLA AT LARGE (1954) Featuring what is undoubtedly the most prestigious cast ever assembled for a gorilla movie, “Gorilla At Large” boasts Lee J. Cobb, Ann Bancroft, Cameron Mitchell, Raymond Burr and Lee Marvin. It’s also the first, last and only one in 3-D. But don’t expect a lot of thrills and chills. This is one of those movies that makes you sit through seeming hours of boring melodrama about a love triangle (and an equally dull murder mystery) before giving you the good stuff. Only at the film’s climax are we finally rewarded with the spectacle of Goliath the Gorilla climbing to the top of the roller coaster with the screaming Ann Bancroft slung over his shoulder. When Goliath falls to his death, so too apparently does this minor subgenre. The next time we get a whiff of scary apes in the movies, about 15 years later, they will vastly outnumber the humans — and the costumes will be considerably better. Trav S.D. has been producing the American Vaudeville Theatre since 1995, and periodically trots it out in new incarnations. Stay in the loop at travsd.wordpress.com, and also catch up with him at Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, et al. His books include “No Applause, Just Throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous” and “Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and its Legacies from Nickelodeons to YouTube.”

52

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Window, Shop: Artist Paints a Vanishing Village Baumann’s storefronts are lovingly rendered time capsules

ART RICHARD BAUMANN: SHOP FRONT PAINTINGS Through October 31 In the window of 14th Street Framing Gallery 225 W. 14th St., btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves. Visit rbaumannstudio.com “Mulberry Street” (14x16 inches) — on view through Oct. 31, at The 14th St. Framing Gallery.

BY SCOTT STIFFLER IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

S

omeone once said,” observes artist Richard Baumann, “that landscape painting is all about loss and memory.” A project that began in 1993, it took only two decades for many of the West Village and Lower Manhattan shops depicted in Baumann’s oil paintings to go from neighborhood anchors to relics of a bygone era. These days, visiting Joe’s Candy Store can only be accomplished by peering into the front window of the 14th Street Framing Gallery. That’s where Baumann’s work is on display, through October 31. Be warned, though. The artist’s moody, time capsule take on his subject matter is awash in longing for a New York that lies just beyond our grasp — and the fact that the exhibit’s shelf life will soon expire puts an additional coat of melancholy on the experience. This is just one of the sad ironies resonating throughout Baumann’s thoughtprovoking collection of establishments

“Vesuvio Bakery” (18x20 inches).

that — were it not for unmistakable cues like urban stoops — might be found on the main drag of any small town in the early decades of the previous century. What’s more, the framed paintings of storefronts you’re mulling over happen to be hanging in the front window of…a store that specializes in framing things. Some works on display were created on the very same block as the host venue, in a room with floor-to-ceiling windows that served as a painters’ studio since the 1950s.

Baumann occupied it for 25 years, until “the lease went very high and I moved to a studio in Long Island City.” Most of the six stores featured in his current exhibit aren’t around anymore — casualties of changing tastes, migrating populations and the same skyrocketing rents that chased Baumann out of Manhattan. It’s not as if he didn’t see it coming. “When I had my first solo show in SoHo,” he recalls, “an art critic said that I was painting just ahead of the wrecking ball.”

Like Harry Chong Laundry (which opened for business on Charles Street and Waverly Place in 1945 and closed in 2006), Joe’s Candy Store only exists in the memories of its customers, the vapor trails of a Google search and, thankfully, in a Baumann painting. Prince Street’s Vesuvio Bakery (whose iconic storefront is still there) closed in 2009, a mere decade short of its century mark. It’s hard to imagine anyone mounting a similar exhibit 20 years from now, in which lovingly rendered Citibank branches and 7-Eleven franchises evoke the same affectionate sense of belonging that Baumann brings to paintings like “Lower East Side Printshop.” But for 2013 toddlers who have little else to look up to, the corporate kudzu of today could very well become tomorrow’s nostalgia. Of course, they’d have to go away in order to be missed — but if a Duane Reade were replaced by a mom and pop shop, one hopes Baumann would be there, brush in hand, to document it.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 Come see and be seen and Celebrate the Night of Nights! Costume Parade & Live Bands Miracles & Monsters HOT FOOD AND HOT ENTERTAINMENT

Bandstage on E. 10th St at 4:00pm

DOORS OPEN 7:30pm ALL TICKETS $20

Theater for the New City 155 1st Ave. at East 10th St. for Info call (212) 254-1109 Tickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net Also at www.facebook.com/theaterforthenewcity

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

53


A ‘Radical Presence’ to be Reckoned With IMAGE COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, NY

Group show chronicles five decades of black performance art

ART RADICAL PRESENCE: BLACK PERFORMANCE IN CONTEMPORARY ART

the historical path of black performance in the second half of the 20th century, is on view through Dec. 7 (at Grey Art Gallery). Part II, which includes an array of videos and performance-based photography and documentation, takes place Nov. 14-March 9, 2014 (at The Studio Museum in Harlem, 144 W. 125th St.).

Through December 7 At NYU’s Grey Art Gallery

Lorraine O’Grady: Untitled (Mlle. Bourgeoise Noire and her Master of Ceremonies enter the New Museum). 1980-83, printed 2009. Gelatin silver print. 7 1/4 x 9 1/4 in.

100 Washington Square East (btw. Waverly & Washington Places)

PHOTO BY MAX FIELDS, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM HOUSTON

Tuesday, Thursday, Friday: 11am-6pm Wednesday: 11am-8pm Saturday: 11am-5pm Call 212-998-6780 or visit nyu.edu/greyart Also visit radicalpresenceny.org and studiomuseum.org

PHOTO BY PETER GABRIEL, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN

T

his group show chronicles the emergence and development of black performance art over three generations. To fully shed light on the rich and complex history of this subject, it surveys the scene from the 1960s to the present. Benjamin Patterson, David Hammons, Senga Nengudi and Coco Fusco are among the artists featured. In addition, a series of performances by participating artists accompanies the exhibition (some of them co-organized with Performa 13, New York’s Nov. 1-24 performance art biennial). Part I of “Radical Presence,” which traces

Satch Hoyt: “Say It Loud” (2004, books, metal staircase, microphone, speakers and sound. Dimensions: variable).

Trenton Doyle Hancock performing “Devotion” at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston — to be performed at Grey Art Gallery on Nov. 7.

CUBBYHOLE Villager, You’re Still the One! BIG FUN! SMALL BUCKS! GREAT SPECIALS EVERY DAY! COCKTAIL HOUR MON-SAT till 8PM

“Best of NYC” - Time Out, 2012 281 W 12th St @ 4th St. NYC 212-243-9041

54

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Just Do Art www.edengourmet.com

Your Friendly Neighborhood Marketplace Produce • Groceries • Cheese • Bakery • Deli • Fish • Meat Sandwiches • Catering • Hot Food • Salad & Olive Bar • Gift Baskets

PHOTO BY RANDY MORRISON

Love, after a very long spell: Kate Middleton and Brett Bolton, in Ground UP Productions’ “Bell, Book & Candle.”

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

BELL, BOOK & CANDLE

CHARLES BUSCH: RIDIN’ HIGH The Lady in Question has declared her upcoming run at 54 Below to be a boa-free zone. Otherwise, anything goes — including we’re assured, “laughter, music, tears and sequins.” That, filtered through the sassy lips and ample pipes of Tony-nominated

TheVillager.com

Union Square 7 East 14th Street 212 255-4200

Chelsea 162 W 23rd Street Btwn 6th & 7th Avenue 212-675-6300

Upper West Side 2780 Broadway, btwn 107th & 108th Street 212-222-7300

T       G  E   ’    ... Brooklyn Heights 180 Montague Street By Borough Hall 718-222-1515

Hoboken 226 Washington Street 201-659-0355

July 25th thru August 31st

PHOTO BY STEPHEN SOROKOFF

Old rivalries, new crushes and crossed wires all come to a boil — when a nice, single witch finds her cauldron (and love life) bubbling with trouble. Bond Street’s Gene Frankel Theatre is a fitting location for “Bell, Book & Candle” — the 1950s romantic comedy set in Greenwich Village. Kate Middleton and Brett Bolton star in this Ground UP Productions revival, which finds mostly good-intentioned witch Gillian thrown for a loop when her publisher neighbor gets serious with (of all people!) her college nemesis. Casting a spell will make Shep fall in love with her — although doing so means she’ll lose her powers. True love triumphs, of course, but only after a series of misunderstandings, betrayals and revelations (involving, among other things, an agitated cat and Gillian’s scheming brother). Through Oct. 26, at the Gene Frankel Theatre (24 Bond St., btw. Lafayette & Bowery). Performances are Wed.-Sat. at 7pm, Mon. at 7pm and Sat./Sun. at 2pm. For tickets ($25, $18 for students/seniors), call 800-838-3006 or visit groundupproduductions.org. 

All of us at the Garden wish THE VILLAGER a Happy 80th Anniversary!!!

Two, at 54 Below: Charles Busch (R) and Tom Judson are “Ridin’ High.”

play wright and drag legend Charles Busch, makes “Ridin’ High” a must-see for lovers of tall tales, tough gals and tunes from the American Songbook. Armed with more zingers than a chorus boy can shake his stick at, Busch will dish on certain actresses he’s known and tell anecdotes about his long career. He’ll also be doing a parody of 1940s film noirs and a new monologue for Miriam Passman — the inspiration for his Broadway play, “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife.” Songs from the camp icon, whose approach is far more affectionate than ironic, include an Irving Berlin number, a Sinatra classic and a few choices likely inspired by recent time spent taking his act on the road (“Route 66,” “Kansas City”). Accompanist Tom Judson, who toured with Busch, tickles the ivories. “Ridin’ High” happens Thurs., Oct. 17, 24 & Nov. 7, 14. At 54 Below (254 W. 54th St., btw. Broadway & Eighth Ave.). Doors open at 8:45pm, show at 9:30pm. Cover Charge: $35-45. Food/ Beverage minimum: $25. Tickets on the day of performance, after 4pm, available only by calling 646-476-3551. For reservations, visit 54below. com. Also visit charlesbusch.com.

We’ve been serving good food to the village for 50 years, while you have been serving the good news for 80 years. Let’s both of us keep up the good work! Best wishes, Sergio Bitici

MACELLERIA

48 Gansevoort Street New York, NY 10014 212-741-2555 www.macelleria.com

October 17, 2013

55


Can you dig it? ‘Day of the Dirt’ restores La Plaza By LiNCOLN aNDERSON

T

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

o preserve their garden, members of La Plaza Cultural decided it was time to get down and dirty on Saturday. Dozens in the garden, at E. Ninth St. and Avenue C, were scooping and hauling new soil, or related tasks, as part of the aptly named “Day of the Dirt.” In all, 50 cubic yards — equal to 50 tons — of fresh dirt had been dumped in the garden in a huge mound the previous day, and they then spread it all around on Saturday. Bill LoSasso, a Community Board 3 member and the garden’s executive director, said the community garden had been losing soil, and Superstorm Sandy only added to the problem. In short, there were concerns that the storm’s surge waters might have contaminated the soil. Marga Snyder noted there had been “a lot of talk in the street” about the garden’s soil, so they “had to set the record straight.” But testing by GreenThumb subsequently found very low levels of toxins, on par with what would be expected in any Manhattan plot, including low amounts of led and aluminum and very low PCB’s. Nevertheless, LoSasso said, children play in the garden and they wanted to ensure its safety. Hence, the “Day of the Dirt.” Gardeners also installed semipermeable liners under their plots. Everyone was working diligently, then around 1 p.m. paused briefly to dig into something else — pizza — before returning to scooping, toting and spreading the new soil. “The larger thing was preserving the garden after Sandy,” LoSasso said. “We lost like 25 trees — so there is this physical and psychological reset. They fought in the ’90s to keep these spaces. We’re really the stewards of this neighborhood now. It’s really our responsibility to restore it, to preserve it — now and into the future.”

Bill LoSasso and Carolyn Ratcliffe scooped fresh soil into a wheelbarrow so it could be spread out around La Plaza Cultural on Saturday.

www.reddenfuneralhome.net

56

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Notice iS HerebY GiVeN that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by 5oz. Factory 24 West 8th Street LLC d/b/a 5oz. Factory to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 24 West 8th Street New York NY 10011. Vil: 10/17 - 10/24/2013 ViJaYa reaLtY LLc a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/20/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Vamsi Bollu, 80 Riverside Blvd., Unit 9K, NY, NY 10069. General Purpose. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 Notice iS HerebY GiVeN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by Adoro Lei, LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 287 Hudson Street New York NY 10012. Vil: 10/17 - 10/24/2013 eLiSabetH croS coNSuLtiNG, LLc Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/24/13. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Herve N. Linder Ernst & Linder LLC 17 Battery Place Ste. 1307 NewYork, NY 10004. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

13 WebSter fuNdiNG LLc Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 09/05/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O JVG MANAGEMENT, 20 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 biG SiSter HoLdiNG LLc a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: GGMC, 1651 Third Ave., NY, NY 10128. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 WHittmaN ProPertY HoLdiNGS, LLc a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/24/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 200 Park Ave. S., Ste. 1518, NY, NY 10003. General Purpose Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 decoratorSbeSt trade, LLc a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/25/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 767 Lexington Ave., Ste. 505, NY, NY 10065. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

65 fourtH, LLc a domestic LLC, currently known as IPPUDO NY, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/29/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: R.O.S.E., 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 2160, NY, NY 10170. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of eSrt 250 WeSt 57tH St., L.L.c. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/10/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/05/13. Princ. office of LLC: One Grand Central Pl., 60 E. 42nd St., NY, NY 10165. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

Notice of formatioN of Limited LiabiLitY comPaNY NAME: MedSpa 44, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/04/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 144 E. 44th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10017. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of bLoNdit LLc App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/1/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/30/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Lori Hope Shabtai, 1 Central Park West, Apt. 41C, NY, NY 10023. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

Notice of formatioN of uNe coNSuLtiNG LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Gleason & Koatz, LLP, 122 E. 42nd St., Ste. 518, NY, NY 10168. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 Notice of formatioN of St. urbaN, LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Lenore Davis, 285 Central Park West, Apt. 8S, NY, NY 10024-3006. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

Notice of QuaLificatioN of caVaLier teLePHoNe, L.L.c. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/27/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in VA on 10/6/98. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office addr.: 4001 Rodney Parham Rd., Little Rock, AR 72212. Cert. of Org. filed with VA Clerk of the Commission, 1300 E. Main St., Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

Notice of QuaLificatioN of eeGo 123 WiLLiam oWNer, LLc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 6/8/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC:The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

Notice of formatioN of oaSiS Jimma Juice bar, LLc Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 3163 BROADWAY NY, NY 10027. Purpose: any lawful act. 2139669. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013

Notice of formatioN of mSH PartNerS LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/19/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., Ten Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

Notice iS HerebY GiVeN that an on-premises license, #TBA has been applied for by FourthGen, LLC d/b/a Russ & Daughters to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 127 Orchard Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 10/10 - 10/17/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of touraiNe 3b, LLc Art of Org filed with Secy of State of NY on 6/18/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 5/15/13. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to princ bus address: 1000 Brickell Ave, Ste. 300, Miami, FL 33131. Cert of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE located: 16192 Coastal Highway, Lewes, DE 19958. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013

PubLic Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday November 6, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for RDK Restaurant Corp. to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 180 Spring Street in the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 10/17 - 10/24/2013

MESSIAH Handel’s

“…to experience the full, formidable range of ‘Messiah,’ from the furious flames of the ‘refiner’s fire’ to the delirious party of the finale… let Trinity be your guide.” – Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times

The GRAMMY®-nominated Choir of Trinity Wall Street and Trinity Baroque Orchestra, Julian Wachner, Conductor

trinity church alice tully hall saturday, december 7, 7pm sunday, december 8, 3pm

wednesday, december 18, 7:30pm

Get tickets today at:

trinitywallstreet.org/Messiah Take 10% off any ticket price with the early bird discount code DOWNTOWN10. Limited time only.

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

57


Notice of Formation of 355 GREENWICH LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 419 Park Ave. South, 15th Fl., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: The acquisition, ownership, leasing, operation, sale or other disposition of the commercial units in the building known as The GreenwichTownhouse Condominium and by the street number 355-361Greenwich Street a/k/a 28-30 Harrison Street, New York, New York. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of PHAETRA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/26/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/24/13. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: Haena Park, 55 W. 25th St., #14J, NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of OrbiMed Global Healthcare GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/22/13. Princ. office of LLC: 601 Lexington Ave., 54th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, State of DE, Dept. of State,Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Investments. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of STACEY GANDLER PUBLIC RELATIONS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 333 E. 75th St., #5G, NY, NY 10021. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Style Bookings LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/24/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 181 Thompson St 9 NY, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful act. 2161145 w.o. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013

58

LESLIE DAVENPORT LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/29/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leslie Davenport, 173 E. 101st St., NY, NY 10029. General Purposes. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 SOLE HUB, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/11/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 75 Broad St., Ste. 3010, NY, NY 10004. General Purposes. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: 111 POWERS LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/18/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 530 Laguardia Place, New York, NewYork 10012. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of RIDGE ADVISORY, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/10/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Union Square Downtown LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/17/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Chadbourne & Parke, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, Rm. 3248, NY, NY 10112. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Unconventional Food and Beverage LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Pavel Kolarov, 315 E. 80th St., Apt. 6H, NY, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful activities Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013

October 17, 2013

Notice of Formation of Globey World Productions LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/19/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 357 W. 22nd St., #1, NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/10 - 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of TLDH Co, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/16/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Leon Wagner, 600 Madison Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 AV HOLDINGS GP LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/2/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 61 W. 8th St., NY, NY 10011. General Purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Qualification of Illuminarium Experiences LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/24/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/5/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of ENY II DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/25/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o BRP Companies, 767 Third Ave., 33rd Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 Notice of Formation of BRP ENY II LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/25/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o BRP Companies, 767 Third Ave., 33rd Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013

Notice of Qualification of 30 Park Place Hotel Junior Mezz LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/14/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, Attn: Corporation Service Co., regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of 30 Park Place Hotel Senior Mezz LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/14/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, Attn: Corporation Service Co., regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of 30 Park Place Retail LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/14/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, Attn: Corporation Service Co., regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of 30 Park Place RRG Mezz LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/14/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, Attn: Corporation Service Co., regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/10- 11/14/2013

Notice of Formation of GO ROCKWELL LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 1010 Ave. of the Americas, 4th Fl., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gotham Organization, Inc., Attn: Christopher Jaskiewicz at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of SAMBA CHAPTER TWO, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/25/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/21/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Samba Brands Management, 17 E. 16th St., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10003. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with State of DE, Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 NOT. OF FRMN of 1114 Avenue of America L.P. Cert. of L.P. f w/ Secy of STA of NY (SSNY) 07/31/13. OFC LCTN: NY Cty. SSNY is DA upon whom PROC AGA it may be served. SSNY shall mail a CY: C/O 1114 Avenue of America L.P. - 1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. The Prin. bus. add.:1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. PUR: any lawful act or ACTY. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of formation of Madelin Adena Smith LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/11/2013. Office location, County of New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste 202, Brooklyn NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: TAMARES DEVELOPMENT I MANAGER LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/25/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o BraunsteinTurkish LLP, 7600 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 402, Woodbury, New York 11797. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013

Notice of Formation of SEM KIDS DESIGN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Mamiye Brothers, Inc., 1385 Broadway, 18th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: GIO COACHING & CONSULTING LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/30/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 408 East 92nd Street, #1403, NewYork, NewYork 10128. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Plateau Data Services, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/30/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Evajom Productions LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/10/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 7/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Paracorp Incorporated, 2804 Gateway Oaks Dr., #200, Sacramento, CA 95833-3509. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 S. Dupont Hwy., Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Formation of 149W119TH, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/2/03. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Charles D. Rubenstein, 192 Lexington Avenue, Suite 901, New York, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Reichmann Seventh, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/23/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus.addr.: 999 Waterside Dr., Ste. 2300, Norfolk, VA 23510. LLC formed in DE on 8/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03 - 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Ridgewood Club Seventh, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/23/13. Office location: NY County.Princ. bus. addr.: 999 Waterside Dr., Ste. 2300, Norfolk, VA 23510. LLC formed in DE on 8/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Westwood Seventh, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/23/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus.addr.: 999 Waterside Dr., Ste. 2300, Norfolk, VA 23510. LLC formed in DE on 8/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Crestview Partners III Co-Investors, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/13. Office location: NY County.Princ. bus. addr.: 667 Madison Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10065. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 8/23/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Ground Fl., Citrus Grove Bldg., Goring Ave., George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Crestview Partners III (TE), L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus.addr.: 667 Madison Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10065. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 5/8/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., PO Box 309, UglandHouse, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Ground Fl., Citrus Grove Bldg., Goring Ave., George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of RPAI Fordham Place Office, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/6/13. Office location: NY County.Princ. bus. addr.: 2021 Spring Rd., Ste. 200, Oak Brook, IL 60523. LLC formed in DE on 8/29/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 ALPHATECH ONE, LLC a domestic LLC, currently known as ALPHATECH TWO, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/4/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Trief & Olk, Esqs., 150 E. 58th St., 34th Fl., NY, NY 10155. General Purposes. Vil: 09/26 - 10/31/2013 LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Toby’s Coffee 5th Ave. LLC Articles of Organization filed by the Department of State of New York on: 08/06/2013 Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 125 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11249 Vil: 09/26 - 10/31/2013 PARK SLOPE ASSOCIATES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 12/22/1997. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 303 East 57th St, Ste 45E, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013

TheVillager.com


Notice of Qualification of 250 BOWERY STAR, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/13/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. or Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of 545 EDGECOMBE BCR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 20803 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 301, Aventura, FL 33180. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Real estate. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of BRE Non-Core 1 Owner A LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/28/13. Princ. office of LLC: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of FAIRFAX MERRIFIELD ASSOCIATES II L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of 470 4th Avenue Investors LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Adam America LLC, 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 607, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013

TheVillager.com

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 15335 78TH AVENUE LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/18/07. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 128 Willis Court, Woodmere, New York 11598-1448. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 VIVIAN MULLER, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/22/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 210 West 89th St., Ste. 12J, NY, NY 10024. General Purposes. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Viskovic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 302 Fifth Avenue, 8th Fl., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Capsule LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/30/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 80 Eighth Avenue, Suite 202, NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of NYOT 25 Limited LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Patrice Stavile, Esq., c/o M1 Real Estate, 600 Fifth Ave., 21st Fl., NY, NY 10020, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of MSB Advisors LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. NYS fict. name: MSB Advisors (New York). Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 9/10/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o MSB Advisors GP LLC, 95 Charles St., #3, NY, NY 10014, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013

Qualification of Anchorage Illiquid Opportunities IV, L.P. Authority filed with the Sect. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/06/13. Office Loc: NY County. LP formed in DE on 8/5/13. SSNY has been designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, DE 19809. DE address of LP: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, 19809. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. avail from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sect. of State, PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of UPPER EAST SIDE LENDER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/09/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of SUNNYSIDE-BARNETT ASSOCIATES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 13th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, c/o Phipps Houses at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose:To own and develop real property. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 NOT. OF FRMN of Activity LLC Art. of Org. f w/ Secy of STA of NY (SSNY) 08/16/13. OFC LCTN: NY Cty. SSNY is DA upon whom PROC AGA it may be served. SSNY shall mail a CY: C/O Activity LLC1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. The Prin. bus. add. :1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. PUR: any lawful act or ACTY. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 THE WORKING WATERFRONT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/09/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jennifer Valentine, 307 E. 76th St. #14, NY, NY 10021. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 RVZ STRATEGIC ADVISORS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/16/13. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC ATTN: Frederick Van Zijl 179 E 64th St New York, NY 10065. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Frederick Van Zijl 179 E 64th St New York, NY 10065. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Benjamin K LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NEW YORK COUNTY. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. P.O. address to which SSNY shall mail copy of process against LLC served upon him is: 580 5th Ave., Ste. 1140, NY, NY 10036. The principal business address of the LLC is 580 5th Ave., Ste. 1140, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of 76 Lefferts Place LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9728 3rd Avenue, Ste. 133, Brooklyn, NY 11209. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013

READY, SET, SUBSCRIBE!

Notice of Formation of 2357 84th Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9728 3rd Avenue, Ste. 133, Brooklyn, NY 11209. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of Tallgrove, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 345 W. 14th St., #PHD, NY, NY 10014, Attn: Magnus Hoglund. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of Arthur Avenue Residence, L.P. Certificate filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/30/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Center for Urban Community Services, Inc., 198 E. 121st St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10035. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2099. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of FMS Wayne County, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/29/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 920 Winter St., Waltham, MA 02451. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013

Subscription form on page 63 October 17, 2013

59


In the end, Neon outshines Black in Sol Lain opener SPORTS By Daniel Jean-Loubin

A

PHOTO BY DANIEL JEAN-LOUBIN

s the Sol Lain flag football league opened another season, Lower East Side athletes gathered on Sat., Oct. 5, at Edward Garcia Field for a defensive slugfest of a game between the Black team and the Neon team. The Sol Lain Flag Football League was created by community leader Edward Garcia as a way to help at-risk local youth. “Eddie tried to offer a positive influence to the lives of the kids in the neighborhood,” A Black team runner turns the corner and heads upfield behind strong blocking by his teammates. said Marilu Garcia, his sister. Today, the co-ed league fields four teams, punt after three downs. holding penalty. The Black team could not with about 50 kids total, ages 10 to 15. With the ball back in the Black team’s convert and gave up possession. The first half of the game began with the On Neon’s next possession, an underBlack team marching down the field and hands, and with great field position, Black scoring on their opening drive with a touch- looked primed to tally another score, thanks thrown pass was intercepted by Black’s down pass to one of their shifty wide receiv- in part to a big gain by their speedy running quarterback, who also plays cornerback on back. At the goal line, though, Neon made defense. But on the game’s very next play, ers to make it 6-0. The ensuing kickoff to Neon, however, did two key stops on a pair of pass plays, and Black’s Q.B., under pressure, threw a floater not produce the same result, as they failed to on third down, a seeming touchdown was up into double coverage that was picked off gain any kind of yardage and were forced to called back by the referee due to an offensive and run back for the game-tying touchdown

to end the half knotted at 6-6. After a deep touchdown pass for the Black team opened up the second half to make it 12-6, both sides’ offensive struggles continued for most of the rest of the game. With about seven minutes remaining, Neon called a timeout and huddled up on third down with about two yards to go. Once the play was set up by their coach, Brian Gonzalez, both teams settled into position. The timeout proved to be a wise one since Neon was not only able to get the first down but also score on a well-designed run play. The score was now 12-12. It remained that way till the end of regulation. Then, in sudden-victory overtime, a bad snap by Black resulted in a punt to Neon. On the punt return, the Neon team was able make it to about midfield before being stopped. Two quick midrange passes drove Neon into the red zone, and they scored on a designed quarterback run to win the game 18-12. Not only was it a terrific game, but Marilu Garcia was equally impressed by the co-ed league’s great turnout that afternoon. “It’s unbelievable,” she said. “Through sports they learn discipline and commitment to teamwork.”

FREE FAMILY FUN FOR ALL AGES!

Sat. Oct. 26 | 10am to 4PM Gansevoort Plaza

Hudson St

Nin

th

Av

e

Meatpacking District

Gansevo ort St

www.meatpacking-district.com/events 60

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


Notice of QuaLificatioN of Soam market NeutraL fuNd, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/31/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 7/11/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o SOAM Holdings, LLC, 150 E. 52nd St., 30th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of formatioN of fLoodStoPuSa LLc Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/10/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 515 E 79 St, Ste 20D, NY, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of rNr media coNSuLtiNG, LLc Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/21/13 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: RNR Media Consulting, 55 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of Laureate bW. 2150 LLc Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/30. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: LAW OFFICE OF Z. TAN PLLC 110 E 59TH ST., STE 3200, NY, NY 10022. Principal business address: County of NY. Purpose: any lawful act. 2147291 w.o Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of boP oNe NortH eNd LLc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 09/05/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 09/03/2013. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

TheVillager.com

Notice of formatioN of tWiNkYcLeaN LLc Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 613 W 146th St Apt 3R MB 7 NY, NY 10031 4316 USA. Purpose: any lawful act. 2144794 w.o Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 7013 VeteraNS aVeNue LLc Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 07/29/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O OMRI MININ, 404 East 79th Street, Apt. 15C, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 HubbeLL mouNtaiN LLc Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 11/23/2011. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O Alan Haberman, 11 Mill Pond Road, Sherman, CT 06784. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 2184 cedar aVeNue LLc Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 07/23/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 404 East 79th Street, Suite 15C, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of ctc aLterNatiVeS acceSS fuNd L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/6/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1290 E. Main St., Stamford, CT 06902. LP formed in DE on 7/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of SoLuS recoVerY fuNd iii LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 410 Park Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LP formed in DE on 7/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

Yu NeW York LLc a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/7/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Aldo V. Vitagliano, 150 Purchase St., Ste. 9, Rye, NY 10580. General Purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of citY fire LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/03/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 733 Ridgedale Ave., E. Hanover, NJ 07936 Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of QuaLificatioN of iH3 ProPertY GP LLc Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/29/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/08/13. Princ. office of LLC: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2811 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of cocotte fiftH aVeNue LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Deborah A. Nilson & Associates, PLLC, 10 E. 40th St., Ste. 3310, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of cHaPter tWo ProPertieS, LLc. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Forrest Zlochiver, 147 W. 35th St., Room 803, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of formatioN of z-432/52a LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 60 E. 56th St., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

Notice of QuaLificatioN of adam PLuS comPaNY LLc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/25/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 261 Madison Ave., Ste. 9038, NY, NY 10016, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

JOIN IN! BECAUSE BEING PART OF A NEIGHBORHOOD MATTERS. Subscribe Now! Subscription form on page 63 October 17, 2013

61


30

October 10 - 16, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00 PM MAIL 515 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212-229-2790 REAL ESTATE

SoHo SPACE 4 LEASE Six (6) Soho district manufacturing spaces for lease Ideal for service, industrial No retail or office users

TEKSERVE

TRADE-iN

Loc#1: 8,130SF gnd+cellar, Loc#2: 2,200SF gnd+cellar, Loc#3: 2,600SF gnd+cellar, Loc#4: 2,400SF gnd+cellar, Loc#5: 3,700SF gnd+cellar, Loc#6: 4,400SF gnd+cellar. $80/SF call ELIOT @ 212-431-7500 LOOKING TO BUY SOUTH BEACH CONDO

GET HELP WITH MORTGAGE PAYMENTS! CATSKILL VILLAGE DUPLEX FOR SALE Live in the 3-bedroom unit and rent out the 2-bedroom unit to minimize your living expenses. Both units offer spacious rooms and off-street parking. 3-bdrm has 1 1/4 baths; 2-bedrm has 1 bath. Walking distance to town, stores and restaurants. Asking $111,900. Contact Karen Deyo at Rip Van Winkle Realty 518-943-5303.

EMPLOYMENT

1 bedroom or large studio mykonos55@yahoo.com

WHAT’S YOUR MAC WORTH? Check out our trade-in calculator to find out: tekserve.com/tradein

Get serious store credit for your next Mac, iPad, or iPhone.

COMMERCIAL SPACE

SOHO MANUFACTURING SPACE Ground Floor aprox 1,550 sqft $120k per Anum. Call 212-226-3100

LEGAL SERVICES Suhas: Geek, Gamer, Tekserver

SALES-BRANDING

Financial District-Wall Street

DOMA DEFEATED Marriage Equality Immigration benefits Luna Chou, Eq. 212-226-2610 401 Broadway, #1708 NY NY 10013 LChouLaw@gmail.com

15 Yr Business Expanding ▪Need 12 Branding Inside Sales Persons ▪No cold-calling not telemarketing ▪Phone closers make $. ▪Paid Training ▪True Base + Commission ▪Immediate Hire!

Call VP of HR 212-233-2947 ext. 2125 OFFICE ASSISTANT COMPUTER DATA ENTRY Part Time Monday to Friday, 9am-2pm. Send Resume to helstromny@gmail.com

119 W 23rd St • 212.929.3645 • tekserve.com 62

October 17, 2013

TheVillager.com


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of October 17 - 23 By Rob Brezsny

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I was out walking when I spied an older woman standing over her aged Yorkshire Terrier. “He’s having trouble getting his business done,” she confided. “He’s been struggling for 10 minutes.” Feeling sympathy, with a flourish of my hand, I said, “More power to you, little one. May you purge your burden.” The dog instantly defecated. “It’s like you waved a magic wand!” the woman exclaimed. Now I am invoking my wizardry in your behalf, Aries, though less literally: More power to you. May you purge your psychological burden. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “You won’t do it at the right time,” warns writer Kate Moller. “You’ll change your mind. You’ll change your heart. It’s not going to turn out the way you thought it would.” And yet, Moller concludes, “It will be better.” Fate may be comical in the way it plays with your expectations and plans, Taurus, but I predict you will ultimately be glad about the outcome. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the coming weeks, you Geminis could be skillful and even spectacular liars. You will have the potential to deceive more people, bend more truths, and even fool yourself better than anyone else. Yet you could also tell imaginative stories that rouse people from their ruts. You might explore the positive aspects of Kurt

Vonnegut’s theory that we tend to become what we pretend to be. Or you could simply be so creative and playful and improvisational in everything you do that you catalyze a lot of inspirational fun. Which way will you go? CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m all in favor of you indulging your instinct for self-protection. As a Cancerian myself, I understand that one of the ways you take good care of yourself is by making sure that you feel reasonably safe. Yet, your mental and emotional health also requires you to leave your comfort zone regularly. If you make yourself ready and eager for changes, the changes that are coming will kick your ass in mostly educational and pleasurable ways. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Who exactly do you want to be when you grow up, and what is the single most important experience you need in order to make that happen? What riches do you want to possess when you are finally wise enough to make enlightened use of them? Which one of your glorious dreams is not quite ripe enough for you to fulfill it, but is primed to be dramatically ripened soon? Leo, I would meditate on these questions. Answers will be forthcoming. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At an elementary school festival some years ago, I was the Mad Hatter from “Alice in Wonderland.” I asked kids to make a wish, whereupon I sprinkled their heads with magic fairy dust. Some kids were skeptical. They questioned that the fairy

dust would make their wishes come true. A few walked away without making a wish or accepting the fairy dust. Yet every single one of those kids returned later saying they had changed their minds, and each asked for more than the usual amount of fairy dust. Virgo, you should return to the scene of your doubts and demand extra fairy dust. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The door to the invisible must be visible,” wrote surrealist spiritual author Rene Daumal. The opportunity is still invisible simply because it has no precedents in your life; you can’t imagine what it is. But just recently a door to that unknown realm has become visible to you. I suggest you open it, though you have almost no idea what’s behind it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In Tim Burton’s film “Alice in Wonderland,” Alice asks the White Rabbit, “How long is forever?” He replies, “Sometimes, just one second.” That’s an important piece of information for you, Scorpio. “Forever” might actually turn out to be one second or 90 minutes or a month or a year or who knows? A situation you assumed was permanent could ultimately change — perhaps much faster than you imagined — as if by magic. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I need a little language such as lovers use,” wrote Virginia Woolf in her novel “The Waves.” “I need no words. Nothing neat... I need a howl; a cry.” Sagittarius, Woolf is speaking for you right now. You should be willing to get guttural and primal... to trust the teachings of silence and the crazy wisdom of your body... to bask in the dumfounding brilliance of the Eternal Wow. Are you brave enough to love what can’t be put into words?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I get bored with the idea of becoming a better listener,” writes business blogger Penelope Trunk. “Why would I do that when interrupting people is so much faster?” If you want to impose your will on people and do things as quickly as possible, Capricorn, follow Trunk’s advice this week. If you have other goals — like building consensus, learning important information you don’t know, and winning help from people who feel affection for you — I suggest you find out how to have maximum fun by being an excellent listener. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The last time meteorologists officially added a new type of cloud formation to the International Cloud Atlas was 1951. They’re considering another one. It’s called “asperatus” — from the Latin undulatus asperatus, meaning “turbulent undulation.” According to the Cloud Appreciation Society, it resembles “the surface of a choppy sea from below.” But although it looks rough and agitated, it almost never brings a storm. I suspect you, too, will soon discover something new. It may at first look turbulent, but I bet it will mostly just be interesting. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Should you try private experiments that might generate intimate miracles? Yes! Should you dream up extravagant proposals and schedule midnight rendezvous! By all means! Should you pick up where your fantasies left off the last time you got too timid to explore further? Naturally! Should you find out what “as raw as the law allows” actually means? I encourage you! Should you tap into the open secret at the core of your wild beauty! Of course!

call to subscribe

646-452-2475

experience the new. experience the now.

MAIL TO: The Villager • 515 Canal St., Suite 1C • New York, NY 10013 YES! I want to receive The Villager every week of the year.

CHECK ONE:

New Subscription

Renewal

(New Subscription $29•Renewal $24, for 52 weeks, by check or credit card, will be added to your current subscription)

Name: Address: City: State: Zip Code: Email: Phone: Card Type: [ ] Visa [ ] Mastercard [ ] Amex [ ] Discover Card Holder’s Signature: Credit Card Number: Exp. Date: Security Code:

TheVillager.com

October 17, 2013

63


Make your

MEETING Delicious! Calling all companies! Looking to serve lunch? We've got the best sandwiches, salads, and much more, made with super fresh, quality ingredients, at seriously great prices. Keep your employees productive and happy! Check out our menus online at fairwaymarket.com/catering.

FAIRWAY CATERING Our extensive catering menu offers everything you need, to serve and enjoy. Your employees will rave, without the rant for once. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL OR EMAIL*:

64

October 17, 2013

CHELSEA

KIPS BAY

Bonnie Langer

Takisha Williams

(866) 392-2837 Bonnie.Langer@fairwaymarket.com

(646) 720-9450 takisha.williams@fairwaymarket.com

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER! RECEIVE WEEKLY SPECIALS RIGHT TO YOUR INBOX AND GET A CHANCE TO WIN A $1,000 FAIRWAY GIFT CARD! FAIRWAYMARKET.COM /NEWSLETTER-SIGNUP

YOU COULD BE THE NEXT WINNER! *Please do not place orders or send order-related information via email.

TheVillager.com


THE VILLAGER, OCT. 17, 2013