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September 11, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 84 • Number 15

The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Former City Council candidate Pete Gleason voted in Tribeca on Tuesday. “We need a magnifying glass to put our elected officials under scrutiny,” he said. “I believe a Zephyr / Wu win will restore integrity in our government.” Teachout trounced Cuomo 55 to 9 and Wu bested Hochul 49 to 14 at the Tribeca poll.

Riding wind of discontent, Zephyr runs strong BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

S

he entered the race with zero name recognition, but that’s definitely not the case anymore, as progressive Zephyr Teachout surprisingly won more than 34 percent of the vote against incumbent Andrew Cuomo in Tuesday’s Democratic primary election for governor. In the race for lieutenant governor, Teachout’s running mate, Tim Wu, lost to Kathy Hochul by 40

percent to 60 percent. “You have been heard,” Teachout told her supporters in her concession speech. “There is no politician in this state who doesn’t know about you and know about what you care about right now tonight. You created a courageous and marvelous campaign, waged against all odds, with very little resources, against this massive and corrupt New York political machine.” In a statement, Cuomo said, in part, “I want to congratulate Zephyr Teachout and Tim Wu on running a spirited campaign, engaging in the democratic process and having the courage to make their voices heard.” Teachout entered the race late, in June, and she never came close to matching

Cuomo’s cash-packed war chest. Cuomo spent $3 million to $4 million on the race, while Teachout spent perhaps a few thousand dollars. But she had an excellent Web presence. A Fordham law professor and expert on the role of money in politics, she hammered away at the centrist governor on his left. Fracking was a particularly vulnerable point of his, and she pledged that, if elected, she would take a firm position and keep it from happening in New York. Cuomo was further badly wounded in July by The New York Times’s exposé on how he hobbled his own anticorruption Moreland Commission — which he had disbanded early — from probing too close to his own doings.

www.TheVillager.com

ELECTION, continued on p. 3


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DORIS MARKS THE BIG 5-0: Marking Doris Diether’s half decade serving on Community Board 2, friends and colleagues will throw her a 50th anniversary party on Sun., Sept. 14, at fellow board member Richard Stewart and Dr. David Ramsay’s One Fifth Ave. home. It’s invite only. Though we hear Mr. Stix may try to crash it!

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DOT MEANS WAR! Paul Garrin, of name.space, is fighting back. The city has recently been selling off .nyc addresses, even though Garrin repeatedly has explained that he created the .nyc top-level domain name — and .sex, .chat, .art and many, many more — as early as 1996. He’s been operating all of them on “alternate root,” outside of the main Internet that we all use, because the powers that be, a.k.a. ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), won’t let him into the “main root.” Now that the options of Internet suffix possibilities are finally being expanded, the East Village tech pioneer isn’t willing to give up what’s his. And why should he? He’s working to raise $75,000 for his lawsuit in federal court against ICANN. As part of his plan to sell .nyc addresses, profits would be funneled back into social-justice causes, like equipping schools with laptops or buying back the old P.S. 64 / CHARAS and restoring it as a community center. (Oh well, it may be too late for that last one, unfortunately.) You can help Garrin by donating at rally.org/namespace. “SHAM DORM!” Speaking of the old P.S. 64, at 605 E. Ninth St., which Gregg Singer is bent on turning into a college dorm, preservationist Andrew Berman gave us his stinging response to the city’s recent approval of the project’s application plan. “We are deeply disappointed that the Department of Buildings has decided to allow this sham dorm arrangement to move ahead,” Berman said. “It does not conform with D.O.B.’s own rules, which were promulgated to try to prevent exactly the kind of fraud being perpetuated here. We are working with our allies in the community and elected officials to do everything we can to ensure that this does not come to fruition.” HISTORIC DEMO? We hear from a reliable source that the owners of the former CVS retail space on Sixth Ave. north of Carmine St. hope to raze the place and redevelop the site residentially. The owner is reportedly the Ranieri family, who have about 150 buildings. Word is that grandson William would take a penthouse if the project gets built. The lot is 75 feet wide. “This is no small building,” our source noted. It’s not clear how tall it would be. Plus, it’s located in an extension of the Greenwich Village Historic District, so it’s landmarked, and it’s unusual for a building to get demolished in a hisSCOOPY’S, continued on p.10 TheVillager.com


Teachout shocks Cuomo, wins one in three votes ELECTION, continued from p. 1

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Wu, a Columbia law professor, is an expert on ’Net neutrality, which basically means that all pages on the Internet should load at the same speed — that Fox’s pages don’t get to load faster than a blogger’s. In what was a very light primary day turnout, Teachout won 46 percent of Manhattan’s votes. She won all three of Manhattan’s West Side Assembly districts, Tony Hoffmann, president of the Village Independent Democrats, said. Teachout also won liberal voting areas in Brooklyn, including Brooklyn Heights, Park Slope, Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill. “I think she did great,” Hoffmann said on Wednesday. “She was in the race for — what? — eight weeks. And eight weeks later, with little name recognition and no money...it’s incredible.” V.I.D. endorsed Teachout and Wu, as did several other leading Downtown progressive Democratic clubs, including the Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club, Coalition for a District Alternative and Downtown Independent Democrats. The Jim Owles club was the first to endorse Teachout, and she didn’t forget it. She personally thanked Allen Roskoff, the gay club’s president, during her televised concession speech. Hoffmann said Teachout won in the city’s liberal white districts. She fared less well in working-class districts and among poorer, minority and conservative Jewish voters — the latter likely at least partly swayed by Cuomo’s strong position in support of Israel. But Teachout won among liberal Jewish voters. In addition, she won the entire Hudson Valley, stretching north above Westchester up to Canada. She and Cuomo each won 31 counties, but the ones Teachout took had few votes and the ones Cuomo garnered had many. “She sent a message — on the Moreland Commission, fracking, education — that we need public investment in education,” Hoffmann said. In addition, Randy Credico, the stand-up comic turned political candidate, all things considered, did very well for himself, too, Hoffmann said. Credico — who was angered when Teachout suddenly became the “protest vote candidate” instead of him — won 3.6 percent of Democratic votes cast. Hoffman said that, over the past weekends, V.I.D. was campaigning for Teachout and Wu at the Abingdon Square farmers market, and that the response was overwhelming. “It’s been a long time since I saw

Zephyr Teachout and Tim Wu pedaled off from the L.G.B.T. Center on Tuesday morning as they made the rounds on primary day.

that kind of reception,” he said. “People wanted the literature. People smiled and said, ‘Yes, I’ll be voting for her.’ ” On primary day, Teachout and Wu swung by the L.G.B.T. Center, on W. 13th St. Wu had earlier voted at P.S. 33, on W. 26th St. in Chelsea, near where he lives, and he and Teachout — who voted in Brooklyn — then biked down to the Village to campaign with V.I.D. members outside P.S. 3, on Hudson St., before going up to the Center. Teachout rode a bike-share Citi Bike while Wu — who used to live in the West Village — pedaled a funky, old, steel black Raleigh. Jacqueline Kirk, the poll coordinator, came out and scolded the candidates that they were “electioneering,” and, shooing them away, told them that they needed to stay 100 feet from the poll entrance. “C’mon, they know that,” she said. During a press conference at a safe 100 feet from the poll doorway, Teachout was asked what she thought of Cuomo reportedly telling state legislators that if they endorsed her, he would cut funding for projects in their districts. “The use of public power to sway political choices is something Andrew Cuomo is known for,” she stated. Of Cuomo and Hochul, she said, “They haven’t been prepared for the kind of enthusiasm we’ve seen. This troublesome exercise in democracy isn’t something Andrew Cuomo is excited about.”

Wu noted that their lawsuit is continuing over what they charge was the Democratic State Committee’s spend-

c

ing millions of dollars on Cuomo’s re-election campaign. The committee, they said, is supposed to be impartial. “Cuomo’s lawyers tried to have the case thrown out yesterday,” he said. “The case is proceeding. Regardless of who wins this election, there is a track record of enormous illegal contributions and illegalities. The lawsuit is going to expand.” “We’re very excited about pursuing the lawsuit,” Teachout added. The majority of voters at the L.G.B.T. Center were strongly for Teachout and Wu. “This person should not be in office,” Lucy Komisar told the press conference after she had voted, referring to Cuomo. “When I heard he was warning he’d cut funding for Assembly and state Senate districts if they backed Teachout... . In the next election, I might vote Republican,” she said, referring to G.O.P. candidate Rob Astorino, who will face Cuomo in the November general election. Teachout again praised Roskoff and his club for their early support. Even though Cuomo passed same-sex marriage, it wasn’t enough for Roskoff to overlook his faults. Noting he authored the nation’s ELECTION, continued on p. 24

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September 11, 2014

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POLICE BLOTTER

apprehended the man for the alcohol, a search allegedly revealed six bags of marijuana on him, as well as a box cutter stashed in his underpants. Police charged Robert Knowles, 31, with criminal possession of a weapon.

Sixties stabbing At about 1:15 a.m. on Wed., Sept. 3, a 69-year-old man approached a 60-yearold regarding missing property. Soon they were arguing, leading to the second man swinging at the first with a weapon, stabbing him in the face, according to police, who did not specify what the property or weapon were. The altercation at the northeast corner of LaGuardia Place and Bleecker St. left the victim with facial lacerations. Responding police recovered the weapon from Brigilio Sese and charged him with felony assault. Two additional victims, ages 36 and 51, were listed on a police report that did not describe their role in the incident or their gender.

W. 10th St. mugging Two people attacked a woman, 26, who was walking westbound on W. 10th St. near the intersection of Greenwich and Christopher Sts. at about 3 a.m. on Tues., Aug. 30. They punched and pushed her to the ground, grabbed a black pocketbook from her right shoulder and ran northbound on Greenwich St. The victim suffered “substantial pain” and swelling to her face and left knee, police said. A police canvass of the area with the victim led to the arrests of James Gillespie, 25, and Christopher Guzman, 20, who were charged with felony robbery. Among the woman’s missing possessions were a bag, iPhone 5S, U.S. passport and debit card cumulatively valued at $900, plus $80 cash. None of it has been recovered, police said.

Brief case

A man drinking from an open alcohol container found himself in bigger trouble soon after getting arrested at the southwest corner of Sixth Ave. and W. Fourth St. around 1 a.m. on Sat., Sept. 6. After a police officer

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Subway strangler On Tues., Sept. 9, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, Jr., announced the trial conviction of Anthony White, 44, for the robbery and strangulation assault of six victims in Manhattan subway stations and surrounding areas in August 2011. The defendant was found guilty by a jury in New York State Supreme Court of all of the charges in the indictment: robbery in the first, second and third degrees and strangulation in the first and second degrees. White is expected to be sentenced on Nov. 13. “The more than 5 million people who ride the subway every day in this city should not have to look over their shoulders for fear of being robbed,” said Vance. “Anthony White purposely selected victims whom he could easily overpower, including four men over the age of 70. He choked them from behind and violently robbed them, all in broad daylight. He now faces a lengthy prison sentence thanks to the sharp eyes of the N.Y.P.D. and the hard work of my office’s prosecutors.” As proven at trial, at around 9 a.m. on Au. 13, 2011, White attacked a 71-year-old man on the platform of the N/R subway station at W. 28th St. and Broadway. White approached the victim from behind, choked him until he lost consciousness, and stole $150 from his pocket before fleeing. The victim suffered a stroke in the hours following the attack, and had to be hospitalized for about a month. Over the next 13 days, White similarly attacked five other men, all between the ages of 38 and 85, choking them from behind and stealing their money and other personal items. In one instance, on Aug. 16, 2011, White followed a 75-year-old man into a commercial building near the entrance of the W. 28th St. N/R station. The defendant entered the elevator behind the victim, choked him, and stole about $200 from his wallet. Between Aug. 18, 2011, and Aug. 26, 2011, White attacked two more men in the same W. 28th  St. station, as well as a 78-year-old man in the W. 23rd  St. and Eighth Ave. A/C/E station, and an 85-year-old man in the W. 72nd St. and Central Park West A/B/C station. The Aug. 26 attack at the 28th  St. station was captured on surveillance camera. Three days later, an undercover Police Department Transit officer recognized White at the W. 28th St. station and arrested him.

According to the D.A.’s Office, White has been designated by the court as a “mandatory persistent violent predicate felon.” In 1987, he was convicted of second-degree robbery for strangling a man to the point of unconsciousness in the stairwell of a Manhattan subway station. Additionally, in 1992, White was sentenced to nine to 18 years in state prison after being convicted of first-degree manslaughter for choking a fellow inmate to death.

Fists fly at Raven The dance floor at The Raven, a bar at 55 Gansevoort St., got a little crazy at about 2:20 a.m. on Sun., Aug. 31. According to police, a man identified as Guy Gubani grabbed a 34-year-old woman there, resulting in a confrontation with a 26-year-old man, police say. The grabber then reportedly hit the other man on the head with a champagne bottle. Then another man struck the victim with a closed fist, but he wasn’t done fighting yet. Police arriving at the scene had trouble cuffing the second perpetrator, who was flailing his arms and kicking about. The 26-year-old man suffered swelling to his head and a laceration above his lip, according to a police report. Gubani, 23, and Joshua Sharon, 23 were both charged with felony assault.

Bad bench business At about 10:30 a.m. on Aug. 28 a man, 26, was sitting on a bench in Washington Square Park when he stood up to toss away some rubbish. When he returned to his seat, someone sitting on a nearby bench told him that an unknown man sitting on a bench had taken his backpack. The bag contained an Apple MacBook, an iPad and other possessions valued at a total of $3,320. The victim walked over to the man who indeed had the backpack and was rummaging through it, police said. The perpetrator then returned the bag. However, the laptop was missing. After the victim brought over an officer, a search of the perpetrator’s bag recovered the laptop. Samir Ibrahim, 44, was charged with grand larceny.

Zach Williams and Lincoln Anderson TheVillager.com


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TheVillager.com

September 11, 2014

5


PHOTOS BY MILO HESS

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TheVillager.com


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Climate march is hot ticket BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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he People’s Climate March, expected by organizers to be the largest climate march in history, is set to kick off in New York City on Sun., Sept. 21. There will be related solidarity events around the world. More than 1,000 businesses, unions, faith groups, schools, social justice groups, environmental groups and others are all working together on the event. The march’s focus will be environmental justice and equality — representing communities that are being hit the hardest by climate change. It’s perfect timing since world leaders are coming to New York City this month for a United Nations summit on the climate crisis. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is urging governments to support an ambitious global agreement to dramatically reduce global warming TheVillager.com

pollution. “With our future on the line and the whole world watching, we’ll take a stand to bend the course of history,” the march’s organizers said. “We’ll take to the streets to demand the world we know is within our reach: a world with an economy that works for people and the planet; a world safe from the ravages of climate change; a world with good jobs, clean air and water, and healthy communities.” Marchers will assemble along Central Park West between 59th and 86th Sts., and the march will begin at 11:30 a.m. The procession will leave Columbus Circle and head east on 59th St.; then turn onto Sixth Ave. and go south to 42nd St.; then turn right onto 42nd St. and go west to 11th Ave.; then turn left on 11th Ave. and go south to 34th St. The march will end in the streets between 34th and 38th Sts.

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TheVillager.com


D.O.E. now says adult league can use schoolyard BY YANNIC RACK

I

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY JAMES OO

n a disappointing turn for a group of local residents, an adult sports league has not suspended its weekend kickball games at two schools on the Lower East Side. The Villager reported in August that, according to a Department of Education spokesperson, ZogSports, a co-ed social sports league that operates across the city’s boroughs, had its permit revoked for kickball games at P.S. 142, at 100 Attorney St., and Lower East Side Preparatory and Marta Valle high schools, at 145 Stanton St., by D.O.E. because it was a for-profit business and therefore not fulfilling the permit requirements. Now, after residents have been complaining about continuing kickball games on the schoolyards, the department has made a full reverse on the issue. In an e-mail two weeks ago, Marge Feinberg, the same spokesperson who initially told The Villager that the permits had been rescinded, said that ZogSports “provided documentation showing they are a nonprofit organization” and that “their permit has not been revoked.” She previously stood by her original statement but conceded to investigate after the office manager for ZogSports confirmed that games were continuing on the Lower East Side, starting the fall season this past weekend. “We met with the Department of Education on August 15 [after the Villager article was published] and they confirmed that the ZogSports Athletic Association has permits and that the person that you spoke with was incorrect when they said that. Our permit was never revoked,” the ZogSports office manager said. The residents have complained that Zogsports promotes alcohol on schoolyards by partnering with sponsors such as Bud Light and Wild Turkey American Honey. The residents also say that children are turned away at the gates of their own schoolyards to make room for the adult kickball games. “I guess they can technically cover themselves as a not-for-profit because of their sister entity,” said Diem Boyd, founder of L.E.S. Dwellers, an activist local neighborhood group. “But our argument still says that it’s promoting happy hour at local bars and alcohol brands, and we don’t see how that’s appropriate on D.O.E. property.” Boyd added that the problems don’t end on the field because the players move on to the countless nearby bars on the Lower East Side after the games. According to the Town & Village

ZogSports kickball players using the playground outside Lower East Side Prep High School, at 145 Stanton St., last Sunday.

blog, ZogSports was expelled from Stuyvesant Town-area playgrounds in 2012 after a woman and her kids were turned away at the gate because of an ongoing kickball game, which triggered a flurry of complaints from residents. ZogSports is a for-profit entity that gives a portion of its net profit to a sister nonprofit called Play For Your Cause. In addition, the ZogSports Athletic Association of New York City is a nonprofit that runs “100 percent of the [ZogSports] activities in NYC Department of Education facilities” and in turn donates 100 percent of net proceeds to charity, according to the ZogSports Web site. According to the ZogSports office manager, the permits are made out to the nonprofit ZSAANYC, therefore qualifying the games for D.O.E. facilities. Part of the donations that are made through the association also go directly to the schools that host the games. Play For Your Cause “receives money from ZogSports, ZSAANYC, partner bars and sponsors” and donates funds to charities as well, according to the Web site. The group including Boyd and L.E.S. Dwellers has written numerous letters to the department and also filed a complaint against Play for Your Cause with the New York State Charities Bureau of the Attorney General’s Office. “They seem to be concentrating in certain areas where there’s a lot of alcohol around, and the poor neighborhoods,” Boyd said of ZogSports. “It’s not happening at Upper East Side schools, it’s not happening at Upper West Side schools. I think they’re doing it down here for obvious reasons. One local resident who did not

want to be named, but claims she has witnessed this behavior from her apartment opposite P.S. 142, said, “This is shameful. I mean, come on, you’re kicking kids out so that these adult kickball leagues can play on school property?” Marge Feinberg, the D.O.E. spokesperson, responded to the al-

legations last week, saying, “There was no evidence of promoting alcohol. Also, schoolchildren are not inconvenienced because the permit only allows the organization to use the field when it would otherwise be closed.” Other than ZogSports’ office manager, company representatives could not be reached for a comment. This is not the first time the residents are fighting an adult sports league. Last month, NYC Social Sports League, another organizer of co-ed leagues, stopped playing there after L.E.S. Dwellers and residents repeatedly contacted the department with similar complaints. Boyd said they never heard back, but the league removed its equipment from the fields and hasn’t been playing since. NYC Social did not return phone calls asking for confirmation. But Feinberg said, “NYC Social decided not to complete its time left on its permit.” Martha Polin, who has been the principal at Lower East Side Preparatory High School for 13 years and is the building principal for M.O. 25 (which houses three schools), said she can’t understand the complaints. “These are lovely people, they’re SPORTS LEAGUE, continued on p.11

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PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Knitting the ages together Knitting is great no matter who you are, as these women from the 20 Washington Square North senior center, above, and this cupcake crafter in Washington Square Park, left, will tell you.

SCOOPY’S, continued from p. 2

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OCCUPY PORTLAND! Michael Ellick, the minister of Judson Church, gave his last sermon on Washington Square South on Sunday. He’s heading off to Portland, Oregon. Known as the “Priest of Occupy Wall Street,” Ellick was the leader of Occupy Faith NYC, a coalition of progressive New York City houses of worship supporting O.W.S. Judson congregants held a farewell party for him, at which warm memories of his times with the church were shared. HOT OR NOT? We saw this jar of La Esquina salsa roja (red salsa) on a deli shelf in Brooklyn. Yup, it seems to be put out by the hip Kenmare St. eatery/nightclub of the same name. Needless to say, we don’t think it has earned the Friends of Petrosino Square’s seal of approval! AH, SUCH IS LIFE...: Jane St. author Warren Allen Smith, 92, has self-published his ninth book, a memoir, “Mr. Smith, The Sybarite Who Also Was A

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September 11, 2014

PHOTO BY SCOOPY

toric district. G.V.S.H.P.’s Berman said it was the first he’d heard of it. “If I’m not mistaken, it’s a relatively nondescript postwar building,” he said. The Landmarks Preservation Commission would have to approve the demo and then the building plans. “It’s a multistep process,” the preservationist said.

Teacher.” Clocking in at 450 pages, it details his life’s high points, such as serving as a chief clerk for General Eisenhower in W.W. II; co-owning Variety Recording Studio, and recording the likes of Marvin Hamlisch, Quincy Jones, Tito Puente, Liza Minnelli, Sun Ra, Stevie Wonder and many more; being a paramour to three-time Tony nominee Gilbert Price and “making sweet music” with Fernando Vargas, also of Variety Recording Studio; lending a mic to Sammy Davis Jr. to hide in his crotch; and being mooned by Screw publisher Al Goldstein, to name a few.

BALLOTS ’N’ BOOKS: Gina Shamus, of Westbeth, tells us that the famed artists’ housing complex will be having a book sale, possibly on Election Day. This way people can vote and pick up a good read in one swing. TheVillager.com


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young professionals, it’s good for the neighborhood,” she said. “It’s really not loud. There’s no promotion, there’s no signs, nothing. There’s no alcohol on the premises. After they are finished playing kickball, they may go out to a bar — I don’t know what they do, and if they do, so be it. It’s not my business. “Down here, on a Thursday night or a Friday night, people are vomiting in the streets; it’s so crowded you can’t walk on the sidewalk,” Polin added. “But this is where these people choose to live. And they’re complaining about a little kickball, a little fun. Plus, these organized sports,

they donate all their money to charity. So I don’t know what their problem is, but I think if we had a flower-arranging class back there, they’d complain about that, too!” Polin added that ZogSports doesn’t pay the schools to play on their grounds and hasn’t donated any money to M.O. 25 either. The league does, however, pay D.O.E. a fee for its permit. The principal also confirmed that the schoolyard would normally not be open to children anyway. “If they weren’t using the yard, it would be locked,” she said. “It’s not a park.” A spokesperson for P.S. 142 referred questions about the sports league to D.O.E.

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Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF LINCOLN ANDERSON

ARTS EDITOR

SCOTT STIFFLER

CONTRIBUTORS PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

IRA BLUTREICH TEQUILA MINSKY JEFFERSON SIEGEL JERRY TALLMER

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR TROY MASTERS

SENIOR DESIGNER MICHAEL SHIREY

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CHRIS ORTIZ ANDREW GOOS

EXECUTIVE VP OF ADVERTISING AMANDA TARLEY

SENIOR VP OF ADVERTISING / MARKETING FRANCESCO REGINI

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JACK AGLIATA BILL FINK ALLISON GREAKER JENNIFER HOLLAND JULIO TUMBACO

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR. MARVIN ROCK

PUBLISHER EMERITUS JOHN W. SUTTER

Member of the New York Press Association

‘Day by Day’ (by the fountain) Some star power was assembled around the Washington Square Fountain on Monday for what was reportedly a 1972 “Godspell” cast reunion shoot for Vanity Fair. From left, Paul Shaffer, Andrea Martin, Eugene Levy and Martin Short. Also there, but not in this shot, was Victor Garber.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Caffeine jitters To The Editor: There is a new Starbucks on Bleecker St. between Sixth and Seventh Aves., and I am dismayed. I feel this changes the unique character of Bleecker St. It’s only two doors from that lovely pastry shop Rocco that has been there for years. Don’t we have enough Starbucks locations? Marilyn Moorcroft

Doesn’t sound kosher Member of the National Newspaper Association

The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 0042-6202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2011 NYC Community Media LLC.

PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR

The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue. Published by NYC Community Media, LLC One Metrotech North, 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (212) 229-1890 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2012 NYC Community Media, LLC

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September 11, 2014

To The Editor: Re “Katz’s reportedly sells its development rights, but deli will be staying” (news article, Sept. 11): They really will stay in business during construction? Will they build an underground entrance and beam the tourists into Katz’s? Will your pastrami come with mustard, coleslaw and dust? Will all of Houston St. become a bigger parking lot during construction? Affordable housing — really affordable — would be nice. Foreign investors money-laundering through luxu-

ry housing is a no-no. Shame on you, Jake Dell. Judith Chazen Walsh

Students care the most To The Editor: Re “Cooper protest continues as new tuition kicks in, new security comes on” (news article, Sept. 4): Cooper students have been amazing throughout this mess. They know and care more about Peter Cooper’s vision and trust than the administration that is (over)paid to act as the trust’s steward. And while school spokesman Harmon continues to hype the Pell Grant family numbers, the board of trustees own April 21, 2013, meeting notes quote school president Bharucha reassuring them that the added grants are only a temporary measure to bolster applications: “The president explained that the additional need- and merit-based aid in the model reduces over time.” Scott Lerman

N.Y. not on his agenda To The Editor: Re “The revolution will be televised” (Scoopy’s Notebook, Sept. 4): In case you didn’t get it yet after all these years, the whole Yippie propaganda strategy was about media hype. Also, I hate gentrified New York and would have to move back and possibly be homeless to do this, and too many of my old friends from the L.E.S. are dead, so I find the city very depressing and expensive. Besides, I already told The Villager that I was going to NOLA and then back to Mexico to photograph Chiapas, Oaxaca and the Zapatistas. F N.Y.C. John Penley E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 1 Metrotech North, 10th floor, Brooklyn, NY, NY 11201. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

TheVillager.com


Sorting it all out: A look at kinds of clutter NOTEBOOK BY OTIS KIDWELL BURGER Clut-ter (Klut’ tar prob. ME clutteren to CLOT. 1. Confused or disorganized condition or state; JUMBLE. To litter or pile in a disorganized state. Webster New Riverside University Dictionary

T

he streets of New York aren’t paved with gold, but they are littered with castoff treasure. Some years ago, when I possessed a station wagon and a strong friend, I considered cruising Park Avenue at night, collecting and selling discarded treasures. A friend said, “But that’s the turf of the Russian Mafia.” I have no wish to tussle with Russians, real or imaginary. So we confined our enterprise to our native Village turf. He found: A working air conditioner. A working microwave. An antique store-sized coffee grinder. An antique child’s toy wagon. A queen-sized mattress (no bedbugs). An abandoned bicycle. A Hitchcock chair. A tennis racquet. An expensive stainless-steel garbage can. Five nonworking vacuum cleaners, which he repaired and gave away. A dressmaker’s dummy. Many working TVs. Two 9-x-12 Oriental rugs. One evening he phoned, “Bring a dolly!” and we wheeled a working washer-dryer from 23rd St. down Eighth Avenue; it still sits in the basement, in a spiderweb of hoses and clothesline. After the Great TV Extinction the streets and this house were soon littered with still-twitching TVs and heaps of wonderful videotapes. Most of which I have not yet played. Progress is an infallible source of obsolete clutter. I found: chairs, tables, shelves, lamps, window boxes, jackets, gloves, scarves, a fur-lined raincoat, earmuffs, an antique washstand, books, books, books, plants. A couch. A friend of ours furnished most of her apartment in this style, which she calls “West Village Eclectic.” Squirrels hoard nuts. Packrats and jackdaws collect junk and shiny objects. Humans collect both...with a great deal of help from street finds, thrift stores, Macy’s, etc. and eBay. (One friend was so weakened by eBay she had to hold a tag

EVAN FORSCH

sale in order to move around.) Things say, “Take me,” and we do. A few make it to “Antiques Roadshow.” Some are actively used. Some disappear into closets or basements or back on the street. Some stay. Whatever entered the Collyers’ house never left. The Collyer brothers is the Great Cautionary Tale. In the ’30s and ’40s they filled their entire house on upper Fifth Avenue from floor to ceiling with junk and newspapers, and burrowed throughout with tunnels, nests and booby traps. The younger Collyer, once a concert pianist and engineer, was finally killed in one of his own booby traps. The blind and paralyzed brother starved to death. The Collyers’ problem wasn’t a lack of space. ... But nowadays ours often is. Not so long ago, many of us lived on farms, with an agreeable and fairly organized clutter of cats, chickens, farm machinery and livestock. We also lived in houses with attics and basements. Then came the urban slums, in which the chief clutter was humans. The middle-class Village brownstones housed a different clutter, a smother of knickknacks, overstuffed furniture and potted palms. Eventually, many homes split into apart-

My children accuse me of clutter. But I do know where things are.

ments and rooming houses (like mine), and were often replaced by apartment buildings, where a one-room “studio” rents for as much per month as many farmers made in a year. So, how do we trim our lives to fit our shrinking space? Some of us don’t. A professional clutter-cleaner said his worst job was cleaning a one-room apartment where 12 people had lived. There had been a fire. There was a six-inch-deep crust of dead roaches, bedbugs, rats, garbage, junk over everything.

At the opposite extreme, when the Van Gogh opened more than 50 years ago, our friend Jay Bell, the super, said some people couldn’t afford both rent and furniture and slept on the floor. How long does it take to collect clutter (let alone furniture) after such barebones beginnings? No time at all, if you live and work in one room. I once volunteered to feed a woman’s cats. Problem: Find the cats. She was a dressmaker in the West Village. Narrow trails between chest-high piles of clothing led to the kitchen and bathroom. Two cats, alerted by the can opener, cautiously appeared from under heaps of skirts. A friend of mine, an artist living in Westbeth, also lived in a one-room apartment filled with her work. She took in a pregnant feral cat. After the kittens were born and given to good homes, Mom cat was rarely seen again. Like the Collyers, she had made tunnels and nests through the (mostly organized) heaps of art materials. Cats are often associated with clutter, and sometimes they are clutter. In the South Village, many years ago, two old ladies, rumored to be Jimmy Breslin’s aunts, lived in a brick house full of cats. Authorities reportedly tactfully failed to notice and intervene. Neighbors complained the smell came right through the walls. Back in the 1960s, the West Village was full of stray cats and dogs. We found many, adopted some, found homes for others. Neighbors kept cats. On a sunny day, these backyards were a living tapestry of greenery and little cat faces. Keeping more cats or dogs than you can manage turns clutter into hoarding, with often tragic results. Some years ago we visited a house in the northwest Village that had literally gone to the dogs. There were dogs of all sizes and types, everywhere. The owner had to be told by the authorities to move. To where? He asked distractedly, opening a chest door as he talked. A heap of newborn puppies tumbled out. “Now where did those...!” he said. There is also urban clutter. Some years ago, a covered pier space near us was littered with mattresses and feral cats. I took a cat carrier there to rescue some kittens but there had been a fire the previous night and mattresses and cats were gone. A few years later a genuine shantytown appeared on the river near Gansevoort Peninsula, a fairly order clutter of scrap-built homes, with improvised stoves, no toilets, no running water but plenty of feral cats. The city rightly decided that this was unsanitary clutter and this impromptu village vanished. In the 1950s William Zeckendorf decided to tear down the “little old low decaying” clutter of the West Village in order to erect tall, more financially worthy towers. Jane Jacobs, who lived with her family around the corner, rented a room here when this was a rooming house, and wrote “The Death and Life of Great American Cities.” This house — which I now own — was then owned by two retired policemen, who kept the heat on half an hour in the morning and a half hour in the evening. When not physically writing, Jane huddled in bed to keep warm. Then she sallied forth to save the West Village and Lower Manhattan. (Jane and I went to a meeting at which the Lower Manhattan Expressway was being bulldozed down on us, and I said to Jane, “There must be some way to stop this.” She leapt up and jumped on the stage and lifted the paper out of the reBURGER, continued on p. 16

TheVillager.com

September 11, 2014

13


Fast-food workers turn up heat for higher wages BY GERARD FLYNN

J

umal Tarber is a 35-year-old worker at a McDonald’s in Midtown, Manhattan. He’s got a 5-year-old daughter, Danae, and would love to take her to Disney World sometime. However, he can’t. While his daughter lives elsewhere, he rents a room and works five days a week, earning $8 an hour, leaving him, he said, to make some tough decisions. “Me, personally, I have to pick from food or transportation to get to work,” he said. For now, Disneyland is a distant dream. But that’s not all that’s wrong with his job, where he has worked for more than two years. He only recently got three sick days, and gets no vacation time at all, another reason why his daughter won’t be seeing Mickey Mouse anytime soon, except maybe in a storefront. Tarber wants his employer to hike his wages to $15 an hour because he says, in one of the world’s most expensive cities, you can’t live on that. And so he was among protestors in Midtown Thursday, campaigning for a higher wage — and a union. A union, he said, is desperately needed, for a number of reasons. For starters, a general manager can get personal with an employee, who has little recourse but to take it, something an arbitrating union could mitigate, he said. “No union means no backbone. You don’t have no support,” Tarber explained. “So if something is to happen, like a dispute with a manager over something personal that

Fast-food workers rallied for higher wages at a Sept. 4 rally in Times Square.

has nothing to do with work, the manager can write you up.” But he’s witnessed worse, he said. “They do a lot of discrimination,” he stated. “Women at my job feel scared to talk because the G.M. says stuff at the store that is inappropriate, and female employees are scared to speak out about sexual discrimination because they are afraid to lose their jobs.” He added that if a more affordable city like Seattle can raise its minimum wage to $15 an hour, a wealthy city like New York should, too. Hundreds took part in Thursday’s action in Times Square, with 19 reportedly arrested for disorderly conduct for sitting down in the street. That demonstration followed speakins at St. Mark’s and Judson churches on Aug. 31 as part of a  “labor in

the pulpits,” according to Reverend Winnie Varghese, of St. Mark’s. A fast-food worker with Kentucky Fried Chicken in Brooklyn told the East Village congregation of the great uncertainty she faces, echoing Tarber’s words that without union protection one’s hours can be reduced without notice, often a way to make a worker quit. “As people of faith, we believe we should be able to live with dignity in this city,” Varghese said. “And it is particularly appalling that people working 40 hours a week cannot meet their basic needs.” But the campaign has been running into resistance from the industry and franchise owners. Jack Mazloom, a spokesperson for the National Federation of Independent Business, said the notion

that this campaign is about pitting workers against big, powerful corporations is “misleading in seeking to persuade the American public about big corporations and their excess profits.” Keeping in line with the industry’s position, he said that many franchises aren’t owned by big corporations, but operate as small businesses and can’t afford such a hike. Close to 90 percent of McDonald’s stores in the U.S. are franchises, he noted. Mazloom put The Villager in touch with Randall Bradley, who operates two Burger King franchises in Missouri and Iowa. “I am a franchise, which means I am an independent operator,” Bradley explained. “Burger King has nothing to do with whether I make it or break it on my own. I pay a royalty fee and I pay into the national advertising fund and that’s my cost for being able to use the Burger King brand. I pay regardless of if I make money or not. “I would love to increase their wages to $15 per hour,” he said of his workers. “But that would be about four times what I make in profit and at that increased cost I would go bankrupt.” However, a July ruling by the federal National Labor Relations Board seriously challenges McDonald’s assertion that it lacks authority over issues like setting minimum wage. To reach a decision that can have wide-reaching effects on the fastfood industry, a long legal road must be traveled. However, the Los Angeles Times reported that the N.L.R.B. general counsel ruled the federal agency will treat McDonald’s as the workers’ “joint employer.”

Disabled advocates ramp up pressure with lawsuit BY ZACH WILLIAMS

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September 11, 2014

PHOTO BY ZACH WILLIAMS

isability activists received unanimous support from the Community Board 3 Transportation Committee for a class-action lawsuit seeking to force the city Department of Transportation to repair thousands of sidewalks and curb ramps in Lower Manhattan. The suit alleges that the city has ignored requests from the Center for Independence of the Disabled New York to address alleged violations of both the Americans with Disabilities Act and the New York City Human Rights Law. While the problems are citywide, the predominance of government buildings in Lower Manhattan prompted activists to focus on this area, Julia Pinover-Kupiec — an attorney for

A disabled woman rode her wheelchair for a block along Broadway because she couldn’t access the sidewalk at Astor Place.

Disability Rights Advocates, which sued in U.S. District Court on July 30 — told the committee.

The situation in Manhattan below 14th St. is “more important and it’s worse, and that is why I’m here,” she told C.B. 3 members at the Sept. 4 meeting. “I don’t think the city has been acting in good faith for a decade,” said committee member David Crane, who wondered whether the suit’s allegations were strong enough. A letter sent on May 30 about the issue did not receive a response, Pinover-Kupiec said later. D.O.T. met with activists in July after a second effort, but would not agree to enter into “structured settlement negotiations to discuss” how to resolve issues or make suggested improvements over “a reasonable period of time,” according to the lawsuit. The plaintiffs include two disabled people and CIDNY. This reporter’s sister works at CIDNY but

is not involved in the suit. The city, D.O.T. and Polly Trottenberg, the agency’s commissioner, are listed as defendants in the suit. The lawsuit’s endorsement by C.B. 3 paves the way for hopefully garnering the same from neighboring Boards 1 and 2, as well as increasing public pressure on D.O.T. to address the issues, according to Pinover-Kupiec. According to CIDNY, more than 75 percent of 1,066 surveyed curbs had barriers presenting safety hazards to people with mobility or vision disabilities. Almost one-quarter of the curbs had no curb ramps at all, according to the survey. A D.O.T. spokesperson said that 89 percent of street corners in C.B. 2 and 3 had pedestrian ramps installed. Data for C.B. 1 was unavailable, he said, due to “a great deal of capital construction” there. TheVillager.com


There’s only one way to save our small businesses TALKING POINT BY SHARON WOOLUMS

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TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

oday Villagers walk past closed neighborhood businesses once filled with customers; Union Square Cafe, The Back Fence, Pearl Paint, even Gray’s Papaya — we all had our favorites — gone but not forgotten and greatly missed. We’ve all wondered, “Will the Village as we know it become extinct before anything is done about it?” Finally, after so many long-established small businesses were forced to close and jobs were lost, solutions are coming. When the new progressive City Council returns, two different solutions will be considered: The first, introduced in June by Bronx Councilmember Annabel Palma, the Small Business Jobs Survival Act, gives small business owners — our city’s major job creators and our economy’s backbone — rights equal to landlords in negotiating lease-renewal terms. After bargaining in good faith, if agreement on lease terms can’t be reached, it goes to mediation; if that fails, arbitration. No tax dollars would be needed. Originally introduced by Councilmember Ruth Messinger in 1986, the S.B.J.S.A. has never had a vote by the full City Council in more than 30 years. Even with the sponsorship of the former chairperson of the Small Business Committee, David Yassky, the entire committee and 32 co-sponsors, the bill was denied a hearing by the Speaker’s Office for more than four years. The second potential solution was detailed by Robert Cornegy, Jr., chairperson of the Small Business Committee, in a recent Gotham Gazette column. Cornegy wrote that he is “working on legislation using subsidies to pay landlords to not rentgouge… . I hope that we can create an effective incentive for commercial landlords that will give businesses greater predictability and allow them to benefit from the positive changes they help to create,” he said. Since the Giuliani administration, and continuing under Mayors Bloomberg and de Blasio, the starting point for most economic policy decisions begins with giving real estate developers tax incentives or subsidies for doing projects claiming to create jobs or benefiting a community. In Cornegy’s proposal, landlords would be given tax breaks for not doing something — for not rent-gouging long established businesses, forcing them to close. What do small business advocates say is the better solution? Long recognized as the city’s top

Earlier this year, Villagers were once again feeling agita at the possibility of yet another possible closure, when Caffé Dante — which has been on MacDougal St. since 1915 and is one of the Village’s oldest cafes — was shuttered. But Mario Flotta, above, who has owned the place since 1970, assured it was not closing. “We’re renovating and adding to the menu,” he said, promising to reopen in two to three weeks — and so he did.

authority on the issue, Sung Soo Kim, known as the “Godfather of Small Businesses,” in 1984 founded the Korean American Small Business Service Center, which assists more than 17,000 businesses. Kim was the first chairperson of Mayor Dinkins’s and Giuliani’s Small Business Advisory Committee and a co-founder of the Small Business Congress, a 112-member advocacy group. In 1991, he created the first Small Business Bill of Rights in New York City. “There is only one real solution to saving our city’s small businesses, the S.B.J.S.A.,” Kim stated. “Our City Council must give job creators — our small businesses — rights to negotiate fair lease terms with landlords, giving them reasonable return for their hard work and investment. If business owners make a reasonable profit and have some control over future costs, they can plan growth, which will create jobs and pay higher wages. Without this right to negotiate equally, where only landlords’ profits count, and only the landlords have all the rights, a take-itor-leave-it commercial marketplace, the future of every small business and their employees is solely in the hands of a small group of landlords. “It’s getting worse every year as landlords get greedier demanding

ever-more exorbitant rents to gain unreasonable profits,” Kim continued. “Twenty-three percent of my Korean members were forced to close in 2013. As an immigrant business organization, I must say our City Council and mayor are sending the message that New York City is no longer the gateway to the American Dream, especially for immigrant owners.” Steven Spinola, president of the Real Estate Board of New York, quoted in a Sept. 3 New York Post article, “City Council lease proposal will hurt landlords and city,” clearly stated the landlords’ position on the S.B.J.S.A. “This is the kind of bill that would send a terrible message to the business community about having arm’slength transactions between two parties,” he said. “City Council attorneys have suggested in the past, and we still believe, it is not within the scope of the powers of the City of New York, and if it moves ahead, it will be subject to legal challenges.” The article ended with the recommendation to reject the S.B.J.S.A. before it bursts the city’s economic bubble. However, Kim responded, “The S.B.J.S.A. will make for better communications between a landlord and business tenant, not less. Years ago, when a lease expired, landlords and

tenants met face to face, bargaining in good faith to arrive at fair lease terms which allowed both parties a reasonable profit. Now, little or no bargaining between the landlord and tenant occurs. Business owners receive letters from the landlord’s attorney to accept the terms demanded by the landlord or vacate the premise by the end of the month. They have no certainty of new lease terms, or if the landlord will even want them to stay in business.” Behind closed doors at City Hall, the S.B.J.S.A.’s legality was questioned, though this was never done publicly. That the bill simply could not work was allegedly “proven” by a “legal review panel” in 2010. Assisted by this so-called “legal roadblock,” a vote on the bill was stopped by friends of the real estate lobby. In fact, in 1945, the state Legislature passed a strict commercial rent-control law that remained in effect until 1963. This law protected businesses from real estate speculators, greedy landlords and forced closings. New York’s highest courts upheld the law every time as constitutional, and no landlord ever claimed he went out of business during the entire 18 years as a result of being regulated and forced to accept a reasonable return. Now, with no rights or protections, 185,000 small businesses are at risk and their employees’ jobs in jeopardy. The longer a mom-and-pop store has been in business, the more successful it is, the more money has been put into it, the more at risk it is of being exploited and virtually robbed by landlords. Rent-gouging, extortion, “cash under the table” deals, shorter leases that prevent growth, all result in forced layoffs, higher prices for customers. Small businesses are destroyed as a handful of landlords become super-wealthy. If elected officials really meant it when they say, “Our small businesses are the backbone of our economy, the engines that create jobs,” then why the silence? Over the past 20 years, our Democratic City Council has used government to maximize and protect the real estate industry’s profits — a partnership producing huge profits for the Council’s major campaign contributor. As small businesses grew weaker each year, their problems were ignored. The real estate industry, having more influence at City Hall, grew stronger as they received every possible tax break and subsidy. Refusing to appoint a small business owner or advocate to any agency establishing economic policy for small businesses, Mayor de Blasio, though progressive on social issues, clearly is not concerned about small businesses and jobs. More than 53,200 SMALL BUSINESS, continued on p. 25 September 11, 2014

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Sept. 16: Mobile Tech for Hospitality, Retail, Sales, and Education

Sept. 23: Essential Technologies for Emerging Businesses

Sept. 30: Business Workstations for Office Environments

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BURGER, continued from p. 13

cording machine and she was jailed. I was awed and so was the city, and the project was abandoned.) My children have often accused me of clutter, with some justification. But I do know where things are. Usually. However, magazines do keep coming. And how can I say goodbye to Kurt Vonnegut? ...Tony Hillerman, E. Nesbit, Beatrix Potter...and a host of others? I did manage to give away some 1960s Natural History magazines recently. Then the basement flooded. Not rainwater this time. Dental floss is not biodegradable. Flushed down the toilet, it can lurk in your plumbing for decades. We had already replaced an upstairs toilet. Now Jerry the plumber extracted another huge clot, a jumble of dental floss clogging the main drain. Everything in the house, including the toilets, had been emptying into the basement, lapping around 55-year-old heaps of stored odds and ends. Not so long ago these backyards housed privies, which tended to overflow in heavy rains. This historical comparison was no comfort. To the rescue came Clutter Free Junk Removal Services and Cleanouts. A truck as impressive as the Queen Mary parked outside, and Raul and his team donned rubber boots, masks and hazmat suites and disappeared into the Dismal Swamp below. They pumped out the sewage, power-washed everything, sanitized everything, moved everything around, threw out many huge bags of sodden stuff and several planks of contaminated wood. Then the waters receded, and the cats and I (but no dove) came tiptoe-

ing around the newly emerging dry land. “Do they also do dead bodies?” my daughter Kathy asked. “Yes!” Two of my neighbors, people I knew, had died alone during heat waves. I have often wondered... . Nature provides its own cleanup services: vultures, dung beetles, ants, maggots, fungi, bacteria, etc. It takes intrepid humans to clean up the messes humans make: sewage, garbage, junk, coal ash, plastic, oil spills, radioactive waste. Dental floss. Humans are the only species that leaves such imperishable clutter on the Earth. Meanwhile, many buried treasures have resurfaced in my basement: a nice humpback trunk, smelling strongly of mold; two chainsaws; a skittles board but no skittles; a Coleman lantern; several canes, crutches and a walker, in case of future need; several ancient wax Edison recordings; an immense pipe cutter; a big ornate metal house with attached exercise wheels presumably for gerbils; and a unicycle. As to the stuff Raul & Co. hauled away, thanks to my own immense collection of National Geographic and environmental magazines, I know that landfills — like cows, humans and other creatures — produce methane, a useful gas, usually burned off as waste by corporations fracking for oil. But some landfills now capture their methane and pipe it as fuel to many nearby homes. I like to think that those sewage-sodden bags and environmental magazines hauled from my basement are in some enlightened landfill being recycled, reborn, redeemed from clutter and providing clean energy for this cluttered planet.

Bob, lobsters and the elbow 119 West 23rd Street • 212.929.3645 • tekserve.com 16

September 11, 2014

With a cast of mini-humans fishing for lobster in a bigger man’s lymphatic system and praying to the god Bob (Robert Redford), “Revolution in the Elbow of Ragnar Agnarsson Furniture Painter” is definitely offbeat. One thing that’s clear is the off Broadway show’s music, by Icelandic songwriter Ívar Páll Jónsson, definitely rocks, with shades of Radiohead, Bowie and Queen. Featuring Tony Award winner Cady Huffman and former Miss America Kate Shindle, it’s playing at the Minetta Lane Theater through Sept. 20. In addition, cast members and the band will be doing a special concert at Joe’s Pub on Sun., Sept. 14. TheVillager.com


A high volume of poetic greatness

‘Best American’ anthology has brilliance, innovation, surprises

ANTHOLOGY THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY 2014 Guest Editor, Terrance Hayes Series Editor, David Lehman 240 pages Scribner Hardcover: $35.00 Paperback: $18.99 E-book: $11.99 Visit thebestamericanpoetry.typepad.com

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ast November, while on a West Coast poetry reading tour, I stayed for a few days at my friend Beverly’s San Francisco home. Beverly loves books more than anyone I know. Floor to ceiling shelves line every inch of available wall space, and there are additional cartons in the garage and in storage. Serendipitously, the guest room doubles as the Poetry Room, everything alphabetized and divided into categories and sub-categories. It was there that I discovered the Best American Poetry series in its entirety. I had come across a volume or two and was already an admirer of the work of the Senior Editor, David Lehman, but never before had I had access to all twenty-five volumes. Jet lagged and bleary eyed, I stayed up as long as possible, devouring volume after volume. The next afternoon I was still at it, vaguely annoyed when I had to stop and attend my own reading. As a poet, my knee-jerk reaction to anything labeled “best” is “How do you know?” or “By whose standards?” David Lehman’s 2011 introTheVillager.com

COURTESY OF SCRIBNER

BY PUMA PERL

duction provided some insight into the editorial methods by exploring the concept of poetic greatness and the standards we use, and the ways in which an editor must suspend his own “natural resistance” to new forms and new ideas. This year’s Guest Editor, National Book Award-winning poet Terrance Hayes, admits in his introduction to finding himself obsessing over the concept of “best” and concluding that there are all kinds of “bests,” representing a “unity of contradictions.” What I will attest to, in all of these volumes, including the current one, is that there is brilliance, there is innovation, there are surprises, and there are no poems that I would unequivocally state are unworthy of inclusion. The series began in 1988, and employs a different poet as Guest Editor each year, who is respon-

sible for the final selection. For the most part, the poems were published during the previous year. The first Guest Editor, John Ashbery, included a poem of his own, and appears in the current volume. David Lehman’s early practice of writing forewords has evolved into a “state of the art ” statement. In the current volume, he considers the ways in which the digital age has changed our language and thinking. Poetry may continue to be celebrated “if you can write in units of 140 keystrokes,” as a character from “Mad Men” states in the opening paragraph. Lehman points out two things that you can count on. First, that “people will keep writing as they adjust from one medium to another,” and second, that articles will appear at regular intervals declaring that poetry is dead. The selected poems vary in form and are diverse in the choice of poets. They are arranged alphabetically, yet, magically, create links and form natural arrangements, probably because of the vision of the editor. Many anthologists spend countless hours creating order among their selections; I’ve found it to be one of the biggest challenges in my own solo collections. In this case the poems line up like children in size place, some of them rowdy, some quiet, some refusing to stand quietly in place. A poem by Ray Gonzalez, “One El Paso, Two El Paso” ends with the words five centuries praying in the beautiful dust as a young woman’s body is dragged from the river. The following entry, by Kathleen Graber, is titled “The River Twice,” which takes its title from a pre-Socratic philosopher, and concludes, A hymn with the chorus Every moment you shall be judged is followed by in which the choir shouts Praise! Stand up and be forgiven. To me, some of the gifts of the volume are these coincidences, cultural diversity connecting on artistic soil. Another aspect that distinguishes this series is a lengthy section (42 pages) of contributors’ notes and comments. Rather than the usual array of accomplishments and/or cute one-liners, an opportunity is provided for the poets to write POETRY, continued on p.18 September 11, 2014

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The Best American Poetry 2014 POETRY, continued from p. 17

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

about the published pieces. Olena Kalytiak Davis, whose entry, “It is to Have or Nothing” was one of my favorites, admits, “I don’t really like this poem.” She goes on to explain that the most interesting thing about it is all of the other poems that happened around it — “that they are part of the dirt!” Jon Sands, a thirty-one-year-old Brooklyn resident, created a new form in his poem, “Decoded,” in which he tried to “produce an effect similar to what you get when you examine a photograph beside its negative.” He adds that “without the work and personhood of Eboni Hogan” this poem could not have been written.” I’ve known Jon Sands for several years and his innovation and generosity of spirit are what you would expect from him. The kid is a mensch of the highest order and his work stands up equally on page and stage. He has built a community both with other poets and in the human service arena, providing well received workshops in harm reduction settings. I decided to have a conversation with him about his inclusion in the series and his view of the state of the art. I was curious about how the selection process played out for him. “I received a fairly nondescript email about possible inclusion in ‘an anthology,’ and I’m really glad I wrote back,” he explained. He later learned that the Guest Editor reads as much published work as possible for a year, and curates from there. It is telling that Sands’ piece was originally appeared in “Rattle,” which publishes in several forms, including online, and whose mission is solely “to promote the practice of poetry.” I noted that despite the complexity of his piece, a

2014 Best American Poetry contributor Jon Sands made his solo collection debut in 2011, with “The New Clean.”

sly humor also emerged. “I believe that ninety-nine percent of the discoveries in my life that I have been most proud of would not have been possible without a sense of play. My hope is that the sense of play, dark humor, and the undeniable pain (and growth) that can accompany not looking away are all-present in the poem.” Sands had just returned from a residency at the Blue Mountain Center in Upstate New York when we spoke, and I asked him about the experience. “The residency was transformative and productive,” he responded. “The true benefit for me has come in its wake. But, like most profoundly transformative spaces, you’re not meant to stay there. You’re meant to take it with you on your journey into the difficult and

beautiful world.” The description of the world as “difficult and beautiful” is what I have come to expect from him. Sands’ first solo collection, “The New Clean,” was published in 2011 and I attended the book release party. Some moments stay with you. I was greatly moved by the sense of community and the love present among the participants and the audience. I specifically recall Sands’ friend, Jeanann Verlee, who is also a favorite poet of mine, describing their friendship, hours spent on the floor of Barnes & Noble, in love with poems, words and each others’ spirits, and I remembered when that was me. On the floor in the Eighth Street Bookstore, or the back of the Fillmore, or going through records in Free Being, in love with the mo-

ment of discovery. For many people, it’s only new once, but artists get to continually transform. The torch has not only passed, it returns to light the fires under those who thought hope was lost. And that is why I like this series so much. It brings hope. As Lehman points out, Whitman wrote an essay in 1888 forecasting the demise of poetry in fifty years “owing to the special tendency to science and to its all-devouring force.” Hayes ends his introductory interview with these words: “The poems are here as proof. They are a gift to you whom I was thinking of all along the way. How you might, on an overcast day, criticize my choices. How you might, on a well-lit day, salute what I salute, and be transformed as I have been transformed.” How, maybe, you might even write a poem. Learn more about Jon Sands at jonsands.com. His collection, “The New Clean,” is available at bookstores or online, at powells.com/biblio/61-9781935904267-0. His favorite show of the year is coming up Sat., Sept. 13, 7-9 p.m., at The Firehouse Space (246 Frost St., Brooklyn), hosted by Sands and Adam Falkner, with special guests a cappella trio Saheli. Tickets are $12, $8 for students and veterans. Puma Perl and Friends will appear at Moscow 57 (168 Delancey St.) on Thurs., Sept. 18, 9:00. The next Puma Perl Pandemonium is Friday, Sept. 26, 7-9:30, at the Bowery Electric Map Room (327 Bowery), and includes featured guests Michael Anthony Alago, Annie Sauter and Jim Petrie, Alison Gordy, Johnny Young and a cast of regulars: Puma Perl and Friends, Joff Wilson, Walter Steding, Danny Ray, Angello Olivieri, Joe Sztabnik, Jeff Ward and Rick Eckerle. Admission to both events are free.

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August 2 - September 14 Saturday & Sunday, 2pm The Final Four Shows are: Sat, September 6th, 2pm- Corporal Thompson Park @ Bdway & Wayne St., Staten Island Sun, September 7th, 2pm- Washington Square Park, Manhattan Sat, September 13th, 2pm- Wise Towers at W. 90th St. btwn Columbus & Amsterdam, Manhattan Sun, September 14th, 2pm- St. Marks Church at E. 10th St., Manhattan ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ALSO AT THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY: TNC’S 5TH ANNUAL DREAM UP FESTIVAL Come enjoy the final week of the Dream Up Festival! For more information & ticket prices, visit our website: www.theaterforthenewcity.net/dreamup.htm TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

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TheVillager.com


Deep in the stroller jungle, a 17-year battle is waged ‘Urban Momfare’ has engaging music and moments of honesty

THEATER URBAN MOMFARE A FringeNYC ENCORE SERIES PRESENTATION Book by Pamela Weiler Grayson and Alice Jankell Music & Lyrics by Pamela Weiler Grayson Directed by Alice Jankell Runtime: 1hr. 35min. Sun., Sept. 21, 7 p.m. Wed., Sept. 24, 2 p.m. Sat., Sept. 27, 7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28, 5 p.m. PHOTO BY DIXIE SHERIDAN

At SoHo Playhouse 15 Vandam St. (btw. Varick & Ave. of the Americas) Tickets: $18 Reservations: 212-352-3101 Or fringenyc-encoreseries.com Visit urbanmomfare.com

BY MAKIA MARTIN

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ar is real folks, and we have to be prepared. Entering this land isn’t easy or for the weak-minded. You have to stay sharp. Keep your head clear. Make sure you’re locked and loaded and ready to fire sugarcoated insults at any time. Keep your Jimmy Choo’s close and your enemies even closer. This ain’t no regular battlefield ladies — it’s the Upper East Side, and it will eat you alive. Fear is not an option. In “Urban Momfare,” Pamela Weiler Grayson and Alice Jankell take us deep into the stroller jungle where competition is just as natural as breathing and the school your child attends can decided your social fate. The play follows Upper East Side rookie Kate (Christiana Little) as she navigates through the mommy mafia-like world. Along with her new friends Ellen (Tiffan Borelli) and Debbie (Christine Toy Johnson), Kate takes the UES head on while tackling the greatest challenge of her life: raising a child. The curtains open to reveal a group on women on the stage — TheVillager.com

Sandi DeGeorge, Antonietta Corvinelli, Christine Toy Johnson, Tiffan Borelli, Cheryl Howard and Christiana Little.

poised, alert and armed with round bellies, baby bottles and strollers. They are ready for battle. It’s an amazing picture and immediately lets you know that you are in for a ride. From there, we are taken on a 17-year journey, following Kate and her friends through the ups and downs of motherhood with plenty of laughs, arguments, revelations and sassy nannies along the way. And, lets not forget about the amazing songs! Did I mention that this show was a musical? Imagine tales of over achieving children, “helpful” husbands and Upper East Side war mixed with hilarious lyrics, beautiful harmonies and groovy choreography. The show kicks off with the title song ”Urban Momfare” and keeps you singing along with catchy lyrics. I found myself singing “I’m a bad mother. A baaaaaaad mother” on the train going home. There’s a sexy MILF mambo and even a song that causes the main character to let out a lovely pitched “F*** Youuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu!” when overwhelmed with other mothers bragging about their “practically perfect in every way” children. Yes, the laughs and the songs are amazing — but, what really caught

me about the show were those clear moments of complete honesty when it comes to motherhood, relationships, and even the fear of not liking your child. There were scenes that made me want to call my own mother to just say thanks. Battles are lost and won but, the most important objective is surviving the war. As you can see, I loved the show. “Urban Momfare” is charming, cheeky, heartfelt and just a downright fun show that I think anyone would get a kick out of.

Makia Martin is an actor/writer from North Carolina who made the jump to New York City three years ago, after graduating from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Most recently, she was part of the nytheaternow.com FringeNYC review crew. For reviews of all 200 shows, posted on the website founded and edited by our Downtown theater columnist, Martin Denton, visit nytheaternow.com/Category/FringeNYCReviews/2014.

September 11, 2014

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Theater:Village explores diversity, American style Four unique companies champion a common cause THEATER THEATER: VILLAGE FESTIVAL presents E PLURIBUS Through Oct. 5 PHOTO BY J. STEPHEN BRANTLEY

At Axis Theatre, Cherry Lane Theatre, New Ohio Theatre & Rattlestick Playwrights Theater Tickets $10-$40 Four-Show Pass: $95 To Order: 866-811-4111 Or theatervillage.com

The highs and lows of life, all in one night, in “I Like to Be Here: Jackson Heights Revisited.”

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

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hether from just across the border or the other side of the world, they come to America, wanting — needing — to find a better life, and often find themselves working subsistence jobs amidst unsafe conditions. Two plays in the Theater:Village Festival, set a century apart, bring that plight into sharp focus while illustrating how little has changed despite how far we’ve come. A pair of additional works focus on change, as experienced by those who’ve put considerable distance between themselves and their roots. Awareness of heritage, and the desire to build on the positive aspects of its legacy, is something David Van Asselt has spent considerable time shaping into a cohesive vision — realized for the first time last year, as a collaborative effort that became an annual event: the Theater:Village Festival. The artistic director of Rattlestick Playwrights Theater (244 Waverly Place), Van Asselt says the notion of a festival came about “because I’d been looking for a way to bring attention to the West Village as a place where theater goes on, and where it has always been going on. When [Eugene] O’Neill came to New York in 1916 with his Provincetown Players, it was MacDou-

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September 11, 2014

gal Street where they [established a base and] first presented “The Emperor Jones.” The West Village is where Edward Albee, Samuel Beckett and Sam Shepherd were first done.” Having been a presence in the small world of NYC independent theater for quite some time, Van Asselt already “had a relationship with Angelina Fiordellisi at the Cherry Lane Theatre. Rattlestick was producing at Cherry Lane prior to this [having our own space], and she thought it was a great idea. Then I talked to Randy Sharp, who runs Axis Theatre Company, and they were very enthusiastic. So I approached Robert [Lyons] at the New Ohio Theater, and we all began getting together as a group. The idea was that we’d decide on a theme or a playwright.” Last year was devoted to “The Town Hill Plays,” a cycle of five works by Lucy Thurber — but longterm, that format wasn’t viable for what the festival founders determined would be an annual event. “It’s not often a playwright writes linked plays like Lucy Thurber did,” says Van Asselt. “You almost never see quartets or quintets. So even last year, we knew that 2014 would be [geared towards] a theme. We tossed around a number of different ideas, and settled on ‘E Pluri-

bus,’ which is mainly about the celebrating the diversity of culture in New York.” The festival is also a celebration of diversity within, and cooperation among, the West Village theater community. “It shows that theaters can work together in a meaningful way,” says Van Asselt, echoing the festival press material’s declaration that “Theater:Village signifies a major shift in the ways theaters work. It challenges the assumptions that we must cut back and compete more fiercely with each other in order to survive as nonprofit arts institutions, and instead promotes collaboration and community-conscious programming.” The realization of that promise, this year, is:

I LIKE TO BE HERE: JACKSON HEIGHTS REVISITED, OR, THIS IS A MANGO

New Ohio Theatre’s production of this multi-writer play has new characters meeting those already established during the course of Theatre 167’s “The Jackson Heights Trilogy.” Taking place during a single, sleepless night in the most diverse neighborhood in the world, “I like to be here” serves not only as the work’s partial title, but also

as a memorable line and an encapsulation of the play’s affectionate, ultimately optimistic take on what both lures and tethers people to Jackson Heights. It’s a neighborhood where empathetic cabbies, closeted cops, shop clerks, drag queens, meth heads, dosa chefs, predatory realtors, custodial workers and two-dollar dance partners coax forward their own dreams while deal with those who come off the 7 train just long enough to buy exotic spices or pay for sex. “That’s what I love about Jackson Heights,” says one character, “you never know who’s going to show up on the bad side of a half-price margarita.” Through Sept. 27. Wed.–Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 7 p.m. Added performance Sept. 21 at 2 p.m. At the New Ohio Theatre (154 Christopher St., btw. Greenwich & Washington Sts.). Tickets: $18 ($16 students/seniors). Visit NewOhioTheatre.org and Theatre167.org.

JUÁREZ: A DOCUMENTARY MYTHOLOGY

Rattlestick Playwrights Theatre presents this new work by Theater Mitu that challenges us to examine the porous US/Mexico border through the eyes of those who’ve seen the highs and lows of life in and around Ciudad Juráez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas. Hundreds of conversations drawn from over 200 hours of interview footage represent lives transformed by gangs, cartels, corruption, NAFTA, femicide, the War on Drugs, fear and familial honor. Through Oct. 5. Sun.–Tues., 7 p.m., Thurs.-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat., 3 & 8 p.m. At Rattlestick Playwrights Theater (244 Waverly Place, btw. W. 11th & Perry Sts.). Tickets: $25 ($10 for theater artists/under 30, $5 students, $30 premium seating), Visit rattlestick.org.

SOLITARY LIGHT

Axis Theatre’s world premiere musical — directed by Randy Sharp with music and lyrics by Sharp and Paul Carbonara — wanders through the streets of Lower Manhattan, assessing the fallout from 1911’s Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. Based on historical documents and newspaper accounts, “Solitary Continued on page 21 TheVillager.com


Theater:Village

Continued from page 20 Light” looks at the horrors of working class life, as seen (and sung) by two young politically minded immigrants in love. Using the motif of illumination — from a single star, a lone light in a factory window — the infamous disaster, which took the lives of 146 trapped workers, is

used to ask why what’s widely acknowledged as a turning point in history “still occurs in factories all over the world.” Through Oct. 4. Wed.–Sat. at 8 p.m. Additional performance Sept. 15, 8 p.m. At the Axis Theatre (One Sheridan Square, btw. Washington Pl. & W. Fourth St.). Tickets: $40 ($30 students/seniors). Visit axiscompany.org.

PHOTO BY LISA RAMIREZ

PHOTO BY THEATER MITU

Multiple perspectives, multi-media presentation: “Juárez: A Mythology Documentary.”

The Cherry Lane Theatre’s 90th anniversary season kicks off, with “To The Bone.”

TO THE BONE

Cherry Lane Theatre’s new play by Lisa Ramirez puts the politics of “Solidary Light” into a modern context, by delving into the lives of Latina immigrant poultry workers. Created after extensive interviews conducted by Ramirez during a sixmonth stint in New York’s Sullivan County, the play is written in the tradition of John Steinbeck’s “Of

Mice and Men,” to “give the audience a close up look into the lives of the invisible work force that puts food on our tables.” Through Oct. 4. Mon.–Fri. at 7 p.m., Sat. at 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. At the Cherry Lane Theatre  (38 Commerce St., at Seventh Ave. South). Tickets: $40 ($25 for 30 years and under, $20 rush, $10 student). Visit cherrylanetheatre.org.

What the great ones groove to, and why

The One LP Project pairs famous fans with favorite recordings

Annie Ross, with Billie Holiday’s “The Lady in Satin.”

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rom Graham Nash beaming with pride at the “Sgt. Pepper ’s” album to Al Jarreau giving Les Double TheVillager.com

own favorite recording, is sold out. Another session has been added: Sat., Sept. 20, 2–4 p.m. The $100 fee benefits the ARChive of Contemporary Music — a noble non-profit music library and industry research center that knows how to throw a party (contact them to attend, or become a member and snag an invite to their impending Holiday Record + CD Sale opening night shingdig). “The One LP Project” is a free exhibit, at the ARChive of Contemporary Music (54 White St., 3 blocks south of Canal St., btw. Broadway & Church Sts.). Sept. 19–Oct. 3. Mon.–Sat., 11 a.m.–5 p.m. For info, call 212-226-6967 or visit arcmusic.org. Also visit onelp.com.

© WILLIAM ELLIS

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

Six a thumbs up, to Johnny Marr paying Iggy and the Stooges’ “Raw Power” some somber respect: The One LP Project reminds us that those we have on heavy rotation started out as humble, ravenous fans. Determined to provide “a compelling insight into how this music often sets out the course of their lives,” British photographer William Ellis spoke with 50 musicians about the deep connection they felt with a particular recording. This exhibit (the very first for its host venue) will have QR code links to the interviews, alongside its equally candid and revealing portraits. The opening night event, at which Ellis will take photos of those in attendance cradling their

Ron Carter, with his copy of Leonard Bernstein & The NY Philharmonic’s recording of Dvorak’s “New World Symphony.”

September 11, 2014

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100 SARDINES MANAGEMENT LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 5/5/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Portuga Restaurant, 31 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 101 WILLOW ST., LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/11/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Lance G. Harris, Esq., 1211 Ave. of the Americas, 40th Fl., NY, NY 10036. General Purposes. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 AMIKAM LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 7/1/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 70W 36th St., Ste 5A, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR WOMENS HEALTH PRACTICE, LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 12/30/2013 LLC. Registered in Wyoming on 11/21/2012 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Edline V. Walters, 232 Seven Spring Mountain Rd., Monroe, NY 10950. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 BKLYN156 LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/31/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Watershed Ventures LLC, 170 E. 61st St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10065. General Purposes. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 FORMATION OF COLLISTER MEDIA LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/24/14. Office loc.: New York County. The principal business loc. is 12 E. 36th St., New York, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Essex Equity, 7 Columbia Turnpike, 2nd Fl., Florham Park, NJ 07932. Mgmt. shall be by one or more managers. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 365 UNION RRG NEW RESIDENTIAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/21/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014

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MAXDELIVERY 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 08/06/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Gilbride, Tusa, Last & Spellane LLC Attn: JMW , 31 Brookside Drive, Greenwich, CT 06830. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 Name of LLC: Boredom Therapy LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/14/14. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Asaf Katzir, 140 W. 70th St., #4R, NY, NY 10023, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, 1280409, for beer, and/or wine has been applied for by Entrez Bar & Grill, Inc. d/b/a Farfasha to sell beer, and/or wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at, 162 2nd Avenue, New York, NY 10007, New York, New York County, for on premises consumption. Entrez Bar & Grill, Inc. d/b/a Farfasha. Vil: 09/11 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FILING OF THE ARTS OF ORGAN OF 2862 ASSOCIATES, LLC filed with NY Secy of State on 06/24/2014. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Julian W. Friedman, Ballard Spahr Stillman & Friedman, LLP, 425 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: To engage in all aspects of real estate development and management. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FOREIGN REGISTRATION OF CARPENTER LIPPS & LELAND LLP. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLP registered in OH on 12/11/01. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 280 N. High St., Ste 1300, Columbus, OH 43215, principal office address. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Ste 103, Columbus, OH 43215 . Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DIANA ADAMS LAW & MEDIATION, PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/05/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Diana Adams Law & Mediation, PLLC, 48 Wall Street, 11th Floor, New York NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014

September 11, 2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION KENNEDY ADVERTAINMENT COMPANY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/4/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The reg. agent is: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. at same address. Purpose: all lawful activities. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 14 FIELDVIEW LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whim process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: % Avi Telyas, 200 Central Park South, Apt 9-R, New York, NY 10019. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1560 BROADWAY GFI, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, 125 Park Avenue, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 16 FIELDVIEW LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whim process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: % Avi Telyas, 200 Central Park South, Apt 9-R, New York, NY 10019. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BETSOLA LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/08/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Betsy Olum, 222 Park Ave. S., NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 353-357 BROADWAY OWNER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 328W108 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/3/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 328 W. 108th St., NY, NY 10025. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 32 FRONT PORCH LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/30/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 51 W. 52nd St., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 353-357 BROADWAY OWNER MEMBER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/5/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 505 GREENWICH STREET UNIT 6E LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Hyde Park Holdings, 500 Fifth Ave., 50th Fl., NY, NY 10110. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 IPPUDO KURO-OBI, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/8/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, c/o R.O.S.E., 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 2160, NY, NY 10170. General Purposes. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HIPPIE ROSE LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/28/2014. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is: United State Corporation Agents, Inc 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. The principal business address of the LLC is: 499 Fashion Avenue, 3rd Floor NY, NY 10018 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/04- 10/09/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 57 DEVELOPER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Royal Realty Corp., Attn: Corporate Counsel, One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 58 DEVELOPER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Royal Realty Corp., Attn: Corporate Counsel, One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 781 METROPOLITAN AVE JV LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Adam America Real Estate, 850 Third Ave., Ste. 13D, NY, NY 10022, Attn: Omri Sachs. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1280780 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 331 Lenox Avenue, New York, NY 10027 for on-premises consumption. Serf Two Inc. d/b/a Babalucci’s Vil: 09/04 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FIDUCIARY MANAGEMENT GROUP, LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/15/2002. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her is: 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 803, NY, NY 10017. The principal business address of the LLC is: 370 Lexington Ave., Ste. 803, NY, NY 10017 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 60G 121 SPRING STREET LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/18/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/17/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 370 7th Ave., Ste. 512, NY, NY 10001. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FXFL LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/28/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: FXFL LLC 590 Madison Ave. Floor 25 New York NY 10022. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GGMC PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1651 Third Ave., Ste. 207, NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GRAMERCY DAISY 22 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 304 Sweetbriar Court, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GRANUM, LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Sec. of State of NY (?SSNY?) on 7/10/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, c/o Globex Int’l, Inc., 515 Madison Avenue, 38th Floor, New York, NY 10022, Attn: Leonid Kogan. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GREENWICH 1982 LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) 8/4/14. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address:c/o Sabin, Bermant & Gould LLP, 4 Times Square, NY NY 10036 Attn: Managing Partner Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SONS OF LEO LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 234 W. 44th St., Ste. 800, NY, NY 10036, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1679 S. DuPont Hwy., Ste. 100, Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LOH CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/1/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Franklin Loh, 240 E. 93rd St., Apt. 14F, NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HAPPY DIAMOND RESTAURANT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/23/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 154 W. 14th St., NY, NY 10011, Attn: Jonathan Goldman. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 210 WYCOMBE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/28/14.Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Paul Wrobleski, Clarfeld, 560 White Plains Rd.,Tarrytown, NY 10591. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INDUSTRIE CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/19/05. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Industrie Wear, Attn: Eli Hamway, 1375 Broadway, 15th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JUSTICE: JUST US LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/14/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: JUSTICE: Just Us LLC, 45 Wall Street, Apt 2203, New York, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 090/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGCP IV LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/1/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 7/30/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LORIMER NEIGHBOURS LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Cert. of LP filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/05/14. Office location: NY County. Latest date on which the LP may dissolve is 12/31/2044. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the Partnership, 82 Nassau St. #222, NY, NY 10038. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MAEBASHI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/17/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 14 W. 87th St., Unit 1, NY, NY 10024. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MUM’S THE WORD LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/06/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, c/o Alexandra G. Williamson, 215 E. 73rd St., Apt. 3FG, NY, NY 10021. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MYNYC PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/23/2014. Office location, County of New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 6 Stuyvesant Oval #8H, NY, NY 10009. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 336 EAST 81ST ST LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Trevi Retail LLC, 130 E. 59th St., Ste. 14A, NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 8/7/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SILKSTONE HOSPITALITY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 17 Orchard St., NY, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 090/04 - 10/09/2014

TheVillager.com


NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARC NY24549W17, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/05/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/31/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Montgomery, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SG GROWTH PARTNERS III, LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 402 W. 13th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LP formed in DE on 6/26/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LP: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PARKER LIFESTYLE, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 600 Kellwood Pkwy., Chesterfield, MO 63017. LLC formed in DE on 6/20/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: CT Corporation System, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ABBOTT SELECT VENTURE FUND, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/17/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1290 Ave. of the Americas, 9th Fl., NY, NY 10104. LP formed in DE on 7/10/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Company, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

TheVillager.com

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SPIN CERAMICS USA LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/22/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 344 EAST 85TH ST LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/12/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Trevi Retail LLC, 130 E. 59th St., Ste. 14A, NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 8/7/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOUTWELL FAY LLP Notice of Registration (Foreign) filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/21/14. Office location: NY County. LLP formed in CA on 6/15/98. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLP to: Boutwell Fay LLP, 1 Park Plaza, Ste 600, Irvine, CA 92614. Principal business address: 40 Worth Street, New York, NY 10013. CA address of LLP: 1 Park Plaza, Ste 600, Irvine, CA 92614. Certificate of LLP filed with Secy of State of CA located in Sacramento CA. Purpose: any lawful act. 2330640. Vil: 09/04 - 10/09/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF ADI CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/20/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 9/11/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to 529 5th Ave., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10017. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LONGCLAW, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/07/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Longclaw, LLC, P.O. Box 105, New York, NY 10009. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PROFILE ENTERPRISES 2 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/04/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 347 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gatsby Enterprises at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NICE BIKE TOURING, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/19/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Shukat Arrow Hafer Weber & Herbsman, Att: Jason Finestone, Esq., 494 8th Ave., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NICE BIKE MEDIA, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/19/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Shukat Arrow Hafer Weber & Herbsman, Att: Jason Finestone, Esq., 494 8th Ave., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VOXILITY, LLC Application of Authority filed with Secreptary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/16/2014. Office location: NY County. Principal business address: 580 California Street, 12th floor, suite #1243, San Francisco, CA 94104. LLC formed in Virginia (VA) on 09/05/2012. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, 580 California Street, 12th floor, suite #1243, San Francisco, CA 94104. VA address of LLC: N/A. Articles of Formation filed with VA State Corporation Commission, 1300 E Main St, Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TRANS WORLD INTERNATIONAL, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/31/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1360 E. 9th St., Ste. 100, Cleveland, OH 44114. LLC formed in DE on 4/24/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/28 - 10/02/2014

Notice of Qualification of BMC Software Federal, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/15/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 2101 CityWest Blvd., Houston, TX 77042. LLC formed in DE on 9/18/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF DAWN CITY GLOBAL II LLC App. for Auth. filed w/ Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/15/14. Office loc.: NY County. Formed in DE on 5/14/14. SSNY designated agent upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal bus. add. of LLC: 80 Broad Street, 5th Floor, #602, New York NY 10004. DE address: A Registered Agent, Inc., 1521 Concord Pike #303, Wilmington DE 19803. Cert of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE at: 820 N French St, 4th Fl, Wilmington DE 19801. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARCP FE MARCY NY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/29/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/28/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF JET CITY GLOBAL II LLC App. for Auth. filed w/ Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/15/14. Office loc.: NY County. Formed in DE on 5/14/14. SSNY designated agent upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal bus. add. of LLC: 80 Broad Street, 5th Floor, #602, New York NY 10004. DE address: A Registered Agent, Inc., 1521 Concord Pike #303, Wilmington DE 19803. Cert of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE at: 820 N French St, 4th Fl, Wilmington DE 19801. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 PARACADEMIA LLC Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 08/01/14. Office: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Milica Paranosic, 281 West 119th Street, #5A, New York, NY 10026. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MIDWOOD SOFTWARE, LLC Authority filed with SSNY on 7/9/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 2/10/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o THE LLC, 116 W. 23rd St., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: c/o USA Corporate Services Inc., 3500 South Dupont Hwy, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. Of Org. filed with the DE Secy. Of State, 401 Federal St., Ste 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PACIFIC RESOURCES BENEFITS ADVISORS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/23/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in IL on 4/18/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office address: 321 N. Clark St., Ste. 940, Chicago, IL 60654. Cert. of Org. filed with IL Sec. of State, 213 State Capitol, Springfield, IL 62756. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 36TH STREET HOSPITALITY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/13/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/28/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF ADI CAPITAL ADVISORS LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/20/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 9/19/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to 529 5th Ave., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10017. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 STANDARD SHOE OF NEW YORK, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 5/19/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Gartner & Bloom, Esqs., 801 Second Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SGGP III, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 402 W. 13th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LLC formed in DE on 6/26/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF R & B REALTY GROUP, A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Application for Authority filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/16/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LP may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LP is to: R & B Realty Group, A California Limited Partnership, 2222 Corinth Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90064. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/07 - 09/11/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF THOMPSON HOTELS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/12/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 2085 LEXINGTON JV LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/19/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/18/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 685 FIFTH AVENUE OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/19/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/15/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PAUL MOSS INSURANCE AGENCY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/9/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in OH on 10/18/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. OH and principal business address: 3700 Park East Dr., Ste. 350, Beachwood, OH 44122. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014

Notice of Qualification of The Line LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/15/14. NYS fict. name: The Line NY LLC. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 10/19/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 3555 Timmons Lane, Ste. 800, Houston, TX 77027. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 09/11 - 10/16/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF UNTITLED COWBOY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/28/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 453 W. 21st St., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10011. LLC formed in DE on 7/22/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 08/14 - 09/18/2014 VERADEANA PROPERTIES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 3/25/2014. Off. Loc.:New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 240 East 47th St., Apt 17B, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 08/21 - 09/25/2014

September 11, 2014

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Teachout, with strong run, may have hurt Cuomo ELECTION, continued from p. 3

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September 11, 2014

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

first gay-rights bill, Roskoff said, “The gay community showed its true colors when we voted against Christine Quinn” for mayor last year. Quinn prominently supported Cuomo’s re-election. Meanwhile, a Quinn ally, former state Senator Tom Duane happened to be passing by after taking his dog to a local vet. He wouldn’t say who he voted for. “People should vote as often as they’re legally allowed,” he quipped. Teachout and Wu then biked off on the way to their next stop, in Harlem. She actually docked her bike in Jackson Square and they hopped on the subway at W. 14th St. and headed uptown. Barbara Tirrell, an actress and N.Y.U. teacher, also voted for Teachout. “I think Andrew Cuomo has disrespected me as a Democrat,” she said. “I want to see him ban fracking. I want him to be far more supportive of the public education system. I’m much more to the left — that’s where I live.” Ray Tsao, who lives near the Center and attended Yale undergrad with Teachout, said he has always thought highly of her. “She is a woman of tremendous integrity, energy and intelligence,” he said. “I already admired her as a constitutional thinker and advocate. She’s very trustworthy.” Iris Ascher, a psychiatrist and a senior, voted at P.S. 3. As she came out using her walker, said she voted for a split ticket of Teachout and Hochul. “She’s outspoken, she’s a woman,” she said of Teachout. “I feel she’s fresh. Cuomo is old hat to me, the old guard. It’s not like a presidential election where I’d really be thinking about my vote,” she added. Asked why she voted for Hochul, she said, again, largely because she was a woman. “I think we’d be better off if the country was run by more women,” she said. Sean Sweeney, a leading member of D.I.D., said his prediction, which he made to The Villager back in July, was borne out by Tuesday’s results. Back then, he said, voting for Teachout would be “a protest vote,” but that nonetheless her campaign could hurt Cuomo. “If she gets 25 or 30 percent, that’s embarrassing,” he said then, noting that, in any race, the typical protest vote is only around 15 percent. “She could bloody Cuomo’s nose, which would certainly affect his ability to garner the Democratic nomination in 2016.” Many news reports are now saying just this — that Teachout’s strong

Tim Wu, right, spoke with Allen Roskoff, a prominent early supported of the Teachout-Wu ticket, outside the L.G.B.T. Center on Tuesday.

Local politicians campaigned with Kathy Hochul at the Christopher St. station on Tuesday. From left, Councilmember Corey Johnson, state Senator Brad Hoylman, Hochul, Assemblymember Deborah Glick and District Leader Keen Berger. Berger endorsed Teachout for governor by Hochul for lieutenant governor.

showing may have seriously wounded Cuomo’s national ambitions. Speaking Wednesday, Sweeney said of Cuomo, “He did poorly. It could derail his chances of being president.” Sweeney said he particularly disliked how Cuomo refused to acknowledge Teachout at the West Indian Day Parade, which the media blew up into a big story. The governor had refused

to debate her — or even utter her name — so this incident took on larger life. “That was really rude, and it’s childish,” Sweeney said. “He said he didn’t see her. “If it wasn’t for his campaigning,” he said, “the millions he spent and the millions the real estate developers gave him, and her late entry into the race, and the arm-twisting endorse-

ments he got from local politicians, against an unknown who had only been running two or three months, she would have done much better.” As for what’s next for Teachout, a source told The Villager on Tuesday, that if she lost to Cuomo, she might very well join up with the lawfirm of a well-known local political figure and activist. TheVillager.com


There’s only one way to save our small businesses SMALL BUSINESS, continued from p. 15

commercial evictions were issued and 160,000 businesses closed during Bloomberg’s 12-year term. De Blasio, appointing the same people and taking the same position as Bloomberg, said the major problems facing small businesses were “excessive fines and lack of affordable loans,” never mentioning rent-gouging, illegal extortion or action to stop the closings and save jobs. Why would anyone want to start a business in this city without any builtin predictability of success? Stores do come and go now quickly, but we all know nothing can replace the patina of the tried and true. No matter what side you’re on, political, aesthetic, sentimental, whatever, we can all agree that we are losing the Village, Chinatown, Little Italy…our distinctive neighborhoods that we knew and loved. No need for preaching to the choir. Many voices, sing perhaps a different tune, but ending on the same note: We all want our Village back safe and secure. Of the small businesses interviewed for this article, one merchant’s response struck a chord that resonates with many. The owner of a successful West Village restaurant, she wishes to remain anonymous — like most, in fear of retaliation upon lease renewal. “December, the fate of my 30-yearold Greenwich Ave. restaurant will be

decided when its lease expires,” she said. “With exorbitant rents demanded by landlords, several businesses already closed in surrounding blocks, we are fearful for the future of our own establishment. We need help in negotiating fair lease terms to level the playing field with our landlords. If I do not get lease terms allowing me a reasonable profit, I will have to close my business and walk away from 30 years of hard work. “How many more banks and Duane Reades can we cram in before no one comes here anymore?” she asked desperately. “Everyone you talk to hates what is happening. We are standing by watching the literal destruction of the capital city of the world — the city dreams are made of. No more can you have a good idea and become an entrepreneur. Most people don’t realize tenants pay huge portions of the buildings’ out-of-control real estate taxes, adding thousands of dollars a year in expenses— another reason so many small shops are gone.  “If I reject the lease terms and close my business,” she continued, “the landlord will not care if it remains empty for years because they can get a tax deduction for loss of income. Great for the landlord, destructive to everyone else. Empty space is not generating jobs, sales and payroll tax or attracting people to neighborhoods. Something must be done or there will be nothing left, and those rich people in luxury apartments will

wonder why they moved to such a boring, unsexy city.” Myriad, long-favored establishments have disappeared before our disbelieving eyes; distinctive colorful neighborhoods faded into a gray sea of mediocrity — the bitter end of a trickle-down economy at its worst. Mayor de Blasio thinks “trickle-down” creates jobs. Except it never does “trickle” past the corrupt political machine. And when it rains, it pours — profits into the pockets of greedy landlords taking advantage of a situation because “they can.” Renowned economist Robert Reich aptly frames it: “The moral crisis of our age [is] corporate payoffs to friendly politicians...and the billionaire takeover of our democracy.” Bottom-up or top-down, advocates, the choice is yours but no longer can we afford to ignore the obvious. For this article, Councilmember Annabel Palma, who introduced the S.B.J.S.A. into the Council in June, was interviewed, along with local politicians. Villager: Why do you feel your bill is the best solution to stopping the closing of small businesses and saving jobs? Palma: The S.B.J.S.A. would help facilitate and cultivate a fair negotiating environment, which would result in more reasonable leasing terms to help small businesses thrive, and encourage job retention and growth in the city of New York.

Villager: Have you resolved ‘legal concerns’ expressed by the city’s Legal Department? Palma: This bill has been circulated within the Council for decades and has been analyzed and vetted by some of the most seasoned and competent lawyers I know. It is perhaps the most scrutinized bill put before the Council. As a result, I believe this bill is legally sound and viable. Arguments to the contrary, I sincerely feel, are wrong. Keen Berger, Village Democratic district leader: I favor the S.B.J.S.A. It seems necessary to level the playing field. I hate to make more laws, but this one seems essential. Councilmember Corey Johnson (not a sponsor of the S.B.J.S.A.): A variety of approaches need to be embraced to ensure the continued vitality of the small businesses that give New York City and its neighborhoods their distinct character and communities, and so I support commercial rent regulation. I applaud the creativity of my colleagues in developing various legislative mechanisms to preserve the local jobs and economies provided by these long-established businesses. Councilmember Margaret Chin is a sponsor of the S.B.J.S.A., but did not respond to the survey questions. Councilmember Rosie Mendez sponsored the S.B.J.S.A. in 2010, but is not a sponsor of the current S.B.J.S.A. She did not respond to survey questions.

Don’t change Orchard St. too much, BID is told BY ZACH WILLIAMS

A

plan to improve the safety, traffic and appearance of Orchard St. received support from a Community Board 3 committee on Sept. 4. Presented by the Lower East Side Business Improvement District, proposed changes to the streetscape would increase consistency among curbside amenities, such as trees, bike racks and benches, among other proposals. However, the C.B. 3 Transportation Committee urged the BID to protect the historic street’s character. Additionally, the committee made its support for the plan conditional upon further study of the traffic implications of a proposed pedestrian plaza on Broome St. meant to prevent drivers from bypassing Allen St. via Orchard St. on their way to the Williamsburg Bridge. “I would caution you against sanitizing Orchard St. too much. It’s part of its charm,” Karen Blatt, the TheVillager.com

A concept drawing showing the “grove concept” in place on Orchard St.

committee’s chairperson, told Tim Laughlin, the BID’s executive director, who presented the plan. Laughlin said that some improvements were underway, such as installation of new trees. However, implementing much of the project depends on acquiring further funding, as well as additional design and cooperation with city agencies. The

proposed plaza on Broome St. would require an additional design process, he added. The project’s overarching theme is “celebrating the past and looking to the future in a way that stays true to the Lower East Side,” he added. Inviting local artists to participate is one way that the street could better reflect the surrounding neighbor-

hood, suggested committee member Morris Faitelewicz, who specifically mentioned Jim “Mosaic Man” Power as a candidate for such outreach. Chad Marlow, another committee member, said the loss of community-oriented businesses along the street has diminished some of its uniqueness in recent years. However, the street must remain relevant in the coming years, he added. “And this may be it if it’s done in the right way,” he said during the meeting. According to the 47-page “Orchard Streetscape Manual,” developed in cooperation with the Pilot Projects Design collective, the “grove concept” guided the design process. By placing street furniture and bike facilities together in various combinations, traffic is calmed and pedestrians and cyclists can enjoy additional space within a grove. Under the plan, groves would be placed at every corner of Orchard St. between Canal and E. Houston Sts. “It is a variant of what a slow zone does,” Laughlin explained. September 11, 2014

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TheVillager.com


Cooper alum now practices art of the knockout SPORTS BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

O

ne can expect to find alumni of The Cooper Union in the arts, design and engineering fields. But in the ring in an Ultimate Fighting competition, meting out and absorbing vicious punishment? In the case of Angela Hill, 29, a graduate of the elite East Village school, the answer is yes. And Hill’s now set to become a household name as a member of the first-ever all-female cast of “The Ultimate Fighter Season 20.” The series debuted on Wed., Sept. 10, on Fox Sports 1. Set in Las Vegas, the show will introduce the newest women’s weight class. The winner will be crowned the first-ever U.F.C. strawweight champion (115 pounds). Hill got into Muay Thai, a Thai martial art form, four years ago. “I still consider myself an artist,” she said in an interview last week. “I was really into animation — motion graphics — after school, and I started working in a couple of studios. That’s when I got interested in Muay Thai; you sit around in an office for 12 hours, you get antsy.” Hill is married, to another artist. “We both draw and paint and sketch,” she said. “But I feel, in terms of making money, this is what I want to do,” she said of mixed martial arts fighting. “For fighters, the window / timeframe is brief. Art you can do till you die.” Asked what her best move is, Hill said, “probably my roundhouse — my kick. I don’t do them often, but I have really strong kicks — very fast. Also, my overhead right [punch]. “I have a few knockouts. My best was an overhead right against this girl. She was just facedown on the mat.” Originally from Maryland, Hill currently lives near Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, in Brooklyn. She trains four hours a day. You might have seen her sprinting across the Brooklyn or Williamsburg bridges. “A lot of hard training,” she said. Her ring name, “Overkill Hill,” gives a sense of her power. She doesn’t brag, but, then again, she doesn’t have to. Her record speaks for itself. She’s had 14 amateur Muay Thai fights, two pro bouts and one mixed martial-arts fight. She’s undefeated. “Confidence is what got me here,” she said. “Most of my fights, I had to fight girls with a lot more experience, a lot more wins than me. That didn’t stop me from beating them. “I feel like I want it more. I have a TheVillager.com

Angela Hill’s best weapons are her roundhouse kick and overhead right punch.

lot of drive. Also, I’m very technical,” she said. “You see a lot of sloppy fighters, just kind of swinging from the hips — and they leave a lot of holes in their game. I blame it on the coaches.” All of the fighters are very attractive. (Hey, after all, it’s Fox.) The series is touting the pugilists’ beauty as well as their strength. As for Cooper Union, Hill said she’s familiar with the ongoing battle over the formerly full-tuition school’s decision to start charging incoming freshmen tuition this year. “Yeah, it sucks,” she said of the new policy. “The only reason I was able to go to art school was because of Cooper Union, because of that scholarship. I applied to other schools, RISD, for a partial scholarship. But I still would have been $50,000 in debt. Cooper Union gave newcomers like me entrée into that world — people not from a lot of money or third-generation artists. I might still be in Maryland if not for Cooper Union. It just opened my eyes. “It’s really sad. It’s really unfortunate,” she said of the decision to institute tuition. “I wish there was something I could do,” she said. Then, as quick as one of her kicks, she added, “Maybe if I play my cards right, I can — maybe help one student.”

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27


GRISTEDES GIVE THE GIFT OF HEALTHY FOOD Give a Gristedes Gift Card...Buy them on Gristedes.com

BUMBLE BEE

BUMBLE BEE

BUMBLE BEE

Chunk Light Solid White Crab Meat Tuna Tuna $ 99 $ $ 99

2/ 3

In Oil or Water

5 oz.

USDA Choice Certified Angus Beef Bone-In

3

6 oz.

Shell Steak

$

Fresh • Grade A Boneless

Chicken Breast

Assorted Var. • 11-12 oz.

Hebrew National Beef Franks

1

In Oil or Water

5 oz.

BEE BUMBLE BEE BUMBLE BEE BUMBLE BEE BUMBLE Prime Fillet

Sardines

2/ 3 $

Asst’d. Var.

3.75 oz.

99 Store Baked Ham

10 $ 99 4 $ 99 5

lb.

lb.

lb.

Store Baked Turkey Breast Yellow or White

ShopRite American Cheese

Solid White Tuna In 3 Pack Water

Tuna $ 99

SuperFresh Frozen Seafood NEW! Entrees

4 2 8 $ 99 $ 99 4 Grapes 2 $ 99 $ 99 6 Cantaloupe 2 $ 99 $ 99 4 Salmon Fillet 11 $ 99

9 oz.

$ 99

5 oz.

9.2-10.4 oz.

California • Seedless Red or Green

lb.

lb.

Western Sweet • Jumbo

Ea.

lb.

Fresh • Atlantic Farm Raised

lb.

lb.

BONUS SAVINGS CARD SUPER SPECIALS! Excluding Decaf • 10.3-11.3 oz.

Chock Full O’Nuts Coffee

Excluding Decaf • 10.3 oz.

Martinson Coffee

Assorted Var. • 16 oz.

Newman’s Own Salsa Assorted Var. • 6 Pack • 24 oz.

Musselman’s Apple Sauce

Assorted Varieties 14.5-15 oz.

Tabatchnick Soup

4 $ 99 4 Quaker Oats $ 39 3 $ 69 3 $ 99 2 $ 99

Assorted Var. • 13.9-50 oz.

Arm & Hammer Liquid Laundry Detergent or Pacs

Old Fashioned or Quick 18 oz.

Clear or Natural • 64 oz.

Apple & Eve Apple Juice

Select-A-Size • 2 Pack • 188 ct.

Bounty Big Roll Paper Towels

Assorted Var. • 48 oz.

Turkey Hill Ice Cream

Asst’d. Var.

4 $ 99 2 $ 29 3 $ 99 4 $ 99 4 $ 99

16.9 oz.

Botticelli Extra Virgin Italian Olive Oil

Assorted Var. • 24 oz.

Barilla Pasta Sauce

Assorted Var. • 26 oz.

Windex Cleaner

Assorted Var. • 16 oz.

Pennsylvania Dutch Noodles

Assorted Var. • 64 oz.

Almond Breeze Almond Milk

5 $ 59 2 $ 89 4 $ 79 1 $ 99 3 $ 99

At GRISTEDES, your opinions and suggestions count. If you have a complaint or problem, call our CONSUMER HOTLINE at 212-956-5770 ext. 1100, or e-mail us at customeradvocate@gristedes.com • Prices Effective 9/12–9/18/14 28

September 11, 2014

TheVillager.com

THE VILLAGER, SEPT. 11, 2014  

THE VILLAGER, SEPT. 11, 2014

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