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Free will astrology reincarnated, p. 31

Volume 83, Number 19 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

October 10 - 16, 2013

Garage up for sale as developers drive prices ever higher By linColn anDerson With its weathered brick facade, the Perry Garage, at Perry and Greenwich Sts., blends in with the West Village’s historic streetscape, and of course also serves a functional purpose as a parking garage. But, amid the West Village’s superheated real estate market, the four-story property, at 125 Perry St., is up for sale for high-end residential conversion and is being brokered by Massey Knakal Realty Services.

According to a sales brochure on the property, “The subject currently consists of nearly 40,000 existing square feet that offer an unusually large canvas for a developer or user to execute a wide variety of potential visions, from boutique condominiums to mixtures of multifamily and high-end retail to a one-of-akind single family residence.” In addition, the brochure notes, the building comes

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Vintage bike shop keeps rolling, stays true to its roots Photo by Tequila Minsky

The sunset was sublime from the top of The Standard, East Village, but Georgette Fleischer, left, was more intent on filling in Fran Lebowitz about efforts to relocate a Citi Bike station from Petrosino Square.

Anti-development is in the air at FASP penthouse fundraiser By linColn anDerson Taking their fight to new heights, N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan held a fundraiser Tuesday evening in the swank 21st-story penthouse of The Standard, East Village on Cooper Square. Chic hotelier André Balazs donated the space — which features awesome, unobstructed views in every direction — for free. FASP is battling in court against New York University’s 2031 mega-expansion plan that would add nearly 2 million

square feet of space to its two South Village superblocks. Balazs himself couldn’t make the event because he was traveling. The same went for Susan Sarandon and Padma Lakshmi, who initially had been expected to be there. But humorist Fran Lebowitz attended and did not disappoint with her remarks. “I’m not connected to N.Y.U. in any way,” Lebowitz, who lives in the Village, told the crowd. “I’m not a former student. I’m not a teacher. ... I don’t like N.Y.U.”

She then went on to explain the cause of her dislike: that the university has been a blunt force for development, sapping away and smothering Downtown’s affordability and character. “Look at where we are. We’re in a hotel — that belongs in an airport. N.Y.U. has basically been a suburbanizing influence on New York City. The south side of Washington Square Park is basically suburban junk. “It’s not necessary to have a university in

By heather DuBin Hugh Mackie thinks everything is fixable. This is exactly what you would want to hear from the seasoned owner of Sixth Street Specials, a motorcycle repair shop in the East Village. During a recent interview — while the shop, located on E. Sixth St. near Avenue C, was buzzing with activity — Mackie, 54, his son Keith, 24, and Fumi Matsueda, 34, a mechanic from Ashikaga,

Continued on page 17 5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

Japan, spoke about Sixth Street Specials and what vintage bikes mean to them. Mackie, originally from Garvin, Ayrshire, a little harbor town on the southwest coast of Scotland, bolted to Paris the day he graduated from the Glasgow School of Art. He lived there for a year and worked on a film building sets. When his American girlfriend, a runway fashion

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editoRial, letteRS PAGE 12

penny aRcade – ‘mUtilated’! PAGE 21


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October 10 - 16, 2013

Photos by William Alatriste

At left, Patti Smith, who knew Lucy Cecere as a dear friend from the neighborhood, spoke before the unveiling. At right, friends of Cecere’s admired the new plaque.

Beloved senior advocate Cecere honored with plaque Friends, including City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and rock star Patti Smith, dedicated a commemorative plaque to senior advocate Lucy Cecere last month in the basement of Our Lady of Pompeii Church, at Carmine and Bleecker Sts. Cecere, a tireless advocate for her beloved Greenwich Village community, where she

was born, died at age 87 at home on MacDougal St. on March 19, 2011. The Caring Community, a group Cecere helped found 40 years ago, uses the church’s basement hall for its senior day programs. Cecere remained a member of the organization’s board of directors for her whole life. She also was part of the group that fought to keep

open the Village Nursing Home, which in 1977 became part of VillageCare. Several years ago, Greenwich House took over Caring Community, which was struggling financially, and now runs three Caring Community centers, the Pompeii one, plus the one on Washington Square North and one in Independence Plaza in Tribeca.

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October 10 - 16, 2013

Scoopy’s

notebook De Blasio does it up at Sheridan Square: Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio was in Sheridan Square in the Village on the afternoon of Wed., Oct. 2, and the local Democratic team was right there by his side in a strong show of support. As de Blasio shook hands and spoke one on one with voters, state Senator Brad Hoylman and Assemblymember Deborah Glick — who both supported Council Speaker Christine Quinn in the primary election — and Councilmember-elect Corey Johnson distributed de Blasio campaign literature and urged passersby to come and “meet the next mayor.” Asked his thoughts after watching de Blasio in action on the campaign trail, and his feelings about the candidate in general, Hoylman was very encouraged. “What I learned campaigning with the public advocate is that Bill is an amazing retail politician,” Hoylman told us. “Bill was deluged by Villagers on his visit to Sheridan Square last week, but very patiently and thoroughly addressed everyone who had lined up with a question. Bill clearly connects with voters on the economic issues they care about, whether it be childcare, development or the cost of living. I think New Yorkers are going to love his refreshing candor and accessibility when he’s mayor.” Similarly, Glick was pumped about the public advocate and his campaign. “What I think was really interesting,” she said, “was that, when he arrived, his advance people sort of gave people an opportunity to line up so they could actually ask a question, raise an issue. It wasn’t just ‘line up, glad-hand and go in the subway.’ There were around 20 people on line at any given moment. He was there quite some time — whether they were local residents or just passing through. One guy from City Island told him he was upset about a new, glitzy, expensive bridge they were planning for City Island. De Blasio could have interacted with more people by just saying hi than having people step up and have a substantive conversation. It was interesting, and very positive. I think what people would take away from this is that he is actually interested in what people think.” When she got off the phone, Glick was heading over to the East Side to campaign for de Blasio at Second Ave. and 10th St. near St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, where there’s a lot of foot traffic. She said there’s always a risk of “election fatigue” and people not coming out to the polls on Election Day. “You don’t want to jinx the outcome, but I’m very positive about Bill being the next mayor,” she told us. As for her quick switch from Quinn to de Blasio, she said, “In the primary, Democrats choose between different Democrats. And then after the primary, you coalesce behind the nominee.” Glick added that she

From left, Brad Hoylman, Bill de Blasio, Deborah Glick and Corey Johnson in Sheridan Square on Oct. 2.

has recently been giving some serious thought to the idea of so-called “instant runoffs,” in which voters would rank the candidates by their preference. “He was my No. 2,” she said of De Blasio. Also, if there were instant runoffs, candidates might be “more civil” to each other, she added, since they wouldn’t want to alienate their rivals’ supporters and hurt their chances of winning the instant runoff. Johnson was also impressed with de Blasio. “The line to meet Bill wrapped around the corner,” he said. “I think that’s a testament to the appeal of his candidacy and the popularity of his progressive vision for a city government that has too often aligned itself with the wealthy and connected and not with the vast majority of its people who are struggling to make ends meet.” For Pete’s sake — wants to be D.A.: We seem to recall Pete Gleason recently telling us he was done running for public office. Four years ago, the Tribeca attorney and former firefighter ran for City Council in the First District Democratic primary election that was won by Margaret Chin. Now, however, Gleason is challenging Cy Vance for Manhattan district attorney. “It was quietly done on July 19,” he said of launching his bid to be the borough’s top prosecutor. “I am a Democrat running on the Republican line — and I think there is a lot of conventional wisdom about the cesspool of corruption in our own backyard, i.e. William Rapfogel,” he said. In short, Gleason stated, he believes Rapfogel’s wife, Judy, and her boss, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, should both also be investigated in connection with the purported $5 million Met Council insurance fraud scheme, for which William Rapfogel was arrested in August. William Rapfogel is accused of embezzling $1 million of that sum for himself. “That money that was found in Judy Rapogel’s closet, there’s a good chance that money came from the public trough,”

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Gleason said. “If I were the sitting Manhattan district attorney right now, I’d have a full-blown investigation against Sheldon Silver and Judy Rapfogel. … It’s time for a change,” he declared. “And if anybody is going to cast aspersions that I’m a Democrat running as a Republican, look across the Brooklyn Bridge at what Charles Hynes is doing.” However, the State Attorney General’s Office is already conducting an investigation into the William Rapfogel case — so, typically, the D.A. would support that investigation, rather than open a new one of its own. Also, the A.G. has oversight of nonprofits in a way the D.A. does not. “The investigation is ongoing,” an A.G. spokesperson told us Tuesday. In addition to William Rapfogel, two unnamed co-conspirators are named in the felony complaint. More will be coming out about the case in coming weeks, we’re told. Silver did not respond for this Scoopy item. As for Vance, his campaign responded, “While the Manhattan D.A.’s Office has vigorously pursued corruption cases, this one is being investigated by the New York attorney general and Mr. Rapfogel has been arrested. Where appropriate, the D.A.’s Office has and will coordinate with the A.G. and other prosecutors.” City going after news vendor again: Two days after the primary election, Jerry Delakas, the embattled Astor Place newsstand operator, received a summons from the Department of Consumer Affairs telling him that he doesn’t legally have the right to operate the stand. The newsstand’s former owner, in her will, said she wanted Delakas to gain official control of the kiosk, but two years ago the city denied this, arguing that Delakas wasn’t a family member, so didn’t have succession rights. We had previously heard the issue would be put over until after Mayor Blooomberg left office, leaving it for the next administration

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October 10 - 16, 2013

Protesters slam N.Y.U. Law trustees as union busters BY SAM SPOKONY Several dozen union workers and students held a protest targeting three N.Y.U. Law School trustees that they charge are anti-union on the evening of Oct. 1, outside the university’s annual Law School gala dinner at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Cablevision workers from Brooklyn who are unionized with the Communications Workers of America, the world’s largest telecommunications union, demonstrated against New York University Law trustees Zachary Carter and Vincent Tese, who sit on Cablevision’s board of directors. The National Labor Relations Board filed charges in April — and began a hearing in September — against Cablevision’s allegedly illegal union-busting practices. Cablevision is accused of giving a 17 percent raise to all of the company’s roughly 15,000 employees, except the nearly 300 Brooklyn employees who unionized, and firing 22 of the union workers when they tried to utilize an “open door” policy to negotiate their contracts. “The door is only open to ‘yes’ people,” said Steven Ashurst, one of the 22 Brooklyn Cablevision workers who were fired last January. The employees were later rehired when elected officials put massive pressure on the company to change its course. Tim Dubnau, a C.W.A. organizer, said the union reached out to Carter and Tese, and actually met with Carter to try talking

Photos by Sam Spokony

Outside the gala, James McGregor, an employee of 1199 SEIU Healthcare Workers East, left, handed out fliers about the accusations against N.Y.U. Law trustees Daniel Straus, Zachary Carter and Vincent Tese.

about Cablevision’s alleged federal labor violations, but said that Carter “refused to do anything.” “[Carter and Tese] are trustees for a law school, so you would think they would be interested in upholding the law,” Dubnau

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said. “And at a certain point, N.Y.U. has to make a decision. Do they really want these people representing their law school, when they’re going to sit by silently while illegal practices take place?” Cablevision released a statement claiming that the company has done no wrong, and that C.W.A. is not really acting in the interests of workers. “We don’t know much about this alleged protest, but we do know that our employees in Brooklyn have petitioned to vote on whether to continue with C.W.A. representation, and the C.W.A. is doing everything it can to block that employee vote,” said a Cablevision spokesperson. But Dubnau said that’s a lie. In addition, alongside C.W.A., workers from 1199 SEIU Healthcare Workers East demonstrated against N.Y.U. Law trustee Daniel Straus, who owns CareOne and HealthBridge nursing homes in New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania, and whose companies have already violated federal labor laws 38 times, according to the N.L.R.B. Among other things, workers have said — and the N.L.R.B. agreed — that Straus dealt unfairly by asking the union to sign a contract that eliminated six paid sick days and a week of vacation for many employees, froze pensions and required many workers to pay at least $6,000 more per year for family healthcare coverage. Jeffrey Jimenez, a worker at Woodcrest CareOne in New Milford, N.J., said that the mood among his fellow employees is particularly grim right now — even though their claims have been proven true by the N.L.R.B. — because Straus is allegedly waiting to make any positive changes until the federal government actually forces him to do so. “Everything is the same, and all the benefits that were frozen are still frozen,

Andre Ucava-Sombillo, grandson of union organizer Isabellita Sombillo, held a protest sign outside the N.Y.U. Law School gala.

so people aren’t any happier,” Jimenez said. “The company keeps telling us that the rulings are still pending, so they just go back and forth with the courts while we don’t know when this is ever going to end.” Straus, as well as CareOne and Healthbridge representatives, declined to comment. Both unions were joined in their protests by students from N.Y.U.’s Student Labor Action Movement, who demonstrated alongside 1119 SEIU workers against Straus numerous times last year. Last October, this newspaper reported that CareOne and Healthbridge representatives hired anti-union “goons” to harass union workers and students during an oncampus protest against Straus. N.Y.U. declined to comment. Also at the Oct. 1 protest was Ben Kallos, who won the Democratic nomination for the City Council’s District 5 seat — which includes the Upper East Side, Midtown East and Roosevelt Island — in last month’s primary election. Kallos, who is a labor attorney, has been endorsed by C.W.A. “When Cablevision has an open-door policy, and they then tell 22 employees that the open door is basically just a door to see themselves out, that’s wrong,” Kallos said. “And this protest is about saying that N.Y.U.’s School of Law simply shouldn’t have union busters on its board of trustees.” The N.L.R.B. could not be reached for comment due to the federal government shutdown.


October 10 - 16, 2013

Police BLOTTER Guilty in brutal beating Two Brooklyn men were found guilty of brutally attacking five out-of-town visitors — one of whom was beaten nearly to death — in Greenwich Village in January, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced on Oct. 7. But both Hatem Farsakh, 25, and Sherif Rizk, 23, were acquitted of attempted murder, the top charge they faced. And the D.A. said that Farsakh is currently a fugitive whose whereabouts are unknown, after he went into hiding while out free on bail. A State Supreme Court jury convicted Farsakh, in absentia, of first-degree gang assault, four counts of first-degree attempted gang assault and two counts of second-degree assault. Rizk was convicted of second-degree assault. According to court documents, around 5 a.m. on Jan. 13, Farsakh, Rizk and their friends got into a verbal argument on MacDougal St. near Artichoke Pizza with the five young men, who were visiting from Massachusetts. The first group then took a tire iron, baseball bat and other weapons out of Rizk’s car trunk, and used them to hit all the other men. One of the victims, 24, was continually beaten until his skull fractured and was nearly killed. Farsakh is scheduled to be sentenced in absentia on Nov. 7, and Rizk is scheduled to be sentenced Nov. 26.

Crazy for newspapers Police arrested Ronald Wright, 51, after he allegedly damaged a passing car on Oct. 4 by pushing sidewalk newspaper bins into traffic. A traffic officer said he spotted Wright around 9:45 p.m. screaming while walking in the street at W. Fourth St. and Sixth Ave. Wright then reportedly began pushing the bins haphazardly into the road, eventually hitting a car and denting its rear passenger door. He fled the scene, but police were able to identify him by using video surveillance footage from a nearby Chase Bank. Wright was caught the next day and charged with criminal mischief.

Busted at Whole Foods Police arrested Fahdia Khan, 39, after she allegedly tried to steal items from the Whole Foods Market in Union Square on Oct. 2. A security guard for the supermarket at 40 E. 14th was by the store’s exit around 7:30 p.m., when he spotted her walking out while hiding the goods — which totaled $150 — under her clothing. She was detained at the store. When police arrived, they also found that Khan was carrying a fake New Jersey ID card

and a stolen credit card. She was charged with petty larceny, criminal possession of a forged instrument and criminal possession of stolen property.

Senior slugger Police arrested Ignatius Piccirillo, 69, after he allegedly beat up a co-worker after an argument in the West Village on Oct. 2. The victim, 53, said he and Piccirillo were in the middle of a work-related dispute around 6:45 a.m., near the corner of Washington and W. 10th Sts., when Piccirillo reared back and punched him in the face. The senior citizen then reportedly threw the other man to the ground and continued punching him, until a witness broke it up and called police. Officers soon arrived and arrested Piccirillo, and charged him with assault.

Pot, pills and knife Police arrested Karl Draper, 18, after they said they caught him smoking marijuana on a West Village street corner on Oct. 4. Officers on patrol said they spotted Draper around 2 a.m. near the corner of Grove and Bleecker Sts., while he was puffing on a pipe filled with purported pot. When they stopped and searched him, the officers said they found Draper was also carrying seven alleged pills of the prescription drug Klonopin, as well as a switchblade. Draper was charged with criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of a controlled substance and unlawful possession of marijuana.

Caught after curfew Police said they arrested Jonathon Konon, 33, when he was hanging out in Washington Square Park after closing time on Oct. 5. Officers said they spotted Konon in the southwest corner of the park — which closes at midnight — around 3 a.m., and stopped and questioned him. They found he was carrying a debit card that turned out to have been stolen. Konon was charged with trespassing and criminal possession of stolen property.

Sam Spokony

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October 10 - 16, 2013

Tellers and lovers of stories flock to The Moth as if to a flame By HEATHER DUBIN Everyone loves a good story. Especially the New Yorkers who were willing to stand in a line that wrapped around the block on a recent Monday night to get into The Moth StorySLAM. This installment of the weekly competition was held at The Bitter End on Bleecker St., which has a 230-person capacity and is one of The Moth’s smaller venues. Right before the show, Robin Wachsberger, associate producer and StorySLAM manager, sat down for an interview about the ins and outs of The Moth. The basic premise at each StorySLAM is that anyone in the audience can put his or her name into a hat in hopes of performing as a storyteller that evening. The host then randomly selects 10 names from the hat, and those lucky brave souls have five minutes to tell a story from their own life that pertains to the event’s theme. Staff members generate themes prior to the season during a big brainstorming session. They search for broad themes that allow for a variety of interpretations from the storytellers. Fundamental concepts are best, which was exemplified by this particular evening’s theme, “Promises.” Wachsberger had trouble coming up with a bad theme from past slams. “We did a location one once — ‘Roof.’ It was weird,” she recalled. Apparently, most of those stories involved sexual escapades. Themes are posted at the beginning of the season so people can see if there is an intriguing topic ahead or mull over a story they would like to tell. With weekly and monthly slams in 16 cities nationwide, there’s bound to be some repeat. “We recycle themes, there’s no shame in it,” Wachsberger said. The event would not be a slam without judges. There are three sets of judges, who are chosen from the audience — some are familiar faces and others are new. “We also look for those who don’t have a horse in the race,” Wachsberger said. “We look for a team with longstanding knowledge, and we stress consistency.” Storytellers are not allowed to be judges. Armed with a set of criteria, judges are instructed to look for stories that stay on theme, reflect personal change and stick to the time limit. Like figure skating, judges are given scorecards from 0 to 9. They are encouraged to go no lower than 7.0 since the stories are personal and judging is subjective. And they are told to exercise restraint in awarding a perfect score. “A 10 means you’ve changed the fabric of our reality, and we try to discourage judges from giving them out liberally,” Wachsberger

Photo by Heather Dubin

“Release the Moths!” StorySLAM host David Crabb kept the evening moving along with humor and stories of his own, and encouraged the audience to show support for the storytelling contestants.

said. Judges also need to be mindful that they are not inflating scores after a few drinks. With so much responsibility, there are still many people eager to be the arbitrators. Wachsberger explained the nuances of The Moth community, and said there are unspoken codes of conduct against retelling a story or repeating one that has won. But that doesn’t mean everyone adheres to them. “You can bet people gossip,” she said. “They gossip.” Ultimately, it’s the judging that makes the regulars care. “They take the recommendations of good storytelling seriously,” she said. Winning a StorySLAM has cachet since the final 10 winners of each slam contest compete in a regional GrandSLAM championship. The next one will be at the Music Hall of Williamsburg in Brooklyn on Oct. 23. The Moth started in 1997, and was founded by George Dawes Green, a poet and novelist who would gather with friends on a porch in Georgia to exchange stories. He brought the idea to New York, first in his living room, and it has grown to include the many venues it occurs in today. “The Moth came from the poetic image of moth to a flame,” Wachsberger said. “It’s the

Feed Your Head! Read The Villager

basic sentiment of listening to stories instead of talking to people.” The slams have become so popular in New York City that people are usually turned away at the door. They are no longer able to hold events for under 200 people. Even at larger venues like The Bell House in Brooklyn, the slams are packed and not everyone can get in. Wachsberger was first introduced to a StorySLAM four years ago at the Nuyorican Poets Café in the East Village. “It was the first event where there was a chance you could get on stage,” she said. The original content and supportive audience also inspired her. She went back, performed and, as she put it, “became a Moth head.” While she did actually make it all the way to the GrandSLAM, she did not win. Some people are well rehearsed at slams, while others are a little more impromptu. “There’s a spur-of-the-moment, metaphoric beauty in the sheer panic of the moment,” Wachsberger noted. Even though the experience can be raw, Wachsberger was quick to appreciate that there’s “always a positive nugget in the evening.” Although it is rare, when something great comes out of a slam, it can go straight through to programming on “The Moth Radio Hour” on NPR. Sometimes a celebrity participates at a slam along with the masses. “It’s super-exciting because of the democracy of a system, you could accidentally have a star-studded evening,” she said. There were no such sightings at the event at The Bitter End, but David Crabb, the host, was entertainment enough. Crabb got his start as a storyteller, and hosts the

StorySLAM on a regular basis. He kept the evening moving with humor and his own personal tales between storytellers. Crabb also made sure the audience was responsive to all 10 participants. “Everyone wants you to succeed,” Wachsberger noted. “There’s a vulnerability everyone can appreciate.” Crabb began the night by exclaiming, “Release the Moths!” He explained the rules and told storytellers that their tales must be true and actually have happened to them. A recorder was used to alert storytellers when their time was coming a close. “At five minutes you will hear a sound, like a wood nymph,” he said. “At six minutes you will hear a more dire sound.” Crabb reminded the storytellers to stay on theme, and tales of pledges kept and reneged ensued. Participants talked about promises involving a marriage proposal or finding a homeless man a place to live. The winner was a teacher who told a story about his students and a promise he made to them that ended up with him being bombarded by ice snowballs. Sloan Crawford and Kate Fagan, who are roommates in the East Village, were each judges. Crawford loved the responsibility and thought it was “the ultimate distinction.” Fagan was more forthcoming and revealed private information about her roommate. “Sloan listens to this every morning when she gets ready to go to work,” she said. “This was a big deal for her.” Crawford then confessed that she listens on NPR to “This American Life” — another popular storytelling show — on Mondays, and “The Moth” Tuesday through Friday.


October 10 - 16, 2013

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October 10 - 16, 2013

A big day for Sara Curry and Little Missionary’s At the unveiling of the new Sara Curry Way honorary street co-naming sign in the East Village on Saturday, actress Kelly McDonald experienced some slight technical difficulties as the paper covering ripped instead of sliding off. (This seems to frequently happen at these street-sign unveilings!) Susan Stetzer, district manager of Community Board 3, at left, got a kick out of the momentary glitch. The ceremony, at the corner of First Ave. and St. Mark’s Place, was the highlight of an allday block party on St. Mark’s in honor of Curry, who founded the Little Missionary’s Day Nursery on St. Mark’s in 1896. Curry started the school to give Lower East Side kids a safe space during the day while their impoverished, immigrant parents were off working in sweatshops.

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October 10 - 16, 2013

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Amid Meatpacking District’s glitz, there’s still some meat By Heather Dubin The smell of meat hits you at the door. Once an omnipresent odor in the Meatpacking District, it can still be found here, at the “Co-op,” the last remnant of a bustling meat market that was once much, much larger. The address is 832 Washington St., home to JT Jobbagy, a meat wholesaler, and six other meat companies. Tucked under the High Line and next door to Hector’s, an old-school diner on the corner of Little West 12th St., the Co-op represents a slice of New York that is long gone. Today, there is a Disneyland feel to the Meatpacking District with designer clothing shops, high-end restaurants and nightclubs, in sharp contrast to the raw market neighborhood it was. Brothers John and Tom Jobbagy started JT Jobbagy together in 1990, having followed in their father’s footsteps, who also worked in the industry. The male-dominated world that was the old Meat Market covered a six- or seven-block area — with three major buildings on the current Co-op block — and employed a couple thousand men. These days, the remaining handful of meat

businesses are clustered in one last building. The massive new Downtown Whitney Museum, currently under construction, replaced the other old meat buildings on this same block. John Jobbagy, who begins his day at 4:30 a.m., recently took some time out of his afternoon to talk about the meat industry and how it has changed. His older brother Tom sat next to him, busy fielding customers’ calls and doing paperwork.  “We’ve been here in this building when it was completely a market,” John said. “It was all just meat, tons of vendors, a few of the bigger companies and wholesalers.” Carcasses were trucked in, cut up and sold to supermarkets and other meat companies.  Now the Jobbagys have 14 employees, and the rest of the meat businesses left on the block are similar in size. They still do carcasses — fresh hanging like they did years ago — wholesale restaurants, retail markets and also supply other meat companies. But today, the bulk of their work is supplying restaurants. While Jobbagy recalled the Meat Market as a former place of fast action with trucks

roaring in and out and camaraderie, he is more pragmatic than nostalgic. With the industry changes and surrounding newly posh neighborhood, he acknowledged things could never be the same.  “Back in the day, it was an all-male world,” he said. “There were four to five women as bookkeepers — it wasn’t a universe without women — but it was without women in the meat lockers.” Jobbagy described the men as a bunch of blue-collar guys who cursed a lot and worked in extreme temperatures year-round.  “Everyone knew each other. It was a community and it was an interesting sort of meat world,” he said. “Any group of 2,000 blue-collar workers who knew each other — it was a cast of characters.” These same men may have also frequented the nearby Frank’s Restaurant or a local diner that is now Hogs & Heifers bar, or strip clubs and the three or four topless clubs that used to exist in the vicinity. According to Jobbagy, when Pastis, Keith McNally’s French bistro, opened up at Ninth Ave. and Little West 12th St. in 1999, everything changed. The area rapidly became fashionable, more restaurants popped up, and “Sex and the City” filmed there along with “Law & Order” and movies.  “It’s really noticeable in this area — without a doubt, the transformation is really vivid,” Jobbagy said. 

As for the meat industry, older buildings, mostly from the 1900s, were no longer able to meet United States Department of Agriculture codes. Wooden beams in buildings had rotted from the moisture over the years and needed to be replaced. Also, the U.S.D.A. grew stricter concerning drains, walls and floors. Additionally, beef and pork were now not only being produced, but also carved and packed, in the Midwest. “They had slaughterhouses back in the Midwest, and then got smart and built packing plants,” Jobbagy said. And finally, the meatpacking owners were in their 60s, and Jobbagy noted, there was “no more succession.” These factors and economics prompted the meat industry to go elsewhere, with many relocating to newer, modern facilities in Hunts Point in the Bronx or New Jersey. But the brothers are not going anywhere, and they are successfully doing what other meat companies do, though on a smaller scale. “Beef is our biggest thing,” Jobbagy said. “We also do veal, lamb, pork and poultry — we do all the species.” When asked if he was headed out for a vegetarian lunch at the close of the interview, Jobbagy laughed and exclaimed, “No, I’m going to Hector’s to have a Jobbagy burger!”

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John Jobbagy in his well-stocked refrigerated meat locker.


10

October 10 - 16, 2013

Ten years later: The Meatpacking District would have By Andrew Berman Ten years ago this September, the Gansevoort Market Historic District was designated, granting landmark protections to about two-thirds of the Meatpacking District. The neighborhood has gone through an incredible amount of change during the past decade, but the type of change might have been completely different had it not been for landmark designation. How the district’s landmarking came about was an improbable tale, about as hard to predict as the incredible transformation the neighborhood has undergone. On Aug. 1, 2000, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation convened the first meeting of the Save Gansevoort Market Task Force. Though it may be hard to believe now, in the summer of 2000 the Meatpacking District was still very much a backwater. The neighborhood was pretty empty during most daylight hours. But when the sun went down, the clubs opened (of both the sex and dance variety), transgendered prostitutes worked the streets, and the meatpacking businesses opened their doors around 4 a.m. and started loading and unloading their products until around noon, when the cycle started all over again. The cobblestoned streets dripped with animal blood (and some other unsavory liquids), but the neighborhood had achieved a kind of equilibrium in which not much changed,

A Meat Market worker back during the district’s heyday as a working market. At its peak, in the mid-20th century, there were several hundred meat companies packed into the district’s several blocks.

HAUNTED HIGH LINE HALLOWEEN

and all parts seemed to coexist in relative harmony. But some prescient locals knew things were not likely to stay this way for long. The construction of the Hudson River Park was clearly going to increase the desirability of this and other adjacent neighborhoods. Bill Gottlieb, the eccentric “accidental preservationist” who bought scores of buildings in the Meatpacking District, the Village and Chelsea and then did nothing with them, had just died without a will, leaving the

fate of his incredible portfolio of properties in limbo. And on “Sex and the City,” Samantha had just moved into a loft in the Meatpacking District, indicating that a cultural tipping point had been reached. There were also these two crazy guys from the neighborhood talking about a plan to turn the old abandoned overhead rail line into a park, but nobody really paid much attention to that.

Continued on page 11

Saturday, October 26 11:00 AM – 3:00 PM On the High Line, Between West 13th and West 18th Streets Come in costume for a free day of family-friendly fun celebrating the High Line’s spooky past. Treats · Face Painting Live Music · Spooky Characters Haunted Trains · Much More! MetLife Foundation is a Supporting Sponsor of High Line Kids.

www.thehighline.org

The Triangle Building, at W. 14th St. and Ninth Ave., used to have sex clubs in its basement, and the infamous Pope of Pot was once a tenant. Today, the building includes grandfathered residential tenants, art galleries and upscale eateries.


October 10 - 16, 2013

11

become minced meat without landmark protections Continued from page 10 G.V.S.H.P. had been researching and documenting the history of the Meatpacking District since the late 1980s, when the organization’s first executive director, Regina Kellerman, published “The Architecture of the Greenwich Village Waterfront.” Kellerman’s seminal work surveyed the history of every building between 14th and Houston Sts. west of the then-existing Greenwich Village Historic District, including all of the Meatpacking District. G.V.S.H.P. had for years been calling attention to the plight of this historic area, and the rest of the Greenwich Village waterfront, and the need to preserve it before it could be consumed by out-of-control development. Into this mix came Jo Hamilton, a local resident with a strong interest in preserving the Meatpacking District who had

recently joined the board of G.V.S.H.P., and restaurateur Florent Morellet, a member of the G.V.S.H.P. board of advisers and eventually board of directors, who owned a popular, eponymous diner on Gansevoort St. Hamilton and Morellet became co-chairpersons of G.V.S.H.P.’s Save Gansevoort Market Task Force, which was a coalition of local businesses, nearby residents and preservationists who sought to do what seemed like an impossible task at the time — secure landmark designation to preserve the quirky architecture of the Meatpacking District. All things considered, the effort made incredible progress in what was, by New York City standards for a preservation effort, a relatively short period of time. In 2000 and 2001 G.V.S.H.P.’s Save Gansevoort Market Task Force published a walking tour and a case study showcasing the area’s historic significance, along with a formal proposal for landmark designation that was submitted

Defying the odds, the Gansevoort Market Historic District was designed in 2003. Four years later, the entire Meat Market was placed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. In 2002 Save Gansevoort Market secured a determination from the New York State Historic Preservation Office that the neighborhood was eligible for the State and National Registers of Historic Places, as well as a “Seven To Save” designation from the Preservation League of New York State, naming Gansevoort Market one of the seven most significant and endangered historic sites in New York State. By the end of 2002, the city agreed to formally consider, or calendar, G.V.S.H.P.’s proposal for landmark designation for the district, which was in and of itself an incredible victory. The Meatpacking District’s unconventional history and highly altered architecture was not the kind of stuff that landmark designation had ever been applied to in New York City before. But between the time of the calendaring and designation of the district in September 2003, there were successes and setbacks. G.V.S.H.P. spearheaded a successful campaign to torpedo a zoning variance for a 500-foot-tall residential condo tower proposed for the corner of 13th and Washington Sts. But a developer moved ahead with plans to build a new hotel on what had long been a parking lot bounded by Ninth Ave., 13th, Hudson and Gansevoort Sts., which became the Hotel Gansevoort. When the city did vote to designate the Gansevoort Market Historic District in September, it also pulled back the district boundaries somewhat,

after having already cut out some areas we had proposed when they calendared. Nevertheless, this was an enormous victory, and no matter what one says about what the Meatpacking District has become in the 10 intervening years, without landmark protections, it would likely today be a sea of Hotel Gansevoorts. After the landmark designation was secured, G.V.S.H.P. continued preservation work in the Meatpacking District. In 2004, we defeated a second attempt to build the 500-foot-tall tower on 13th and Washington Sts., just outside the new historic district’s boundaries. In 2007, we got the entire Meatpacking District placed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places, not just the part the city was willing to landmark. And due to landmark designation, we have been able to review and effect changes to literally dozens of applications for alterations to buildings in the neighborhood. For better or worse, the clubs from the old days have been replaced by high-end restaurants and lounges, and there are not many prostitutes or meatpackers left in the Meatpacking District today. But there is a rich array of buildings reflecting more than 150 years of the evolution of commerce in New York City — some of it more colorful than others. Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Not only is the Gansevoort District’s hodgepodge of quirky, much-altered market buildings landmarked, but so too are its beautiful old Belgian block-paved streets — much to the chagrin of women in high heels out for a night on the town.


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October 10 - 16, 2013

editorial

Give us Liberty; End the shutdown

In Lower Manhattan the mobs of tourists are no longer coming to spend their money before and after seeing the Statue of Liberty. The African Burial Ground is closed. So is Federal Hall where George Washington was sworn into office — and his namesake city, our nation’s capital, has reached unprecedented levels of dysfunction. The closed monuments caused by the government shutdown have damaged our economy, but the far greater damage is being done to our nation’s poor, particularly children, who rely on things like food stamps — an undeniable economic simulant — and Head Start. The blame falls entirely on the Republican members of Congress, some of whom campaigned on promises to shut the government down. Democrats have agreed to continue “sequester level” budget cuts, the same ones that Republicans also described as terrible not too long ago. The Republican-controlled House has passed measure after measure that members know will not pass the Democratically controlled Senate. The Senate’s bill, on the other hand, would open the government entirely and by all appearances, would pass the House if only Speaker Boehner would allow a vote. Boehner says the Senate bill would not pass, but it is a claim without credibility since he can’t explain why he won’t bring the bill to the floor. Some Republicans, including Boehner, sound ready to not raise the debt limit before the deadline. Economists can’t predict how calamitous the consequences would be if the debt limit is not raised next week, but the overwhelming consensus is it would be devastating. The latest Washington mess comes from the G.O.P.’s obsessive desire to roll back the Affordable Care Act. Senator Ted Cruz, one of the leaders in this effort, has admitted that when Obamacare is fully implemented in two months, Americans will like it so much that it will be impossible to be undone. He compared the law to people’s love of sugar. Mitt Romney made the same admission after he lost last year’s presidential election, saying the plan was such a “gift” to so many people that it made it hard to defeat President Obama. Republicans once cared about helping the economy, but those days are getting harder to remember. It is long overdue for Republican members of Congress to start caring about the American people a little bit more than they hate Barack Obama.

SOUND OFF! Write a letter to the editor news@thevillager.com

letters to the editor How about the rest of us? To The Editor: Re “Conservancy wants to help the park, not run it, they say” (news article, Oct. 3): Have you noticed that all four members of the steering committee of the newly established Washington Square Park Conservancy live north of the park, an area dominated by Fifth Ave.? Where is the representation of the poorer South and East Village from whence so much original talent in the past made Washington Square Park truly a people’s park? Staid flower beds and tough upper-class rules can never replace that bygone spirit. Vahe A. Tiryakian

O.K. for now…what about later? To The Editor: Re “Conservancy wants to help the park, not run it, they say” (news article, Oct. 3): What mechanism is in place to stop the conservancy from being co-opted by major donors, like N.Y.U.? Why are there no bylaws developed for or posted by the group? No one is arguing that they are well-intentioned and committed neighbors, but an organization such as this without a clear mission statement and rules or order becomes ripe for takeover over time. Every nonprofit I know keeps a publicly available donor list. Every board I have served on has clear and available minutes, and must abide by stringent fundraising and expenditure requirements. Will the Washington Square Park Conservancy have this type of transparency? Donor dollars bring pressure, especially if anonymous. Let’s not kid each other here, and simply hope for the best. Things change over time, board / conservancy makeup changes over time, and verbal commitments for something on this scale, and with the history of this park, are simply not enough. The bar must be raised. Patrick Shields

A few tips for conservancy To The Editor: Re “Conservancy wants to help the park, not run it, they say” (news article, Oct. 3): Dear ladies, who lunch, of the Washington Square Conservancy:

Before you get the Zamboni and before you get the power washer, perhaps you could do the following:  Get the rats out of the park. Get the dogs out of the flower beds and off the lawns. After all, there are not one but two dog runs.  Get park Administrator Neilson to sit up and do her job and issue summonses to all the men using the northwestcorner planted beds as a toilet. Wouldn’t want to be the volunteer gardener working is those areas! (Question: Is the park supervisor, who has an office in the new building, a position different from Neilson’s? Who’s paying that salary, and what does the supervisor do?)  Designate a “quiet zone” away from piano players, jazz combos, barking dogs and traffic noise. Your college-student summer playground associate made an annualized salary of $45,000. Who do you have to know to get that gig?  The Parks Department did a good job of budgeting for nice plantings even before this endless renovation, and of budgeting for all the new plantings in the completed sections. So do tell the community again why we need a conservancy.                           Noreen Shipman

Fighting ‘Citi-fication’ — for real To The Editor: Re “First, Citi Bike; Next...Citi Arch?” (news brief, Oct. 3): Spoofing aside, thanks to Save Our Village.org for raising awareness of corporate takeovers and corporate branding of our public amenities, whether parks or transportation modes. Friends of Petrosino Square would like to extend an invitation to all to our day in court that will determine whether the Department of Transportation can alienate our public parkland and art-installation space with a Citi Bike kiosk that could easily be relocated a few feet away into roadbed where transportation modes belong. We will be joined by co-petitioners Lieutenant Joseph Petrosino Lodge of the Sons of Italy in America, Spring Studio Life Drawing, the Soho Alliance, the Noho Neighborhood Association, the Chinatown Civic Association and former District 1 City Councilmember Alan J. Gerson on Tues., Oct. 15, beginning at 9:30 a.m. in front of Supreme Court Justice Cynthia Kern at 60 Centre St., Room 432. Oral argument by our pro bono attorneys at Gibson Dunn promises to result in a precedent-setting decision for the future of the public trust. Georgette Fleischer Fleischer is founder, Friends of Petrosino Square

Continued on page 14

EVAN FORSCH


October 10 - 16, 2013

13

Is frozen yogurt smoothing my relationship with D’Ag? notebook By MiChele herMan In an ideal world, among your many mutually satisfying relationships, you get along with your local supermarket. You know it. It knows you. There’s some respect running in both directions. In my real world here in the West Village, my local D’Agostino and I have never quite gotten each other. I am a grudging customer, but then it’s not as if the store is doing such a great job of meeting my needs. My trips to D’Ag, on Bethune St., are all business — I’ve run out of an ingredient in a recipe already in progress, or I need a staple that I can’t get cheaper or faster elsewhere. As much as I disdain the place, its layout is carved deep in my brain, as it is in the brains of everyone who lives in a half-mile radius. Imagine my surprise when I ran in a few weeks ago, fresh from vacation, to find a frozen-yogurt station where the carrots are supposed to live, and a “café” (some woodlaminate tables and hotel conference-room chairs) in place of the manager’s booth. There was more: The frosty old open icecream freezer was replaced by upright freezers with glass doors. In one of the displays in the front, the sort reserved for Halloween candy or Passover matzoh, they’d put some small appliances, chain drugstore-style. A homeless-looking guy was wandering the aisles muttering about how he couldn’t find a f------ thing. I knew how he felt. I was already feeling uneasy about the yogurt, but the toasters tipped me toward alarm; they seemed to signal something very bad in the culture at large, although it took me a while to pinpoint it: the convenienceification of America, an insistence that everything must be readily available to consumers at all times under the same roof. The following Saturday night, my husband, son and I happened to be out and talked about doing an ice cream run. As we approached D’Ag we thought, like actors in a commercial: Hey — why not check out the frozen yogurt? Apparently, the station hadn’t yet officially opened. The spigots were unmarked and the bits of cheesecake and M&Ms were in bowls with no spoons. We had to keep calling a manager over to explain the operation. But we pulled on the spigots and out came yogurt into our huge cardboard cups, the sort designed for takeout wonton soup.

They chose fruit bubble toppings (mango, blueberry and pomegranate), which looked a little too much like fish eggs for me, so I went with brownie bits.

I got to wondering about how a supermarket actually does assess the desires of its patrons. We paid and sat down at the “café.” It was around 9:40. The store was practically empty. We looked at each other, with the fluorescent lights sapping our vacation tans, and burst out laughing. Who sits in the supermarket on a Saturday night in the heart of the West Village — the land that invented the cafe, or at least took the idea from Italy and perfected it? The vanilla yogurt struck me as a little on the sweet, bland side. The almost-black brownie bits were chewy but tasted more of brownie-mix chemicals rather than chocolate. If D’Ag had asked my opinion about how it could serve me better, I would’ve gone in different directions: Bring down the price of milk and butter; or get good, freshly made bagels; or make an arrangement with local farmers for great corn in the summer and apples in the fall. I got to wondering about how a supermarket actually does assess the desires of its patrons, so I called Robert Fonti, D’Ag’s vice president of operations and merchandising, and Danielle McIntyre, deli and bakery director. Fonti told me that the Bethune St. store is D’Ag’s second yogurt test market, the first being the store on 91st and Columbus, across the street from a school that the store management thought might appreciate a healthy snack alternative (his phrase, not mine — the huge containers and candy toppings are certainly not encouraging healthy habits). We in the Village got the yogurt because it’s in an area with a lot of walkin trade and “folks out strolling at night,” Fonti noted. Also, the nearest 16 Handles or Pinkberry is a long schlep away. Fonti told me they went with ready-made market research from Taylor, the company that supplies the machinery. Member of the New York Press Association

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“We took their research for the New York area and picked their top 10 items,” he explained. McIntyre added that there will be a promotional calendar with lots of seasonal flavors, particularly as we get deeper into fall and the holiday season. Then we talked yogurt. I asked about the lack of tartness in the vanilla. I was assured that the yogurt does come in a “Euro-tart” flavor and, of course, Greek, which is having its moment in the sun. “But we started with basics just to get people’s eyes on it,” Fonti said. “We welcome customer feedback. We’ll struggle to please everybody.” This was an interesting statement, given my long-standing sense that D’Ag, in trying to straddle the neighborhood’s double population (one very wealthy and the other not at all), doesn’t really please anybody. I’m not sure I’m at liberty to divulge the name of the company that supplies the yogurt. Let’s just say that you’ve heard of it and it starts with the fourth letter of the alphabet. “It’s a very high-quality yogurt,” said Fonti, adding that it comes in mixes like any other similar product. Upon learning this, I fell prey either to a funny psychological phenomenon or to more interesting flavors. I went back to give the yogurt another chance and found four flavors: chocolate and cappuccino — both nonfat — premium peanut butter and low-fat dulce de

leche. I tried the peanut butter and the dulce de leche, and sure enough, I liked both much more than the vanilla I had dismissed as just a no-name house brand. The peanut butter’s saltiness contrasted nicely with the sweetness, and I found the dulce de leche’s warm, buttery flavor a pleasing counterpoint to the cold. I asked how D’Ag measures the success of the yogurt. “We look at a five-year period and see what the return is,” Fonti replied. “We know already what the break-even point is. We already know that on 91st St., we’ve tremendously surpassed the break-even point. We feel we will easily pass that in the Village.” While I had a V.P. on the phone, I asked if it was my imagination or had D’Ag actually been offering some deals lately. It turns out that this is a conscious strategy. “We decided to become a lot more aggressive,” he said. “The plan is to increase sales enough to make up the loss margin. There’s a lot of competition and we need to hold onto market share.” He wouldn’t say which stores are considered the competition. I mentioned the fact that the Gristedes on Sheridan Square was recently spiffed up — and this is a store that really needed some spiffing. All Fonti would say on the subject was this: “Remodeling tends to spread. You paint your house and your neighbor paints his.”

Photo by Adele Gotlib

Scene

A sign on the door of the Key Food supermarket on Avenue A at E. Fourth St. made the photographer think it’s unfair that “tourists” should be allowed privileges denied to the locals. And what about sightseeing cats? she added.

PUBLISHER Jennifer Goodstein EDITOR IN CHIEF Lincoln Anderson ARTS EDITOR Scott Stiffler Reporter Heather Dubin PUBLISHER EMERITUS John W. Sutter

SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING Francesco Regini

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Troy Masters

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.

RETAIL ADVERTISING MANAGER Colin Gregory

SENIOR DESIGNER Michael Shirey

CONTRIBUTORS

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Allison Greaker Alex Morris Andrew Regier Rebecca Rosenthal Julio Tumbaco

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Arnold Rozon Chris Ortiz PHOTOGRAPHERS Tequila Minsky Jefferson Siegel Clayton Patterson

Marvin Rock Ira Blutreich Terese Loeb Kreuzer Patricia Fieldsteel Bonnie Rosenstock Jefferson Siegel Jerry Tallmer


14

October 10 - 16, 2013

þ Choose to live the life you want.

letters to the editor Continued from page 12

What’s still left of the left? To The Editor: Re “Marxists can’t make the rent; Make move east to Brooklyn” (news article, Oct. 10): This is pretty pathetic. It is interesting to reflect how low the left has sunk in presence ever since the U.S. right opened a home front against it in the 1950s. A Moscow-born artist, Yevgeney Fiks, made a 2007 survey of formerly left-owned places in New York City — the extent and variety is astonishing. It’s online at http://yevgeniyfiks.com/section/120722_Communist_Guide_to_New_ York_City_2007.html. Alan W. Moore

Dressing up a poem

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To The Editor: Re “Word up! Artists reopen gallery in ‘novel’ fashion” (news article, Oct. 3): The dress with the script on it is “Oceanic Slip” by Desiree Alvarez, and was one of my absolute favorite pieces in the show. Not only was the poem one she wrote herself, but — even though it was too loud to catch it all — it sounded wonderful. Sarah Stengle

Candidate seems committed To The Editor: Re “Green candidate’s seed of an idea: Wall St. ‘fair tax’” (news article, Oct. 3): Miles Budde seems to be committed to helping the people of New York have a better life. And I appreciate that he seems hard-working and intelligent. Given the moral quality of some of New York City’s politicians, it is refreshing to know that there are people like Miles in the race. Barbara Pochan

Green with appreciation To The Editor: Re “Green candidate’s seed of an idea: Wall St. ‘fair tax’” (news article, Oct. 3): Thank you for the Green Party article. I admire this Green Party candidate. We need many more 23-year-old folk running for office as Green Party candidates. Solar jobs, rail jobs, geothermal jobs — the Green New Deal is eco for the economy we need. Carey Campbell

Oh God, deliver us… To The Editor: Re “God���s Love gets a facelift as Rivers, Kors pitch in” (news article, Oct. 3): As a decades-long neighbor of God’s Love We Deliver, I am wondering if groundbreaking comedienne Joan Rivers is breaking ground for another “facelift”... or some other kind of cover-up. The proposed building, as pictured in your article, is quite different than the rendering previously presented to the Community Board 2 Land Use Committee, and which appears on the G.L.W.D. Web site. Furthermore, the Department of Buildings plan examination (which has been mysteriously rejected numerous times, including this past week) calls for a 107-foot-tall structure (as compared with the existing 24-foot building), which, by my reckoning, is more like 10 stories, rather than the six stories that G.L.W.D. has filed with D.O.B. The rendering also conveniently excludes the 14-story One Vandam condo, now under construction alongside G.L.W.D., which has already resulted in the evacuation of neighboring buildings. This angular cacophony of glass and aluminum, replete with what appears to be a gigantic diving board atop One Vandam, and roof gardens for the wealthy condo owners astride G.L.W.D., will be a visual abomination stating to all that our historic South VIllage is now ripe for ruination. Much like the bandito in “The Treasure of The Sierra Madre,” the fashionable celebrities in your groundbreaking photo might as well be saying, “Covenant? We don’t need no stinkin’ covenant!” The fact that G.L.W.D. has “grown by more than 60 percent in five years” is another reason why this out-of-scale, out-ofcharacter land grab does not belong on the congested residential corner of Spring St. and Avenue of the Americas. G.L.W.D. had already outgrown this site as of several years ago, causing enormous traffic and pedestrian congestion. Now they will be transgressing upon numerous longtime residents of modest means, many of whom are elderly and ill. If G.L.W.D. is indeed growing this fast, why don’t they set up shop in an industrial zone, such as their new location in Brooklyn, and truly involve themselves in serving a growing population of people in need? It’s painful to oppose an organization with “God’s Love” in its name. But I am reminded by the current realities of Downtown real estate valuation that there are, indeed, many gods in this world. Harry Pincus E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


October 10 - 16, 2013

15

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October 10 - 16, 2013

Stories amid the stacks at Jefferson Market Library

Photos by Tequila Minsky

As part of the French Institute Alliance Française’s FIAF Fall Fstvl, “Crossing the Line,” artist Fanny de Chaillé (above, in the library’s balcony overlooking the stacks) introduced a new take on storytelling at the Jefferson Market Library on Fri., Sept. 27. Twelve storytellers each told his or her own “book” in 20 minutes to members of the

public, one on one, with ongoing exchange between teller and listener. The storytellers each had their name on the back of their T-shirt and their “book”’s name — one was “In Search of Lost Knishes” — on the front. The storytelling posts were set up throughout the Sixth Ave. library’s second-floor stacks.


October 10 - 16, 2013

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Anti-development is in the air at FASP fundraiser Continued from page 1 the city,” Lebowitz continued. “There are many more universities than there are New Yorks. “The people who got here in the 1960s, we can’t live here because N.Y.U. buys up all the real estate. “This election and Bill de Blasio,” she went on, “it was about real estate — people have no place to live. Every place that N.Y.U. buys is a place where people — adults — can’t live.” Semester breaks come as a relief, she said. “It’s not such a wonderful presence,” she said of N.Y.U. “I wait for December because finally the conversations I’m hearing on the street are less annoying.” Noting she recently spoke to a group that she described as several hundred N.Y.U. undergraduates who were aspiring film directors, she accused the university of basically playing on the students’ unrealistic dreams. She said she wanted to tell them, “ ‘Don’t you know there aren’t 300 directors in the world?’ Yes, Martin Scorsese went to N.Y.U., but billions of other people went to N.Y.U. and didn’t become directors. Someone needs to tell them the truth.” Like the members of FASP are saying, Lebowitz said it’s time for the university simply to stop its expansion in the Village area. “You know what?” she said. “We’re full. We’re full — no vacancies.” Media studies professor Mark Crispin Miller, a leader of N.Y.U. FASP, said, “We are confident we will win this — both in court, and in the court of public opinion — because we represent the community, and we won’t let N.Y.U. crush the community with its own dead weight. “There is no academic rationale for the university’s plan,” he added, “other than, ‘We have to grow to maintain excellence.’ ” Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, said, “This struggle has really brought out people from all walks of life, from all over the city. This was an unbelievable land grab and abuse of the public trust by N.Y.U. “The administration of N.Y.U. is definitely feeling the heat. You can tell that they know they are under the gun, that the court of public opinion is against them.” Alex Manevitz, an N.Y.U. graduate student teaching assistant in the history department, noted that the university’s students — even before this costly $6 billion expansion project has started — are struggling with enormous debt. “We are the leader in the average debt, the median debt and the cost of tuition,” he stated. Even to conceive of doing the 2031 project in this context, he said, “It’s a slap in the face, really unfair to a lot of students who will leave here with crushing debt.” Assemblymember Deborah Glick agreed, saying, “The issue of student debt, this is really the epicenter. To cripple young people economically for most of their adult lives is really a crime — it’s stupidity. “I think we can get them on RICO,” she quipped, referring to charging the university with racketeering. Glick said she’s glad to see the N.Y.U. faculty and the community coming together on this struggle.

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Professor Mark Crispin Miller spoke at the fundraiser, while flanked by posters of the N.Y.U. “Debt Star,” left, and of university President John Sexton fiddling like Nero as the Village burns, right.

“We’ve had other fights with N.Y.U. in the past — pretty much all of my life,” she noted. “So it’s great to have the faculty with us.” Letitia James, the Democratic nominee for public advocate, also showed up and gave remarks. She noted that part of the platform she ran on was “responsible development,” adding that she opposed the Atlantic Yards project. Despite an agreement with the Atlantic Yards developer, not a single unit of affordable housing has been built there yet, she said. FASP has consciously tried to tie together its battle with N.Y.U. in the Village with other anti-development struggles around the city. Former Councilmember Sal Albanese, who ran for mayor in the recent Democratic primary, and who came out against N.Y.U. 2031 during his campaign, also spoke. In his run for office, he took a principled stand of not accepting any campaign contributions from real estate developers. “We didn’t do very well in the race,” he noted. “Obviously, it’s hard to project out [a message] without taking money from real estate developers and lobbyists.” Real estate developers spend millions of dollars on New York City’s elections, he said. Albanese said he viewed the N.Y.U. project “as a microcosm of what’s happening around the city, and around the country. “I think the real estate industry is running amok,” he said. The N.Y.U. FASP lawsuit — which includes G.V.S.H.P. and an array of local community organizations as co-plaintiffs — currently awaits a decision by State Supreme Court Judge Donna Mills. The plaintiffs expect she may issue a ruling by January. The suit argues, among other things, that strips of city-owned land along the superblocks’ eastern and western edges — on Mercer St. and LaGuardia Place — have always been used as parks, and have even been recognized as parkland by the city’s Parks Department. However, as part of the city’s approval of the project last year, N.Y.U. has been granted a 20-year easement on two of the strips to allow its construction project. In addition, the university also has been given the O.K. to acquire another one of the strips — where the Mercer-

Houston Dog Run is now — to allow it to build its planned “Zipper Building” on part of it, since the new building would have a larger footprint than the current Coles Gym. N.Y.U. spokesperson John Beckman issued the following statement in response to the FASP fundraiser: “FASP is unalterably opposed to any practical plan to expand N.Y.U.’s available space. However, new academic space is vital for N.Y.U. to maintain its academic trajectory.

There is a faculty group — the University Space Priorities Working Group, which is composed of representatives from each school — that has been considering space issues thoroughly, objectively and based on facts. The conclusions in the Working Group’s interim report are delivered calmly and dispassionately, andthey speak for themselves.” N.Y.U. did not immediately respond to the speakers’ comments about the issue of its students’ debt.

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October 10 - 16, 2013

Garage is for sale as developers drive prices higher Continued from page 1 with hard-to-get curb cuts, “allowing prospective developers or users to deliver on-site parking — a highly prized and very scarce commodity within the West Village for which the willingness to pay is enormous.” Although the brochure notes one potential option is to raze the property and build anew, the site is within the Greenwich Village Historic District, so any such changes would need approval by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. Also shown are several ideas for how the existing building’s facade could be altered, which again would need L.P.C. approval. The brochure notes that a chunk of the building’s rear could be removed to create a backyard and that this square footage could then be added atop the building as a setback fifth-story penthouse, again requiring L.P.C. approval. One interested buyer reportedly wants to convert the classic garage into a boutique hotel. According to a representative for another interested developer, the old garage is actually currently owned by the West Village Houses. Finding a buyer shouldn’t be hard. The marketing materials note that “data confirms that there is an insatiable demand for housing within just a few blocks of 125 Perry St.” Indeed, the brochure offers a truly eyeopening look at the current state of the West Village’s through-the-roof real estate market. Three years ago, a five-bedroom penthouse apartment at nearby Superior Ink, at West and W. 12th Sts., sold for a whopping $31.5 million.

“It was delivered as a white box for prospective buyers to build out the space themselves,” the brochure notes, “and sold at a record price solely based on its amazing West Village location in a marquee building.” Similarly, at 150 Charles St., currently under construction, a pair of five-bedroom penthouse apartments are under contract for sale for a cool $35 million and $34 million. And at least six four-bedroom apartments there are under contract for an average of $15 million. The building’s units were almost 75 percent as of a few months ago. Meanwhile, sales have been booming over at the Abingdon, the former Village Nursing Home, at Hudson and W. 12th Sts., which has been converted into 10 luxury homes. In May, a seven-bedroom apartment there sold for $29.7 million, while a three-bedroom residence sold for $22.4 million. Meanwhile, recent sales at the Richard Meier-designed glass towers at 165 Charles St. at West St. — a mere $5 million or $6 million on average — seem like, well, chump change compared with the mega-sales of the larger, multi-bedroom apartments at some of the behemoth newcomers mentioned above. Ironically, it was the Meier towers — and of course the development of the new Hudson River Park — built in the early 2000s that originally blew open the doors to the new so-called “Gold Coast” along the Village waterfront. In short, the Perry Garage brochure notes, the formerly funky, bohemian enclave of the West Village now ranks with the “most exclusive submarkets” in Manhattan, including the Upper East Side and Central Park South, and is “now commanding pricing which will most likely outpace these other submarkets in years to come; making it the most expensive and

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Changing the landscape physically, and soon economically, the project at 150 Charles St. will add 98 super-high-end residences.

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

The old, four-story garage building at 125 Perry St. is on the market for sale as conversion into luxury condos or even as a single-family mansion.

exclusive place to live in all of Manhattan.” As for 150 Charles St., opponents at the West Village Houses in July lost their challenge at the Board of Standards and Appeals. The opponents argued that Steven Witkoff, the developer of the new 16-story, 98-unit project, was supposed to preserve significantly more of the base of the former Whitehall Storage warehouse than he did. They contend Witkoff agreed to save all the columns and floors about 30 feet in from the old building’s sides, but that

he only preserved a mere, flimsy “lattice” of the former facade. But the B.S.A. ruled in favor of the developer. A Witkoff representative said, “The Board of Standards and Appeals’ unanimous decision affirmed previous determinations of the Department of Buildings that the construction of 150 Charles St. is proceeding within the approvals granted by the City of New York. Construction on the site is well underway consistent with all of the approved plans.”

One of the ideas in a marketing brochure showing how 125 Perry St.’s facade might be altered in the future.


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Michael LaMantia, 72, the heart of Our Lady of Pompeii OBITUARY By Albert Amateau The parish of Our Lady of Pompeii said goodbye last week to Brother Michael LaMantia, who died Fri., Sept. 27, after 51 years as a brother in the Scalabrini Order and nearly 40 years at the parish in the heart of Greenwich Village. At his wake on Mon., Sept 30, and at his funeral the following day, hundreds of friends spanning three generations paid tribute to Brother Michael, who died of cancer at the age of 72. In a moving eulogy, his youngest brother, Jim LaMantia, recalled sitting at Brother Michael’s bedside in the hospice where he spent his last moments. “Just look around this church and you’ll see his legacy,” LaMantia said. Father John Massari, former pastor of Our Lady of Pompeii, spoke of Michael’s devotion to the church. “I have to say ‘Thanks’ to Brother Michael. He was always ready to serve, to do what people needed and to do what I asked him,” Massari recalled. A year ago, on the 50th anniversary of his entry into the Scalabrini Order, Brother Michael told The Villager about his family life in Chicago where he was born, the fifth of eight children, on Aug. 9, 1941, to Walter LaMantia and Rose Pullano. He wasn’t

baptized until July 4, 1942, because the family was waiting for his godfather, Uncle Michael, to come home on furlough from his service in the Pacific during World War II. “My father was born in Pittsburgh and my mother was born in Chicago,” he told The Villager last year. “My father was a butcher and we had a grocery store at one time. My grandfather bought a house near the White Sox stadium on the South Side,” he said. Michael went to public school, “but we were more religious than the kids who went to Catholic School,” he recalled. “I can still see my mother ironing my shirt for church. It was always white shirts and ties for church.” As a boy, Michael had a calling for religious life and transferred from public school to Sacred Heart Seminary to finish high school. “I became close to our parish priest, who was a Scalabrinian,” he told The Villager. The order, Missionaries of St. Charles Borromeo, was founded in 1888 by Bishop John Scalabrini of Piacenza, Italy, to minister to the thousands of Italian immigrants to the New World. The order now serves newer immigrants from all over the world. After graduating from high school in 1960, Michael entered the newly opened novitiate of the Scalabrini Fathers in Cornwall, N.Y., and took his first vows on Aug. 23, 1963. At Cornwall, Michael took charge of the kitchen, cooking, buying provi-

Scoopy’s

notebook Continued from page 3 to deal with, but now Delakas’s stay on the corner outside Starbucks is in jeopardy. Councilmember Rosie Mendez told us she’ll reach out again to her colleague Dan Garodnick, who chairs the Council’s Committee on Consumer Affairs, and try to restart the process to help Delakas. One local activist actually suspected Mendez of being behind the new summons. He told us he refused to sign a “Dear Neighbor” letter for Mendez — soliciting support for her in the recent primary election — to be circulated in his housing complex, because he couldn’t do it in good conscience after she supported N.Y.U.’s 2031 mega-development plan. The activist, who has been one of Delakas’s biggest supporters, fears the summons may have been a backlash for withholding his signature. But Mendez said she would never do that. “Why? Because I’m not a vicious bitch,” she told us.

Begging to stop the lynne-sanity: Supporters of radical attorney Lynne Stewart gathered at Theatre 80 St. Mark’s on Tuesday evening, her 74th birthday, to call for her compassionate release from federal prison in Texas. Reportedly terminally ill, Stewart has applied for release but the application is moving “glacially” while she is getting “weaker,” she told supporters in a message. The letter included photos of a bald Stewart, apparently the result of heavy doses of chemotherapy. She urged her backers to demonstrate on Tuesday for her release. “YOU AND YOUR COMRADES, FRIENDS, ACQUAINTANCES CAN GATHER AT YOUR LOCAL FEDERAL (U.S.) COURTHOUSE OR POST OFFICE TO REMIND THEM THAT WE WILL NOT LET ME DIE IN A JAIL CELL!!!,” she wrote, adding of her efforts, “I may be the ‘poster child,’ but this is done on behalf of all the prisoners who are languishing, in pain or worse, trying to go home.”

Brother Michael LaMantia.

sions and cleaning the house. “I learned to cook watching my mother at home,” Michael said last year. His reputation as a cook made the Cornwall novitiate a destination for Scalabrini priests from the region. But the Scalabrinians had to give up the house in 1968, and Michael was transferred back to the Scared Heart Seminary in

Chicago where he had gone to high school. There he took his perpetual vows on Aug. 23, 1969, and was transferred to Our Lady of Pompeii in the Village. It would remain his home except for a brief sojourn in Toronto in 1974 when he ran the kitchen of the Scalabrini House. The then-pastor of Our Lady of Pompeii asked the order to send Brother Michael back to the Village to take care of Our Lady of Pompeii. In 1971 Brother Michael helped organize the Golden Age Club, which served meals to the elderly. He prepared 200 meals a week for Golden Age, which expanded in 1975 to become the Caring Community, a coalition of Village institutions serving lunches to the elderly. Over the years, Brother Michael organized and led pilgrimages to Italy and to shrines in the U.S. and Canada. He was also active in the Clinical Pastoral Educational Program at Cabrini Hospital, visiting the sick and giving communion to Catholic patients. Those programs, of course, were in addition to taking care of Our Lady of Pompeii, the shrine church of the Scalabrinians. Celebrating the funeral Mass on Sept. 30 were Reverend Heitor Castoldi, regional superior of the Scalabrinians, Father Walter Tonelotto, current pastor of Our Lady of Pompeii, and Father Massari. In addition to his brother, Jim, he is survived by two other brothers, Rafaelo and Frank, and a sister, Yvonne Puleo.

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October 10 - 16, 2013

A vintage motorcycle shop stays true to its roots Continued from page 1 model, who later became his first wife, had to return to the States, Mackie decided to join her. They initially moved to Second Ave. between Fourth and Fifth Sts. in 1981, and he worked in construction. “Second Avenue was much more of a divide line for the East Village,” he recalled. “Come over to First [Avenue] it’d get a little rough, and you couldn’t go east of [Avenue] A.” Mackie worked on buildings in the neighborhood, as he put it, “starting the gentrification of it.” He earned about $1,000 a week and remarked how that was a sizeable income then. “I don’t know if I’ve ever managed to re-create that,” he said. After the couple split, Mackie stayed in their apartment on Avenue B between 10th and 11th Sts., where they had been robbed, and all their wedding gifts were taken. “It was a bombed-out shell, it was absolutely horrendous down here,” he said. “People coming to the area to buy and sell drugs. I was in my early 20s and enjoying all of that.” He was also privy to the emerging art and party scenes, and rode around on motorcycles with his friends. Mackie became friends with Dimitri Turin, stepson of the writer and Nobel Prize winner Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and the two opened up a construction company together. Tinkering with old British motorcycles was a pastime for Mackie, and the two friends partnered again in 1986 to establish Sixth Street Specials, in the basement of a former nightclub called Neither Nor. “When we moved in here, we were a real live presence on the block,” Mackie said. “People felt safe down here walking up and down the block. Now I’m the eyesore, and everybody complains about me — time is marching on.” Mackie, who closes shop at 6 p.m., speculated that noise from the bikes scares the senior citizens in the housing complex next door. Also, he noted, Harley-Davidson motorcycle riders frequently gun their engines when they pass the shop and see vintage Triumph, Norton and Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) bikes parked outside. Over the years, the shop took off through word of mouth and the partners’ handiwork.

Photo by Claire Flack

Hugh Mackie and his personal racing bike, a 1957 BSA factory race bike, one of 200 made. This year, he won the American Motorcycle Association Vintage National Dirt Track Championship Series with it.

“We were buying old bikes in the countryside. The whole thing was growing as a hobby and a scene,” he said. The friends rode in the East Village on vintage bikes and were renowned for it. Mackie and Turin tired of construction in 1992, and went full time with the shop to focus more on learning how to fix the bikes and ride them. By this point, Mackie had remarried in 1988 to Pat Mackie, and they had Keith the next year, followed by their daughter, Tiger, in 1994. Sadly, that same year, Turin, his partner and close friend, died. The eastern part of the East Village was no longer the wild frontier it once was, and in 1996, the Mackies moved in near the shop, where they currently live. Keith, who has worked summers at the shop since he was 13, has been there full time the past two years after finishing college, where he studied drawing and painting. “It’s weird, I did all that and now I’m back here fixing bikes,” he said, “which is kind of what I thought I’d always be doing.” Keith respects that his dad created the shop, and wants to continue its legacy. While he still paints and draws on the side, and would rather do that, he said working with his dad is a “close second.” People have suggested Keith fuse the two by painting bikes, but he prefers black-and-white ink drawings and animation. Sixth Street Specials does not advertise, except for T-shirts and stickers, which are designed by Keith. He mostly does bike pickups and is a shop hand. Earlier that day, Keith had cleaned up and started a 1971 Triumph Rickman that was having trouble. He explained that his dad was fixing a 1970 Triumph Bonneville, belonging to Mike Kramer, who lives nearby and was helping out. The bike had its original paint and parts, which increases its value. Some people create choppers (motorcycles with the frames cut up) with older classic bikes, but Hugh does not like to do that. “We’re trying to just restore the original way and keep the scene alive — as my dad would say,” Keith said. The shop is as much about the scene as it is about repairs. Many motorcycle aficionados hang out to talk and observe Hugh at work. “There are rumors that some people admire Hugh so much they get tattoos about Sixth Street,” Kramer said. Seconds later, he revealed an elaborate tattoo on his whole lower right leg with the words “Sixth Street Hooligan” above it. There is a racing element to the shop, too, and Keith, who races for fun on trails Upstate

Continued on page 28

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October 10 - 16, 2013

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villager arts & entertainment All Fall Downtown Puppets, Pie and Penny Populate the Off-Off Boards BY TRAV S.D. (travsd.wordpress.com) Much like schools, Downtown theaters seem to start their annual “year” in the autumn — often presenting their best and most interesting work in the crucial fall months when it’s no longer so warm that most people are recreating outdoors, and not yet so cold that some won’t venture out of doors to see shows. This fall, there’s so much exciting stuff in the works at Downtown theaters you could get shin splints trying to see it all. First, we treat you to some of the shows that are already open (so act fast!): Through October 26, you can see The Bats (the resident acting company of The Flea Theater) present their production of “Sarah Floor in Salem Mass,” a movement-based “radical retelling” of the events leading up to the Salem Witch Trials. It’s written by Adriano Shaplin and directed by Rebecca Wright. Tickets can be purchased by calling 212-3523101 or online at theflea.org. Through November 2, if you have sufficient courage, you can check out the 10th anniversary edition of Nightmare Haunted House, entitled “Killers2” — a sequel to last year’s production, which promises to take us up close and personal to such cuddly figures as Charles Manson, Harrison Graham and Aileen Wournos. As always, Nightmare will take place at the atmospheric, castle-like Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center. More info to be found at hauntedhousenyc.com. At the Kraine Theater through November 10, Radiotheater will present their adaptation of Orson Welles’ radio version of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” This interesting company does something quite different from old time radio show recreations — much of the effort goes into original soundscapes of music and effects that undergird the work of the actors — definitely worth checking out. Tickets are available at horsetrade.info. From October 5 through October 27, you’re downright crazy if you don’t go see Varla Jean Merman and the Gold Dust Orphans in “Mildred Fierce,” their cross-dressing musical send-up up of the classic 1945 Joan Crawford vehicle. The show will be ensconced at Theater 80 St. Marks, and promises to be “sprinkled with splashy songs, tap dancing pies, bawdy waitress lingo and more surprises than you can shake a rolling pin at.” Also in the cast are Ryan Landry, Penny Champayne, Olive Another, Liza Lott and Delta Miles. For tickets and info, go to varlaonline.com.  One of my favorite Downtown companies, the Irish Repertory Theater, has two promising shows on deck this season. From October 9 through December 8, they will be presenting

Photo by Cosmin Chivu

Here comes trouble: Penny Arcade (L) and Mink Stole, in Tennessee Williams’ “The Mutilated” — Nov. 1-24, at the New Ohio Theatre.

a revival of Sean O’Casey’s 1924 masterpiece “Juno and the Paycock.” Concurrently, they are mounting a triple-header of avant-garde one acts by Samuel Beckett (“Act Without Words,” “Play” and “Breath”), directed by Bob Flanagan. It runs from October 16 through December 1. The skinny on these two shows can be found at irishrep.org. October 9 through November 17, Soho Rep, in association with American Repertory Theater and Yale Repertory Theater, is presenting the New York premiere of David Adjmi’s “Marie Antoinette.” The production is billed as “raw, fantastical and funny” — but frankly, the main reason I hope to attend is that they promise that popular Downtown actor/playwright David Greenspan will be playing a sheep. To get yours, go to sohorep.org. At UNDER St. Marks, from October 10 through 26, you can catch the latest edition of

writer and raconteur Clay McCloud Chapman’s “Pumpkin Pie Show” — featuring himself, Hanna Cheek and Ana Anensio enacting Chapman’s funny, gross and scary monologues. This year the pieces are about such craziness as a case of postpartum depression that descends into madness and an episode of masturbation in the middle of a matinee performance of “Phantom of the Opera.” To get in on the action, go to horsetrade.info. October 10 through 30, the Axis Theater has booked a show they call “Concert of the Mind: Exceeding Human Limits” — a show by Israeli magician Asi Wind, which will consist of mentalism and memorization. In this remarkable-sounding show, he promises to simultaneously solve two Rubik’s cubes (one in each hand) without looking, instantaneously remember the order of a completely shuffled deck of cards, perfectly recall a photo he has

seen only for a few seconds and memorize the names of the entire audience. Shall we all go and try to stump him? I can’t even remember the names of the people in my OWN family photos! More info at axiscompany.org. Previews begin October 15 for a new show at 3LD called “The Downtown Loop,” which purports to offer a virtual bus ride through a future Manhattan showing what was or what might have been. Knowing this company and their penchant for bells and whistles, you can expect to be dazzled — or at least tickled. Official opening is October 23, and it runs through November 16. Info is at 3ldnyc.org. Here’s a brief blip but well worth knowing about: From October 16-19, the so-very-aptlynamed gothic queer storyteller Dandy Darkly will be presenting “Gory Hole” (his recent

Continued on page 21


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Downtown Theater Continued from page 22 hit of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival) at the C.O.W. Theater (in the Living Theater’s old Clinton Street headquarters). “C.O.W.” stands for “Celebration of Whimsy” — surroundings in which we feel the rara ava Mr. Darkly will feel right at home. Tickets at 917-972-9394. Also visit dandydarkly.com. And this is one I don’t think I’m going to be able to pass up: Underground legends Mink Stole and Penny Arcade co-starring in the long-neglected Tennessee Williams play, “The Mutilated” (1966). True to form, filth and degradation are their portion in this transitional outing, written when Williams was just beginning to stretch the envelope of sordidness to even lower depths. It remains to be seen whether these two Downtown superstars will play it straight or go for camp, but this is a drink I’ll be glad to take either way. It’s going to be at the New Ohio Theatre, November 1-24. For more info, go to sohothinktank.org. November 7 through the 24, La MaMa’s Puppet Series, curated by Denise Greber, kicks into high gear — offering nine pieces of cool sounding puppet theater (call ‘em “puppet shows” and get your ass kicked!). On the menu will be “The Orphan Circus” by Los Sages Fous (Nov. 7-10), “Are They Edible?” by Jeanette Yew (Nov. 7-10),  “Echo in Camera” a co-production of Dead Puppet, the Schauspielhaus Wien and the Grand Theater de Luxembourg (Nov. 7-17), “The God Projekt” by Lone Wolf Tribe (Nov. 14-24), “Dorme” by Laura Bartolomei (Nov. 21-24), a Puppet Slam on Nov. 15 and several kid’s shows — “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” (Nov. 16), “The Three Little Pigs” (Nov. 17) and “Squirrel Stole My Underpants Nov. 16-17). If that’s not enough to sate your wanton puppetlust, stick around. The Czechoslovak-American Marionette Theatre will be presenting their marionette adaptation of Plato’s “Republic” from November 29 through December 15 and STOP RIGHT THERE. Before you reject it out of hand, I must tip you off that this company’s scripts are always way funnier and smarter than they have any right to be. I would gladly see anything this company does — and that includes this show, Socratic Dialogues and all. Info and

tickets available at lamama.org. From November 19 through January 5, something a little different at New York Theater Workshop — 25-year-old Kyle Riabko of the casts of “Spring Awakening” and the recent “Hair” revival will perform a concert of the songs of Burt Bacharach featuring, from the look of the publicity photo, a lot of electric guitar. Go to nytw.org for more details. Or just “Say a Little Prayer.” November 29 through January 6, my favorite dance troupe, the neo-baroque Company XIV, will be presenting their decadent holiday classic “Nutcracker Rouge” at the Minetta Lane Theatre. Companyxiv.com for information and tickets. Lastly, two more cool-sounding shows at La MaMa, both opening December 6. “The Third Policeman” is the Nomad Theatrical Company’s adaptation of Flann O’Brien’s absurdist novel, playing through December 15. At the same time, they will be running the world premiere of Mabou Mines cofounder Lee Breuer’s “40 year-in-the-making magnum opus,” “La Divina Caricatura Part One, The Shaggy Dog.” That will be on the boards until December 22. 

Photo by Moema Umanns

Greg Carere as the Tour Guide, takes you on a virtual bus ride through a future Manhattan — in 3LD’s “The Downtown Loop.”

Photo courtesy of the artists

Two junk peddlers evoke the life of a cabaret troupe, in “The Orphan Circus” — part of La MaMa’s Puppet Series (Nov. 7-24).


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Welcome to their ‘Nightmares’

Buran Theatre’s immersive style is sublime THEATER NIGHTMARES: A DEMONSTRATION OF THE SUBLIME A Buran Theatre production Oct. 17-20, at 8pm & Oct. 20 at 3pm At The Brick 575 Metropolitan Avenue (btw. Union Ave. & Lorimer St.) Williamsburg, Brooklyn Subway: L to Lorimer, G to Metropolitan For tickets ($18): bricktheater.com or 212-352-3101

BY MARTIN DENTON The first Buran Theatre production I saw was “The House of Fitzcarraldo,” which had a brief but memorable run at the Brick in early 2012. We went to the opening night performance, which was sparsely attended because at that point few New Yorkers knew about Buran and their special brand of immersive theater. The first to enter the space, we made our way for the front row, where we always like to sit (because we’re short, and we don’t like to have anyone tall in front of us). But the stage was cluttered with props and — well, stuff — of all kinds and shapes and sizes, starting with a heavy length of rope laid out across the edge. Behind it, blithely tuning up, sat a man with a guitar. Not wanting to mess with their set, I asked the musician, “Is it okay for us to sit in the front row?” And not missing a beat, he replied “It’s fine, but you might get splashed with beer.” And in a way, that’s all you need to know about the Buran aesthetic. It is fine, and you might get splashed with beer. But you’re going to be in for a whirlwind of a night that’s going to engage all your senses, including the ones that are too rarely engaged in the theater these days — the ones that make you do the deepest, heartiest thinking; the ones that make a Buran work linger in your consciousness for days and weeks after you see it. New Yorkers are getting another chance to catch the current Buran opus in October, again at the Brick, for a too-short run of just four days. This one has the marvelous title “Nightmares: A Demonstration of the Sublime.” It premiered at the Brick right after New Year’s, to considerable acclaim — not just from me, but from a number of other observers, including Mitch Montgomery (then writing for Back Stage),

who astutely identified “Nightmares” as “overwhelming” and “an expressionist critical mass…vehemently defying categorization.” Even if you saw it then, you will still want to see it now, because it’s changed a whole bunch since January. The Buran aesthetic is all about process, you see: the joy — the point — of creation for these artists is…creation. So rather than be satisfied with some excellent notices and sold-out houses, Buran followed up the New York run of “Nightmares” with a national tour during which they completely took apart the show, re-cast and re-mounted it three different times in three different cities, and then put it all back together for a new (but I won’t say final) version — the one we’ll be seeing this month. Buran’s co-founder and artistic director Adam R. Burnett explains: “The House of Fitzcarraldo” had five runs in different cities and the performance changed every night. I was cutting and rearranging in the MIDST Photo by Nick Kostner of the performance. I’d come off stage You plagiarist. You little liar: Adam R. Burnett and Jud Knudsen, from the original January and tell everyone, ‘Cut the next scene, 2013 staging of “Nightmares.” move scene nine to scene four’ and such and such. We didn’t have a final run- cussed by these characters and a truly mind- been changed in “Nightmares: as it wendning order until the last few performances blowing animated short film (for want of a ed its way to Kansas, New Mexico and of our run in Brooklyn at The Brick. Now better way to describe it) that I thought was California last summer, that will undoubtthat the show is set in this way, I'm finished. based on sonogram-esque views of the human edly still be true. “The biggest discovery was I have no interest in ever revisiting. And as circulatory system but my companion thought how LARGE and truly OVERWHELMING far I’m concerned, until I find some reason was about the game of “Telephone” that is we could make it,” Adam told me. I hope lots to alter it beyond recognition, it won't be Twitter, filled with almost-accurate, not-quite- of adventurous theatergoers will be excited performed again.” synchronized repetitions of themes….The text to discover just that this month at the Brick. Of course, and happily, that last part is dazzles as it considers our imprecision and There’s lots of information about Buran not necessarily true — Adam has told me our faulty memories: how we muddle and and “Nightmares” on Indie Theater Now at more than once that there may be more mix up words and attributions, and what indietheaternow.com/Company/buran-the“Fitzcarraldo” performances in the future. that does to clear thinking. The direction, by atre — including my podcast conversation I hope so. Burnett, Theresa Buchheister and Knudsen, with Adam and Jud about the tour. So, gosh, here we are halfway through manages the illusion of anarchy without feel  Martin Denton has been covering the the article and I haven’t really told you a ing out of control. Nick Kostner’s set is unex- NYC theater scene for nearly two decades. thing about the play itself. “Nightmares” is pectedly lovely.” His current project is Indie Theater Now. an investigation of appropriation and art. It I concluded by encouraging any thought- Launched in 2011, it’s a digital theater wonders how, in an age when precise repro- ful student of contemporary American the- library where people can discover plays from duction of a painting or a piece of music can ater to experience this work. Whatever’s the contemporary indie theater scene. be accomplished cheaply and immediately thanks to modern technology, anything origiTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 nal and beautiful can be made. It does this through a story — if “story” is really the Come see and be seen and word. Buran’s work is postdramatic in every sense, always about what’s happening in the Celebrate the Night of Nights! room rather than the travails of made-up characters. Burnett plays a young man, who Costume Parade & Live Bands has acquired some modest fame as a blogMiracles & Monsters HOT FOOD AND HOT ENTERTAINMENT ger. Buran co-founder Jud Knudsen, Buran co-founder and the other pivotal creator of this piece, plays the young man’s friend — Bandstage on E. 10th St at 4:00pm who thinks, just maybe, that the blogs were DOORS OPEN 7:30pm plagiarized. So much goes on in a Buran show! Here’s ALL TICKETS $20 some of what I wrote about it earlier this year: Theater for the New City 155 1st Ave. at East 10th St. “The show contains funny scenes and starfor Info call (212) 254-1109 tling surprises; there are wondrously animatTickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net ed projections of some of the paintings disAlso at www.facebook.com/theaterforthenewcity


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October 10 - 16, 2013

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

CHANT MACABRE: SONGS FROM THE CRYPT

It’s no wonder ghosts, ghouls and goblins haunt so much of mid-19th century music. A high mortality rate meant death was always lurking nearby — and when the time came for internment, a somber procession would ferry the coffin from parlor to graveyard. The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society (BSESS) dares you to return with them, to those chilling days of yesteryear. “Chant Macabre: Songs from the Crypt” finds the frighteningly talented foursome in concert, offering a bewitching program of meticulously exhumed, rarely performed work by Schubert, Schumann, Liszt, Debussy, Loewe and Mussorgsky. Authentic period bonus: “Chant Macabre” takes place in the stunning Greek revival parlor of Merchant’s House Museum — an 1832 row house in which dozens of visitors have reported encounters with deceased Tredwell family members, servants and caretakers. The BSESS’s vocal pyrotechnics, spirited theatrics and Victorian aesthetic just might attract some of the longgone tenants. Such sightings aren’t guaranteed with admission, of course — although musical events in the house have, in the past, brought out the dead. At merchantshouse.org, you’ll find information on many other paranormal-themed October events — including certified psychic medium and paranormal researcher Cathy Towle’s “Reading the Rooms: A Psychic Talks with the Tredwells” (Oct. 24). Find out why Merchant’s has been dubbed “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House,” by going on a Candlelight Ghost Tour (Oct. 25, 26, 28-30). You’ll hear gripping tales of inexplicable occurrences, while standing in the very rooms in which they took place. “Chant Macabre” happens on Fri., Oct. 18, at 7:30pm. At the Merchant’s House Museum (29 E. Fourth St., btw. Lafayette & Bowery). Admission: $25 (MHM members, $15). Limited seats — reservations strongly encouraged. Call 212-777-1089 or visit merchantshouse. org/calendar. Follow: facebook.com/merchantshouse and, on Twitter: @merchantshouse. Regular Museum hours, during which you can take a self-guided tour of the house, are 12-5pm, Thurs.-Mon. (admission is $10 general, $5 for students/seniors).

CHARLES BUSCH: RIDIN’ HIGH

The Lady in Question has declared her upcoming run at 54 Below to be a boa-free zone. Otherwise, anything goes — including we’re assured, “laughter, music, tears and sequins.” That, filtered through the sassy lips and ample pipes of Tony-nominated play

Photo courtesy of the Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society

L-R: Anthony Bellov, Roberta Alessandra, Jane Elizabeth Rady and Dayle Vander Sande are scary talented — and in concert, on Oct. 18.

wright and drag legend Charles Busch, makes “Ridin’ High” a must-see for lovers of tall tales, tough gals and tunes from the American Songbook. Armed with more zingers than a chorus boy can shake his stick at, Busch will dish on certain actresses he’s known and tell anecdotes about his long career. He’ll also be doing a parody of 1940s film noirs and a new monologue for Miriam Passman — the inspiration for his Broadway play, “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife.” Songs from the camp icon, whose approach is far more affectionate than ironic, include an Irving Berlin number, a Sinatra classic and a few choices likely inspired by recent time spent taking his act on the road (“Route 66,” “Kansas City”). Accompanist Tom Judson, who toured with Busch, tickles the ivories. Always sweet and only bitter when it serves the punchline, Busch is, nonetheless, more than a little salty — so leave the kids at home for this one. But parents of budding little divas with a sense of the absurd would do well to scoop up tickets for the Oct. 27, 1:30pm Tribeca Performing Arts Center's presentation of “Bunnicula.” Co-written by Busch, it’s a musical stage adaptation of the best-selling children’s book series about a family who adopts an orphaned rabbit with vampire-like leanings. For info: tribecapac.org/children. “Ridin’ High” happens Thurs., Oct. 17, 24 & Nov. 7, 14. At 54 Below (254 W. 54th St., btw. Broadway & Eighth Ave.). Doors open at 8:45pm, show at 9:30pm. Cover Charge: $35-45. Food/Beverage minimum: $25. Tickets on the day of performance, after 4pm, available only by calling 646-476-3551. For reservations, visit 54below.com. Also visit charlesbusch.com.

Photo by Stephen Sorokoff

Two, at 54 Below: Charles Busch (R) and Tom Judson are “Ridin’ High.”


October 10 - 16, 2013

25

Just Do Art! MOMENTUM: 8 WOMEN, 8 SINGULAR VOICES

Hudon Guild’s recent series of events celebrating the achievements of women in the arts continues, with this exhibit featuring work by eight women — Kitt Barnes, Elena Brady, Denise Corley, Chris Costan, Theresa Ellerbrok, Eve Le Ber, Elke Solomon and Veronica Tyson-Strait — whose careers continue to have the kind of forward-moving momentum which results from drive and commitment to ongoing experimentation and productivity. Free. On display through Nov. 5, at the Hudson Guild Gallery (441 W. 26th St., btw. 9th & 10th Aves.). Viewing Hours: Tues.-Fri., 10am-7pm & Sat., 1-4pm. For more info, visit hudsonguild.org.

Art Walk Invites You Behind Closed Doors

As sprawling and visually appealing as the elevated park its name invokes, “High Line Open Studios” is a self-guided tour of work spaces normally open by appointment only — allowing visitors to gain unique insights into the creative process through a dialogue that strips away the layers between artist and enthusiast. From 6-8pm on Fri., Oct. 18 and from 12-6pm on Sat./ Sun., Oct. 19-20. The free self-guided tour begins at the West Chelsea Arts Building (508-526 W. 26th St., btw. 10th &11th Aves.). Preview participating artist at highlineopenstudios.org.

Photo courtesy of Carmen Mesink

RMA instructor Carmen Mesink shows you how it’s done.

Photo by Chris Kreussling

Rev. John Magisano, pastoral counselor for Chelsea Community Church, at 2012’s Blessing of Animals.

‘PAWS’ FOR PRAYER: BLESSING OF AMINALS

Beasts of all species and denominations, and their bipedal roommates, are welcome at Chelsea Community Church’s Blessing of Animals. The 14th installment of this popular annual event gets a cabaret twist this time around — as tenor Otto Walberg, the longtime lay leader for the service, sings a new song: “I Was Thinking.” Awardwinning cabaret artist Carolyn Montgomery-Forant wrote the lyrics and the music. CCC’s Music Director Jeff Cubeta (also a noted cabaret performer) will accompany Walberg on piano. It’s anybody’s guess as to whether that will inspire some doggie dancing in the aisles — but at least when the plate is passed, there won’t be a two-bone minimum (admission is free, voluntary collection taken). Sun., Oct. 20, at noon. At St. Peter’s (346 W. 20 St., btw. Eighth and Ninth Aves.). People of all faiths, and of uncertain faith, are welcome to commune with their fellow man — while giving their pets a bit of alone time — when the nondenominational, lay-led Chelsea Community Church meets every Sun. at 12 noon, at St. Peter’s. For more info, visit chelseachurch.org.

Photo by Scotto Mycklebust

Visit Adrienne Leban’s studio (at 278 W. 25th St.) during the High Line Open Studios art walk.

RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART: FALL CLASSES

The Rubin Museum of Art has added yet another layer to the mind-expanding, soul-nourishing experience that comes from immersing one’s self in their outstanding collection of Chinese, Indian, Afghan, Bhutanese, Mongolian, Nepalese, Pakistani and Tibetan art. Housed in the former home of Barney’s, the RMA has always been a place where visitors can actively engage with the traditions and cultures of the Himalayas. Two years ago, they began to offer Adult Education classes whose themes were tied to current exhibits — allowing a deeply personal take-away for the senses (in the most literal of senses). Experienced artistinstructors guide participants in small class settings that take place after hours in museum galleries and designated art studio spaces. “The Buddha of Ultimate Healing” is a Thangka-Making workshop in which you will learn how to draw and paint The Medicine Buddha (drawing, Oct. 11-13; painting, Oct. 18-20). No experience is necessary. On Wed., from Nov. 6-20 and Dec. 4, “Writing along the Himalayas” encourages you to discover how works of art inspire writing — through intimate encounters with artwork in the galleries.   At the Rubin Museum of Art (150 W. 17th St., btw. Sixth & Seventh Aves.). For info on class times and rates, visit rmanyc.org.

Image courtesy of the artist and Hudson Guild Gallery

Eve Le Ber’s “The Art Train” is on view through Nov. 5, as part of Hudson Guild’s “8 Women, 8 Singular Voices” exhibit.


October 10 - 16, 2013

Notice of Qualification of Westwood Seventh, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/23/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus.addr.: 999 Waterside Dr., Ste. 2300, Norfolk, VA 23510. LLC formed in DE on 8/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Crestview Partners III Co-Investors, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/13. Office location: NY County.Princ. bus. addr.: 667 Madison Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10065. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 8/23/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., PO Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Ground Fl., Citrus Grove Bldg., Goring Ave., George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Crestview Partners III (TE), L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus.addr.: 667 Madison Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10065. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 5/8/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., PO Box 309, UglandHouse, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Ground Fl., Citrus Grove Bldg., Goring Ave., George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of RPAI Fordham Place Office, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/6/13. Office location: NY County.Princ. bus. addr.: 2021 Spring Rd., Ste. 200, Oak Brook, IL 60523. LLC formed in DE on 8/29/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/03- 11/07/2013

ALPHATECH ONE, LLC a domestic LLC, currently known as ALPHATECH TWO, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/4/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Trief & Olk, Esqs., 150 E. 58th St., 34th Fl., NY, NY 10155. General Purposes. Vil: 09/26 - 10/31/2013 LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Toby’s Coffee 5th Ave. LLC Articles of Organization filed by the Department of State of New York on: 08/06/2013 Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 125 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11249 Vil: 09/26 - 10/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of 250 BOWERY STAR, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/13/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. or Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of 545 EDGECOMBE BCR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 20803 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 301, Aventura, FL 33180. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Real estate. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of BRE Non-Core 1 Owner A LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/28/13. Princ. office of LLC: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013

Notice of Formation of FAIRFAX MERRIFIELD ASSOCIATES II L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 PARK SLOPE ASSOCIATES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 12/22/1997. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 303 East 57th St, Ste 45E, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of 470 4th Avenue Investors LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Adam America LLC, 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 607, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 15335 78TH AVENUE LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/18/07. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 128 Willis Court, Woodmere, New York 11598-1448. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 VIVIAN MULLER, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/22/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 210 West 89th St., Ste. 12J, NY, NY 10024. General Purposes. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Viskovic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 302 Fifth Avenue, 8th Fl., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Capsule LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/30/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 80 Eighth Avenue, Suite 202, NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013

Notice of Formation of NYOT 25 Limited LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Patrice Stavile, Esq., c/o M1 Real Estate, 600 Fifth Ave., 21st Fl., NY, NY 10020, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of MSB Advisors LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/11/13. NYS fict. name: MSB Advisors (New York). Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 9/10/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o MSB Advisors GP LLC, 95 Charles St., #3, NY, NY 10014, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/26- 10/31/2013 Qualification of Anchorage Illiquid Opportunities IV, L.P. Authority filed with the Sect. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/06/13. Office Loc: NY County. LP formed in DE on 8/5/13. SSNY has been designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, DE 19809. DE address of LP: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, 19809. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. avail from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sect. of State, PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of UPPER EAST SIDE LENDER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/09/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of SUNNYSIDE-BARNETT ASSOCIATES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 13th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, c/o Phipps Houses at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose:To own and develop real property. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013

NOT. OF FRMN of Activity LLC Art. of Org. f w/ Secy of STA of NY (SSNY) 08/16/13. OFC LCTN: NY Cty. SSNY is DA upon whom PROC AGA it may be served. SSNY shall mail a CY: C/O Activity LLC1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. The Prin. bus. add. :1500 Broadway 22nd Fl, NY, NY 10036. PUR: any lawful act or ACTY. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 THE WORKING WATERFRONT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/09/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jennifer Valentine, 307 E. 76th St. #14, NY, NY 10021. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 RVZ STRATEGIC ADVISORS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/16/13. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC ATTN: Frederick Van Zijl 179 E 64th St New York, NY 10065. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Frederick Van Zijl 179 E 64th St New York, NY 10065. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Benjamin K LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NEW YORK COUNTY. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. P.O. address to which SSNY shall mail copy of process against LLC served upon him is: 580 5th Ave., Ste. 1140, NY, NY 10036. The principal business address of the LLC is 580 5th Ave., Ste. 1140, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of 76 Lefferts Place LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9728 3rd Avenue, Ste. 133, Brooklyn, NY 11209. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of 2357 84th Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9728 3rd Avenue, Ste. 133, Brooklyn, NY 11209. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of Tallgrove, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 345 W. 14th St., #PHD, NY, NY 10014, Attn: Magnus Hoglund. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013

Notice of Formation of Arthur Avenue Residence, L.P. Certificate filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/30/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Center for Urban Community Services, Inc., 198 E. 121st St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10035. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2099. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Formation of FMS Wayne County, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/29/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 920 Winter St., Waltham, MA 02451. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of SOAM Market Neutral Fund, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/31/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 7/11/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o SOAM Holdings, LLC, 150 E. 52nd St., 30th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/19 - 10/24/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FloodstopUSA LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/10/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 515 E 79 St, Ste 20D, NY, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of RNR Media Consulting, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/21/13 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: RNR Media Consulting, 55 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Laureate BW. 2150 LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/30. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: LAW OFFICE OF Z. TAN PLLC 110 E 59TH ST., STE 3200, NY, NY 10022. Principal business address: County of NY. Purpose: any lawful act. 2147291 w.o Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of BOP One North End LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 09/05/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 09/03/2013. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TwinkyClean LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 613 W 146th St Apt 3R MB 7 NY, NY 10031 4316 USA. Purpose: any lawful act. 2144794 w.o Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 7013 VETERANS AVENUE LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 07/29/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O OMRI MININ, 404 East 79th Street, Apt. 15C, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 HUBBELL MOUNTAIN LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 11/23/2011. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O Alan Haberman, 11 Mill Pond Road, Sherman, CT 06784. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 2184 CEDAR AVENUE LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 07/23/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 404 East 79th Street, Suite 15C, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 AV HOLDINGS GP LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/2/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 61 W. 8th St., NY, NY 10011. General Purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 YU NEW YORK LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/7/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Aldo V. Vitagliano, 150 Purchase St., Ste. 9, Rye, NY 10580. General Purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013

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Notice of Formation of CITY FIRE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/03/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 733 Ridgedale Ave., E. Hanover, NJ 07936 Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Qualification of IH3 PROPERTY GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/29/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/08/13. Princ. office of LLC: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2811 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Formation of COCOTTE FIFTH AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Deborah A. Nilson & Associates, PLLC, 10 E. 40th St., Ste. 3310, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Formation of Chapter Two Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Forrest Zlochiver, 147 W. 35th St., Room 803, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Formation of SEM KIDS DESIGN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Mamiye Brothers, Inc., 1385 Broadway, 18th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Formation of MSH Partners LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/19/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., Ten Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013


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Notice of Formation of Z-432/52A LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 60 E. 56th St., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Qualification of Adam Plus Company LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/25/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 261 Madison Ave., Ste. 9038, NY, NY 10016, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Qualification of CTC Alternatives Access Fund L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/6/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1290 E. Main St., Stamford, CT 06902. LP formed in DE on 7/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 Notice of Qualification of Solus Recovery Fund III LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/30/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 410 Park Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LP formed in DE on 7/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/12 - 10/17/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of IMAGINEMOTION PRODUCTIONS LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/08/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: IMAGINEMOTION PRODUCTIONS LLC, 45 West 132nd Street, APT 7K, New York, NY 10037. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013

Notice of Qualification of SIM III, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/20/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/14/13. Princ. office of LLC: 10 E. 53rd St., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10022. NYS fictitious name: SIM FUNDING III, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, New Castle Cnty., DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John B. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of CBV Fine Cars, LLC (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on August 9, 2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served c/o Conrad B. Voldstad, 340 E. 64th Street, Apt. 8A, New York, New York 10065. The principal office of the LLC is 340 E. 64th Street, Apt. 8A, New York, New York 10065. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF Anchorage IO GP IV, L.L.C. Authority filed with the Sect of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. N.Y. Office Loc: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/5/13. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, 19809. DE addr. of LLC: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilmington, 19809. Cert of Form filed with DE Sect of State, PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of RECIDIVIST FILMS, LLC Formation of Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/23/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o CRM, 205 Hudson St., Ste. 1002, NY, NY 10013. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 205 Hudson St., Ste. 1002, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of 221 W29 Garage LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/12/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/11/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013

Notice of Qual. of 690 Madison Mezz LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/28/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of 121 Greene Retail Owner LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/3/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 7/2/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of 232 Capital Management LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/17/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 12/12/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Andrew O’Connor, 100 William St., Ste. 2005, NY, NY 10038. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of Alkeon Select Partners, LP Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 1/7/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to 350 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10017. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/ addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of Altalis Capital (GP), LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 2/5/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Samuel Elder, 885 Third Ave., 24th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013

Notice of Qual. of Altalis Capital Partners, LP Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 2/5/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Samuel Elder, 885 Third Ave., 24th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qual. of 1735 Del Gesu Partners II, L.P. Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 12/18/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: John Townsend, 101 Park Ave., 48th Fl., NY, NY 10178. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of CONTENT X PRODUCT LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: CONTENT X PRODUCT LLC, 250 E Houston Street 9G, New York, NY 10002. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qualification of Illamasqua, LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 3/15/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Gallet Dreyer & Berkey, LLP, 845Third Avenue, 5th Fl., NY, NY 10022, Attn: Tobias F. Ziegler, Esq. DE address of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013 Notice of Qualification of Broad Street Real Estate Credit Partners II, L.P. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/14/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/10/13. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 West St., NY, NY 10282. DE address of LP: Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/05 - 10/10/2013

Photo by Claire Flack

The basement of the Sixth Street Specials shop, which extends back 100 feet, was flooded last year during Hurricane Sandy. Mackie lost six bikes, as well as large electrical tools and all the motorcycle parts he had amassed over 27 years.

Bike shop is true to its roots Continued from page 20 with his dad, gave the lowdown. “These guys do American-style bike racing, from the ’70s called ‘flat track,’” Keith explained. “It’s a dirt oval, as opposed to the new races you see over huge jumps or along paved roads.” They race vintage Triumphs and Yamahas, and Hugh, who began the sport at 43, rides a BSA. Keith is content to leave the track to his dad. “I like racing with these guys when there’s no pressure,” he said. “I don’t like it when it’s about a trophy.” Even though the guys tell him it has nothing to do with winning, he knows better. Aware that nepotism serves him well, Keith readily admits he is not the best employee. His desire has shifted to art these days, and he thinks his dad spots him daydreaming at work. “I get away with everything,” he said with a grin. “If I was someone else, I would’ve been fired a long time ago.” Matsueda, the unrelated helper in the shop, has been in the mix for six years. He worked as a mechanic on Yamahas in Japan, but was unfamiliar with British bikes. After a climb at Sixth Street Specials over the years from floor sweeper to welder to mechanic, Matsueda was diligently rebuilding the motor of a 1963 Triumph Bonneville that day. Making the switch to British bikes was not easy. “It takes a while,” he said. “I’m still learning. It’s a very interesting world with so much history.” Four years ago, Hugh invited Matsueda to a flat-track race, and the former novice has been hooked ever since. At that race, he slid off the bike a few times, and came in last in his heat. However, due to a technicality — another guy’s bike broke down — Matsueda was bumped up to third place.  He fondly recalled the plastic “tiny stupid third-place trophy” they gave him, which spurred him on to become a better racer. “It feels good to win,” Hugh interjected. “He’s really well-known.” Matsueda competes nationally now, and

claims flat-track racing and the shop are why he remains in the States. In addition to his quest for victory, Matsueda aspires to stand on the winners’ podium to also represent the shop.   When asked whether Keith receives special treatment, Matsueda declined to comment on the family business. Matsueda has a good working relationship with Hugh, and they share a mutual respect for each other’s ideas. “He’s the reason actually that I’m still here,” he said. “He gave me all his friends, opportunities and introduced me. He gave me everything he has; otherwise, it would’ve been very difficult for me to make my way in this world.” Hugh’s generosity extends to his family, friends and customers. While Keith was making a bike pickup, Hugh admitted that working with a family member has pros and cons. “I can’t beat him up since we’re related,” he joked. Hugh thinks he’s a good kid and a talented painter. “He’s a much better artist than he is this,” he said. “His mom would tell you he’s a genius. As far as we’re concerned, he’s better than [Jean-Michel] Basquiat in that vein.” Working at the shop long term may not be for Keith, but the more immediate concern is Sixth Street Special’s survival. “The whole neighborhood has been built to death, overpopulated and overpriced,” Hugh said. “We’re very lucky to still be here.” He rents the space, and prospective buyers of the building were a regular occurrence before the recession. Since then, his rent has increased annually, and Hugh, who struggles to pay it, only recently raised his hourly rate from $75 to $90. He used to sell bikes also until, he said, it became “too much of a headache.”  His new customers these days are wealthier Manhattanites who buy costly modern bikes made to look old. Hugh’s loyal client base includes celebrities and regular folk with vintage bikes, from a 300-mile radius, and they keep him going just with repairs. For now, Hugh plans to stay put until Tiger is done with college. As for the future, he said, he will endure, “as long as it lasts.”


October 10 - 16, 2013

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Thaddeus loves his local: Pool games get pretty hairy PET SET By Heather Dubin Living over a bar in New York City has its perks. There’s that last drink on the way home with old familiar faces, and a built-in group of friends on the block.  Thaddeus, a 6-year-old Cockapoo, a cocker spaniel and poodle mix, finds similar comfort, five flights down from his apartment, at his East Village local. He likes beer and covets attention. But what keeps him coming back, aside from his owners, David Crane and Mark Hammer, might be the dog treats behind the bar and free rein of the pool table.  Standing on his hind legs, Thaddeus rests his front paws on the pool table, and plants himself directly in front of one of the pockets where the balls end up. When the cue ball is mishit and loudly “scratched” into a pocket, it thunders through a chute to the slot on the bottom of the table, where Thaddeus is poised and ready. Once it gets there, Thaddeus works himself into a frenzy, and scratches his front paws at top speed round and round the ball.   “He likes pool balls because he ain’t got none,” Crane joked. The couple, who hung out with Thaddeus at their local for a recent interview, tried to remember the exact year they met.   “We date our past by our politics,” Hammer said.  After some discussion as to whether it was 1996 or 1997, Crane, a Community Board 3 member, was able to trace their beginnings back to ’97, when former Mayor Rudy Giuliani tried to sell off the neighborhood’s community gardens. They’ve been together ever since.  “When you find something precious, you hold onto it,” Hammer said.  Thaddeus falls solidly under this category for the couple, who spent a year looking and pining for the right dog, with frequent visits to the Tompkins Square Park dog run for ideas. Also, they wanted to adopt a rescue dog in need of a good home.  “There are so many wonderful animals, there’s no reason to buy a dog,” Crane said.  One night, Crane decided to turn to Craigslist for their quest. Crane had worked in financial services for 20 years — “it was gruesome” — and after a friend suggested he switch to the nonprofit world, Crane found his current job through Craigslist. Currently, he is the director of engineering at donorschoose. org, a nonprofit that matches public school teacher classroom requests with private donations.  “I love Craigslist,” he said. “The first time I found my job, and the other time I found my dog.”  Hammer works at the the New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute as director of program integration and special projects in the H.I.V., S.T.D. and H.C.V. prevention division. He joined Crane in answering the Craigslist ad for Thaddeus. They admitted to writing five “essays” instead of five short responses,

and Hammer reveled in one essay’s “winning line.” The couple already had two cats, Beazy and Lucy (short for Beelzebub and Lucifer), who are the same age as Thaddeus. Together, the couple wrote, they were “Four hearts waiting to be joined by a fifth,” Hammer said. “The rescue ladies loved that.” Another essay question inquired about past pet ownership. They had an edge with Crane, originally from Dallas, who had seven dogs growing up, one of which was his brother’s. This helped to balance out Hammer, who is from Cuba, in Upstate N.Y., and had never lived with dogs. But a childhood without dogs was not a deterrent. “It was love at first sight,” Hammer said.  According to Crane, Thaddeus was dropped off at the pound, at 15 months, by a woman with a note that read, “I hate his hair.” Cockapoos are known for their curly manes, and while trying to trim Thaddeus’s hair, his previous owner had left cuts all over his body instead. Crane suggested the woman did not know how to take care of or handle Thaddeus.  “Her stupidity is our great fortune,” Hammer said.    The woman also left behind Thaddeus’s papers, which is not typical. In addition to his breed, “We know his parents, which is unusual in the rescue world,” Hammer said.  The couple’s essays landed them a next-day response from the Craigslist ad. They went to Brooklyn to see Thaddeus, impressed his foster moms, and a rescue representative called them that night with the good news. The couple brought home their new dog the very next day, and explained the origin of his name.  “Thaddeus was one of the lesser-known apostles, also known as St. Jude,” Crane said. But as Crane noted, Thaddeus is the only apostle of 13 listed twice. Hammer, however, said the Cockapoo, in fact, takes his name from a congressmember who was a famed abolitionist. “He’s named after Thaddeus Stevens,” Hammer said. “For this, he is reviled in the South.” “Where I’m from,” Crane interjected. “Nevertheless, I think of him as a hero.” Thaddeus has celebrity status with the couple. He is part of their family and joins them most places they go — from an art festival in Brooklyn, to dinner in a dog carrier, to hiking Upstate along the Hudson River, where he likes to get muddy. Crane proudly showed a video on his phone of Thaddeus in a Yankees baseball hat plunging his whole head into the water.  “Thank God for shampoo,” he said.  The couple takes 25-mile bike rides pretty regularly, and Thaddeus, who wears “doggles” for the occasion, sits in a steel basket at the front of Crane’s bike. They recently rode bikes to Clifton, N.J. (with a train boost), to visit

Photo by Claire Flack

“Thaddeus in the corner pocket!” This frisky Cockapoo works all the angles on the pool table at his favorite East Village bar.

Hammer’s 98-year-old Aunt Beatrice in her nursing home.  “Thaddeus is much loved at Daughters of Miriam,” Hammer said.     Thaddeus has many loves himself, and water is a definite first. He’s been in the Mississippi and Hudson rivers and the Atlantic Ocean. When the couple travels to California soon, he will be Pacific-bound.  “He loves Yorkies,” Hammer added. Crane piped in, “He had two for breakfast.” Thaddeus really does love to eat crawdad (Texan for “crawfish”), and has had two in his life. Both were in Dallas — one Crane caught, and the other Thaddeus found solo.  Thaddeus also loves to fish-gaze for hours at koi in the community garden on E. Sixth St. near Avenue B.  Maybe it is because he has a thing for sushi, though he only gets shrimp tails.     “If you say the name of a person or a dog he likes, he gets excited, and he touches your nose,” Crane said. This was demonstrated by Crane when he asked where Mama (his mom) and Jeanette (Hammer’s mom) were, his two favorites.     Thaddeus also responds by nodding yes with his nose to foods he likes: carrots, nori, kohlrabi, corn, edamame and lettuce. 

“He likes any vegetables I’m cooking with,” Crane said, “pastries, anything I bake — banana bread.”  Hammer acknowledged that he lives with his “personal chef.”  Other Thaddeus eccentricities involve eating flowers, and an affinity for ladies and Edgar Allan Poe — especially “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Which is no surprise as Hammer began to recite “The Raven” from memory.  Although his pool ball obsession is enough of a treat, Thaddeus performed a few tricks he picked up in class at the Ruff Club, a new dog bar in the East Village.  “He learns routines, and that’s the poodle side,” Crane said. Highlights featured Thaddeus jumping through Crane’s arms that he held to make a hoop, and twirling in a circle on his back legs to calls of “Pretty Princess.”          Thaddeus likes to perch on his owners’ shoulders, and at the end of the night, Crane had him around his neck like a towel.  “He’s my heated stole,” he said.  When he got down, Thaddeus took off to dance on his hind legs with Hammer, who held onto his front paws. All and all, it was a just another night for Thaddeus at his local.


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October 10 - 16, 2013

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October 10 - 16, 2013

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of October 10 - 16 By Rob Brezsny ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sometimes, Aries, you run away and dive into a new amusement before you have gotten all the benefits you can out of the old amusement. But you seem more committed than usual to the ongoing process. You’ve also got to be clear, though, that there’s something about it you don’t like and want to change. Otherwise, you might suddenly run away somewhere down the line. Be proactive now, not rash later. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Jugaad is a Hindi-Urdu word that can be translated as “frugal innovation.” People in India and Pakistan use it a lot. It’s the art of finding a creative workaround to a problem despite facing logistical and financial barriers. Masters of jugaad call on ingenuity and improvisation to make up for sparse resources. Though you may not have access to V.I.P.’s and filthy riches, Taurus, you do have the resourcefulness necessary right now to come up with novel solutions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In accordance with your current astrological omens, I authorize you to be like a bird in the coming week — specifically, as described by the zoologist Norman J. Berrill: “To be a bird is to be more intensely alive than any other living creature. Birds have hotter blood, brighter colors, stronger emotions. They live in a world that is always present, mostly full of joy.” Sing, hop around, glide, love the wind, see great vistas, travel everywhere, be attracted to hundreds of beautiful things, and do everything. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The nonexistent is whatever we have not sufficiently desired,” wrote Nikos Kazantzakis in his book “Report to Greco.” I’m hoping when you read that statement, Cancerian, you will get a vision of an exciting experience you have always wanted but have not yet managed to bring into your life. Maybe this provocation will goad you into finally conjuring up the desire to actually make your dream come true. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “It is truly strange how long it takes to get to know oneself,” wrote the prominent 20th-century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. “I am now 62 years old, yet just one moment ago I realized that I love lightly toasted bread and loathe bread when it is heavily toasted.” Your assignment, Leo, is to engage in an intense phase of self-discovery like Wittgenstein’s — to become fully conscious of all the small likes and dislikes that together shape your identity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I’d rather be in the mountains thinking of God than in church thinking about the mountains,” said the naturalist John Muir. These days, Virgo, you need to be at the heart of the hot action, not floating in a cloud of abstract thoughts. The only version of God that’s meaningful to you right now is the one that feeds your lust for life in the here and now. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This advice may have never before been given to Libras in a horoscope. It might conflict with the elegance and decorum you like to express. Yet, I believe it will inspire you to generate a mess of fertile chaos and invigorating long-term innovations. The message is from “Do the Work,” a book by Steven Pressfield: “Stay primitive. The creative act is primitive. Its principles are of birth and genesis.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Two years ago Sean Murphy, a British man, decided he had enough of the painful wart on his middle finger. So he drank a few beers to steel himself, and tried to blast the blemish off with a gun. He got rid of the wart, but also annihilated most of his finger. May I suggest you not follow Murphy’s lead, Scorpio? Now is a good time to part ways with a hurtful burden, but I’m sure you can do it without causing a lot of collateral damage. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Grace has been trickling into your life lately, but I suspect it may soon start to flood. It’s likely that an abundance of tricky luck will provide you with the leverage and audacity you need to pull off minor miracles. For now at least, it’s realistic to be optimistic. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn innovator Jeff Bezos built Amazon.com from the ground up. He now owns The Washington Post, one of America’s leading newspapers. “We are stubborn on vision,” he says about his team. “We are flexible in details.” In other words, he knows exactly what he wants to create, but is adaptable. That’s excellent advice for you, Capricorn, in the next phase of implementing your master plan. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s the horoscope I want to write for you in early December: “Congratulations, Aquarius! You have escaped a habit that subtly undermined you for a long time. Your monkey mind has eased up on its chatter and your inner critic has at least partially stopped berating you. You are as close as you have ever come to living your own life — as opposed to the life that other people think you should live.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It’s an unbearable thought that roses were not invented by me,” wrote Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. You’re not as egotistical as Mayakovsky, Pisces. And it is due in part to your lack of rampaging egotism that I predict you will invent something almost as good as roses in the coming weeks. Your creative powers will synergize with your aptitude for love to bring a new marvel into the world.

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THE VILLAGER, OCT. 10, 2013