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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

July 24, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 84 • Number 8

Teachout and Astorino blast Cuomo for killing anti-corruption panel BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

I

n an unusual move of candidate bipartisanship, Zephyr Teachout and Rob Astorino held a joint press conference in front of the Tweed Courthouse on Chambers St. on Tuesday morning to bash the incumbent, Governor Cuomo, for what they

called his corruption. “I am here today with a man I disagree with on almost everything because recent events show that Governor Andrew Cuomo has not merely failed to clean up Albany,” said Teachout, who is running as a Democrat. “He has become part of the TEACHOUT, continued on p. 3

BY SERGEI KLEBNIKOV

S

ammy Hagar sang, “I can’t drive 55!” Well, now if the rocker ever drives through the East Village, he won’t even be allowed to drive 30. Under a new “slow zone” initiative, the neighborhood’s speed limit is set to be

shaved down to 20 miles per hour — 10 miles per hour below the city speed limit. Construction for the new Tompkins Square / Alphabet City Slow Zone, approved by the Department of Transportation last October, started this month, and is set to be completed by next SLOW ZONE, continued on p. 4

‘Rice Bomber’ redeemed.............page 21

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

New E.V. slow zone, with 20 m.p.h. limit, is fast approaching

David Baez, 22, who had a bicycle accident, was the first patient at the Lenox Hill HealthPlex last Thursday morning. A doctor checked Baez’s condition after he received a CAT scan.

Bike accidents to bedbugs, HealthPlex is there to help BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

D

avid Baez woke up under a staircase in front of the Search & Destroy punk shop on St. Mark’s Place last Thursday morning. The left side of his head was a mess of bloody scrapes. “I had all this crap on my face,” he said. “I don’t remember what happened.” He got on his lime-green track bike — which he somehow had had the presence of mind to lock up nearby be-

fore winding up under the stairs — and pedaled over to the new Lenox Hill HealthPlex freestanding emergency department, at W. 12th St. and Seventh Ave. He was in luck. It was the E.D.’s opening day. “I knew this place was here,” he said. “But I didn’t know if it was open yet.” He knew the HealthPlex would be opening sometime soon, since he works right around the corner as a dispatcher at Juice Press, on Greenwich Ave. (which, he

proudly noted, is even better than Liquiteria, “way more raw, way more organic”). Baez, 22, spoke Thursday around 1 p.m. as he was lying on a bed in one of the HealthPlex’s 26 private rooms for patients. In fact, he was the West Village’s new healthcare facility’s very first patient. The place had opened its doors at 10 a.m, but it took a little while before patients started arriving — and when HEALTHPLEX, continued on p. 14

Cash grants mean more composting..............page 6 Are N.Y.U. store discounts divisive?...............page 7 R.I.P., Vivien Leone and Florence Otway..........page 8 www.TheVillager.com


MOVIE STAR AND ALL-STARS: In their first season of existence, though they gave it their all, the Lower East Side Lady Furies were knocked out of the playoffs, ending their hopes of making it to the Little League World Series. Now the age-10-and-under ball players are facing the prospect of a tough, all-out winter clinic when they get into top shape to hit the diamond next season and show the world. But last week, at their final practice for this season, the mood was light as they were joined by a local legend, actor Luis Guzman. FIELDS BIDS ADIEU: Longtime director of the

NOHO NY Business Improvement District, Harriet Fields, released a farewell statement to the community this Monday, announcing her retirement from the BID. “It has been a great experience working with you for our area,” she said, in part. “I am truly proud of the work and effort that we did together. I wish you much success in the future and will continue to care for the NOHO NY BID.”

TAKING CARE OF BIN’NESS: On Wednesday, City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, of Brooklyn, announced he is co-sponsoring an “aggressive

bill” that will empower the Department of Sanitation to “immediately remove” the fake clothing donation bins that have proliferated around the East Village and other areas. In a post on his Facebook page, he said that he was proud to announce his co-sponsorship of the legislation aimed at the bogus bins “that have littered our streets.” The bill, he noted, “will impose stiff penalties on companies engaged in this illegal practice.” Menchaca thanked residents and neighborhood organizations, specifically in Sunset Park and Red Hook, for their input and advocacy. “Residents from across [my] district helped shape the final bill by pointing to regulations hindering the city from taking immediate action that we have addressed in the local law we will introduce,” he said. “Community-driven bills like this set an example for the kind of legislative work that you should expect from my office.” Meanwhile residents of the East Village and Lower East Side, where the pink bins have recently mushroomed, will be thanking Menchaca if the bill passes and the receptacles start being removed more rapidly. Visiting in Gowanus, in Brooklyn, we recently noticed one pink bin that had been stickered by Sanitation as illegal was removed, but that another one that has been there for a few weeks, at Dean and Butler Sts., has no stickers, and is collecting a sloppy and growing assortment of clothes on and around it.

AHOY! I DO! John Doswell, one of the founders of the Hudson River Park, is getting married on Fri., July 25, to Jean Preece. The couple have been together for almost 40 years, and they are set to tie the knot onboard the John J. Harvey, a decommissioned fireboat docked on the Tribeca waterfront at Pier 25. The wedding guests are set to arrive at 5:30 p.m., and will wait nearby aboard another historic vessel, the Lilac, for the bride and groom to arrive. The ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m., with Captain Jonathan Boulware, interim president of the South Street Seaport Museum, officiating. We hear from a source that The New York Times’s Vows section is going to cover it, which means no other media are allowed, since — well, you know the Times — they need to have the exclusive. It’s all good, though. We can think of no better nautical nuptial event on this season’s calendar, and we’re looking forward to reading all about it!

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PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

Zephyr Teachout, left, and Rob Astorino held a joint press conference outside the Tweed Courthouse on Tuesday to highlight what they called corruption by Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Teachout, Astorino blast Cuomo TEACHOUT, continued from p. 1

problem, and an example of the very thing he once ran to clean up. “Last year, Governor Andrew Cuomo set up a Moreland Commission to investigate corruption, and then shut it down, after attempting to influence the terms of its conclusions, and the focus of its investigation. “Shutting down your own anti-corruption commission when it gets too close to power is something that would make Boss Tweed blush,” Teachout declared. “Federal Prosecutor Preet Bharrara is now subpoenaing records of e-mails between members of the Moreland Commission and Governor Cuomo and top aides. And there is new evidence that the pattern of good old boy secretive government and protecting powerful friends goes back farther than four years.” Teachout, a charismatic Fordham law school professor, previously worked on Howard Dean’s presidential campaign, but has never run for political office before. She said she wants to challenge Cuomo to three debates — on education, immigration and hydrofracking. “But all three would end up in a debate about corruption,” she quickly added. Meanwhile, Astorino said he wants to do eight debates with Cuomo, each in a different part of the state. As the press conference ended, one woman in the crowd shouted out, “Anyone but Cuomo!” while another countered, “Go back to Vermont,” referring to Teachout, who only moved to New York five years ago. The next day, the headline of the TheVillager.com

lead article on Page 1 of The New York Times blared, “Governor’s Office Hobbled Corruption Investigations,” with the subhead: “Promised Free Rein, Panel Found Groups Linked to Cuomo Were Off Limits.” The Times article, which followed a 20-month investigation by the newspaper, said the panel had been “deeply compromised.” However, Cuomo’s office responded to the Times, “A commission appointed by and staffed by the executive cannot investigate the executive. It is a pure conflict of interest and would not pass the laugh test.” “Huge!” the Teachout campaign declared of the Times article in a press release, with Teachout calling on Cuomo to promptly resign Teachout filed more than 40,000 petition signatures to get on the ballot. Only 15,000 are required, but her signatures are being challenged by two individuals. The attorney doing the work on the challenge is former state Senator Martin Connor, known as being one of the top election lawyers, with a reputation for knocking candidates off the ballot. Allen Roskoff, president of the Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club, which endorsed Teachout, said not to underestimate Connor and the petition challenge, but that Teachout is probably safe. “The general rule is 3-to-1,” he said, referring to getting triple the amount of required signatures to provide a cushion. “I give it credibility because they have Marty Connor looking at it. It’s hard to knock someone off who’s got 3-to-1.” Teachout has also been endorsed by Village Independent Democrats and Coalition for a District Alternative, two other Downtown Manhattan progressive political clubs.

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A map by the Department of Transportation of the Alphabet City / Tompkins Square Park Neighborhood Slow Zone shows where new speed bumps and 20 m.p.h. street markings will go. On the slow zone’s borders, new “gateway marker” signs will alert drivers that they’re entering the zone.

Slow zone, with 20 m.p.h. limit, fast approaching SLOW ZONE, continued from p. 1

month. Last year, D.O.T. renewed its slow zone program, which had been initiated under former Mayor Bloomberg. Mayor de Blasio supports the program, and it’s a component of his “Vision Zero” plan for eliminating street fatalities and injuries. There were about 75 applications for local slow zones in the program’s second competitive application process, in 2013. Of the eight chosen for implementation, the Alphabet City-area slow zone is being rolled out first, said Chad Marlow, a Community Board 3 member who championed the original idea. “It’s incredible that we got to go first,” he said. Marlow completed and filed the application after noticing a statement from D.O.T. that the agency would be renewing the program. The application was submitted by the Tompkins Square Park & Playgrounds Parents’ Association, of which Marlow is a founder, and was subsequently endorsed by C.B. 3. “It was something I absolutely had to do,” said Marlow, who explained how he was also motivated by his own experience. When Marlow was 23 years old,

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July 24, 2014

his father was struck and nearly killed by a speeding drunk driver. The accident left his father with severe and lasting injuries, until he passed away 13 years later. Understandably, the topic hits close to home for Marlow. “I’ve always been extremely sensitive to the risk that speeding cars present for pedestrians,” he said. D.O.T. looked at several factors in considering the applications. Nicole Garcia, a D.O.T. spokesperson, provided a presentation outlining the factors that made the East Village slow zone application so worthy of designation. Statistically, the Alphabet City area is simply dangerous because of its traffic level and documented accidents. It’s also a high-risk area: There are many schools, as well as parks, daycare and senior-care centers in the community. Finally, incredible community support for the project helped move it forward, according to D.O.T. The idea of a zone in the East Village won strong backing from local officials, from the City Council to Congress, who represent the area. Marlow firmly believes that the slow zone will help calm car traffic and reduce the number of accidents in the area each year.

“Any community that is eligible for a slow zone should want to have one,” he said. “There’s no downside.” According to D.O.T., in New York City areas where neighborhood slow zones have been implemented, there has been a 10 to 15 percent decrease in speeds, a 14 percent reduction in crashes involving injuries and a 31 percent reduction in injuries caused by vehicles. However, slow zones aren’t intended to slow things down so much that traffic doesn’t move. According to D.O.T., “Slow zones are implemented in areas with low traffic volumes and minimal through traffic, where reducing the speed limit will not cause traffic congestion.” The East Village slow zone will be larger than the average. It’s boundaries will be 14th St. on the north, the F.D.R. Drive on the east, Houston St. on the south and First Ave. on the west. There will be new specialized “gateway” signs posted around the area’s boundaries, notifying drivers entering the zone of the reduced speed limit. The slow zone will also include 20 new “speed humps” that will force drivers to slow down to 20 miles per hour. “Self-enforcing” mechanisms like these make the enforcement

passive, as opposed to active, according to D.O.T. However, the level of active enforcement will be left up to the Police Department to determine, Garcia said. Other additional elements will include high-visibility crosswalks and road markings. Among other areas set to receive slow zones this year are Brownsville-East New York, Clinton Hill, Crown Heights, Jackson Heights and Sunnyside Gardens-Woodside. The eight neighborhoods slated for slow zones in 2015 include the West Village, Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights and Astoria. Local parent and school advocates, led by Kelly Shannon, the principal of P.S. 41, are pushing for the West Village Neighborhood Slow Zone to be expanded to include a wider swath of the area, which would take in more schools. Over all, Marlow said he is extremely “proud and pleased” at how the initiative is turning out. He had the idea for an East Village slow zone more than a year ago. That was followed by D.O.T.’s selection of the application, and then, in turn, a thorough planning process for the project. Now Marlow’s vision for a safer neighborhood — a vision eagerly embraced by so many East Villagers — will at last become a reality. TheVillager.com


POLICE BLOTTER Took a strange PATH Last Saturday, at 2:39 a.m., police received reports of a person walking on the train tracks from the Christopher St. PATH station toward the W. Ninth St. station. Roland Syria, 57, was arrested at 2:55 a.m. when he arrived at W. Ninth St. He was charged with criminal trespassing. There are “numerous and conspicuous signs posted prohibiting anyone to trespass on the tracks,” the police report noted. Syria told arresting officers that he had left his iPhone at the other station, and he was just walking to go get it.

Police net McEnroe son Kevin McEnroe, the son of tennis legend John McEnroe, was stopped by police on the corner of E. Fourth St. and Avenue A about 11:24 p.m. Tues., July 15, after making an apparent drug deal, police said. His alleged dealer, 22-year-old Niro Meneses, of

the Upper West Side, was also arrested and charged. McEnroe reportedly bought cocaine and a quantity of prescription pills, the Daily News reported. Specifically, he reportedly was carrying six glassine envelopes of cocaine, 20 oxycodone pills, 10 morphine pills and one anxiety pill, prosecutors said. McEnroe, who is a bartender and lives in Gowanus, Brooklyn, was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. “Given the amount of drugs on him...we believe we have a strong intent to sell case,” prosecutor Mary Ostberg reportedly said at McEnroe’s Manhattan Criminal Court arraignment, according to the News. His famous father was not seated in the audience. McEnroe was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance. He was ordered released on his own recognizance. He reportedly tends bar at Keith McNally’s Schiller’s Liquor Bar, at Rivington and Norfolk Sts.

When police arrested Meneses, he was carrying 13 glassine envelopes of cocaine and three vials of the drug, according to the News.

Citi Bike robbery On Sun., July 20, police arrested a man and a woman for stealing a Citi Bike from its docking station on W. 14th St. Tailee Caines, 28, was observed at 2:19 a.m. attempting to dislodge multiple bikes from the location, while Cristal Rodriguez, 19, acted as a lookout, according to the police report. Caines eventually dislodged one of the bikes, and rode away with Rodriguez, according to police. They were stopped by police, and allegedly could not produce a receipt for the bike, which was valued at $1,400. They were both charged with grand larceny, a felony.

Well, that sucks

allegedly performing oral sex on a man “on the sidewalk in public view,” at the corner of Washington and W. 12th Sts. Police arrested Kim Charles, 39, who was allegedly performing oral sex, and Umar Khan, 23, who was allegedly receiving it. They were both charged with public lewdness, a misdemeanor.

App catches him Also on Sunday, at 5:45 a.m., police arrested a man for stealing an iPhone near Washington Square Village. A male victim, 41, reported leaving his iPhone 5s inside his car, before noticing that it was missing when he returned. A canvass was conducted by police using the “Find My iPhone” app, and Hassau Powell, 49, was found to be in possession of the stolen phone, valued at $650. The phone was recovered, and Powell was charged with a misdemeanor for petit larceny.

Sergei Klebnikov

While on patrol at 2:45 a.m. on Sunday, police observed a woman

THE SHO W C A N ’ T G O O N I F T H E LI G H T S D O N ’ T . Three months of rehearsals. Two weeks of ticket sales. One performance. Talk about pressure. Not just on the kids, but on the electricity. That’s why Con Edison spends $2 billion a year improving its energy systems. But if you ever do lose power, please report the outage online at conEd.com or call us at 1-800-75-CONED. And, to learn more about our work backstage, follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

TheVillager.com

July 24, 2014

5


PHOTO BY ZACH WILLIAMS

Borough President Gale Brewer, in La Plaza Cultural, spoke at the announcement of the composting grants. To the right of her, from left to right, were Brendan Sexton, Peter Kostmayer, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh and state Senator Brad Hoylman.

Breaking it down: How to grow composting efforts BY ZACH WILLIAMS

F

our grants to community gardens will expand public composting stations available to East Village residents. Hopes are high among gardeners, activists and local elected officials that the $2,900 in funding — specifically earmarked for composting — will promote environmental sustainability and education. The Citizens Committee For New York City awarded the grants in partnership with the borough president’s Solid Waste Advisory Board. La Plaza Cultural de Armando Perez, at E. Ninth St. and Avenue C, received $650. The funds will be used to rat-proof the garden’s recycling bins, as well as replace worn equipment. Borough President Gale Brewer said it’s important to note how cutting waste has ancillary benefits.

Welcom

“My feeling with composting — to get the general public — is you explain that these recycling bins are rat-proof, and that really makes a difference,” she said on Sat., July 12, at an event at La Plaza announcing the grants. Three other sites receiving grant money are East Side Community High School, at 420 E. 12th St.; Green Oasis Community Garden, at 374-388 E. Eighth St.; and Peach Tree Garden, at 236 E. Second St. The first two will use the funding to expand current composting efforts. Peach Tree will rebuild a three-bin composting system damaged by Hurricane Sandy, as well as do outreach to the surrounding community. Eight additional composting projects received Citizen Committee grants this year in other areas of Manhattan. In total, 50 groups citywide received about $32,000 in composting

e To The

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grants. La Plaza and Peach Tree were also recipients this year of Citizens Committee neighborhood grants. La Plaza will use these funds to host an educational nature walk for local students. Peach Tree Garden will use this grant to increase neighbors’ access to fresh produce and nutritional information. State Senator Brad Hoylman, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh and Brendan Sexton, chairperson of the Solid Waste Advisory Board, also spoke at the event. Sexton was also the commissioner of the city’s Department of Sanitation from 1985 to 1990. Increasing local residents’ proximity to composting sites is critical in getting them to see a greater cause at work, said Sexton. “Trash doesn’t immediately call up fun and games to people,” Sexton said. “It’s not what they want to do on the weekend. But there are things about recycling and energy management and trash management and the rest of it that can actually be fun. It’s good to focus on that and remember that we’re here to have a good time in this life and this is part of it.” Organic waste currently makes up 31 percent of New York City’s garbage, according to the Department of Sanitation Bureau of Waste Prevention, Reuse and Recycling Web site. Meanwhile, only about 20 percent of city gardens currently have composting programs, according to Peter Kostmayer, C.E.O. of Citizens Committee. A city composting program now

being tested in the outer boroughs aims eventually to cut food waste by 75 percent, Kostmayer noted. But community gardens provide both a forum and a convenient location for a bottom-up approach, inviting personal investment, he said. “You need a willingness on the part of the people to do the work that needs to be done,” Kostmayer explained. Lenore Odbor noted that, not only adults, but some children, too, approach gardening with apprehension, which disappears soon after they get their hands dirty. She brings East Village Community School students from 3 to 10 years old there to tend kale and other crops. The children love to do the planting, but quickly must learn that a successful crop involves much more effort, Odbor said. Community gardens and composting are also an important element in outreach to the East Village’s Latino and African-American communities, said Rivera Santos. A local resident of nearly 60 years, Santos has been involved with several other community gardens. As he explained it, in a previous era, community gardens helped people regain control of their neighborhoods when arson and crime were everyday dangers; similarly, composting can now empower people, on a personal level, to confront the scourge of pollution. “You have to reach into the communities and bring everybody onto the same page,” he said. TheVillager.com


Discounts great for N.Y.U., but locals have issues BY SERGEI KLEBNIKOV AND LINCOLN ANDERSON

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A sign for a Sullivan St. hair salon notes it offers N.Y.U. students 20 percent off on any kind of barber work.

added that locals have come in and inquired about the exclusive discounts. J. Crew, Banana Republic, and other popular clothing department stores all have N.Y.U. discounts, as well. Various local hotels in the area provide discounts to those looking for accommodation near N.Y.U., such as family members in town for students’ graduation. This summer, through N.Y.U.’s Museum Gateway Program, students even get free admission with their student IDs to “some of New York City’s best cultural institutions,” including the Frick Collection, the Museum of Modern Art, the New-York Historical Society and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others. N.Y.U. faculty and employees also enjoy discounts on AT&T, The New York Times, Verizon wireless service and Apple computers, according to the university Web site. Although some locals may feel that the merchant discounts are unfairly bestowed upon the students, Beckman added that after speaking with colleagues from various offices within the university, annoyance over the special offers apparently hasn’t been a big issue. “No one has heard of resentments among our neighbors over the discounts being offered by local businesses to N.Y.U. students,” he said. However, Lois Rakoff, a member of Community Board 2, said she feels the N.Y.U. discounts create a division between the university and the community.

CUBBYHOLE

“As a resident who uses the stores, the salon, it’s almost like a barrier between local residents and N.Y.U.,” she said. “I think local residents should get a discount, too. And it’s not just for students — it’s for faculty, staff, anyone who shows an N.Y.U. ID. It means that if I go to the beauty parlor and get my hair cut, I don’t get a discount, but an N.Y.U. student does get one.” Martin Tessler, a former C.B. 2 member, said the issue really goes beyond the N.Y.U. discounts. The neighborhood’s residential population has gotten younger, with more children, but there aren’t stores here to support their needs. “All these stores cater to the N.Y.U. students,” he said. “Nobody caters to the residents who live here. There’s no children’s shop around here. The issue is that the stores are solely oriented toward the N.Y.U. students. Eighth St. east of Fifth Ave. is all food shops, which cater to the students. “We need establishments that cater to the existing residential population — the year-round, permanent residential population — not the students that come in for four years. “They took away Silver Spurs,” Tessler noted of the popular diner on Broadway that closed in December. “A lot of our people ate there, especially seniors. It was there for 34 years. The seniors were crying, they really relied on it.” Tessler said he hopes the Village Alliance business improvement district can work to address what he sees as the neighborhood’s retail imbalance.

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t’s expensive to be a college student — no more so than in New York City, where the cost of living is already so high. However, local merchants around New York University both help their own businesses and help out students by offering exclusive discounts — that don’t happen to include non-university-affiliated locals. These discounts are primarily geared toward university students, though N.Y.U. faculty and employees are sometimes also included. Discounts provided by local stores and restaurants definitely help N.Y.U. students living on a budget. However, as university spokesperson John Beckman pointed out, it’s not an initiative by N.Y.U., and it’s not something it even tracks in any way. “Discounts are made by businesses themselves, without consultation from the university,” he noted. “For that reason, N.Y.U. doesn’t have anything like a comprehensive understanding of what businesses are offering by way of discounts.” Nishat Chowdhury, owner of the Baburchi Indian restaurant, at 90 W. Third St., explained that he started offering deals several years ago, to help cover his costs, including rent. Non-university-affiliated locals also get discounts and benefits, he noted. But when school is in session, “everything is about the students,” he said. Chowdhury offers a 40 percent discount for the “N.Y.U. community” at lunchtime, and a 10 percent discount at dinner. Village Stationery, at 552 LaGuardia Place, offers a 5 percent discount for N.Y.U. students. Nadim Cheudhury, the store’s manager, said that he has been offering it for a long time, and that it’s “helpful for students.” He noted that in addition to N.Y.U. students, the discount is also applicable to other college students — since few faculty ever use it. He also pointed out that “there have been no complaints from locals,” about it. Next door, the Subway sandwich store, at 550 LaGuardia Place, also offers a 5 percent discount to any students, including those from N.Y.U. “I’ve had the discount forever,” said manager Ahmed, who didn’t give his last name. “It definitely helps business.” He added that students are usually happy to see the sign, since most other Subway locations don’t give discounts. Frozen Peaks, a fresh frozen yogurt store, at 154 Bleecker St., that opened two months ago, offers a 10 percent discount. “It helps students keep a low budget and pay for college,” said employee Kayla Ciara. However, she

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Vivien Leone, heiress, arts patron who lived large OBITUARIES BY MARY REINHOLZ

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n her younger days, real estate heiress Vivien Leone lived large in glamorous surroundings, befriending writers, artists and intellectuals in New York and Rome. At times, she seemed to embody the spirit of la dolce vita. But her last Manhattan apartment was a modestly appointed one on Patchin Place, that quaint 19th-century gated court in the West Village once considered home to literary figures like poet E.E. Cummings and journalist Djuna Barnes. Shortly before her lease was up for renewal this spring, Leone — who by then was having trouble walking and suffering the effects of concussions after falling off her horse in years past — reportedly told a friend she would die if forced to leave her $4,000-a-month two-story rental. Sure enough, the 84-year-old onetime reporter, feminist writer, editor and financial supporter of women’s art and poetry, expired April 6, two weeks after she was moved to a nursing home on the Upper West Side, according to her niece Claudia Ganz, an architect who lives on Morton St. and acted as the administrator of Leone’s estate. “She couldn’t afford to stay in her apartment,” Ganz said. “She had to move to a nursing home. She wasn’t happy about it and she lived two weeks. She was completely broke.” Ganz couldn’t pinpoint the exact cause of her aunt’s demise but attributed it to natural causes. Leone, who was divorced and had no children, did not make out a will. Ganz said she had no assets, in part, because of a “bad financial adviser.” But she noted Leone “never paid any attention to money.” Cynthia Navaretta, director of Midmarch Arts Press, was a friend of Leone’s since the late 1960s and visited her at the nursing home a week before she died. She called her death a “terrible loss to all the women in the arts she helped. She gave money to anyone who asked for it and had a good reason,” Navaretta said. “She had passion and gave of herself freely.” Navaretta said Leone supported a few women poets financially and gave the late Westbeth feminist artist Anita Steckel a “monthly stipend” for years. She claimed that Steckel, known for her sexually provocative paintings, sued Leone when she ended the financial arrangement. Internationally known artist Suzanne Benton met Leone in the early

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July 24, 2014

Vivien Leone, with riding crop, in front of her portrait by Alice Neely. The painting was set to be auctioned on July 24 by Christie’s on Rockefeller Plaza, with a listed estimated starting price from $120,000 to $180,000.

1970s, and the two women became friends. Benton, who lives in Connecticut, remembers Leone “giving me the key to her Gramercy Park place to stay when I was in New York.” Benton, a feminist, sold Leone about dozen of her pieces over the years, including two 6-inch bronze sculptures of Susan B. Anthony. In 1998, Benton said, she created for Leone a locked 60-inch-tall wall sculpture to be opened on her 66th birthday. It contains personal items related to Leone’s life, including a photograph of Leone at her voice recital at Syracuse University where she was a music major, graduating in 1951. Last year, Benton said, Leone donated the lockedagain sculpture, called “Secret Future Work, Number 1,” to a Queens College CUNY library. Benton characterized Leone as “an unforgettable being. There was nothing boring about Vivien,” she said of her patron. “She was basically good company, very bright and always interesting. But she acted on whim. When she had an idea at the moment, she acted on it without thinking of the consequences.” Benton and other friends said peo-

ple took advantage of Leone. The multimedia artist called Leone’s financial problems in her last years “shocking. She was literally without money,” Benton said. Indeed, Fred Scheiman, Leone’s brother-in-law, said she was about to apply for Medicaid when she entered the nursing home. During a telephone conversation from his Columbus, Ohio, apartment, Scheiman claimed his sister-in-law “pissed away” the fortune she inherited from her late parents’ New Jersey real estate business, D. Leone, Inc. He contended she spent $2 million on three renovations of her rented penthouse atop the Gramercy Park Hotel. Leone had lived at the hotel from the late 1970s until she relocated to Patchin Place about 10 years ago. One pricey renovation of the penthouse by Clodagh, the Downtown Irish designer, was written up as a 1989 cover spread in The New York Times’ Home section. The paper described Leone’s redecorated two-bedroom apartment a “tribute to women” and “one of the most idiosyncratic and personal interiors in the city.” Much the same could be said about Leone in her heyday when she threw

lavish parties called “saloons” at the penthouse, and commissioned a 1983 portrait of herself by famed feminist painter Alice Neely, who charged her $20,000, as noted by Leone in her 1988 “Story of A Portrait,” published as a keepsake book of less than 20 pages. “A great painting is to belong to one’s time in a way that is like no other,” she wrote. “It pleases me to add to Whitman’s, ‘I was the man, I suffer’d, I was there,’ a different refrain: I was the woman, I celebrated, I too was there.” On July 24, Christie’s on Rockefeller Plaza will hold a sale to auction off the painting. Its estimated starting price was listed online as between $120,000 to $180,000. Leone’s generosity was legendary among her friends. Westbeth playwright Delores Walker, who first met Leone in 1970, said she asked Leone if she could hold her 1991 wedding to Kenneth Milford at the Gramercy penthouse “and she kindly agreed.” Walker recalled that the terrace “was like being on a ship with all these railings. There were wonderful views.” Inside, she said, “There was the Neely painting, a row of Vivien’s hats and all these books she had collected” from Aphra magazine for her library, called Lioness Books. Leone was a poetry editor at Aphra, believed to be the first feminist literary journal, publishing writers like Erica Jong, Kate Millett and Rita Mae Brown from 1969 to 1976. Leone “spent a lot of money” funding Aphra when the magazine began, Walker said. She remembered her friend as “very individualistic. She did not want to be pigeonholed or ignored,” Walker said. “She spoke her mind. If you don’t have to work, you don’t have to temper that. She loved taking risks and supported many causes. She would not limit herself to being called just a feminist or just an editor. She wanted to be Vivien Leone, fully herself and fully independent.” Staten Island author and small press publisher Malachi McCormick said he became friends with Leone in the mid-1980s. He recalled being a frequent caller at her penthouse bashes in Gramercy, joining her at expensive lunches where there would be “buckets of champagne,” and riding up to the Bread and Puppet Theater in Vermont in her Cadillac convertible with Walker and Milford. When McCormick and Leone went out for a meal, McCormick said, “Vivien automatically reached for the check.” He noted that when he paid, “She said she appreciated it because few people she knew did that.” He acknowledged Leone could be quirky, VIVIEN LEONE, continued on p. 25 TheVillager.com


Florence Otway, shoe designer, Theatre 80 co-founder BY ALBERT AMATEAU

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lorence Otway, a preeminent designer of women’s shoes who, with her husband, Howard, founded Theatre 80 St. Mark’s, died June 15 at the age of 94. At her July 15 memorial at Theatre 80, her son Lorcan screened a documentary film that he made three years ago about her. It was a life that spanned the Prohibition era, the Great Depression, World War II and the teeming years of the past half-century. “She died of complications of Alzheimer’s, but she never forgot the important things,” said Lorcan, the owner and director of Theatre 80. “She remained with her family in the apartment above the theater and recognized us until the very end.” Born the daughter of Romanian and Russian immigrants who had moved from E. 11th St. in Manhattan to the Grand Concourse in the Bronx, Florence Kirschen was admitted to The Cooper Union as an art student in 1936 when she was 18. The daughter of a politically conservative family, Florence’s bent was to the left. “She helped organize a ‘welcome home’ rally for the Abraham Lincoln Brigade at the end of the Spanish Civil War,” Lorcan said. He added that it began a lifetime of involvement in progressive causes. After Florence graduated in 1940, she landed a job at I. Miller, a maker of women’s shoes, as an artist, and soon advanced to designer, an unusual promotion for a woman in those days. When the United States entered World War II, I. Miller began manufacturing parachutes for the govern-

Florence Otway.

ment. “My mother noticed that an elderly woman on the production line had a piece of tape on one hand and ran it along a seam of the parachute she was working on,” Lorcan recalled. “She told the foreman and together they discovered a razor in the tape and exposed the woman as a saboteur. My mother won an award for that.” During the war, Florence volunteered at the U.S.O. (a social and entertainment agency for members of the armed services), Lorcan said. Through that connection, she became friends with a producer who invited her out to Hollywood for a visit. There, she met and fell in love with Howard Otway, an actor, writer and playwright. They married and moved in 1947 to Greenwich Village, where they lived in a Jane St. apartment and kept open house for sundry friends and colleagues. “My father had a job with Doubleday, the publisher, at the time and became acquainted with a fellow employee, a Belgian by the name of Paul de Man [who later achieved fame as a distinguished literary theorist],” Lorcan continued. “In fact, de Man lived

with my parents until he had a falling out with my father.” De Man, who died in 1985, was exposed after his death as a Nazi collaborator in Belgium during the war. Around 1950, Howard Otway bought a rural retreat in Westchester County and moved his family and entourage there. “My father wrote in a small studio on the property, and he and my mother played host to a series of international visitors,” Lorcan said. “My mother learned to cook Pakistani food from the wife of a visiting diplomat and Chinese food from a Chinese visitor.” Around the same time, Florence’s reputation as a shoe designer made her a byword in the industry. “Florence was a preeminent designer, widely regarded as one of the best in an era of great American footwear design,” Nancy Shapiro, a former editor of Footwear News, said in an obituary in that trade publication. Maggi Mercado, a prominent shoe designer, said, “She was one of very few women in the industry and a mentor to younger people and other women. In 1950, Florence joined Palizzio, a New York firm, as a designer and catalogue illustrator. Two years later, she began working as a freelance illustrator for Bernardo and Bally of Switzerland. Other high-profile firms for whom she designed included Genesco, David Evins, Garolini, Calvin Klein and Adrienne Vittadini. In the mid-1970s, while working for the shoe firm Golo, Florence had the idea of making waterproof boots out of a new fabric, Gore-Tex. “She set out to convince Arthur Samuel, owner of Golo, on the idea,

and he finally agreed,” said Lorcan. “The boot became a big success. My mother loved to tell about the huge blizzard that winter, and everywhere you walked you could see ‘Golo’ imprinted in the snow. It was wonderful.” Meanwhile, in 1963, Howard Otway wrote a play, “This Here Nice Place,” and decided to produce it himself. He bought a Prohibition-era speakeasy at 80 St. Mark’s Place, near First Ave., and proceeded to convert it into a 199-seat Off Broadway theater, with living quarters for his family upstairs. Theatre 80 became a cultural nursery for plays and dance, a temporary home to Robert Ossorio’s Manhattan Ballet, the venue of the hit mini-musical “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown,” and the place where actors like Robert De Niro, Sally Kirkland and Billy Crystal got their start. Florence, in the midst of raising two children and juggling a career that involved travel to shoe manufacturing sites in Europe and Latin America, added the role of theatrical assistant. It wasn’t such a big leap. “After all, her first cousin was Edward G. Robinson,” Lorcan noted. In 1990, Florence retired as a shoe designer and became a full-time associate of Theatre 80. Her husband died in 1994 and Lorcan took over as director of the theater. Lorcan said his mother had survived a bout of cancer in the 1980s. “She made me promise never to lie to her about her health or mental condition. She wanted to be in control as much as possible,” he said. In addition to Lorcan, another son, Thomas Otway, and two grandchildren also survive.

German Diez, 90, head of G.H.M.S. piano program BY PARISA ESMAILI

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA SOULE

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he Greenwich House community is mourning the loss of its beloved teacher Maestro German Diez, chairperson of the piano department at Greenwich House Music School. For more than half a century, Diez, 90, made music an integral part of life in the West Village at Greenwich House Music School. First coming to the United States from Havana, Cuba, upon winning the National Music Award Competition in 1945, he then received a personal scholarship by world-famous artists Maestro Claudio Arrau, and his assistant, Rafael De Silva, to study in the U.S. for a period of 10 years.

Diez began his tenure at Greenwich House Music School in 1950, and since then taught more than 1,500 students. His influence can be seen in every aspect of the school’s operations, including the way it gauges student progress through recitals and end-ofyear concerts. Diez elevated the school’s stature when he established the Piano Master Class Series more than 20 years ago, which has featured renowned pianists, such as Joseph Bloch, Sam Sanders, Seymour Bernstein, David Dubal, Jeffrey Swann and Sara Davis Buechner. Among his students were Erica Nickrenz, of the Eroica Trio, and recent Academy Award-winning composer

German Diez.

Bobby Lopez, of “Frozen,” as well as “The Book of Mormon” and “Avenue Q.” In addition to an Oscar winner,

Lopez is also an Emmy, Grammy and Tony Award — or an EGOT — winner, one of only 12 people to have won all four awards. “He was a towering figure in music education, and our hearts weigh heavy today as we at Greenwich House Music School deeply mourn his passing,” said Rachel Black, the music school’s director. “German’s talent, service, dedication and teaching abilities are something that all of the faculty and staff here at the music school aspired to, and we will continue his legacy by honoring his tireless commitment to our students. His insightfulness, dedication and passion for music and the close-knit community at Greenwich House will be sorely missed.” July 24, 2014

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July 24, 2014

Dancers struck a pose in Sara D. Roosevelt Park on Saturday afternoon during the New Museum’s block party.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Plaque is poetic justice To The Editor: Re “Where poet Frank O’Hara was prolific, a new plaque” (news article, July 3): This is great. Frank O’Hara busted it open and made poetry fun. The East Village is right to claim him as somewhat of a native son. Tony Towle is widely considered to be O’Hara’s protégé, to have inherited the mantle. And it’s well deserved. Few are more urbane, witty or entertaining than Mr. Towle, who often ends his poems with an uplifting soul-searching. Towle’s roommate of the time was also a great poet. But his name was Frank Lima, not Joe. Frank passed on last year. His poems brought duende to the New York School. What a heritage we have here in the East Village! Ted Berrigan! Alice Notley! And the super Berrigan boys,

Eddie, Anselm and David. Kudos to Phil Hartman and Andrew Berman. Jeffrey Cyphers Wright

Adding to O’Hara’s story To The Editor: Re “Where poet Frank O’Hara was prolific, a new plaque” (news article, July 3): Thanks for Heather Dubin’s article on Frank O’Hara. I’ve known about O’Hara and his collaborators, but didn’t know that he lived in the apartment at 441 E. Ninth St. Even more interesting is to learn that he chose subjects for his poems from our neighborhood. With the plaque dedication on June 10, O’Hara is being honored. Also, as a tribute to him, a poetry festival took place in Fire Island Pines on July 12 to celebrate his life and

work. There were readings by a group of noted poets of their own poems and O’Hara’s. One of the poets who read is a friend of mine, Kirby Congdon, who told me about the event. Congratulations to Andrew Berman, of G.V.S.H.P., for his dedication to the preservation of our local history. June Hildebrand Abrams

Some taxing questions… To The Editor: First of all, let me say that except for a small sales tax to help for the infrastructure and educational systems, I am opposed to taxation of property and income. I feel that all citizens are born with sovereign rights, and as sovereign citizens, we have the right LETTERS, continued on p. 12

TheVillager.com


To take or not to take pills, that is the question NOTEBOOK BY MARIANNE GOLDSCHEDIER

M

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

y mother was a pill hound. In wartime Prague, during the Second World War, while I was growing up — a very painful time — she always had codeine at hand, presumably to handle menstrual pain. She had no idea that one of the side effects of codeine is constipation. She complained about this condition bitterly. How she found access to this codeine I have no idea. I now, for years later, have detailed information about how she got access to the pills she used to kill herself. A German friend supplied them. Her suicide was an act of revenge on me, her only child, a daughter, who had left for America as soon as she could, fleeing a Germany that had meant only horror to me. She did not leave a suicide note. She left a suicide novel, elaborating on what a monster I had been to abandon her. After my departure, She mounted a successful literary career. (She had received a doctorate in history from the University of Vienna.). At the time of her suicide in Vienna where she lived, my 21-year-old son had been staying with her, her beloved grandson. She had no idea of the pain she inflicted on him, his brother, who at the time was in Africa, and me. I rushed from New York City, where I still live, to the scene of the tragedy. Human beings have cycles and rhythms. I know that over the years my moods have been up and down, but mostly up. My friends think of me as lively, fun, Marianne. I was not conscious of any mood swings. The summer after my mother’s death — 1983 — for the first time I became deeply despondent. In my wartime childhood there had been no time for expressions of grief. My mother used to admonish me: “Children aren’t sad. They are to be happy.” In the early 1940s, my mother’s parents were scheduled to be sent to Auschwitz, near to the village in which they lived. Stoking up their coal-burning stove and sealing the windows, they died of carbon monoxide poisoning in bed, in each other’s arms. My guilt-ridden mother, their only child, from that moment began talking of taking her own life, telling me tearfully when I left the house to play in

SCENE

Perhaps having drifted up on a “sea of love,” a piano was beached in the sand under the Brooklyn Bridge’s Manhattan side.

the streets, “You may not find me alive when you get home.” We had a gas stove providing easy access to such an act. I had already been declared a monster by her because I didn’t cry when my grandparents died, I shrugged my shoulders. I was 14. But when my mother died in 1982, I tried shrugging my shoulders. However, I no longer could. My

‘Everybody is taking antidepressants. Do the decent thing.’

wonderful sons had left — as the Beatles song goes — the home that never was a home. In my mind, I was giving them a lot of freedom. But now, they tell me, they saw it as neglect. I had reached “the

EVAN FORSCH

Hillary is “talking the talk” of a 99%-er. TheVillager.com

change of life.” My “career” of teaching German at Columbia University as an adjunct (I had passed my Ph.D. qualifying exams) was in a shambles. The 1968 shutdown of the university caused great upheaval and changes. Foreign languages were no longer obligatory. Many departments closed. The German department limped on without me. I had met a Spanish artist named Paco — the proverbial starving artist — and together we were painting apartments to support ourselves. At first, I loved the novelty of it. Later it began to pale. (Some years later, although he was 10 years older than I, he declared me old and undesirable and moved alone to his house in East Hampton, desirable in the summer, in the winter poorly heated, with pipes freezing.) In the summer of 1983 we were visiting friends in New Hampshire, a young artist, named Steve, and his wife, Joyce Maynard, already a successful writer. From an early age I had been writing, but to this day have not found my way to getting my major works published. Joyce had just published her first novel about an 18-year-old looking back on her life. J.D. Salinger, with whom she had lived for a while, had helped her. With the royalties she bought a beautiful farm and 18th-century house, not far from where Salinger lived. She built a studio for her artist husband. On the bus ride returning to New York City, Paco turned to me and asked: “Why can’t you be like Joyce? Look how loving she is and what she is doing for Steve.” My mood sank to a lower bottom than it had ever sunk before. I fervently hoped the bus would crash and end my life. Speechless, I returned with Paco to the house we had bought in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for $32,000 with money my mother had left from a restitution claim. She had been in Theresienstadt, a camp of some renown. Shortly before her death, at last, she received some money, leaving it in a handwritten will to my sons. They gave me money for the $10,000 down payment. The owner of the house, at Bedford Ave. and North Ninth St., was a displaced person like me, and had committed suicide. His one son had died of a drug overdose. The other was in the army, in PILLS, continued on p. 12 July 24, 2014

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To take or not to take pills PILLS, continued from p. 11

Virginia. The divorced father had run a bar in the building’s ground floor. That neighborhood in 1983 was a wild scene of gangs and murders. Paco wanted to get out and return to a peaceful life in East Hampton. After four years, we sold the house, quintupling the price for which we had bought it. A Polish clan bought it and established a successful restaurant in the old bar. Today the restaurant is flourishing. Upon our return from New Hampshire, I sank into a red plush sofa in the old bar, and fell into a deep silence. A longtime friend, a Polish woman, now a nurse, opened her nurse’s manual and declared: “You are a classic bipolar case.” Her earlier diagnosis of a melanoma on my leg she had handled professionally: “See a doctor.” By the time I saw a doctor — I lived for 25 years without any health insurance — it was declared cancer stage four. I’m here to tell the tale. Now she said: “Everybody is taking antidepressants. Sitting there in silence you are depressing everyone around you. This is not decent. I take pills to lower my blood pressure — your disease is just another disease. Do the decent thing.” I am not a Christian Scientist but had sworn off pills. Another friend, suffering from deep depressions, said, “Most depressions are self-limiting.” It turned out to be true for me. A psychiatrist friend in Prague said: “You don’t know what real depression is.” That is what I wanted to hear. A New York psychiatrist friend said: “If you don’t seek help, you’ll kill yourself.” Many years later, he said: “You are the most resilient woman I’ve seen.”

It has not been easy. Few people want to understand. They enjoy me in my down states, tell me how relaxed I look, how wonderful that I am quiet, and say, “You always could be like that, if only you took pills.” When my mood rises again, I feel like my younger self, yet I’m told my behavior is inappropriate for an old woman. They stay away from me, and tell me they only mean well when they suggest I take pills. I’ve resisted taking pills, and I’m proud. Over the years, I’ve gotten countless advice. The son of a psychiatrist, given to strong changing moods himself, gave me the advice his father gave him: Stay away from pills; they only mask what ails you. If you don’t have to go to a job — his father gave him enough money not to have to — then I could get by without a job. Just relax when you feel low, he said. Read, stay in bed as long as you like — and ignore all those lay diagnosticians. When your mood rises, be careful. Many do foolish things in that state. Rest when you don’t feel like resting; curb any exuberance. Talk as little as possible. So was the advice from his father, who had given it to his son. This Dr. Harvey Wasserman, whom I have never met, disappeared with a young woman, owing the I.R.S. a lot of money and having lost his medical license. No one knows where he is. He gave me the best advice I have ever gotten. Thank you, Doctor, wherever you are. And I wish your son — who followed your example of disappearing — appears again. I miss him. This essay is dedicated to all who can deal with life without supporting the trillion-dollar pharmaceutical industry.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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July 24, 2014

to determine the distribution of the sweat of our labor, and that government is only entitled to those drops we say they are entitled to and not one drop more. However, with the extortive threats of seizure of property and imprisonment, we have no choice but to let this creepy system creep on. If, however, we insist on electing and re-electing the same greedy old extortionists and pirates that we call Democrats and Republicans, shouldn’t we be just as insistent that access to adequate food,

clothing, shelter and healthcare be the foremost and absolute rights of the taxed? Jerry The Peddler E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager. com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters. TheVillager.com


Raising awareness about hepatitis B in New York BY JULIANNE CUBA

T

wo out of three Asian-Americans infected with hepatitis B don’t know that they have it, and one out of 12 Asian-Americans is infected with both hepatitis B and C. Currently, there are more than 100,000 people in New York City known to be living with hepatitis B, and likely many more who aren’t even aware that they have it. Mon., July 21, marked the start of New York City’s first annual Hepatitis B Awareness Week, which — after a week of planned events to raise awareness — will culminate on July 28, World Hepatitis Awareness Day. This Monday, members of the Hepatitis B Coalition, the American Liver Foundation and doctors from the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center gathered on the steps of City Hall to advocate for awareness of the disease. Councilmembers Margaret Chin, Corey Johnson and Peter Koo spoke on behalf the New York City Council. This June, the three councilmembers allocated $750,000 from the

city’s fiscal year 2015 budget for a hepatitis treatment program. The American Liver Foundation works to provide resources for those living with hepatitis B or with liver diseases in New York City. “We want people to know that hepatitis B is really prevalent right now in New York,” said Paul Bolter, the organization’s community outreach and education manager. A.L.F. members visit city hospitals, treatment centers and schools, as well as support groups, to educate people about hepatitis B, and to offer support and treatment for those who are suffering from the disease. As part of the awareness week, a documentary screening of “Another Life” will be held Thurs., July 24, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the CUNY Asian American Research Institute. The film shares the stories of eight families in the U.S. and China dealing with hepatitis B. After the screening, the public will have a chance to discuss the documentary, as well as other issues surrounding hepatitis B, with Dr. Su Wang, medical director for the Chinese Medical Program at St. Barnabas Medical

to my father is exactly what no one wants to happen.” Transmission of the hepatitis B virus results from exposure to infectious blood or body fluids containing blood. Possible forms of transmission include sexual contact, blood transfusions, reuse of contaminated needles and syringes, and also childbirth by an infected mother, in which the baby is born with the virus. About onethird of reported hepatitis B among adults, however, cannot be traced back to an identifiable risk factor. China, in particular, has a serious hepatitis B problem. According to Wikipedia, “Hepatitis B is endemic in China. Of the 350 million individuals worldwide infected with hepatitis B, one-third reside in China. … During and before the Cultural Revolution, many of the cases came from unsafe needles that carried the virus. This was due to the fact that medicine in that time was rather poor in quality, and was reduced to one-room hospitals.” To learn more about Hepatitis B Awareness Week for New York City, visit the coalition’s homepage at NYCHEPBC.org.

Center in New Jersey, and who is actually living with hepatitis B herself. Dr. Jay K. Varma, deputy commissioner for disease control at the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, also attended the kickoff event for Hepatitis B Awareness Week. Referring to hepatitis B as a “silent killer,” Varma said, “We want to help others in the community to help raise awareness about hepatitis B. It’s important for the health community to know that this infection may be silent for many years, and it’s important to get tested.” Sue Prezzioti, a 50-year-old self-employed writing and communications consultant from Manhattan, joined the Hepatitis B Coalition just under a year ago after her father passed away from liver cancer. “My father was diagnosed last year with hepatitis B and late-stage liver cancer at the same time,” she said. “He never knew he had hepatitis B and he passed away less than six months later. So I felt like it’s just wrong, and there is so little awareness. People can be tested, there’s a vaccine. People can be treated or at least managed. What happened

C.B. 2 is taking a stand on illegal tree benches BY SERGEI KLEBNIKOV

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TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY SERGEI KLEBNIKOV

he Community Board 2 Executive Committee isn’t taking the issue of illegal tree benches sitting down. On June 16, the board’s district manager, Bob Gormley, discussed recent complaints about the tree-straddling benches. The meeting was led by Bo Riccobono, filling in for David Gruber, the board’s chairperson, who was attending a different meeting. The number of tree benches has increased around the district now, as well as the city. C.B. 2 is currently in the process of making inquiries to determine exactly which city agency should be contacted to deal with the issue. According to the board, the Department of Transportation claims the benches are not in its jurisdiction. The Parks Department will claim responsibility, but only if trees are hurt or damaged by the benches. On the other hand, if the benches are deemed part of the sidewalk, the Department of Sanitation could claim jurisdiction. “We are currently still trying to decide on an agency to deal with the situation,” said Gormley. The district manager described the two types of complaints about the seating that C.B. 2 has received. First, locals have complained about the benches narrowing the sidewalk, essentially creating a “bottleneck ef-

At the Spotted Pig, on Greenwich St., a cluster of an illegal tree bench, another sidewalk bench and a plethora of plants has created a “perfect storm” sidewalk bottleneck, according to C.B. 2.

fect,” as Gormley put it. The second main issue with the benches that has been brought to the board’s attention is that they encourage patrons of nearby bars and restaurants to linger on the sidewalk — potentially with cigarettes or alcohol. The situation could quickly get worse if people become “more likely to linger outside,” especially at night on benches located beneath local residents’ windows. The two most recent complaints that C.B. 2 has received focused on The Spotted Pig and Wallsé, restau-

rants both located at W. 11th and Greenwich Sts. The Spotted Pig’s tree bench situation was described as particularly egregious: In addition to the tree bench, another bench has been placed right across from it, next to the restaurant’s exterior, while various plants have been put out on the sidewalk, allowing for less than 2 feet of space across. Wallsé had also been getting complaints, but it reportedly removed its tree bench after a visit from the Department of Sanitation. P.R. spokespersons for The Spotted Pig said the restaurant would decline to comment for this article.

“They’re all illegal,” Gormley said of the tree benches, explaining that building any bench around a tree constitutes a violation. “They can definitely be problematic,” he said, though added, “but if it’s a wide sidewalk, the benches can be nice to have.” The community board can’t say for sure who it is that erects the benches, Gormley said, but the assumption is it’s the adjacent local establishments. He also reiterated that C.B. 2 only acts when it gets complaints about something, which is why the board is targeting the illegal benches. “The tree benches are always an amenity to the restaurants, sometimes an amenity for pedestrians, and always a nuisance for the city,” Gormley said. However, one local bar/restaurant owner, who asked to remain anonymous, scoffed at the C.B. 2 crackdown. His business is fronted by a wide sidewalk, in an area off the beaten path, with little foot traffic. Apparently, his tree benches are not on the board’s radar. “This has been here 20, 25 years — before the community board,” he declared of his rustic assemblage of tree benches. “It’s a service to the community,” he said of the outdoor seating.

With reporting by Lincoln Anderson July 24, 2014

13


HealthPlex is open in the Village, featuring

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Dr. Alex Hellinger, the executive director of the new Lenox Hill HealthPlex, stood proudly outside of the facility’s Seventh Ave. entrance on its first day open, last Thursday. HEALTHPLEX, continued from p. 1

they did, it was in a surge, 10 patients in the space of an hour and a half. That’s typically how it happens, noted Dr. Eric Cruzen, the HealthPlex’s emergency medical director. Eight of the patients were still at the HealthPlex when The Villager arrived, two having been treated and released. Baez said the last thing he remembered from the previous night was unlocking his bike outside 3 Sheets Saloon, on W. Third St., where he had been drinking, and saying goodbye to his cousin. He was planning to bike home to Sunset Park, Brooklyn — his usual commute. “I honestly don’t know how I ended up on St. Mark’s Place,” he said. “I was very drunk,” he admitted. “I didn’t realize how drunk I was.” Asked what he thought about the treatment he was receiving at the HealthPlex, Baez good-naturedly said, without missing a beat, “Excellent. Honestly, they’re very nice people. Very sociable. Very easy to speak to if you have an issue. Very nonjudgmental.” He was being kept for observation for a while. The HealthPlex would

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July 24, 2014

also make sure he’d have follow-up care, which is very important in the case of such an injury, especially where it wasn’t known exactly how hard he may have hit his head. Local critics, distraught over the loss of St. Vincent’s, which was a full-service hospital, have blasted the 24/7 stand-alone E.D. — which doesn’t have inpatient hospital beds as part of the facility — as an “urgent-care center on steroids.” Yet, it offers a higher level of emergency care than an urgent-care center. For example, Baez was given a CAT scan to check for skull fractures or any bleeding in his brain — a capability that urgent-cares don’t have. All of the walk-in patients on Thursday up to that point had had zero wait time to be seen. Other patients had come in for migraines, abdominal pains and high blood pressure, among other things. A Jane St. resident, 47, had glass, or possibly some other object, lodged under his toe that he got while playing soccer on the beach in Brazil. A Village restaurant worker who lives in the Bronx, 18, had cut the tip off the top of his thumb while chopping asparagus. He came, got three

stitches, and was released. A firecracker of upbeat energy, nurse Amy Smith is the HealthPlex’s project manager. She said she really liked the HealthPlex’s layout, since it allows her to keep an eye on multiple patients in various rooms at once. She noted she could, at that moment, eas-

Plex’s first patient brought in by ambulance — by an ambulance from North Shore-LIJ Health System, the HealthPlex’s umbrella health group. Speaking in very limited English, Melvin Morales, 23, explained that he works in a market — apparently in Midtown — and was in Grand Central Station when he fainted. He was hooked up to a heart monitor, and they were doing blood work on him. “He looks good,” said Smith, who then asked him if he had eaten anything for breakfast. He had not. That could very well have been a factor, she noted, but they would continue the testing. As for why the ambulance brought Morales to the HealthPlex in the Village, Cruzen explained that it’s an algorithm of the emergency responders’ decision, plus a computer that tells

‘They have thought this through from the patients’ point of view.’ Deborah Glick

ily see a patient about 40 feet away who was resting in a room, who had fainted and fallen and didn’t know where he was. “That’s serious,” she said. In fact, that man was the Health-

HEALTHPLEX, continued on p. 15 TheVillager.com


state-of-the-art 24/7 emergency department HEALTHPLEX, continued from p. 14

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

them where the best available treatment option is. No patients had yet been transported by ambulance to local hospitals for higher-level care, such as would be done for acute heart attacks or strokes or major trauma, like a serious gunshot wound. Also resting in a bed after getting treatment was Cathy Casrielgyory, from Horatio St., who had been suffering a severe migraine and vertigo as a result of a debilitating bout of Meniere’s disease. She had been getting herself psyched up to take a taxi ride through crosstown traffic over to N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center in the E. 30s on First Ave., but then — even though she wasn’t sure if it was open yet — she decided to walk over to the HealthPlex. They gave her intravenous valium, for which she was grateful. “I feel better, not 100 percent, so they’re sending me home with some valium,” she said, wearing sunglasses to block out the light and help calm her symptoms, as her daughter sat nearby, having accompanied her over to the HealthPlex. Another thing the HealthPlex can do that an urgent-care center can’t, is dispense a wide variety of medications to its patients. A nurse came in and checked her blood pressure. “One hundred fifty-four over 76,” she said, “a little high for your baseline, but not high for the E.R.” Casrielgyory’s assessment of the care she had received? “Great,” she said. “Very prompt. The place is full of spirit today. And as a resident of the neighborhood,” she said of the healthcare facility, “I’m glad to have it back. If I have an attack like this, I will come back.” As The Villager was leaving the HealthPlex — the patients in good hands with the medical staff — Kelly Gates, 24, was entering , being greeted by the front-desk staff, and preparing to get treated by a staff member for what Gates believed to be bedbug bites. She expressed incredulity that she lives in the West Village, yet could possibly have bedbugs. A week earlier, officials with North Shore-L.I.J. and the HealthPlex, and even the neighboring L.G.B.T. Community Center, had formally dedicated the facility at an opening ceremony. Afterward, Assemblymember Deborah Glick gave the new HealthPlex her seal of approval, and said she especially liked that it has a special section — with a separate entrance — for sexual-assault victims. The area is set up to provide the greatest privacy to the victims, and also to set them at ease.

Cathy Casrielgyory received treatment for a debilitating bout of Meniere’s disease.

“Women in the community need to know that there’s a separate, private entrance for victims of sexual assault,” she said, adding, “That is just an indication of the way they have thought this through from the patients’ point of view.” TPIA, a clot buster given to stroke victims, is available at the facility, Glick added. Over all, she was very bullish on the HealthPlex. “Very much so,” she said, “and I think the community will look forward to the imaging services and specialty care” that will be added in the near future in the building’s upper floors. N.S.-LIJ poured $150 million into the facility — the former St. Vincent’s O’Toole Building — which will be offering more medical services in the near future beyond just the E.D., the latter, admittedly, which was the main aspect of St. Vincent’s that the community feared losing when the historic hospital closed. There hadn’t been any protest action recently by diehard advocates of a full-service hospital who had savaged the freestanding E.D., which ultimately wasn’t surprising, she said. “You’re going to come here and say how this is terrible for the community?” Glick said. “You’re going to have access to up-to-date emergency healthcare.” July 24, 2014

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New tech tools will give students another edge BY ZACH WILLIAMS

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P.S. 142 students doing their “beauty salon” — the sort of interactive learning that will be further enabled by the interactive, touch-screen tables arriving later this summer. The multitasking pupils were also keeping up on their Bridgegate news.

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July 24, 2014

PHOTO COURTESY OF P.S. 142

little something extra in last month’s city budget speeds up the classroom of the future’s arrival a bit for Lower East Side students. Eight local schools received additional funding for technology purchases, including laptops and interactive whiteboards, plus tables with all the capabilities of an iPad, but bigger and inviting for more than one user at a time. City Councilmember Margaret Chin secured the $480,000 in funding, in addition to $360,000 that will enable sidewalk and bathroom repairs at three other schools, as well as the construction of a rooftop garden at Emma Lazarus High School. “In today’s world, education is about more than just textbooks and lectures,” Chin said in a statement. “So I made sure to provide funding for new laptops or digital technology upgrades to schools which required that boost. “I’m particularly excited about providing funding for interactive, touchscreen technology to early-childhood, special-education students at P.S. 142,” she said. “That technology will

greatly aid the school in handling its influx of special-ed students, while giving those students new opportunities to gain important basic skills and explore their creativity.” Principals interviewed by The Villager indicated that the new technology should be ready in time for the upcoming school year. Long gone are the days when a computer or two in the back of a classroom sufficed for introducing children to technology, noted Rhonda Levy, principal of P.S. 142. She said that $40,000 in funding for “interactive tables” in four early-childhood special-education classrooms would be a welcome change from the rote methods of the past. In recent years, Levy’s students have re-created activities, such as building a beauty salon. “What they re-create in those classrooms will make you cry,” she said. “You just don’t realize what a 5-yearold can do.” Every year, the hands-on approach at the school requires loads of new materials and books. Levy said some of her teachers now spend time applying for as many as eight educational grants per year. Meanwhile, technology can aid children with “subtle” learning disabilities to quickly integrate with their peers, she added. Five local schools will purchase

mobile “laptop carts,” allowing several classrooms to share technology. Used alongside interactive whiteboards, multitasking students can read books at the front of the classroom while also accessing a personal device brimming with educational applications, explained James Lee, principal of P.S. 20. Lee’s school received $60,000 for laptop carts. The carts can even update software on students’ iPhones, he said. “We’re putting a lot of our funds into either laptops or iPads in order to serve a great number of kids all at the same time,” Lee said. He added that the funding will also better prepare P.S. 20 to comply with the expected future requirement that standardized testing be done on computers rather than with paper and pencil. However, principals said the software that the Department of Education is offering to go with the carts unfortunately is not that great. “The software that they offer is stupid,” one of them said, though adding, “but they did allow us to roll over the software money.” The principals all said that their students enjoy the expanded use of technology in the classroom. “The kids love it. Why not make use of it?” she said. “There is so much out there.” TheVillager.com


Tales of global, local and internal struggle Fest delivers deeply personal Asian independent films

FILM THE 37th ASIAN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Produced by Asian CineVision July 24 – Aug. 3 At Asia Society (725 Park Ave.) City Cinemas Village East (189 Second Ave.) COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS AND AAIFF

Made in NY Media Center by IFP (30 John St.) The Museum of Chinese in America (215 Centre St.) Tickets: $13 ($11 for students/seniors/disabled) Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule

B Y SCOT T ST IFFL E R Themes of social justice and stories of personal growth dominate the narrative and documentary selections in this year’s Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF) — which, in its 37th year, can claim the distinction of being one of the nation’s longest-running showcases for independent film and video. Nearly every one of the 18 features are having their east coast or world premieres, with many directors in attendance for post-screening Q&A sessions. The work of artists from over 21 countries and regions are represented — including China, the U.S., Japan, Iran, Nepal, India, the Philippines and Taiwan. Films made in response to urbanization and globalization, as well as labor and displacement issues, comprise the social justice element of the festival — among them, the opening night’s screening of “Sold.” Executive-produced by Emma Thompson, it’s an adaptation of Patricia McCormick’s fictional account of human trafficking in India. From the Philippines, “Transit” has foreign workers in Israel resisting the deportation of their children. The documentary “Bringing Home Tibet” follows artist Tenzing Rigdol, as he attempts to smuggle 20 tons of Tibetan TheVillager.com

Thoroughly grounded: Tenzing Rigdol and the 20 tons of native soil he smuggled. “Bringing Home Tibet” screens on July 31.

soil across three countries that border the Himalayas, so that exiles in Dharamsala, India can set foot on their native land. NYU Tisch Professor Christine Choy’s “Ghina” investigates Chinese construction in Africa, by speaking with migrant workers and investors about their experiences. A farmer’s imaginative reaction to Taiwan’s membership in the World Trade Organization is the basis for “The Rice Bomber.” See Sean Egan’s review of the film, elsewhere in this issue. Also reviewed by this publication, the personal growth sagas “Chu and Blossom” and “Pretty Rosebud” concern, respectively, a Korean exchange student’s artistic awakening and a young woman’s determination to leave an unhappy marriage. Two entries from Taiwan also have lead characters coming to realizations under forced circumstances. In “100 Days,” a callous telecom exec returns to the Matsu Islands for a burial, and is given the titular deadline to find a bride in order for his mother’s spirit to depart

peacefully. In “A Time in Quchi,” a young boy tethered to his electronic gadgets is forced to log off and slow down — after being sent to the countryside, for a summer with his grandfather. For the tenth consecutive year, filmmaking teams from around the world will take the challenge posed by AAIFF’s “72-Hour Shootout” — the length of time during which they have to write, shoot and edit a film. This year’s mandatory theme: “The Color of My Hair!” The top 10 films will screen at 1 p.m. on Sun., July 27, at City Cinemas Village East. If those efforts inspire you to make your own film, AAIFF has an outlet — with patience and attention to detail the only requirements (well, besides pre-registration). From July 25-29, Taiwanese stop motion artist Hui-ching Tseng will lead two workshops: one for young people (ages 10-15), and another for the general public. To participate, contact@mandarinink. org and info@asiancinevision.org for, respectively, the youth and general public workshops. July 24, 2014

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Bold course corrections from a pretty mess Husband and wife team bring nuance to tale of personal growth

FILM PRETTY ROSEBUD At The Asian American International PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS & AAIFF

Film Festival Written by Chuti Tiu Directed by Oscar Torre 2014 Runtime: 81 minutes Sat., July 26, at 1 p.m. At City Cinemas Village East Second Ave. & 12th St. Tickets: $13 $11 for students/seniors/disabled Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule Post-screening Q&A with the director & star

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

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ently awoken by parental cooing, Cissy needs little prompting to join her mother in the singing of a favorite nursery rhyme about a blossoming youth, for whom the future holds limitless promise. The only flaw in that plan? The person being coaxed to emerge from the covers is a grown woman in her mid-20s, who’s returned to the security of her childhood bedroom as a means of temporary retreat from a career in danger and a marriage on the rocks. At this pace, it’s going to be a long time before she clears all of the hurdles set by her Chinese Dad

Screenwriter and star Chuti Tiu, as Cissy, is equally admirable in her faults and strengths.

and Filipino-Spanish mom — chief among them, the making of babies (a topic which has an increasingly oppressive way of factoring into conversation with relatives and friends). Every family meal Cissy and her brother are summoned to comes with a mandatory status report on success according to mom and dad. At least they have something to talk about. When dining with her chronically unemployed husband, their stilted conversation takes place as they sit on either side of a giant framed wedding photo that mocks the unfulfilled promise of that happy day. A skilled and nuanced take on the great expectations of family, religion, work, status and sexual desire, the unhappy marriage at the center of “Pretty Rosebud” is

the product of director Oscar Torre and screenwriter/star Chuti Tiu — who, off screen, are husband and wife. Hopefully, they’re both in possession of vivid imaginations. Otherwise, they’ve almost certainly chosen the long hours of the movie business as a way to avoid strife at the dinner table. That’s where some of the film’s most telling moments happen, thanks to Tiu’s remarkable capacity to write in a conversational style that’s mundane on the surface, but packed with subtle clues and savvy misdirection about a particular character’s true nature. Nobody in this film is the saint or sinner we reasonably judge them to be — which eventually pays off in a manner that’s remarkably civil and emotionally genuine, given the multitude of slights and betrayals

(both real and perceived) visited upon the cast. Forced by circumstances into the position of sole breadwinner, Cissy finds herself upending other gender conventions by cheating on her husband, initiating a trial separation and defying the wishes of a candidate whose congressional campaign she’s been tasked with invigorating. “I don’t get what I need from just one person,” Cissy says while seeking council from her family priest. Ostensibly talking about adultery, she might as well be describing her strategy for finding emotional support when she adds, “I go to different people.” As much an act of rebellion as the necessary expression of a healthy libido unsatisfied by her mate or her vibrator, Cissy’s willingness to stray from the marital vow of fidelity earns our empathy, but not necessarily our sympathy. After another dinner table session with her husband (during which they negotiate the terms of separation in a manner resembling corporate dissolution), a confrontation with her parents sheds new light on an old family squabble — revealing the depth of commitment demanded by marriage. Another scene, of mother/ daughter retail therapy, is one of the film’s best. Bel Hernandez, as Lettie Lam, has great chemistry with Tiu and enough comedic chops to merit far more screen time than she’s given. Emboldened by some new realizations, the stage is set for a symbolism-filled sprint to the ocean’s cleansing waves. It’s a clumsy metaphor, and one of the film’s rare missteps — but when Cissy emerges from the water, newly baptized with the strength to cross or burn bridges as the situation requires, she does so with admirable speed and relative ease.

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Buhmann on Art THE INTUITIONISTS Through Aug. 24 At The Drawing Center 35 Wooster St. Btw. Broome & Grand Sts. Wed., Fri., Sat., Sun., 12–6 p.m. Thurs. 12–8 p.m. Adults, $5, Students & Seniors, $3, Kids under 12, Free Free every Thurs, 6–8 p.m. Call 212-219-2166 COURTESY OF AUCOCISCO GALLERY

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Patrick Earl Hammie: “Platform” | 2014 | Oil on mylar | 84 x 11 inches (213.36 x 27.94 cm).

Kenny Cole: “MDNJPN” | 2014 | Gouache on paper | 8 1/2 x 7 inches (21.6 x 17.8 cm).

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN (stephaniebuhmann.com) This collaborative artist project was inspired by Colson Whitehead’s 1999 fiction novel of the same name, which explores the relationships between progress, technology and difference. Pondering how the collection, the database, and the aggregate serve as complementary models for the organization of information and objects in flux, artists Heather Hart, Steffani

Visit drawingcenter.org The Drawing Center is wheelchair accessible

Jemison and Jina Valentine have invited over 60 members of the Drawing Center’s substantial Viewing Program — which has offered emerging artists the opportunity to include their work in a curated Artist Registry since 1977 — to submit artworks specifically responding to a word or phrase from Whitehead’s novel. In addition, each item in the exhibition is hung according to the sequence determined by Whitehead’s text. Meanwhile, the Lab gallery features collaboration by Hart, Jemison and Valentine, inspired by a paragraph from the novel, using its words and letters to form an interpretive drawing.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Cui Fei: “Leaves” | 2014 | Mixed media | 8 1/2 x 4 1/4 x 1 1/2 inches (21.6 x 10.8 x 3.8 cm).

www.TheVillager.com TheVillager.com

July 24, 2014

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Clever love letter, flawed film ‘Awesome’ is so-so, but has some kick to it BY SEAN EGAN

AWESOME ASIAN BAD GUYS At The Asian American International Film Festival Written by Milton Liu Directed by Patrick Epino and Stephen Dypiangco 2014 Runtime: 54 minutes Fri., July 25, at 6 p.m. at City Cinemas Village East (Second Ave. & 12th St.) Sat., July 26, at 2 p.m. at Made in NY Media Center (30 John St., Brooklyn) Tickets: $13 $11 for students/seniors/disabled Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule A director/producer/writer Q&A follows each screening

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his feature from the National Film Society boasts a clever, meta premise and a game cast, but never quite capitalizes on those assets. It tells the tale of two eager Asian-American filmmakers who round up some of their favorite Asian actors famous for their villainous roles in action movies, in order to take down a dangerous crime syndicate. The story never really develops beyond this clever hook though, and the whole thing seems stretched thin even over the meager running time. Indeed, the project is, in actuality, a season of a web series edited together — and its clear that the nonsensical plot was not designed to be scrutinized in the way one unbroken sitting compels you to do. And like a lot of web series looking for viral success, the humor is too often broad and sophomoric

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS & AAIFF

FILM

Webisodes in search of a through line: “Awesome” works best when riffing on its absurd premise.

in a way that doesn’t really land. When the series stops trying so hard with its telegraphed laughs, and simply lets the goofy absurdity of its premise and cast be, it works way better. The cast of Asian badasses has an infectious energy when bouncing off of one another and riffing on their onscreen personas (Randall Park, in particu-

lar, has crack comedic timing). Also infectious is the earnest sense of excitement the filmmakers bring to working with these actors. Their un-ironic love of these mostly forgotten bit-players touches on important ideas about representation in media, and makes the whole thing a tribute way more affecting than it has any right to be. As a comedy, and as a

film, “Awesome Asian Bad Guys” frequently misses the mark and feels underdeveloped — but as a love letter, it works just fine. This film is preceded by Robbie Ikegami’s 16-minute “Pull Over To Kill” — about two Japanese Yakuza hitmen who, while driving through the California desert, learn they’ve been double crossed.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS & AAIFF

An oddball conduit to self-discovery Familiar dramedy has excellent cast, unexpected laughs

FILM CHU AND BLOSSOM At The Asian American International Film Festival Written by Charles Chu and Ryan O’Nan Directed by Charles Chu and Gavin Kelly 2014 Runtime: 104 minutes English, Korean Sun., July 29 at 8:30 p.m. At City Cinemas Village East Second Ave. & 12th St. Tickets: $13 $11 for students/seniors/disabled Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule

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BY SEAN EGAN

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fter years of being a genre of choice for low-budget auteurs and mini-majors alike, it’s safe to say that, at this point, the “indie-coming-of-age dramedy” has certain tropes and narrative beats firmly entrenched in its DNA. The filmmakers behind “Chu and Blossom” know and use just about every trick in the playbook. Fortunately, for the viewer, they have enough of a unique perspective to twist the genre into something that feels fresh. Opening as Joon Chu (co-writer and co-director Charles Chu), a Korean exchange student with a strict upbringing, arrives in America, the film follows the tried-and-true narrative of self-discovery. The conduit for this is the unlikely friendship Joon strikes up with Butch Blossom

(co-writer Ryan O’Nan) — an oddball performance artist who lives to rebel against small-town life. Along the way he meets the requisite love interest, Cherry Swade, and begins to embrace an artistic side that puts him in conflict with the path his parents wish him to take. There are times when “Chu and Blossom” threatens to become a tad too predictable and obvious — the romance, fights and triumphs all come at their expected junctures. The ignorant denizens of the town are a little too cartoonish with their casual racism, and some of the conflicts feel forced. The characters are also a little archetypal (especially Cherry, who veers dangerously close to being a generic manic-pixie dream girl). But it’s easy to overlook these faults when it gets so much else right. Chu and co-director Gavin Kelly favor steady, Wes Anderson-esque shots

Caitlin Stasey, Charles Chu and Ryan O’Nan.

which, when combined with the slightly saturated photography, create a distinctly light and whimsical feel. The cast is also uniformly excellent. Alan Cumming steals scenes in a bit role as Blossom’s flamboyantly gay uncle — all southern drawl and sass. There are a number of genuinely unexpected laughs derived from O’Nan’s wonky, energetic performance. And as Joon, Chu anchors the film, wringing both laughs and pathos out of his character’s language barrier and expressive face. Together, they make for an entertaining and effective odd couple whose chemistry and offbeat rhythms elevate the film. The end result is a charming, indie-dramedy that sets itself apart, even when playing by the rules. TheVillager.com


Bad things happened here Raya Martin’s horror story goes from simmer to boil BY SCOTT STIFFLER

HOW TO DISAPPEAR COMPLETELY At The Asian American International Film Festival Written & Directed by Raya Martin 2013 Runtime: 79 minutes Filipino, Tagalog with English subtitles Fri., Aug. 1, at 10 p.m. At City Cinemas Village East Second Ave. & 12th St. Tickets: $13 $11 for students/seniors/disabled Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule

FILM THE RICE BOMBER International Film Festival Written by: Cho Li, Zin Do-Lan, Hung Hung Directed by Cho Li 2014 Runtime: 117 minutes Mandarin, Taiwanese with English subtitles Sat., July 26, at 7:30 p.m. at City Cinemas Village East (Second Ave. & 12th St.) Sun., July 27, at 2 p.m. at Made in NY Media Center (30 John St., Brooklyn) Following the screenings, a Q&A with the director Tickets: $13 $11 for students/seniors/disabled Visit aaiff.org/2014/schedule

TheVillager.com

Dread, at the dinner table and in the forest: Raya Martin’s “How to Disappear Completely” is a potent horror story without a boogeyman.

structure American audiences crave, along with the horror genre’s compulsory acts of violence — here, effectively delivered by way of a disturbing family reunion and, later, a hypnotic, synth-infused rampage during which rebellious teens assume the powers, privileges and curses of the adult world they seek to desecrate.

The revolution will be heavy-handed ‘Rice Bomber’ redeemed by its potent political message BY SEAN EGAN

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his drama highlights the problems facing farmers in Taiwan by telling a particularly interesting true-life story. The film follows Yang Rumen (Ru for short), as he observes the downfall of the Taiwanese farming industry in his community, at the hands of a disinterested, uncaring government. His righteous anger builds as he spends time with a politically radical young woman and experiences multiple personal blows due to the general mistreatment of farmers and the poor. Becoming a reluctant revolutionary, Ru sets off 17 explosives made from local crops, in order to draw governmental and media attention to the farmers’ plight — and gains the titular nickname in the process. A story as unique as Ru’s should make for thrilling cinema with an activist bent. But the screenplay’s melodramatic elements and heavy-handed political message prevent this from

happening. The characters often speak as if they’re reciting talking points from a simplistic political manifesto rather than having conversations, making it difficult to become emotionally invested in the film. Ru’s internal struggle is visualized, “Parent Trap”style, via an on-screen “evil twin” of sorts that challenges his ideals Set it off: Peaceful revolutionary Ru uses explosives — subtle, this is not. made from local crops, to make his point. Making matters worse, the piano-driven score frame, and composes some striking overbears, with its melancholy plunk- shots. She also uses well-chosen news ing being mildly distracting at best, and clips to contextualize the story, showcomically invasive at worst. ing its significance to society at large. But the film isn’t without merit. The So while the movie does get its importexceptional cinematography, by Cho ant message across effectively, it plays Yongkyu, uses vivid colors, shadows out more like an aesthetically pleasing and light to bring the Taiwanese coun- history lesson or op-ed piece — rather tryside to life. Director Cho Li consis- than the exciting, flesh and blood dratently finds interesting ways to fill the ma promised by the source material.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS & AAIFF

At The Asian American

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et largely in a world of murky dusk that’s about to be overtaken by pitch black night, experimental Filipino filmmaker Raya Martin’s self-proclaimed “homage to American Independent Horror” conjures all of the dread, much of the pounding soundtrack and a few potent whiffs of the boogeyman histrionics found in 1978’s “Halloween” (which, in a flpno.com interview, he cited as a conscious influence). Opening his film with a claustrophobic scene that implies merciless bloodshed, Martin then notes that what we’re about to see took place a year ago. In doing so, he imposes a tone of tragic destiny upon the uneasy (and vaguely sexual) dynamics of a religious mother, a drunken father and an autistic daughter. We’re already aware that no good can possibly come from their widening emotional gulf — just as there’s no escaping the sad fate experienced by characters from ghost stories and cautionary tales meant to keep the daughter from stepping out of line or wandering too

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS & AAIFF

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far into the surrounding forest. “How to Disappear Completely” is confident in its economy of emotional and narrative momentum, letting talk of changing weather or the chirps of insects cast a suffocating pall over scenes of familial discord. A less assured storyteller would pepper these moments with rolling eye reaction shots or put-upon sighs from the sullen teen in the room — but when screenwriter and director Martin shows only the girl’s nearly motionless back during a long dinner table scene during which mom and dad are in full, animated view, it’s all we need to know about the short path from detatchment to defiance. With only stingy hints of a supernatural force at work, threat number one becomes the adolescent urge to escape from a deeply flawed adult world. Having ventured into the night to attend a school play, the parents don’t know what they’re getting into when their normally silent daughter joins a chorus of children to recite, in foreboding unison, “A warning to all people who do atrocious things: We are going to hunt you down.” That sets the stage for a third act that finally delivers on the narrative

July 24, 2014

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, #Pending, for beer, wine, and liquor has been applied for by the Undersigned to sell beer, wine, and liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 176 8th Avenue, New York, NY 10011 for on premises consumption. Firstwave International LLC d/b/a Fat Tiger Vil: 07/24 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license number 1279699 for a Beer & Wine license has been applied for by Black Cat Cafe Inc. to sell Beer & Wine at retail in a Tavern under the Alcoholic Beverage Control law at 172 Rivington St. New York, NY 10002 for on premises consumption. Vil: 07/24 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #1279715 has been applied for by Nisida LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 118 Greenwich Avenue NY, NY 10011. Vil: 07/24 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by 200 Tribeca Restaurant LLC d/b/a Tribeca’s Kitchen to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 200 Church Street NY, NY 10013. Vil: 07/24 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION KENNEDY ADVERTAINMENT COMPANY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/4/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The reg. agent is: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. at same address. Purpose: all lawful activities. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAYNORS LANE PROPERTY LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/14. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: c/o Sabin, Bermant & Gould LLP, 4 Times Square, NY NY 10036 Attn: Managing Partner Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014

104 W. 118TH, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 4/11/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 104 W. 118th St., NY, NY 10026. General Purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 ATIDIM LLC App. for Auth. filed with the SSNY on 07/14/14. Filed with Florida Secretary of State 06/11/12. Office: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Brack Capital, 885 Third Avenue, 24th Floor, New York, New York 10022. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 24-10 29TH STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/23/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Blank Property Group, 712 Fifth Ave., 45th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 281 UNION BPC PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/1/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 365 UNION BPC PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/7/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 EMMY INTERIORS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/27/2014. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 175 West 73rd St., Apt. 7J, NY, NY 10023. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RSS GSMS2011C3-NY GRI, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF LEWELLYN TECHNOLOGY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/14/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 2897 N 1375 W, Linton, IN 47441. LLC formed in DE on 7/19/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RAR2 - 222 BROADWAY OWNER SPE, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/13/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 222 S. Riverside Plz., 26th Fl., Chicago, IL 60606. LLC formed in DE on 5/9/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SMSGLOBAL (US) LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/10/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/11/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/24 - 08/28/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BIG BEND 53W88 (NY) LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/01/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 4441 Buena Vista St., Dallas, TX 75205. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 2M Companies, Inc., 4441 Buena Vista St., Dallas, NY 75205. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 07/02/14, the process addr. is: 2M Companies, Inc., 4441 Buena Vista St., Dallas, TX 75205. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF IN DE GOOT SONGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: William McGathy, 119 West 23rd NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 183 MADISON AVENUE, L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy of State of NY on June 24, 2014. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in DE on June 5, 2014. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th floor, NY, NY 10011. NRAI is registered agent as well. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org filed with DE Secy of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal & Duke of York Streets, P.O,. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SUNNY DAY LLC Arts of Org. filed with the Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/14/2014. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: SUNNY DAY LLC, 440 E 75 STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10021 Purpose: any lawful act or activity Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, THAT THE NYC DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON Wednesday, July 30, 2014 AT 2:00 P.M. AT 66 JOHN STREET, 11TH FLOOR, ON A PETITION FOR 99 SOUTH REST. CORP. TO CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN, AND OPERATE AN UNENCLOSED SIDEWALK CAFE AT 99 7TH AVENUE SOUTH IN THE BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN FOR A TERM OF FOUR YEARS. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 07/17 - 07/24/2014

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July 24, 2014

FAMILY FLAW, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 5/16/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Second Spring LLC, 698 W. End Ave., #11A, NY, NY 10025. General Purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYC COMMAND II, LLC Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of State on 07/09/2014. Office Location: New York County. Secretary of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: Greenberg, Trager & Herbst, LLP, 767 Third Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ASAUROL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/2/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 207 E. 57th St., Apt. 5B, NY, NY 10022, Attn: Anthony Sabastian Aurol. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 137 DUANE HOLDINGS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/23/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 Fifth Avenue, Ste. 3165, NY, NY 10111. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AW2 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/26/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Office of Lawrence E. Fabian, Esq., 437 Fifth Avenue, Ste. 801, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RIVER TREE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/21/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 130 East End Ave., Apt. 4B/C, NY, NY 10028. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 245 FIFTH OWNER LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/23/11. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/15/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 3 Columbus Circle, Ste. 2300, NY, NY 10019. DE address of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PSAM LITERARY & FILM AGENCY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/30/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 E 28th St, Apt 3A, NY, NY 10016. LLC formed in DE on 4/22/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KARGMAN PRODUCTIONS,LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: KargmanProductions, LLC, c/o Bess Kargman, 1 Bank Street, #5K, New York, NY 10014. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 07/24 - 08/23/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SIMMONS HANLY CONROY LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/27/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in IL on 8/12/99. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. IL and principal business address: One Court St., Alton, IL 62002. Cert. of Org. filed with IL Sec. of State, 213 State Capitol, Springfield, IL 62756. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SMARTEDGENET LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/30/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 6509 Windcrest Dr., Ste. 500, Plano, TX 75024. LLC formed in DE on 10/6/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DEaddr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TIOGA AIR HEATERS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/26/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9201 International Pkwy., New Hope, MN 55428. LLC formed in DE on 6/20/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 141 LIVINGSTON OWNER LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/27/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/26/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to David Bistricer, c/o Clipper Equity, 4611 12th Ave., Ste. 1L, Brooklyn, NY 11219. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/10 - 08/14/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VERTO DIRECT OPPORTUNITY GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/19/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/22/14. Princ. office of LLC: 477 Madison Ave., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/10 - 08/14/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MAROON PEAK HOLDINGS LLC ORIGINALLY FILED AS 530 PARK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 56 Indigo Trail, Madison, CT 06443. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/10 - 08/14/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF G$POT MANAGEMENT LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/25/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 411 W. 14th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LLC formed in DE on 10/31/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/10 - 08/14/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GATEWAY GROWTH LLC Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of State on 6/30/14. Office Location: New York County. Secretary of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: Greenberg, Trager & Herbst, LLP, 767 Third Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, THAT THE NYC DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON Wednesday, July 30, 2014 AT 2:00 P.M. AT 66 JOHN STREET, 11TH FLOOR, ON A PETITION FOR ITM GARDEN, INC. TO CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN, AND OPERATE AN UNENCLOSED SIDEWALK CAFE AT 10 LITTLE WEST 12TH STREET IN THE BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN FOR A TERM OF FOUR YEARS. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 07/17 - 07/24/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GATEWAY GROWTH II LLC Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of State on 6/30/14. Office Location: New York County. Secretary of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: Greenberg, Trager & Herbst, LLP, 767 Third Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GATEWAY NYC II, LLC Articles of Organization filed with NY Secretary of State on 6/23/14. Office Location: New York County. Secretary of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: Greenberg, Trager & Herbst, LLP, 767 Third Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful act. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 SHATTAN ADVISORY SERVICES LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“SOS”) on May 29, 2014. LLC office is in NewYork County. SOS was designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SOS shall mail copy of any process served to 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 43rd Floor, New York, New York 10020. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful act or activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF EIGHT CONSTRUCTION GROUP (NY) LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/26/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/18/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, 787 Seventh Ave., NY, NY 10019. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St. #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BV70 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/25/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1285 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10019-6064. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROEBUCK MARKETPLACE ASSOCIATES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/20/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 324 Datura St., Ste. 102, W. Palm Beach, FL 33401. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rosenberg & Estis, P.C., Attn: Michael E. Lefkowitz Esq., 733Third Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 529 WEST 29TH HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/15/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/17 - 08/21/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROUNDSTONE CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Norman R. Berkowitz, Esq., Ballon Stoll Bader & Nadler, P.C., 729 Seventh Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE IRVINE AT GREENWICH, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/17/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 27 Bank St., Apt. 23, NY, NY 10014. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Cestone & Thompson, P.C., 85 Livingston Ave., Roseland, NJ 07068. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (DOMPROF.LLC) JEREMY L. GOLDSTEIN & ASSOCIATES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/28/14. Office loc.: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent of DOM-PROF. LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address SSNY shall mail copy of process to is 119 Old Church Rd., Greenwich, CT 06830. Mgmt. of the LLC shall be by the members. Purpose: To practice law. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 209W14 LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/18/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 3/11/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Adellco, 18 W. 27th St., NY, NY 10001, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

RESTORE REAL ESTATE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/13/2014. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Douglas B Eaton, 270 W. 22nd St. #8, NY, NY 10011. Reg Agent: Douglas B Eaton, 270 W. 22nd St. #8, NY, NY 10011. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 719 SEVENTH TIC 1 OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/10/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 4/9/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BROOKFIELD BPY PROPERTY HOLDINGS I LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State 6/24/14. Off. location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE 2/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 HOK 2 LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 6/4/14. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Lisa Lou, 95 Colon Ave., Staten Island, NY 10308. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 209W14 DEVELOPMENT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/23/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Adellco, 18 W. 27th St., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 7 E 96 LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/11/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 4/10/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 605 GREEN MEMBER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/11/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 4/10/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, THAT THE NYC DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON Wednesday, August 06, 2014 AT 2:00 P.M. AT 66 JOHN STREET, 11TH FLOOR, ON A PETITION FOR SEVENTH AVENUE TOMATO, INC. TO CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN, AND OPERATE AN UNENCLOSED SIDEWALK CAFE AT 209 SEVENTH AVENUE IN THE BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN FOR A TERM OF FOUR YEARS. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 07/17 - 07/24/2014

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NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 605 MEZZ FUNDING LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/11/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 4/10/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 635 MADISON FEE OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/31/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 3/27/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904, the princ off. addr. of LLC. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PACIFIC MULTI-STRATEGY RETURN FUND L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/13/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/3/14. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Sharon A. Cheever, 700 Newport Center Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660. DE address of LP: 160 Greentree Dr., St 101, Dover, DE 19904. Name/address of genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ATL MANAGEMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/26/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Broad St., Apt. 19F, NY, NY 10004. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MADISON DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/01. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o NAW - Goldfarb & Fleece, 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MORRIS AVENUE MASTER TENANT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/23/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Omni New York LLC, 885 Second Ave., 31st Fl., NY, NY 10017, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CERBERUS SWC LEVERED OPPORTUNITIES GP, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/19/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 6/13/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Seth P. Plattus, c/o Cerberus SWC Levered Opportunities GP, LLC, 875 3rd Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 07/03 - 08/07/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NEW YORK FORTUNE GROUP LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/03/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, 40 WALL STREET, 28TH FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF S GROUP MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/08/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF M. MARTIN NEW YORK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 515 Greenwich St., NY, NY 10013. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Alex Gaines at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CONSILIO SERVICES, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/09/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/23/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BNT HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Proskauer Rose LLP, Attn: Ivan Taback, Eleven Times Sq., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 3400 LAWSON BLVD LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/6/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Davis & Gilbert LLP, 1740 Broadway, NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WARBURG PINCUS XI (LEXINGTON) PARTNERS - A, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/16/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 4/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Warburg Pincus LLC, 450 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10017, Attn: General Counsel. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WARBURG PINCUS PRIVATE EQUITY (LEXINGTON) XI - A, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/16/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 4/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Warburg Pincus LLC, 450 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10017, Attn: General Counsel. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl.ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SOLENIS LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/30/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/30/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE and principal business address: 500 Hercules Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NAME OF LLC: RELEVANCE CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 6/6/14. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 06/26 - 07/31/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COMMUNITY NEWS GROUP, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 9, 2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Community News Group, LLC, 515 Canal Street Unit 1C, New York, NY 10013 Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014

July 24, 2014

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2011-3734/A - CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO: Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Isa Schott, Elaine Zarief, Ellen Zarief, Barrow Grove Associates, Inc., Consolidated Edison Company of N.Y. Inc., Atlantic City Electric, GreatCall, Inc. Citibank, NA, for Citi Mastercard account #5424180829832762, Lucy A. Sourial, MD, Discover Card, for account ending in 4238, Bank of America, for account #4313072084419517, SLR Diagnostic Radiology, Citibank, NA, for account #63065506, DIRECTV. To Ellen Zarief, whose whereabouts are unknown, if living, and if she died subsequent to the decedent herein, to her executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown; and to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Theodore Zarief, a/k/a Theodore L. Zarief, a/k/a Ted Zarief, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Theodore Zarief, a/k/a Theodore L. Zarief, a/k/a Ted Zarief, deceased, who at the time of his death was a resident of 77 Barrow Street, New York, New York 10014. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogate’s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on August 27, 2014, at 9:30 A.M. in Room 503, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially settled; (ii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedent’s unknown distributees; (iii) that the claim of Barrow Grove Associates, Inc. in the amount of $3,244.50 for rental expenses associated with decedent’s apartment for the period March 2011 through August 2011, be allowed and paid; (iv) that the claim of Consolidated Edison Company of N.Y. Inc. in the amount of $60.36, be allowed; (v) that the claim of Isa Schott, if any, for reimbursement of payment of decedent’s funeral expenses, be rejected for failure to file a claim in accordance with the provisions of SCPA Section 1803(1); (vi) that the claims of Atlantic City Electric in the amount of $477.69, Great Call, Inc. in the amount of $ 180.51, Citibank, NA, for Citi Mastercard account #5424180829832762 in the amount of $18,449.59, Lucy A. Sourial, MD in the amount of $71.19, Discover Card, for account ending in 4238 in the amount of $1,247.16, Bank of America, for account #4313072084419517 in the amount of $3,984.09, SLR Diagnostics in the amount of $22.08, Citibank, NA, for account #63065506 in the amount of $3,806.91, and DIRECTV in the amount of $249.70, be rejected for failure to file and/or substantiate a claim in accordance with the provisions of SCPA Section 1803(1); (vii) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedules C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (viii) that the persons above mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (ix) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (x) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. June 23, 2014 (Seal) Hon. Nora S. Anderson, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Chief Clerk. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 22 Cortlandt Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10007 (212) 896-3310 Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney-at-law appear for you and you or your attorney may request a copy of the full account from the petitioner or petitioner’s attorney.

Vil: 07/10 – 7/31/2014

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July 24, 2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2065 WALTON AVENUE MANAGING MEMBER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o B&B Supportive LLC, 419 Park Avenue South, 18th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEEN & KOZEK, LLC, A PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (PLLC). Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/4/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 150 Broadway, Ste. 1920, NY, NY 10038, principal business address. Purpose: practice law. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF THIRTEEN PARTNERS PRIVATE EQUITY 3 GP, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/27/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 830 3rd Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 6/17/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF TICO INVESTMENT VEHICLE IV, LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/3/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 5/14/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Madison Ave., 35th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/address of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 06/19 - 07/24/2014

Vil: 07/17  –  08/07/2014     Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY seeks Stage Manager for its Summer Street Theater, a Socially Conscious Operetta for the Street, “EMERGENCY.” Some Pay. This is a full-scale musical production which will tour all five boroughs of New York City in August and September. Entails managing Crew workers. Computer Literacy a must. Tech background a must. Works very closely with Director. Evening and Weekend hours a Must. Rehearsals July 15th through August 1st, 2014 6-10PM Weeknights, 1-6PM Weekends Performances: Weekends Only, 2pm, August 2nd - September 14th, except for 6:30pm performance Friday, August 15th . 13 Performances. No Performances Labor Day Weekend (AUG 30-31). Includes Friday Night Warmups each weekend before performances. (Thurs warmup 8/14). e-mail Resume and a brief cover letter to Crystal Field at info@theaterforthenewcity.net NO CALLS PLEASE!!!!

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

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Stritch woke us up, and brought down the house BY JERRY TALLMER

T

here was a time when the only thing I could tell you about Elaine Stritch was that she was a virgin perpetually on the verge. A professional virgin. You know, good, tall, clever, skinny Catholic girl out of Birmingham, Michigan. Goes with everybody (Marlon Brando, Ben Gazzara, etc.); sleeps with nobody. Well, maybe with Gazzara, her apartment mate, once in a while. Oh, and has a slight drinking problem. Then one day in 1970 there’s a

screening of the making of a cast recording of the Broadway show “Company,” with Sondheim and Prince and Furth and all the other big names sourly riding herd on Elaine Stritch attacking and re-attacking herself, and (the next day) bitterly re-re-attacking composer Sondheim’s ultra-cynical “The Ladies Who Lunch”; until she’d at last got it to suit not only Sondheim & Co. (& “Company”) but Stritch herself: Another long exhausting day Another thousand dollars A matinee, a Pinter play, Perhaps a piece of Mahler’s

Vivien Leone, heiress, arts patron VIVIEN LEONE, continued from p. 8

but added, “We could do with a lot more quirk and there was substance behind the quirkiness.” Leone was born Sept. 3, 1929, in Weehawken, N.J., the third daughter of an Italian immigrant father who worked for a time as a hatter on the Lower East Side, and an immigrant Russian Jewish mother. Her late parents went on to build a real estate empire — first managing buildings and then selling them throughout New Jersey. Ganz said Leone grew up “in a mansion” in Fort Lee on the Palisades. Leone, who spoke fluent Italian, lived and worked in Rome for several years and married Italian mime Carlo Mazzone Clemente, a Venetian, in 1956. The couple soon returned to the U.S. They were divorced in 1966. There was no formal death notice printed about Leone’s passing beyond two paragraphs in a blog written by Jacqueline Ceballos, past president of the New York City chapter of NOW (National Organization for Women) and the Veteran Feminists of America. Ceballos lauded Leone for her contributions to the “early movement” of second-wave feminism. Feminist author and activist Susan Brownmiller, who organized a widely reported 1970 demonstration at the Ladies’ Home Journal offices, recalled Leone’s presence at the sit-in and later reading Leone’s account of it. “I knew her and she wrote an interesting piece for a women’s newspaper,” Brownmiller said in a telephone interview. “It was charming and very insightful. She was somebody with a talent for writing and with very original ideas. But nothing came to fruition.” Leone held a number of jobs in broadcasting and publishing after she graduated from college, including a two-year stint in publicity at WMCA TheVillager.com

when she was trying to break into radio. She had a reporting gig in Rome for International News Service and spent three years writing short photo pieces for Photoplay in New York. She also contributed essays to the Village Voice, The Progressive and Off Our Backs. She’s listed in the 2006 directory “Feminists Who Changed America, 1963-1975,” edited by Barbara J. Love. Although Leone’s brother-in-law Scheiman called Leone’s Patchin Place digs “a hole in the wall,” and said three of her scooters had been stolen outside her doors, several friends said she was happy in her last apartment and reveled in the neighborhood’s literary history. “She loved it there,” said her former live-in caretaker Frank Garcia in an e-mail. Leone would be “looking out the windows every day as the world passed her by with tourists coming from all over to see Patchin Place,” he recalled. “She loved, in her own way, the people in her life and had a strong liking for dogs and horses. Before she vacated her apartment, she gave me some art that would remind me of her to put up in my place. When I walk into my house, the first thing I see is the [picture] of the six hounds, all with Italian names, that she had put up above her bed.” Besides Claudia Ganz and Fred Scheiman, Leone’s survivors include a nephew, Jeffrey Scheiman, of Toledo, Ohio. Ganz said her aunt’s body was cremated at the Greenwich Village Funeral Home, at 199 Bleecker St., and her ashes “scattered to the sea.” She said that people who wanted to honor her memory might consider making donations to poetry foundations or to shelters for dogs and horses. Reinholz met Vivien Leone in the 1970s while covering the women’s liberation movement as a columnist for the New York Daily News’ Sunday magazine.

Elaine Stritch in 1973.

I’ll drink to that, And one for Mahler! It of course also signified Stritch’s own battle cry of freedom from booze, or almost. In any event, she was now more and more the spokesperson for the walking wounded in everything she touched much less sang, at the Carlyle and everywhere else in the world. And she was always what Nora Ephron (and Nora’s screenwriting mother Phoebe Ephron) would have called “good copy.” There came an opportunity to interview her “in depth.” By telephone. Just call her at the Carlyle at midnight. That’s right, midnight. The Carlyle is where she lives. And, on occasion, performs. So I did that. Miss Elaine Stritch, please. And was put through. We got talking. “This Pennebaker thinks he knows more than he knows,” she said of the talented documentary filmmaker with whom she’d been working all day and most of the night. “But he’s learning.” Everybody in show business is a little saltier than everyone else, but Elaine Stritch, who went home to Michigan to die a year ago, was salt-

ier and smarter — and taller — than almost anyone else. Now she is gone for good, out there in Michigan, last Thursday, at 89. The Hotel Carlyle, Madison Avenue and 76th Street, is where she and Ben Gazzara had often crossed paths during the years, long after they’d shared beds. It was where she lived and often took the stage; where hard-working Gazzara hung out in a little lounge between bar and dining room, often only a few feet apart from one another, he and she reading and scribbling away on their separate concerns. Occasionally they would address one another, but only occasionally and tersely. Stritch had long since made a wry joke out of having dropped the dynamic Ben Gazzara from her life in favor of a tall, handsome — and oh yes, stud — movie star named Rock Hudson…“and we all know how that turned out.” She woke us up, and so did Ben Gazzara, now more than two years dead himself. All she had to do — he had to do — was walk out on stage — break into the goings on — bring down the house. A Stritch in time... Thank you, Elaine. Thank you, Ben… . July 24, 2014

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    

   

                                           



 

 

 

 











              



 

 

  

 

     

 

 

   



 

 

 



        

 





 



  

    

    

   

     

 

 

    

    

    



 

    

           

    

      

    

   



  



 

         

    

 

 

    



  



           

   

                                               

 

        28

July 24, 2014

TheVillager.com

JULY 24, 2014, THE VILLAGER  

JULY 24, 2014, THE VILLAGER

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