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Volume 82, Number 52 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

May 30 - June 5, 2013

Hudson Park will be getting power back this weekend BY LINCOLN ANDERSON Nearly a full seven months after Hurricane Sandy, the Hudson River Park is still struggling to restore electrical power to its Greenwich Village section. Speaking last week, a spokesperson for the Hudson River Park Trust told The Villager that the hope was that power would be restored by last Friday in time for the Memorial Day weekend.

Photo by Tequila Minsky

You can ring his bell: Mayor Bloomberg used a bicycle bell Monday to kick off Citi Bike, New York’s new bike-share program, as D.O.T. Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, behind him, beamed proudly.

And they’re off! Bike-share cycles finally hit the streets BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL New York started rolling along with other cosmopolitan cities worldwide last Monday with the launch of Citi Bike, the nation’s largest bike-share program. “We have the A train, and we have yellow cabs and we have the Staten

Island Ferry, and today, Citi Bike joins the ranks of the transportation icon family in New York City,” an ebullient Janette Sadik-Khan, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, said as she joined Mayor Bloomberg outside City Hall for the opening ceremony on Monday, Memorial Day.

CATS For MAYOR

“Citi Bike isn’t just a bike network,” she continued. “It’s New York City’s first new public transit system in more than 75 years.” “We now have an entirely new transportation network without spending

Continued on page 14

A message posted on the Trust’s Web site on Fri., May 24, said that the park had resumed operating under normal hours, from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. — though with exceptions. Yet, as of this Tuesday evening, much of the Village section remained in the dark. As a result, Park Enforcement Patrol officers

Continued on page 24

Quinn to children’s garden developer: Tear down this fence! BY SARAH FERGUSON Council Speaker Christine Quinn is calling on developer Serge Hoyda to remove the fence his workers erected in the middle of the Children’s Magical Garden on the Lower East Side two weeks ago. In a strongly worded letter co-authored with Councilmember Margaret Chin, Quinn said she was “very disappointed” in

Hoyda’s sudden move to fence off the portion of the garden owned by his development firm, Norfolk Development Corporation LLC. “We request that N.D.C. remove the fence, for you are not currently acting in the best interests of your local community,” their May 28 letter states.

Continued on page 16

JOHN CATSIMATIDIS FOR MAYOR A New Yorker for all New Yorkers

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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Your doctor spent 5 minutes? Photo by Sam Spokony

Musical garden get-together Another reason to call.

The Villager’s publisher, Jennifer Goodstein, above, second from left, added some color to a gathering for the Washington Square Music Festival on Sat., May 18, when the event’s supporters and organizers came together at the Jefferson Market Garden, on W. 10th St. between Sixth and Greenwich Aves., to benefit the fest and prepare to kick off its 55th year of free summer concerts in the park. Joining Goodstein were, from left, state Senator Brad Hoylman; Peggy Friedman, the music festival’s executive director; and Lutz Rath, the festival’s musical director. This year’s lineup, with performances on July 9, 16, 23 and 30, features a diverse mix of classical, avant-garde and African music, including the world’s first “toy piano virtuoso.”

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New Whitney right on track The Whitney Museum’s new Downtown building is fast rising on Gansevoort St. next to the High Line’s southern end, just east of the Hudson River Park. Designed by architect Renzo Piano, it is slated to open in 2015. The new building will include more than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor exhibition space on a series of rooftops facing the High Line. The building will also sport a huge space for temporary exhibitions — roughly 18,000 square feet — which will be the city’s largest column-free museum gallery.


May 30 - June 5, 2013

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Scoopy’s

notebook PUSHING PETROSINO BIKE BOYCOTT: It’s now clear that (somehow, not surprisingly) the epicenter of the bike-share backlash is centered in Soho’s tiny Petrosino Square. After discovering the location of Monday’s press conference for the program’s launch, three activists — Georgette Fleischer, Lora Tenenbaum and Carl Rosenstein — rushed down to the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge to hold up signs protesting the location of a bike station near Petrosino’s northern tip, where, they say, public art has been displayed since 1984. “Janette Sadik-Khan looked over at me twice,” Fleischer said of the Department of Transportation commissioner. “Also, Wolfson certainly noticed me,” she said of Howard Wolfson, the deputy mayor. “He was certainly kind of glaring at me — or looking at me in a very intent fashion.” After the remarks were over and Sadik-Khan and Wolfson were getting ready to roll off on their Citi Bikes, Fleischer managed to hand the D.O.T. commish a letter of protest, which was captured in the exclusive Jefferson Siegel photo, right. “She didn’t deign to speak to me. She didn’t deign to look at me,” Fleischer said. Well...at least she did take the letter. But the Soho activists aren’t stopping there. They’ve been asking bike-share riders who pull into the Petrosino rack, to boycott it until it’s moved to another location out of the park and in the street. If the riders have extra minutes left on their half-hour limit, the Petrosino posse are asking them to pedal to another nearby bike dock. However, Fleischer notes, “I actually moved away from the word ‘boycott’ when we got some negative reaction.” Call it what you want, but they’re making sure their message gets out. Meanwhile, bike-share supporters are doing their best to, well, make sure the message doesn’t get out — by ripping down the messages. Basically, she, Tenenbaum, Rosenstein and Pete Davies are constantly sticking protest fliers on all of the bikes, or on the empty docks, and then bike-share backers are pulling them all off. This goes on over and over again, repeatedly, throughout the day. Davies and Rosenstein collect petition signatures, while she and Tenenbuam do the talking to try to redirect the bikers elsewhere. Fleischer noted she had a “very unpleasant encounter” with a man who identified himself as a Citi Bike member and accused her of being a “vandal,” then snapped her photo. “I asked him what right he had to remove our protest literature,” Fleischer said she countered. The peeved Petrosino protector said some Transportation Alternatives reps have even dared to show up at the site to try to sign people up for the program. LIU-EEE, LIU-EEE, OH YEAH! The John Liu juggernaut just can’t be stopped, at least not in Downtown Manhattan’s political clubs. Wednesday night, despite a strong early lead by Bill de Blasio on the first ballot, Liu wound up winning the endorsement of Downtown Independent Democrats on the third ballot.

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Petrosino partisan Georgette Fleischer handed D.O.T. big wheel Janette Sadik-Khan a protest letter at Monday’s bike-share launch.

In the first round of voting, de Blasio got 26 votes to Liu’s 19. Late entry Anthony Weiner, well, just didn’t seem “up to it,” snagging only 4 votes. Yet he did top Christine Quinn, who only got 3 votes, and Sal Albanese, who garnered 2, while Bill Thompson got zero, which was 3 less than “No Endorsement” received. In the runoff, de Blasio and Liu tied. But on the third ballot (second runoff) Liu pulled ahead for the win, 18 to 13. In the public advocate race, Dan Squadron appeared to have won with more than 40 votes to Tish James’s 7 or so, with the other two candidates way behind, though the final count was being tallied as we were going to press. Julie Menin got D.I.D.’s nod for borough president, with 42 votes. Gale Brewer garnered 9, Jessica Lappin 1, Robert Jackson none and “No Endorsement” 3. In the race for City Council District 1, Jenifer Rajkumar totally crushed incumbent Margaret Chin, 39 to 16. D.I.D. endorsed Rosie Mendez for re-election overwhelmingly in District 2. In the hotly contested District 3 race, the club went for Corey Johnson, giving him 32 votes to Yetta Kurland’s 21, with zero for Alexander Meadows. Continuing the Liulapalooza landslide, District Leader John Quinn reported that the Lower East Side Democratic Club also endorsed Liu for mayor, and that they were joined by “all the tenant associations” from local public housing developments. Quinn and the tenant associations held a press conference in the Smith Houses to make the announcement. OPENS FLOODGATE OF COMPLAINTS: Tuesday evening, Community Board 3 voted to recommend denial of a liquor license for the planned new Soho House branch on the Lower East Side on Ludlow St. The vote, which is advisory only, was 25

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against the license versus 10 for it, with 2 abstentions. Before the vote, new C.B. 3 member Ayo Harrington spoke out strongly, not so much against the swank, membership-only club’s application — but against the Educational Alliance’s “swamp,” as she called it, on Avenue D. Soho House’s lawyer had referred to the settlement house as their “community partner in need of space,” which set Harrington off. She noted that for about six years, she and her neighbors have been struggling with the negative impact from standing water on the Educational Alliance’s stalled construction project at 27 Avenue D, east of Orchard Alley garden, between Third and Fourth Sts. Harrington even whipped out her smartphone to show her fellow board members a new photo of the still-waterlogged lot that she recently snapped as the warm weather is returning. “Trees were growing out of the concrete walls, the smell was rank and it looked like a green, murky swamp!” Harrington told us of her ongoing struggles with the adjacent plot last year. “We had to close the garden due to the resulting, horrendous onslaught of mosquitoes. After years of trying to be understanding and promises leading to no permanent resolution, we just couldn’t take it anymore and called in the media last year — after which the Department of Health agreed that the mosquito problem originated from the standing water on Educational Alliance’s lot. Last week I took another picture of several inches of water and called them again! It was that picture I felt reduced to showing around last night. Ironically, the lot was once part of Orchard Alley. We gave it up years ago when Educational Alliance asked us for it. We did so because we supported their plan to use it to increase residential bed space for their drug rehab program, Pride Site 2, located on the south side of the lot.”


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Photos by Tequila Minsky

Cronut craze has them craving in Soho (and Portland) Cronuts are the newest latest thing. People are lining up for before 7 a.m. outside Dominique Ansel Bakery, at 189 Spring St., near Thompson St., to get these scrumptious half-croissant / half-donuts, which sell out by 8:30 a.m. The delicacies debuted two weeks ago. Just to give a little taste: The “rose cronut� ($5) is filled with vanilla ganache, dusted with rose sugar and topped with rose glaze. Lora Woodruff, right, visiting from Portland, Oregon, came straight from the airport to Soho to start her Memorial Day trip to New York, waiting in line for more than an hour so she could buy cronuts. She snapped a photo of her haul to send home to her husband, then offered a cronut to a passing fellow who inquired about them, above.


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Two charged with assault as hate crime in Soho bash By Jefferson Siegel Two men accused of a gay-bashing incident in Soho appeared at their arraignments in Manhattan Criminal Court after 1 a.m. on Wed., May 22. The two were charged with assault as a hate crime after they allegedly punched a man in the face just after 5 a.m. on Tuesday morning May 21 on Broadway near Houston St. Assistant District Attorney Lauren Manso read the criminal complaint against both men. She said Fabian Ortiz, 32, called the victim a “gay fag” in Spanish as he put his arm around him. Defense lawyer Kira Treyvus, representing Ortiz, said he has a job as a dishwasher in a deli and has a 3-year-old child. Lawyer Bret J. Taylor said his client, Pedro Jimenez, 23, has been in the U.S. for four years and this was his first arrest. Jimenez lives with his brother in Brooklyn and is a full-time restaurant cook in Manhattan. Taylor said he took pictures of Jimenez’s hands and, even though he was accused of beating the victim, there were no discolorations or bruises on his hands, according to Taylor. Both lawyers discounted the claims of the victim, noting he was much taller than the two defendants. The accused men did not speak during the hearing. Judge Laura R. Johnson set bail for each man at $2,000 bond or $750 cash, and said if they make bail, they had to surrender their passports. They were remanded into custody.

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Fabian Ortiz, left, and Pedro Jimenez, right, at their arraignment last week, with their Spanish-language interpreter.

The alleged attack was one of a rash of recent gay-bashing incidents in Manhattan. The most serious came just

after midnight on Sat., May 18, when Elliot Morales, 33, allegedly uttered antigay epithets at Mark Carson, 32, before

shooting him in the face, killing him, just east of the corner of Eighth St. and Sixth Ave.

Not very generous

What a (gl)ass                                                                        

An unsuspecting woman asked a passerby for a cigarette — but the man and his friend responded by stealing her cell phone. It was around 4 a.m. Fri., May 24, when the woman, 23, reportedly approached Federico Gonzalez, 28, on the sidewalk of Little W. 12th St., between Washington St. and Ninth Ave., to bum a smoke. A witness to the incident told officers that, as the woman was speaking, Gonzalez snatched her iPhone out of her hand and turned to run away. When the victim tried to grab it back, Gonzalez’s buddy Travis Ford, 25, allegedly stepped in her way to block her, before Ford joined his crony and fled. But after the woman and the witness walked to the Sixth Precinct minutes later to report the crime and describe the suspects, police were able to catch the two suspects during a canvass of the area. Gonzalez and Ford were both charged with grand larceny, and Gonzalez was also slapped with a charge for unlawful possession of marijuana after cops found a bag of purported pot in his pants pocket.

Police arrested Christopher Garner, 21, around 3 a.m. on Sat., May 25, after officers on patrol witnessed him punching in the glass window of an entrance door to the residential building at 77 Christopher St. Amidst a pile of shattered glass, Garner was charged with criminal mischief.

Police BLOTTER ‘Stripped’ by muggers Police arrested four men after they allegedly mugged a teenage boy at knifepoint in the West Village early on Sat., May 25. The victim, 16, told officers that he was walking past the corner of Bedford and Christopher Sts. around 1:30 a.m. when the posse accosted him, beginning with Gregory Deloach, 22, who reportedly shoved the boy to the ground. According to the teen’s testimony, Troy Newton, 30, then stepped in and punched him in the face before Deloach told him to “strip.” The boy, fearing for his life, handed over his sneakers and jacket. Then, according to police, Luis Vasquez, 24, also demanded he give up his backpack. Finally, Benjamin Mazyck, 34, forced the teen to cough up his cell phone and the $45 from his pocket. According to the police report, Deloach then took a razor blade out of his sock, brandished it in front of the boy, and told him, “If you snitch, we’ll kill you and you won’t make it home to your mother.” But, once his alleged attackers had fled, the teen gathered up the courage to walk to the nearby Sixth Precinct to report the crime

and describe the suspects. Hours later, cops were able to round up all four thugs and recover the stolen goods during a canvass of the area. Deloach, Newton, Vasquez and Mazyck were all charged with robbery.

Hudson River punch Police arrested a teenager who allegedly attacked a woman, seemingly targeted at random, while she was walking in Hudson River Park early on Thurs., May 23. The woman, 24, told police she was passing through the park near the corner of Christopher and West Sts. around 1:30 a.m. — a half hour after the park’s curfew — when a man, later identified as Jonte Smith, 17, walked up to her, punched her in the face multiple times and fled on foot. She immediately called the police to report the incident and describe her attacker, and was shortly afterward taken to Beth Israel Hospital for treatment of minor injuries. Within hours, Smith was apprehended near the corner of W. Fourth St. and Sixth Ave. during a police canvass. He was charged with assault.

Monkey business Witnesses said they saw Sadou Diallo, 20, sticking his hands in and around the pants pockets of multiple patrons at Brass Monkey, the bar at 55 Little W. 12th St., early on Sat., May 25. Around 4 a.m., one of them got fed up and called the police, who responded within minutes to cuff the would-be thief before he could succeed in snatching a wallet or cell phone. Diallo was charged with jostling.

Sam Spokony


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Giving the public a real say on NYCHA infill plan TALKING POINT By Brad Hoylman and Brian Kavanagh Leasing off the basketball courts of lowincome New Yorkers to build luxury apartments might sound extreme, but that’s among the proposals by the New York City Housing Authority to raise revenue. Earlier this year, NYCHA announced it was targeting 14 sites, including parking lots, playgrounds and even a community center, in eight Manhattan public housing developments for so-called “infill development,” in order to raise about $50 million annually and help close gaps in its capital budget. Subject only to the approval of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the authority plans to lease the sites to private developers for the construction of new high-rise apartment towers in which 80 percent of the units would be market rate. There’s no doubt that NYCHA is in financial trouble. The authority predicts that its unmet capital needs will more than double to $13.4 billion over the next five years. Its operations budget has been underfunded by $750 million in the past decade. And we’re already seeing the effects — in staff layoffs, youth and community center closures, and multi-year lag times in critical apartment repairs. Residents regularly call our offices seeking help in cutting through red tape on maintenance requests; certainly

NYCHA needs to manage its resources better and expedite critical repairs, but there’s no denying that money plays a role in these issues. Is the infill plan the best option for ameliorating NYCHA’s financial problems? It certainly isn’t the only option. Currently, the city requires NYCHA to pay $100 million a year for police, sanitation and property taxes that are not imposed on other public agencies or low-income housing providers. Whether or not infill development goes forward, these payments — twice the amount of revenue the proposed infill might generate

housing authority’s dire need for cash. NYCHA officials have also made informal promises to residents of affected developments that revenue collected from infill development would be used to make repairs to their developments before being allocated to public housing in other parts of the city, though no funding ratio has been defined. There have also been promising ideas about improving security and energy resiliency for residents — an issue that especially resonates on the Sandy-ravaged Lower East Side — but again, there are as yet no details available

Any disposition of the housing authority’s land or buildings should undergo the city’s ULURP review. — should be eliminated. And on its own terms, the infill development plan raises many questions that have yet to be answered. Since the beginning of the year, NYCHA officials have met with elected officials, tenant associations and the broader public to pitch the proposal. But these pitches have been scant on details and heavy on emotional appeals. Rather than discussing specifics about the proposed new residential towers, the presentations have focused primarily on the

about how this would be accomplished. What’s missing in the infill process is a public forum in which fundamental questions can be addressed and authoritatively answered. Do New Yorkers believe that infill development with mostly market-rate housing is the best use of scarce public land? Would public housing residents, and New York as a whole, get the best possible deal under current plans? What would be required of developers to ensure that any new residential towers are designed with the concerns of the surrounding communities in mind? Even if we conclude infill can go forward at some sites, which ones make sense and with what conditions or limitations? Residents have alternately crowded into community rooms seeking answers at so-called “engagement meetings” and boycotted these same meetings upon hearing from others that the authority isn’t approaching them as honest brokers truly interested in resident input. Many have complained that direct questions to the housing authority have either been ignored or — worse — challenged. For example, one NYCHA official responded to a question at a recent Campos Plaza meeting with this retort: “Come up with a better idea or shut up.” We have suggested improvements to this process, such as it is, and NYCHA has accepted some of them. And the Assembly and the City Council have both held public hearings that have been informative. But here’s a big idea for NYCHA: Subject the infill plan to New York City’s formal land use review process, which ensures transparency and accountability and results in proposals that are better for both developers and the communities in which they build — if and when projects are approved. The Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) includes many checks and balances for major land use actions, including environmental impact studies, a formal role for community boards, the borough president and the City Planning Commission, and a binding decision by the City Council approving or disapproving each project. In fact, any redevelopment of public land owned by a city agency is already subject to ULURP. But because NYCHA is not technically a city agency — it

was created by state law — the authority is not currently bound by the same requirement. That is why we are sponsoring the “NYCHA Real Property Public Review Act,” which would require that any disposition of land or buildings by NYCHA be subject to ULURP. With the leadership of Assembly prime sponsor and Housing Committee Chairperson Keith Wright, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and Council Public Housing Committee Chairperson Rosie Mendez, and the support of other local officials who have played an active role in the infill debate, like state Senator Daniel Squadron and Councilmember Margaret Chin, this legislation would help ensure that residents of public housing and surrounding communities can help shape the future of their neighborhoods through a fair and transparent process. With both clear timelines and requisite opportunities for public input, ULURP would provide the authority with a clear and welltrodden path for community engagement from the ground up. The ULURP process will also enable public housing residents to avail themselves of the same community planning resources that residents of private housing use to evaluate and weigh in on major land use actions. It will bring NYCHA in line with other mayoral agencies, and ensure that the City Council has binding authority in this extremely consequential privatization of publicly owned land. The need for this legislation is clear. According to an August 2008 report by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer entitled, “Land Rich, Pocket Poor,” there are 30.5 million square feet of unused development rights in NYCHA developments throughout Manhattan alone. In other words, there might not be any plan for infill development in your backyard yet, but with all those unused air rights, such a plan may not be too far off. With 630,000 public housing residents and Section 8 recipients, NYCHA is the largest public housing authority in the country and the largest landlord in New York City; it is also one of the oldest, with some buildings nearing 80 years old. To serve all of these people, and maintain these aging buildings, there’s no question that NYCHA needs more money. But it also needs the support of residents, and the partnership of their communities, to tackle the challenges of preserving and expanding affordable housing in the 21st century. Infill development has the potential to generate some revenue to pay for long-overdue capital projects — but at what cost to NYCHA’s relationship with its residents and neighborhood stakeholders? NYCHA will only score a win for the communities it serves by giving them a say and adhering to the standard public review process required of every other developer in the city. It’s about more than just basketball courts, playgrounds and community centers. The integrity of community-based planning is at stake. Hoylman is state senator for the 27th District; Kavanagh is assemblymember for the 74th District


May 30 - June 5, 2013

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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Yes, make bones about it: Grave moment for church BY LINCOLN ANDERSON Last Wed., May 22, East Village community members and local preservation groups, in a bid to stop the demolition of Mary Help of Christians Church, called for a full archaeological review of the site. A Catholic cemetery was once located there, with possibly as many as 41,000 people’s remains, they noted. Joining the rally, outside the shuttered church at E. 12th St. west of Avenue A, were representatives of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative, the Historic Districts Council and the East Village Community Coalition. The historic house of worship was made famous by Allen Ginsberg, who lived across the street from it and referred to it in his poetry. The property — including its spacious blacktop yard stretching down to 11th St. along Avenue A — was recently purchased by developer Douglas Steiner. Demolition permits have been issued for the church, its 150-year-old rectory and its 90-year-old school building. The opponents note that the site’s large, blacktop yard “would allow a great deal of space for new development without demolishing any of the historic buildings.” Thus far, however, the developer has refused to consider reuse of the historic buildings. While a 2008 rezoning that community groups fought for prevents a high-rise from being developed on this site, the current plans would replace all the buildings with new luxury

Andrew Berman, executive director of G.V.S.H.P., at right, speaking at the May 22 rally outside Mary Help of Christians Church.

residential development and retail space. The church was formerly the site of the cemetery of Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral, where thousands of people were buried starting in the early 19th century following the Asian cholera outbreak of 1832. This was only the third — and at the time the largest — Catholic cemetery in New York. While the graveyard was moved to Calvary Cemetery in Queens in 1909, it is not known

if all remains were removed and cleared from the site or if some still lie in burial underneath, the preservationists contend. Records only state that 3,000 to 5,000 people’s remains were relocated. They recently wrote to Steiner, as well as the Department of Buildings and the Landmarks Preservation Commission, calling for a complete archaeological evaluation of the site, “as required by law,” in such cases

before any work proceeds, to prevent disturbance of any burial site or human remains that may still be there. “It would be a tragic waste and shame if these beautiful buildings, so full of New York’s history, were demolished for expediency’s sake,” said Andrew Berman, G.V.S.H.P. executive director. “Their rich and intricate architecture cannot be duplicated, and would only be replaced by something much less distinctive and precious. A smart developer would recognize that by preserving and reusing these historic buildings, and building on the large adjacent yard, he would not only be doing a good deed, but creating an infinitely more unique and valuable development than simply bulldozing the entire site and starting anew.” Said Sara Romanoski, managing director of the East Village Community Coalition, “The church buildings are a testament to the Italian immigrant legacy in New York City and remain living monuments. As a community, we ask the developer to recognize the opportunity for incorporating these architecturally significant buildings into the new development.” Spokesperson Lisi de Bourbon told The Villager, “The Landmarks Preservation Commission has no jurisdiction over this site, and cannot require any parties to conduct archaeology. However, we have shared a list of accredited archaeologists with the site’s owner in order to assist in any effort to conduct an archaeological study in advance of starting work at the site.”


May 30 - June 5, 2013

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Carrots, sticks, air conditioning and N.Y.U. 2031 TALKING POINT By Martin Tessler Recently, The Villager reported on Councilmember Margaret Chin’s announcement about the tenancy of some of the “community facility” space that New York University promised as a condition of getting Council approval of the NYU 2031 Plan. The article happily spoke about Creative Steps Playgroup partnering with University Settlement to be able to grow and have more space for our neighborhood’s early-education needs, and Visiting Neighbors — one of our community’s beloved senior service organizations — getting some space as well. One community member asked whether these were carrots tossed at us to make the N.Y.U. 2031 plan more palatable before the backhoes and pile drivers destroy our community. Sadly, there really aren’t even any carrots here — just spin. This space is at below-market rent, but not free. This is the “giveback-for-pay” N.Y.U. needed to get Council approval. Twenty-five thousand square feet in the to-be-built building at the current Morton Williams supermarket site; 6,000 square feet in Washington Square Village; and about 7,000 in the proposed “Zipper Building” on Mercer St. Stack that against almost 2 million square feet of approved new buildings, and it comes up virtually infinitesimal. Less than 2 percent for the community — and the nonprofits still have to pay for it! If the numbers above are correct, this is also an admission that a public school — the one thing N.Y.U. has been promising the community for decades — will not be built. The school on the Morton Williams site was to be 100,000 square feet. The city’s School Construction Authority has until the end of 2014 to state whether it has the need and funding to build this school, but the inclusion of 25,000 square feet in Councilmember Chin's release shows that she does not expect the school either. Is she hoping we’ll all forget that a school was part of the original promises secured to make the 2031 plan slightly less egregious — not to mention all the other times a school was promised in exchange for prior N.Y.U. projects and not delivered? Creative Steps Playgroup used to pay no rent as a guest of the Washington Square Village Tenants Association, which has had use of space at no cost since its formation. This facility is a benefit to our neighborhood, which desperately needs early childcare — and more now since the closing of the Children’s Aid Society in our area. The good news is that University Settlement is coming in as a partner so Creative Steps can grow. Perhaps they will help Creative Steps pay N.Y.U. what the daycare center never had to pay before. Yes, the rent, we are told, is well below market rates in our very expensive neighborhood, and the expanded daycare will have more space. But below-market is still not the same as free.

This “gift we pay for” doesn’t even begin to mitigate the damage the N.Y.U. 2031 plan will do to Greenwich Village. But that’s O.K. — just turn on your air conditioner (whether it’s hot or not) and you won’t notice a thing… . Councilmember Chin’s recent campaign speeches, especially when questioned about N.Y.U. 2031, feature the fact that 505 LaGuardia Place residents got a very affordable price on the building’s land lease — which could otherwise have reset to a huge number thanks to the revaluation of the land Chin helped N.Y.U. get rezoned from residential to commercial. Saving affordable housing is laudable. But 505 LaGuardia’s land lease was not part of N.Y.U. 2031. This Mitchell-Lama income-limited building’s land lease cost was somehow added into the expansion plan negotiations, with N.Y.U. aware that Councilmember Chin’s dedication to 174 units of affordable

 

housing was a priority despite the thousands of other superblock and adjacent families that would be directly affected by N.Y.U. 2031, and the more widespread effects of the destruction of a historic, residential neighborhood. In addition, 505 LaGuardia had excellent attorneys and other elected officials fighting this battle on their behalf, so it is unclear how much of this victory is the councilmember’s to claim. So our beloved community organizations get to pay N.Y.U. for the carrots, and we get the sticks. And steel. And concrete. We also lose our city-owned parkland and our light and air and gardens, and instead get decades of a toxic environment, and vermin, and congestion, and air conditioning. Tessler is co-chairperson, Community Action Alliance on N.Y.U. 2031

63rd Annual Feast Day and Street Procession in honor of

Saint Anthony of Padua Thursday, June 13, 2013

Shrine Church of St. Anthony of Padua West Houston and Sullivan Streets New York NY 10012 Phone 212-777-2755 www.stanthonynyc.org

   

   

Thursday,  June  13   Feastday  of     Saint  Anthony  of  Padua  

                                             Mass  Schedule:   9  AM  (English)      11  AM  (English)   2  PM  (Italian)                      4  PM  (French)   6:00  PM  (English)  Solemn  Mass  followed  by   Street  Procession      

         

 

ITALIAN FOOD FESTIVAL

Saturday, June 8 Sunday, June 9 Thursday, June 13 ALL DAY

St.  Anthony’s  Bread  and  Oil  will  be  available  in  the  vestibule  of  the  church  each  day  of  the   Novena  beginning  June  5.    Religious  articles  and  refreshments  in  the  Church  Hall  on    June  8,9,  and  13  

NOVENA  IN  HONOR  OF  ST.  ANTHONY-­‐  JUNE  5-­‐13  

325 W. 14th Street New York, NY 10014 (between 8th & 9th Avenues)

(212) 242-1456 www.reddenfuneralhome.net NY State law mandates that funeral trust funds for Medicaid recipients pay for funeral & burial only. These contracts are irrevocable.

 


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

editoRiAl

Seeing the light More than half a year after Hurricane Sandy’s surge deluged Hudson River Park, the park’s Village section is finally poised to get its electricity restored, so its lights can be turned back on. This will allow this park section and its three piers to remain open once again after dusk and until the 1 a.m. curfew. The power was back in the Village section briefly last week, but a brownout knocked it out again. As Madelyn Wils, the Hudson River Park’s president, explained, the task of restoring power has been daunting. At Pier 40, the Trust is using a temporary transformer to replace the one Sandy ruined. This interim equipment, in turn, will be replaced by a permanent one in about three weeks. It’s just one of numerous transformers in the park. In addition, the Trust will raise the new Pier 40 transformer, and has been raising all the park’s electrical plates and panels, outlet plugs and the like, above the flood plain. Where this can’t be done, the infrastructure is being encased in waterproof boxes. This all takes time, Wils said. The park suffered $20 million in damage from the storm, according to the Trust president. She said the Trust reached out for post-Sandy recovery funds, deciding, as she put it, to “be our own master” and make its own applications for FEMA money, as opposed to going through the city or state. This way is faster, Wils said. We told Wils the park’s Chelsea section actually had its lights on Tuesday evening, yet was closed at 11:30 p.m. when we went by. She said she’d make a call about it right away. In short, getting the park’s power has been a difficult work in progress. But now that the warm weather is here, the timing couldn’t be better to reopen the park once again in the evenings. Fortunately, the time the park was closed evenings was mostly off season, so to speak. Sandy was a disaster, but the one consolation is the park will be far better equipped to handle future storm surges. It will be wonderful to have it back open in the evenings.

After the rollout… The app doesn’t work, there are problems at the racks, the bikes are heavy…etc., etc., etc. Despite the (predictable) glitches, it was inspiring to see riders out Memorial Day giving the new bike-share cycles a spin. It may take awhile before we know if the bike-share program turns out to be a good idea, but we can say right now with confidence that it is an experiment well worth making. Mayor Bloomberg and his bike-loving Transportation commissioner, Janette Sadik-Khan, deserve credit for ignoring the risks and making Citi Bike happen. Bike-share has the potential to make the city a much more livable place — particularly for younger New Yorkers crammed into apartments without room for a bicycle, and without a lower-cost way to get to work. Lower Manhattan, with its poor east-west public transportation connections, is also a probable beneficiary. We do sympathize with the complaints about particular bike rack locations. In many cases, they were placed with far too little community consultation. We are pleased to see a few adjustments have already been made. But we’re going to try and keep our eyes on the road ahead, understanding we may have to backtrack once or twice to keep going in the right direction. Real change is not made overnight.

letteRS to the editoR Clarifications on new conservancy To The Editor: We are Village residents who have joined together to support the Parks Department in its maintenance of Washington Square Park. We’ve heard rumors circulating, so we’d like to clarify a few things. Over the past months we met with Parks, community leaders and neighbors to discuss this idea, all of whom encouraged us to proceed. Our group is called the Washington Square Park Conservancy, which may surprise some people. Frankly, it surprised us, too, but other appropriate names were taken. And “conservancy” is just a word that “friends” groups adopt to indicate they raise funds to support parks. We envision an organization with broad representation, reflecting longstanding Village ties and passion for the park. We have no formal agreement with the city. Jurisdiction over all activities in Washington Square Park — including setting policies, permitting events and managing staff — will remain with Parks. Our mission is simple: Keep Washington Square Park clean, safe and beautiful. Our goal is to provide volunteer support and funds for maintenance and plantings. City budgets wax and wane. A committed group of neighbors can help smooth out these cycles. We have already provided funding for a summer playground associate to organize children’s activities. We’d like to raise funds for late-evening maintenance staff. Beyond that, we want to be responsive to our community’s priorities. We look forward to working together to help keep Washington Square Park enjoyable for all. Elizabeth Ely Veronica Bulgari Gwen Evans Justine Leguizamo Founding board members, Washington Square Park Conservancy

Silver should step down To The Editor: I strongly believe that Sheldon Silver should resign as Assembly speaker. Any reasonable view of the affair demonstrates a coverup. His staff was engaged in a coverup, the limited scope of the Ethics Committee’s review (the fact that they could not explore the speaker’s staff) smells like a coverup, and the efforts to censor the report and remove the

negative references to Silver smells like a coverup. I am the father of three daughters. I expect our elected officials to steadfastly protect young women who work in their ranks, and to generally protect women who are harassed. I am disappointed that Assemblymember Deborah Glick — who has so much to say about residential projects in or near Hudson River Park — isn’t leading the righteous charge to have Silver step down. Arthur Schwartz Schwartz is Democratic State Committeeman, 66th Assembly District

Dorm protest is just hot air To The Editor: Re “Dormitory foes warn Cooper: Don’t get in bed with Singer!” (news article, May 16): If the elected officials really wanted to help the community they would be rewriting the law so that a dorm is not a “community use,” because really — it’s not! Just by definition a dorm is for people who come from some other community. Marching and speeches are fine, but they will not prevent this from happening again and again in the Village. In fact, elected folks love it when we protest, because they think this gets it our of our system, and then they can say we were heard (just not responded to). Laws must be amended. Anything less from the elected leaders is just posing for votes. After they win re-election, they will care little if the neighborhood gets screwed. Ralph Lewis

The ‘Rapture’ is still there To The Editor: Re “Forget the couture, ‘Just Chaos’ puts focus on punks” (news article, May 23): Debbie looks terrific! I have some great photos of her back in the day from when I shot for Rolling Stone and she is just as naturally sexy now as she was then. Excuse me. I am going to do some sit-ups now. Lawrence White

Continued on page 12

iRA blutReich

I.R.S.: Incompetent Right-wing-probing Snoops.


May 30 - June 5, 2013

11

Theft of Apple devices drove Big Apple crime spike tAlkinG point BY GREG BEATO During the last 20 years, law enforcement officials, criminologists, journalists and other cultural observers have attempted to solve the mystery of the nation’s declining crime rates. Was the post-1990 drop in murders and other serious crimes due to new police tactics that concentrated resources in unsafe neighborhoods? Maybe. Was it longer prison sentences? The waning crack trade? Increased availability of abortions? Maybe, possibly, perhaps. Bucking the trend, New York City in 2012 experienced its first overall increase in major crimes in 20 years. But this time, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Ray Kelly have decisively fingered the culprit: It was Steve Jobs. Or, rather, the devices Apple produced under his watch. According to New York Police Department statistics, there were 3,484 more major crimes in 2012 than there were in 2011. (These numbers compare the first 51 weeks of each year.) The rise in the total number of Apple-related thefts — which occurred during burglaries, robberies and grand larcenies — exceeded that number. (The N.Y.P.D. keeps track of seven categories of crime that it deems “major.” They are murder, rape, robbery, felony assault, burglary, grand larceny and grand larceny auto. It keeps track of three categories of crime that it deems “minor.” They are petit larceny, misdemeanor assault and misdemeanor sex crimes.) “If you took out thefts of Apple products — not Galaxies, Samsungs — just Apple products, our total [major] crime rate would be lower than it was last year,” Bloomberg told the New York Post. Presumably New York City’s criminals are snapping up iPods, iPhones and iPads not because they prefer Apple’s battery-life management over that of its competitors but because the resale market for Apple devices is robust and predictable. According to The Wall Street Journal, high tariffs in countries like Brazil can drive up the price of a new entry-level iPhone 4s to $1,000, so used ones go for as much as $400 there. Here in the U.S., secondhand dealers buying in bulk on craigslist pay as much as $500 for a used iPhone 5. Demand is strong. Resale prices are high. There are millions of iPhones out there, but unlike so many other products in our age of plenty, they have not yet become too abundant to steal.

With other brands, theft is an iffier proposition. That snatchable, seven-inch, non-Apple tablet could have an initial retail price anywhere between $99 and $499, and there may not be much of a secondhand market. This magnifies crime’s inherent risks: No one wants to be the chump who earns a stretch in the Big House for strong-arming some cheapskate out of what upon closer inspection turns out to be a Nook Simple Touch. Can New York City's Apple-picking epidemic tell us something about crime in general? Most theories about America’s long-term crime trends share a common characteristic: They attribute the drop to some factor that has depleted the nation’s supply of criminals. One theory, for example, holds that because individuals between the ages of 15 and 24 tend to commit crimes at higher rates than people in other age groups, crime started dropping when the country’s median age began to rise, thus leaving fewer young people per capita to commit crimes. Another theory stresses the correlation between crime and high levels of lead in the bloodstream. When

The N.Y.P.D. recorded just 86 Apple-related crimes in all of 2002. leaded gas was banned, this theory suggests, childhood exposure to high lead emissions began to drop as well, which eventually led to fewer adults with the sort of neurological damage that is associated with criminal behavior. None of the major crime hypotheses pays much attention to the ways in which the material landscape of America has changed. Yet such changes obviously have at least some impact on crime. Car theft wasn’t a problem until cars were invented. Apple theft barely existed in New York City a decade ago; according to Ray Kelly, the Police Department recorded just 86 Applerelated crimes in all of 2002. Since then, the company has made its products so portable they’re nearly ubiquitous in public, thus prompting New York City’s criminals to thug different. (On a more positive note, subway thefts involving boom boxes, Sony Walkmen and evening editions of the New York Post are doubtlessly on

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the wane.) But if a new, highly desirable product can lead to a dramatic increase in crime, perhaps the opposite is true as well. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “There was a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States from 1990 through 2010,” exactly the same time in which the country began to experience a dramatic decrease in crime rates. Like the drop in crime, the rise in obesity has provoked many hypotheses but few definitive answers. One credible notion, however, is that waistlines have grown out of increasing affluence and abundance. Food got cheaper and far more accessible. Entertainment options and labor-saving devices proliferated. Life got easier, more convenient, and in many ways, far more pleasurable — so much so that we tend to opt for seconds of everything (more pizza, more video games, more social networking) as long as it doesn’t require much exertion. Think about the ways life has changed since 1990, and specifically about the ways these changes affect young men, who historically have been the cohort most likely to commit crimes. TV sports programming has expanded exponentially. Video games have become far more plentiful and immersive. Hip-hop evolved into a multibillion-dollar lifestyle industry encompassing music, fashion and more. The Internet provided free universal porn. The rise of big-box retailers like Walmart and Target made a wide range of goods increasingly affordable. Given that millions of well-paying jobs in the manufacturing and construction sectors have been lost during the last 20 years, and that this loss has its greatest impact on the prospects of young men, these consolations may seem meager. Yet look at how young men are expressing their discontent. Murder rates have dropped. Rape rates have dropped. Property crimes have dropped. Maybe this is all because of lower lead levels. Or maybe, in the same way that technologically driven abundance has made us fatter, it has also made us more content, giving us more opportunities for self-expression, more opportunities to develop meaningful social connections, and more material goods that are so easily obtainable that they blunt the economic imperatives of crime. Consider what’s happening in New York City with all those non-Apple devices. Physically, they’re no harder to steal than Apples, and there are plenty of them to be found on New York subways. Yet because many non-Apple devices are

PUBLISHER Jennifer Goodstein EDITOR IN CHIEF Lincoln Anderson ARTS EDITOR Scott Stiffler PUBLISHER EMERITUS John W. Sutter

so inexpensive, they are relatively easy to replace (or perhaps easy to live without), undermining the gadgets’ value from the thief’s perspective. So even as these items proliferate, the rate at which they get stolen is actually dropping. Apple, meanwhile, is an ironic outlier. The creative tools with which it equipped the world’s designers, developers and media producers played a crucial role in enabling our new world of super-affordable material wealth. Yet despite the increasing ubiquity of iPhones and iPads, worldwide demand for these products remains so strong that they’re still not universally accessible. As a result, they’re still worth stealing. Of course, if theft of Apple devices increases so much that their air of exclusivity begins to seem like a design flaw, a solution is readily at hand. By flooding the market with bargain-bin iPhone knockoffs, the company could instantly protect its marquee products in ways that antitheft apps like “Find My iPhone” would be hardpressed to match. In the end, abundance is the most powerful form of security.

VeRSe AFTER THE CHEESE STORE CLOSED By Jane Heil We walk down Sullivan Street daily Going to Local, our home away from home. And on the way we pass What used, for eighty years, To be the cheesemaking store With the guys making fresh fresh mozzarella in the basement. It closed two weeks ago And we still smell the smoke, the scent, of mozzarella And smoked mozzarella. It was one of the things that made the neighborhood stand out: The thousands of hungry Italian immigrants who ate it, And then the hippies, And then the bankers. We all smelled this heavenly perfume of Soho And Sullivan Street.

SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING Francesco Regini

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Troy Masters

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.

RETAIL ADVERTISING MANAGER Colin Gregory

SENIOR DESIGNER Michael Shirey

CONTRIBUTORS

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Allison Greaker Julius Harrison Alex Morris Julio Tumbaco Andrew Regier

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Arnold Rozon PHOTOGRAPHERS Tequila Minsky Jefferson Siegel Clayton Patterson

Terese Loeb Kreuzer

Marvin Rock Ira Blutreich Patricia Fieldsteel Bonnie Rosenstock Jefferson Siegel Jerry Tallmer


12

May 30 - June 5, 2013

letters to the editor Gloria had grace

Continued from page 10

Radon reaction is ‘just ignorant’ To The Editor: Re “Spectra pipeline radon fear starting to catch fire” (news article, May 23): Basements in parts of the country have continuous and serious levels of naturally occurring radon isotope Rn222 that is an alpha emitter, has a half-life of 3.8 days and has been linked to an increase in lung cancer rates. These homeowners live day in and day out for dozens of years in a condition where the radon is constantly entering their home and, most importantly, they breathe it into their lungs, which is the only way it can harm you before a statistical significance of lung cancer can be attributed to the radioactive gas. Comparing that condition to the trace amounts that will be part of the natural gas delivered in a steel pipe that blocks alpha particles, as does air and skin, never to be inhaled in you home, is just ignorant. Unfortunately, the well-meaning devotees of so-called environmental protection reach for their torches once again. Michael Bernstein

To The Editor: Re “Gloria Harris, 51, community assistant at Village’s Board 2” (obituary, May 23): The residents of Washington Square Village express their sympathies to Gloria’s family and the Community Board 2 family. She was dedicated, devoted and always helpful, and handled a very hard job with grace. We will miss her and her smile Judith Chazen Walsh

Condos, bike-share... No! To The Editor: Re “D.O.T. backpedals, removes Renwick rack in Hudson Sq.” (news article, May 23): This morning, the Citi Bike racks that were removed from Renwick St. were resited in Soho Square, on Spring St. and Sixth Ave. This was despite the statement by Margaret Forgione, Department of Transportation Manhattan borough commissioner, that they “would not be re-sited anywhere in the area.” In my New York, the sidewalk is for 8-year-olds on trikes, and not the heavy bicycle traffic that is being shoved down our throats by the Bloomberg administration.

Who gave them the right to this wanton takeover of our streets? This disaster will not reduce vehicular traffic, and will in fact increase it. And it will hurt the income of the M.T.A., and poor taxicab drivers. (I’ve still got my hack license!) Furthermore, the healthy inclination to walk will be greatly inhibited. The Avenue of the Americas is used as a highway by every doofus imaginable, and woe unto anyone a little too old, or a little too slow of foot to jump out of the path of danger. The handicapped, those who are escorting a toddler, or an elderly parent can now enjoy the whoosh of inept city planning as it brushes brutally by. And oh, what fun the drunks will have when they get out of the bars and the clubs! “City share”? What else is left of my city to share? The sky is being removed by the Hudson Square rezoning, and God’s Love We Deliver’s broken covenant, which will allow an enormous condo for those who can afford $3 million apartments. And now we can “share” our city sidewalk with thousands of bicycles! As I look out of my window and watch the bank that gave the world the credit default swap taking over Soho Square, I sadly realize that it will no longer be possible to enjoy our greatest pleasure as New Yorkers — the ability to take a nice walk. Indeed, if the personal space required to walk on the sidewalk or see the sky is no longer respected, the very civil fabric of our city will be gone. We will be reduced to digital cavemen — Darwinian class competitors, hunkered down in pricey little glass boxes with digital clubs and flat-screens, chanting, “More condos! More condos!” Fare thee well, bel mondo! Can I offer you a Trump condo? When I came here, what is now “Soho” might rightfully have been called, “So What”? Soon we will have to call it, “Oh No!” Harry Pincus

So we get rejected rack? To The Editor: Re “D.O.T. backpedals, removes Renwick rack in Hudson Sq.” (news article, May 23): We already have a set of racks on MacDougal and Prince Sts., just a block north from these additional racks. We need our extremely limited park space for neighborhood R&R, not just for tourism. These racks from Renwick St. should not have been re-sited in Soho Square, anyway, based on the promise made by Commissioner Forgione, since it is only one block away from Hudson Square. Please place these bike racks in another location that does not inundate the tiny streets of this part of the city with drunken, two-wheeled weekend tourists and other non-local bike riders. Susan Freel

Much griping, little listening To The Editor: Re “Bike-share sites could have been a winwin, but alas” (talking point, by David Gruber and Corey Johnson, May 23): There will almost certainly be valid concerns that are raised by any new program of large size introduced in New York City. That said, most of the concerns I’m hearing voiced about this program involve airing out petty gripes and engaging in wild speculation, and a critical component of this exchange is missing: listening The Department of Transportation’s efforts at P.R., across the board, are as puzzling as they are incompetent and incomplete. But that is a problem that does not extend to the staff of the NYC Bike Share corporation — the entity running the program, separate from D.O.T. and Alta Bicycle and not a ward of Citi, the banking corporation — and does not apply to their deployment of the program. They’ve gotten a lot of work done on 300-plus sites in less than two months, and no essential city service or significant activity has been disrupted in the process. D.O.T. has been — slowly — receptive to concerns where people have been inconvenienced, and made adjustments when the concerns were reasonable. D.O.T. has done appropriate community outreach, and can’t be expected to pursue the direct permission of every person who lives or works in New York City for every change it plans to make. The worst of the changes from this program have extremely mild effects on the neighborhoods in which they were placed, and it’s worth adjusting to those changes in order to gain the benefits of the program. This is the story that has been repeated constantly, but the opponents are not interested in listening. They just want their personal demands met in full, after they’ve had a turn at airing their grievances at whatever length suits them. We have yet to hear the reasonable concerns about bike-share. This makes sense, because so far only the racks have been deployed, innocuously, in public space that belongs to the city. NYC Bike Share has not overstepped its bounds at all. Anything it does to modify rack placement in the upcoming weeks to sort out territorial disputes (which are mostly misguided and sometimes dishonest) will be for the sake of addressing politics. Which is good. It means D.O.T. and NYC Bike Share are listening. But are the people listening back? Or are they just thinking about more ways to argue for their anti-bike-share worldview to receptive ears in the media? Brian Van Nieuwenhoven E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


May 30 - June 5, 2013

13

Photos by Tequila Minsky

Foodies, parents rail against ‘demon seed’ Monsanto Hundreds of likeminded individuals from around the metro area rallied at Union Square on Saturday, braving sporadic rain to protest against and raise awareness about Monsanto and the genetically modified food produced by the multinational company’s seeds. The crowd was filled with Occupy Wall Street demonstrators, going under the name Occupy Monsanto, but also many gray-haired, seasoned activists, parents with children in tow or in strollers, foodies and concerned college students. Drawing attention to the issue of genetically modified and genetically engineered crops and seeds, the New York demonstration was one of more than 400 in 50 countries worldwide. In Union Square’s southern plaza, amplified by a bullhorn that didn’t quite reach the far edges of those gathered, numerous speakers rallied the crowd. One of the speakers, Christine Segal, a health coach, summed up the reasons people were there. “We are marching for clean food,” she declared. “We are marching for our health with nutrient-dense food. We are marching for farmers who have the right to plant seeds of their choice. We are marching for bees…for salmon…for soil…for countries abroad for their right to their own culture, for our planet, for future generations.” Following the speeches, protesters holding a plethora of creative and expressive handmade signs marched on the sidewalk around Union Square — as Greenmarket shopping went on — then continued down Broadway, ending at Washington Square Park.

Tequila Minsky


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

New era or new error? Bike-share is off and rolling Continued from page 1 any taxpayer money,” Bloomberg said as he and Sadik-Khan stood in front of a dozen cyclists sitting on the cobalt-blue bikes. Bicycle bells pealed in place of applause as the two spoke of a new dawn in citywide transportation. The program, delayed for a year, first by software problems and then by equipment damage due to Superstorm Sandy, had 15,000 members already signed up by opening day. Those early adopters will have access to 6,000 of the sturdy blue bikes at more than 300 locations throughout Manhattan below 59th St. and in a half dozen Brooklyn neighborhoods. The program anticipates 10,000 bikes will be available at 600 stations before long. Standing quietly in the crowd was Chelsea resident David Byrne, an avid cyclist and founding member of the new wave band Talking Heads. “In London and Paris the scale is different from New York and it really works,” he said while holding his bike helmet. “It gets people out, it changes people’s mental map of how they see the city.” Citi Bike has faced opposition at every turn. The program was criticized for a plethora of anticipated complications. Naysayers said there would be a mass of injuries by inexperienced cyclists, plus a slew of drivers losing parking spaces, businesses losing customers and thefts of bikes. Some scoffed that the bikes would be unable to carry overweight people. “Bike racks take up space but cars take up more spaces,” Bloomberg responded to the program’s critics. “I own a bike but I know there are times when this will be really handy,” Byrne told The Villager, adding, “Everybody should keep talking. In other cities the local businesses have found that it’s actually good for business.” Three members of the group Friends of Petrosino Square quietly held small protest signs throughout the launch ceremony. Afterward, the group’s founder Georgette Fleischer approached Sadik-Khan and was able to hand her a letter protesting the installation of one of the bike racks at the narrow tip of the square, at Spring and Lafayette Sts. “We’re asking her to please move the racks out of the dedicated parkland that we worked so hard for, for years — the section, specifically, at a space for large sculptures and other 3-D installations,” Fleischer said of the politely worded but firm missive. She said the group had been trying to make contact with Sadik-Khan and D.O.T. for weeks, to no avail. She said a petition with more than 500 signatures requesting that the racks be moved will also be delivered to D.O.T. soon. SadikKhan took the letter and put it in her bag before pedaling off uptown with a half dozen other cyclists.

Photos by Jefferson Siegel

Lee Schalop and his son David, cycling in Union Square, came down from the Upper West Side on Monday just to try out a Citi Bike. (Hey, is riding double considered fare-beating?)

Cycle-sharer, qu’est que ce? Better bike, bike, bike, bike awaaaay! Musician David Byrne showed his support for Citi Bike at the program’s launch. While critics scoff the program is on a “Road to Nowhere,” the former Talking Head said it “changes people’s mental map of how they see the city.”

The bike-share program has tried to anticipate every eventuality. Bikes with flat tires or other mechanical issues can be brought to any bike rack. A user can then press a wrench icon, which will allow the bike to be locked to the rack and another will be made available. A mobile phone app advises users where nearby racks are located. An unknown number of subscribers had not received their “keys” by Monday. Citi Bike set up a table at Union Square on Sunday and Monday to distribute the distinctive blue keychain fobs to annual members who wanted to use bikes on opening day. As crowds gathered around the City Hall bike rack for photo ops, Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson, a bicycle rider, described the Citi Bike he was about to pedal. “Feels good,” he said. “It’s sturdy and I like the color.” Wolfson, who also owns a Specialized Sirrus bike, echoed others who suggest the bikes are perfect for commuting. Susan Van Niftrik of the West Village concurred. “We moved from Amsterdam, so we love bikes,” she said. “When you’re 2 or 3 years old you learn how to ride a bike, so it’s a part of life.

“I have a racing bike for long distances. This is for the inside of the city,” she said as she lifted, then pulled, one of the new blue cruisers out of its rack. Later that afternoon, a steady stream of people were observed using the Citi Bike rack on Union Square North. Lee Schalop and his son, David, were seen giving one bike a whirl. “We rode the subway down just to try it out,” the Upper West Siders said as they dismounted. The three-speed bikes weigh in at just over 42 pounds, including puncture-resistant tires filled with nitrogen. The bike racks are solar-powered. There are three levels of use: a 24-hour pass for $9.95, a seven-day pass for $25 and an annual membership for $95. The bike-share program is being managed by NYC Bike Share LLC, which will share any proceeds with the city. Citigroup is paying $41 million as the primary sponsor and Mastercard is paying an additional $6.5 million. As of late Monday, Citi Bike reported that 6,050 bike trips had been made since the launch earlier in the day, with each trip averaging 20 minutes and a total of 13,768 miles traveled.


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Photos by Tequila Minsky

Standing behind the rack of parked Citi Bikes, the protesters held up cards spelling “ART IN PETROSINO PARK.” (The people holding up the “ART IN” cards couldn’t fit into this photo.)

Petrosino protesters spell it out: Art, not bikes! By Tequila Minsky Saturday was blustery and drizzly, but that didn’t stop very concerned neighbors of Little Italy and Soho who came out fired up, protesting — again — what had happened to their tiny square, which is really a triangle, in what they stressed is a “park-starved” neighborhood. Petrosino Square, bounded by Spring, Lafayette and Kenmare Sts. and Cleveland Place, became parkland in 1938. In 1987, it was renamed for Joseph Petrosino (18601909), a New York police lieutenant who famously battled the mafia. A few weeks ago, as soon as the Citi Bike docking station for bike-share appeared on the square’s northern tip, neighborhood activists began voicing their outrage. The area where the dock intrudes had been designated for public art. So far, there has been no response to public outcries. Georgette Fleischer, founder of Friends of Petrosino Square, came to Saturday’s protest wearing a carnival mask. Founded in 1979, the group today has more than 200 members, according to Fleischer. It took them eight years to get the formerly uninviting, rundown triangle fixed up. “We worked so hard,” she said. “We paid for this park to be expanded and renovated and it was just finished in November 2011. We had Park Day, planting with the Parks Department. We held fundraisers. Our city councilman, Gerson, allocated discretionary funds for the park’s improvement. Then they

come and take it away from us. “Did you know that in 1984, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council sponsored the first Art in the Park here?” she added. “Here, on the eastern edge of Soho, we have nearly three decades of history.” Toni Spinelli, a third-generation Little Italy resident and member of the Sons of Italy in America, Lodge 285, named for Petrosino, said bike-share isn’t the problem. “I’m not against the concept,” she said, adding, “I don’t like the location.” Marna Lawrence, a longtime member of the Little Italy Neighbors Association, LINA, pointed to the northeast corner Spring and Lafayette Sts., saying that’s where she’d like the station to be located. She noted that the dock’s initial planned location, along Cleveland Place south of Spring St., was nixed because of blocking a fire hydrant and handicap access. “Our representative at the community board meetings made it clear that they didn’t want it in the square. And then it appeared, here,” she said. “The Parks Department encouraged and approved this space for art installations. We’re taxpaying citizens and our public interests are dismissed. This is public land that is allocated for art installations.” Some Community Board 2 members and representatives from local political clubs made a showing, too. After a lot of maneuvering around to get every letter in place, neighborhood activists, standing behind the newly parked Citi

Bikes, held up cards that spelled, “ART IN PETROSINO PARK.” Raising a clenched fist, artist Minerva Durham indicated this struggle would be continuing. Mayoral candidate John Liu appeared just

as the gathering was about to finish. “This was supposed to be an open space and is antithetical to the goals of bike-share,” he said. “We’ll talk to D.O.T. of what’s happening here.”

Georgette Fleischer, founder of Friends of Petrosino Square, couldn’t mask her displeasure over the bike station’s siting as she spoke to mayoral candidate John Liu.


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Quinn to L.E.S. garden developer, ‘Remove the fence’ Continued from page 1 When N.D.C. dispatched a security detail and work crew to fence the lot on May 15, Hoyda’s reps said they did so to protect N.D.C. against liability claims that might arise if anyone were injured there. Last week, C.M.G. gardeners took out a $2 million insurance policy to indemnify Hoyda and N.D.C. against any lawsuits due to injury in the garden. “This should allow you to continue sharing your unused property, as you have done for the past 10 years,” Quinn and Chin wrote.     “By suddenly and forcefully putting up the fence,” their joint letter continues, “N.D.C. has threatened this local neighborhood treasure, damaging the garden and its plantings in the process. Given that there are no immediate plans to develop the plot, we believe that N.D.C. should remove the fence and continue to allow the Children’s Magical Garden to flourish on the corner of Stanton and Norfolk Streets.” Borough President Scott Stringer is also urging Hoyda to back off.  “The Children’s Magical Garden has a rich history of serving the Lower East Side’s gardeners, students and residents,” Stringer said in a press statement. “I encourage the property owner to begin a dialogue with the gardeners and community members to find an amenable solution for this precious community resource.” Hoyda, representatives of N.D.C. and Hoyda’s property management firm, S&H Equities, did not respond to requests for comment. Hoyda purchased his small interior lot for $180,000 in 2003. The garden’s other two lots are owned by the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development. Last week, Hoyda reached out to H.P.D. to reaffirm his interest in partnering with the agency to develop the entire garden site as a mix of affordable and market-rate housing. When Hoyda first pitched that plan back in 2006, Community Board 3 rejected it and instead urged the developer to work with the gardeners, greening groups and city officials to find some common ground. H.P.D. says it has made no commitment to develop its lots.  “At this point, the proposal [from N.D.C.] is still in a very preliminary state, and there hasn’t been a decision regarding whether or not to move forward,” H.P.D. spokesperson Eric Bederman told The Villager, adding, “We are still working closely with Councilmember Chin and her staff to assess available options with relation to these sites.” The turf battle over this L.E.S. haven comes at a time when gardens and the importance of green space are receiving heightened attention from City Hall and on the campaign trail. At a recent mayoral forum, Speaker Quinn jousted with her opponents on how to preserve and potentially expand the number of community gardens, including those

Photo by Sam Spokony

Cynthia Marcelino, 17, and Dalia Rodriguez, 18, put up signs on May 20 to protest develop Serge Hoyda’s actions on land used by the Children’s Magical Garden. Both are high school students who attend classes across the street from the garden, and Rodriguez is one of the garden’s youth leaders. Someone later tore down the signs, and Hoyda’s workers are suspected.

occupying lands under the jurisdiction of H.P.D. State Senator Daniel Squadron, who is running for public advocate, just penned an op-ed for Sunday’s New York Times calling on the need to help finance parks in underserved communities.  “We know that the Lower East Side and other communities in need across the city are lacking in open space and green space. I’ll continue to work with the gardeners and our community to find a solution — and I urge the property owner to work with us,” Squadron said of the situation at C.M.G. According to a survey by the advocacy group New Yorkers for Parks, Council District 1 ranks 32nd in the amount of parkland per resident — and that area actually includes the 22-acre Battery Park, on the tip of Manhattan. It was that lack of green space that drove community members to begin clearing what were then abandoned, rubble-strewn lots festering with rats, garbage and junkies 30 years ago. They put up their own fence and began planting peach trees and tomatoes and organizing after-school programs for local children. But C.M.G. was never offered a GreenThumb lease, in large part because a portion of the land was privately owned. C.M.G. has been through its ups and downs over the years, particularly after the death of its co-founder Carmen Rubio in 2005 and the subsequent departure of her partner Alfredo Feliciano, who had been the primary caretaker for the site. But three years ago, the garden revived under the new leadership of longtime member Kate Temple-West and Aresh Javadi of the activist group More Gardens! Working with a pro-bono attorney, they and other local residents formed a nonprofit organization to run the garden. C.M.G. now serves as an outdoor classroom for students at four neighboring

schools and is utilized by groups like the Cub Scouts and Grand Street Settlement, which brings kids there as part of its summer camp and after-school programs. Over the winter, C.M.G. housed 18 chickens on loan from the environmental group Earth Matters, which had been keeping them at its compost project on Governors Island.

Now, gardeners are fighting to save this children’s oasis. They launched a petition calling on Mayor Bloomberg and elected officials to preserve the garden by transferring the two H.P.D. lots to the jurisdiction of the Parks Department’s GreenThumb program. They are further urging the city to “swap” Hoyda’s lot for some other city-owned parcel elsewhere. Chin and the other elected officials say they want to preserve C.M.G. but are waiting for Community Board 3 to vote on the issue first, in order to have a clear sense of what the community wants for this site. On Tuesday, garden members and supporters came to C.B. 3’s full board meeting to plead their case during the public session. Among those speaking were an E.S.L. teacher from Lower East Side Preparatory across the street. She said her students, all recent immigrants, have been planting in the garden. Several other students also said they literally grew up at C.M.G. “I can’t imagine myself without the garden,” said 18-year-old Feng Chen, who has been working at C.M.G. since the sixth grade and is now co-leader of the garden’s youth leadership group C.B. 3’s Parks Committee will be voting on the gardeners’ proposal to save C.M.G. on June 13. C.M.G. members are calling on all “angels, fairies, elves and superheroes young and old” to rally at the garden and then march to the meeting, which will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the BRC Senior Services Center, 30 Delancey St. Hoyda and his reps have been invited to present their plans for the site.

Photo by Talisman Brolin

Dog in distress, needs drugs


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VILLAGER ARtS & enteRtAinMent Nora, Horton and an award called Tony Theatergoer Tallmer casts his votes THEATER LUCKY GUY Written by Nora Ephron Directed by George C. Wolfe Through July 3 At the Broadhurst Theatre 235 W. 44th St., btw. 7th & 8th Aves. For tickets ($87-$152), call 212-2396200, or visit telecharge.com

A TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL

Written by Horton Foote Directed by Michael Wilson Through Sept. 1 At the Stephen Sondheim Theatre 124 W. 43 St., btw. Sixth Ave. & Broadway For tickets ($42-$142), call 212-2396200 or visit telecharge.com

THE TONY AWARDS

Sun., June 9 8pm, on CBS

BY JERRY TALLMER Here they come again — the Tonys. Allow me to cast my votes herewith for two extraordinary candidates — two endlessly fecund artists of two disparate generations — whom I not only knew and from time to

Photo by Joan Marcus

A black and white drama, in more than one sense: “Lucky Guy.”

time wrote about but could, I think, each be called friends of mine over the long haul. They are playwrights Nora Ephron and Horton Foote. There were some years when, as a newspaper’s theater critic, I was what’s called “a Tony voter.” This came to a screeching halt after the season in which on my ballot I wrote in: “Dr. Rose Franzblau, Best Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy.” You don’t remember Dr. Rose Franzblau? No? Well, Dr. Rose Franzblau was for many years the Freudian-slanted agony columnist — the Miss Lonelyhearts — of the New York Post. Her answer to everything was: Go see a shrink. Getting fat? See a shrink. Lost your job? See a shrink. Scared of heart attack? See a shrink. Hate your mother, your husband, your wife, your kids? See a shrink. One day at my desk at the paper, the phone rang. “Hello, dollink. This is Dr. Rose Franzblau. You write like an angel. I told Mrs. Schiff you write like an angel. Dollink, this Joe Papp, he’s got a Shakespeare play about to open in Central Park. I have four

important people coming in from out of town. They want to see it. I don’t want them to have to stand in line. Can you call this Joe Papp and fix me up with six tickets?” I said: Gee, Dr. Franzblau, it’s for free, but Joe Papp makes everybody stand in line. I don't think he’ll — “Try!” So I tried. The answer was: Tell Dr. Rose Franzblau to go eff herself. I conveyed that, more politely, to Dr. Franzblau. Who came back with a cajoling: “Listen, my dear. Are you a nice Jewish boy…?” This was the same Dr. Rose Franzblau, showbiz angel and, at a guess, herself a Tony voter, who at every Broadway opening night could be observed standing erect in the second row on the aisle, her back to the stage, counting the house and waving to friends while all around her had taken their seats as the curtain was rising…. Nora Ephron and I reached the New York Post at roughly the same time in the 1960s, myself a few years ahead of her. She was the oldest daughter of highly successful Hollywood screenwriters and Broadway

playwrights Henry and Phoebe Ephron, who had put Wellesley teenager Nora into their “Take Her, She’s Mine” both in film and on stage — but their daughter had carved her own way into the Post by way of writing for Victor Navasky’s parody issue, The New York Pest. Far from being shocked or angry, celebrity-conscious publisher Dorothy Schiff told her editors to get that Ephron girl, and fast. Of course it didn’t hurt that Nora’s parents were Hollywood stars in their own right, but a movie career for daughter Nora seemed nowhere on the horizon. Indeed, when I did a magazine piece on Nora just a few years ago, and asked her if she’d ever as a kid thought she’d end up writing and directing movies of her own, the screenwriter and/ or director of “Sleepless in Seattle,” “When Harry Met Sally” and a dozen other motion pictures replied: “No, that was the last thing I wanted. One of the reasons I left L.A. was because I hated L.A. and hated the movie business

Continued on page 18


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Tallmer, on Tony Continued from page 17 or anything to do with it. I wanted to be a, quote, real writer — a journalist — forever.” Hated having anything to do with it? Well, Henry and Phoebe Ephron, who ended up as hard-core alcoholics, had something to do with it, and though I never in a million years would have thought Nora (1941-2012) would be dead as I write this — nor did she, I can tell you — a poignant confession of hers atop the script of “Lucky Guy,” the unmade movie that has now turned into the Broadway play that I’m nominating for Best Play in this year’s Tony Awards, reads as follows: But for many years I was in love with journalism. I loved the City Room, I loved the pack. I loved smoking and drinking Scotch and playing dollar poker. I didn’t know much about anything, and I was in a profession where you didn’t have to. I loved the speed. I loved the deadlines. I loved that you wrapped the fish [in yesterday’s newspaper]. And there’s also this: I’d known since I was a child that I was going to live in New York eventually, and that everything in between would be just an intermission. I’d spent all those years imagining what New York was going to be like. I thought it was going to be the most magical, exciting, fraught-with-possibility place that you could ever live…a place where I might be able to become the only thing worth being — a journalist. And I’d turned out to be right. Then there’s this. Phoebe Ephron, a tough cookie, left her daughter just two precepts: 1) Never buy a red coat. 2) Everything is copy.

Photo courtesy of the producers

“The Trip to Bountiful” gets Tallmer’s Tony nod for Best Revival.

Nora promptly went out and bought herself a red coat, but she lived (and died) by Precept No. 2: Everything is copy. “Lucky Guy” is a City Room play that ranks right up there in toughness and knowhow with “The Front Page” and all those other old black and-white “Hello, sweetheart, give me rewrite” movies that Bruce Goldstein runs at Film Forum from time to time. Only this one is about real people with (mostly) real names, starting with Mike McAlary (1957-1998), the New York Daily News and New York Newsday reporter and columnist who, shortly before his death from cancer, won a Pulitzer Prize in journalism for his exposure of the brutality of a handful of Brooklyn cops for the torture and anal rape (by mop handle) of a 30-year-old Haitian immigrant named Abner Louima. The volatile, ambitious, neurotic McAlary is played by first-time-on-Broadway Tom

Hanks, a Nora Ephron regular (“Sleepless in Seattle,” “You’ve Got Mail”) who is up for a Tony Award of his own. “Lucky Guy” is a black-and-white drama in more than one sense, because it co-stars Courtney B. Vance as James (Hap) Hairston (1949-2002), the Daily News city editor who as much as anybody else shaped not only McAlary’s copy but that restless soul’s whole professional life. Here is what, for me, is the high point of “Lucky Guy.” Mike McAlary and Hap Hairston, separately hospitalized, are having a phone talk, miles apart, hospital bed to hospital bed. “I always knew I was going to live in the city,” says McAlary — echoing playwright Nora. “Knew I was going to write for a newspaper. Didn’t know which one, but I knew. I even knew I was going to be edited by a balding black man who drank almost as much as me.” I don’t know who was Nora Ephron’s own Hap Hairston. Maybe nobody — just herself. But if this is the last play we’ll ever get from her, and I think it must be, I wish it well, Tony or no Tony. *

*

*

I did not need FCC chairman Newton Minow to tell me, and the nation, back in 1961, that television was, even then, “a vast wasteland.” I knew it just from watching — as much as I could stand, which wasn’t much. But even then, there was one name that popped up from time to time on “the crawl” — the endless list of production credits — whenever a program of some quality had reached the small screen. And this had been true as far back as

1953, when NBC aired a short, quiet, powerful drama called “The Trip to Bountiful,” starring Lillian Gish as Carrie Watts, the lonely old lady who just wants to go back to take a look at the small town where she grew up. The name on the crawl was Horton Foote. “Written by Horton Foote.” But who was he? It was a good many years before I found out that Horton Foote (1916-2009) was a real person, indeed a very real, authentic, forthcoming person who lived right here in Greenwich Village where the Meatpacking District hits the Hudson River. It was when I got to know Horton better, review his openings, interview him from time to time, that I one day wrote this: Some people get up in the morning and go to Wall Street. Or to their job in a department store. Or a supermarket. Or a newspaper office. Or to fly an airplane. Horton Foote gets up in the morning and writes plays. Lillian Gish was followed over the years by Geraldine Page, Eva Marie Saint and many another prizewinning brilliant actress, and now an all-black “Trip to Bountiful,” with gorgeous Cicely Tyson as Carrie Watts, is up for a Tony as Best Revival of a Play. The competition includes Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” — which makes it tough for me, but I will stick with Horton on grounds of seniority. When he left us at age 93, up in Hartford, Connecticut, he was still hard at work on future projects with daughter Hallie. You can sit down now, Dr. Franzblau.


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Buhmann on Art

Image courtesy of the artist and Salon 94 Freemans

From Betty Woodman’s “Windows, Carpets and Other Paintings.” © The Artist / Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York/Shanghai

Spencer Finch: “Walden Pond (surface/depth),” 2013, mixed media, dimensions variable.

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN

NICOLE MCCORMICK SANTIAGO: THE SWEET LIFE

McCormick Santiago’s figurative paintings are inspired by domestic narratives and environments. Her recent works are autobiographical, exploring bittersweet scenes of celebration. Lushly painted, these images depict the contrast between unabashed indulgence and the selfless constraints of motherhood. One of the artist’s recurring motifs in these works is cake, which serves as an implication of ritual, indulgence and decadence, as well as gluttony. Through June 15, reception: Sat., June 1, 3-5pm at First Street Gallery (526 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves., Ste. 209). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 646336-8053 or visit firststreetgallery.net.

BETTY WOODMAN: WINDOWS, CARPETS AND OTHER PAINTINGS

Woodman’s career began in the 1950s as a production potter, with the aim of creating beautiful objects to enhance everyday life. Since then, her ceramics have transitioned from functional objects to works of art. For many years, the vase was Woodman’s primary subject. By deconstructing its form, she has created an exuberant and complex body of sculpture. In addition, she has constructed large installations comprised of various ceramic shapes. Woodman is known for her exuberant palette, embracing saturated hues of various shades. Woodman acknowledges Greek, Aztec and Tang civilizations, alongside Southern Baroque, American Slipware and 17th century Japanese Oribe motifs as significant sources of inspiration. Through June 14, at Salon 94 Freemans (1 Freeman Alley, off of Rivington St.,

btw. Bowery & Christie). Hours: Tues.Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 212-529-7400 or visit salon94.com.

SPENCER FINCH: FATHOM

While he works in a wide variety of mediums (including watercolor, photography, glass, electronics and video), Finch is best known for dealing with the elusive concepts of memory and perception through light installations. He is interested in recording the invisible world, while simultaneously striving to understand what might lie beyond it. In the past, he has measured the light that exists naturally in a specific place and time with a colorimeter, for example, and re-constructed the luminosity of the location through artificial means. Through June 15, at James Cohan Gallery (533 W. 26th St., btw 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. Call 212-7149500 or visit jamescohan.com.

THE WOOLWORTH BUILDING @ 100

On April 24, 1913, the Woolworth Building opened with a ceremony attended by hundreds of dignitaries. The brilliant spectacle, which also took eighty thousand incandescent bulbs to illuminated the New York night, was a career-crowning achievement for the tower’s owner — the fiveand-dime store king, Frank W. Woolworth. Woolworth paid for the skyscraper with his personal fortune and was very much involved in every decision of its design. This exhibition pays tribute to the great Gothic tower, which has significantly defined the silhouette of the New York skyline ever since. Through July 14 at The Skyscraper Museum (39 Battery Pl., at West St.). Hours: Wed.-Sun., 12-6pm. Call 212-9681961 or visit skyscraper.org.

Image courtesy of the artist and First Street Gallery

Nicole McCormick Santiago: “Baby Cakes (Pregnancy Self-Portrait),” oil on canvas, 42 x 33.


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The films are alive, with the Sound of Silent Chicago fest makes its NYC debut, at Anthology Film Archives FILM SOUND OF SILENT FILM FESTIVAL

8-10pm Fri., June 7 & Sat., June 8 At Anthology Film Archives 32 Second Ave. (btw. First & Second Sts.) Tickets: $30 at the door, $20 online ($10 for students/seniors) Visit acmusic.org or call 212-505-5181 Image courtesy of the filmmakers and Sound of Silent Film Festival

BY TRAv S.D. On June 7 and 8, New Yorkers will have a rare chance to experience something that was once quite common, now for all intents and purposes extinct: contemporary, original silent films with live accompaniment by a small orchestra. Anthology Film Archives will be playing host to the Chicago-based organization Access Contemporary Music (ACM), which will be presenting its Sound of Silent Film Festival in the Big Apple for the first time. ACM was founded in 2004 by Chicago composer Seth Boustead to foster and promote new work by contemporary

Image courtesy of the filmmakers and Sound of Silent Film Festival

From “The Cabinet of Jan Svankmajer,” by the Brothers Quay.

From Michael Dudok De Witt’s “Father and Daughter.”

classical composers. Now in its eighth year, ACM’s Sound of Silent Film Festival is an opportunity for composers to score for film, and to have the scores performed live before an audience as was a common practice in the early twentieth century (while much silent film accompaniment was improvised, major films such as D.W. Griffith’s 1915 “The Birth of a Nation” were distributed with sheet music to an original score). According to festival spokesperson Claire Arkin, “the festival has generated a loyal and enthusiastic following” in its hometown for showing films that are “wonderfully weird, funny and at times disturbing.” This year’s edition includes works by film makers ranging from the well -known to the more obscure. Star contributions include “The Big Shave” by Martin Scorsese, “First Kiss” by Gus Van Sant, “Heart of the World” by Guy Maddin, “The Cabinet of Jan Svankmajer” by the Brothers Quay and “The Mermaid” by anime pioneer Tezuka Osama. But the films by lesser-known directors rate attention, too. “G.M.” by Martin Pickles is a period fantasia inspired by George Méliès, in which the pioneering French film-maker

finds a mysterious world behind the walls of his home. In William Lorton’s clever “Cheating, Inc.,” a student makes use of an absurdly elaborate global spy network in order to cheat on his college math exam. “Father and Daughter” by Michael Dudok De Witt is a beautiful animated film from the Netherlands in which a young girl sets out to catch up to her father who has left on a journey, and finally meets him — seventy years later. In Steve Stein’s “Must Like Magic” a young man answers a help wanted ad for a magician’s apprentice, and ends up having better skills than the man who interviews him. Virgil Widrich’s “Copy Shop” is a surreal outing, where the clerk who works in the titular store actually manages to duplicate himself. Alexander Payne’s “Carmen” is actually set to the music from the original opera by Bizet, arranged by Seth Boustead. The music for the other films ranges from the modern-sounding and dissonant to the traditional. The composers featured include Boustead, Amos Gillespie, Randall West, Brian O’Hern, Eric Malmquist, William Susman, Eric Reda, Doug Johnson, Amy Wurtz, Matthew Pakulski and Patricia Morehead.


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ARC’s CD, LP sale is summer’s number one hit From now through Labor Day, you could spend countless hours scouring every last stoop, garage and yard sale you come across — and you still won’t come even remotely close to the quality pickings you’ll find at the ARChive of Contemporary Music’s Summer Record & CD Sale. Twice a year (now, and again during the holidays), the not-for-profit archive, music library and research center opens its doors to the public with a dizzying, up-for-grabs collection of new and donated items from record companies and collectors. Last week, the staff was sorting through 40,000 new arrivals — including 500 sound effects records, early hip-hop recordings, rap twelve-inch singles and punk rarities. In addition to the CDs and LPs (most of them priced from $1-$5), they’ll also be hanging figurative “For Sale” signs on turntables and audio equipment, Fillmore East programs, music magazines and original 60s psychedelic posters (from Detroit’s Grande Ballroom). For the “dis-en-vinyled,” there’s also an Astroturf Yard Sale, featuring a generous selection of vintage kitchen wares and clothing. As always, becoming a member of ARC will score you an invite to their Summer Party (“great food, nice people and first crack at all the recordings”). Let the pickin’ and the grinnin’ begin! Free admission. Sat., June 8 through Sun., June 16, from 11am-6pm daily. At the ARChive

of Contemporary Music (54 White St., three blocks south of Canal St., btw. Broadway & Church Sts.). Call 212-226-6967 or visit arcmusic.org.

—Scott Stiffler

Photos courtesy of ARChive of Contemporary Music

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THERE’S A LIGHT ON YONDER MOUNTAIN

Written by Stacy Davidowitz, Lindsay Joy Murphy, David H. Rosen and David L. Williams in person — as well as by way of Skype, text messages, phone calls and emails — the characters, themes and narrative fragments that ultimately became “There’s a Light on Yonder Mountain” began to percolate when the project’s literary director, Kate MacCluggage, gave the writers exploratory assignments based on the tried and true mythology popularized by Joseph Campbell’s influential exploration of the “hero’s journey” storytelling arc. The result: an unlikely group of misfits embark on a mysterious mission to change the world (and find out what all the luminescent fuss is about at the top of that far-away mound). Through June 8, Thurs-Sat., at 8pm. At UNDER St. Marks (94 St. Marks Place, btw. 1st Ave. & Ave. A). For tickets ($18, $15 for students/seniors), call 212-868-4444 or visit horsetrade.info.

Vintage Police car show

You provide the loud siren noise, and they’ll provide the vehicles. The New

Photo courtesy of The New York City Police Museum

Photo by Ari Uzi

The collaborative effort of “There’s a Light on Yonder Mountain” takes its cast on a hero’s journey.

York City Police Museum may still be closed for post-Sandy repairs, but its annual Vintage Police Car Show will go

Classic patrol cars come to Front St., on June 8.

on. Join them for a fun-filled day, as you view a spectacular collection of classic patrol vehicles — and keep checking their website (nycpm.org) for updates on special events and exhibitions, spon-

sored in partnership with cultural institutions around the city. The Car Show is a free event. Sat., June 8, from 10am4pm. On Front St., btw. Maiden Lane and John St.


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Publ ic Notice s NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of LAGUARDA. LOW ARCHITECTS. LLC Authority filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/25/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in TX on 10/13/00. SSNY designated as an agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 4333 North Central Expressway Dallas TX 75205. Cert of LLC filed with Secy of State of TX located: 4333 North Central Expressway, Dallas, TX 75205. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1271096 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 13 First Avenue a/k/a 72 East 1stStreet, New York, NY 10003 for on-premises consumption. GOLDEN C HOSPITALITY INC. d/b/a GOLDEN CADILLAC Vil: 05/30 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license 1110955, has been applied for by the undersigned to sell on the premises Liquor Wine & Beer at retail in Fillip’s Catering DBA Champignon under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at 200-202 & 7th Avenue, New York, NY 10011 for on-premises consumption. Fillip’s Catering Inc Vil: 05/30 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. The name of the limited liability company is Gaelic Park Management Company, LLC (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 03/15/2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to The LLC, 52 Duane Street, New York, New York 10007. Purpose: To engage in any lawful activity. Principal business location: 52 Duane Street, New York, New York 10007. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF East End Tennis and Sport, LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 328 8th Ave, Ste 347, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of YOUR CHILD IN FOCUS LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: YOUR CHILD IN FOCUS LLC, Caroline Rosen 1095 Park Avenue, APT. 9B New York, NY 10128. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 BAM 213 FUNDING, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/1/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Bryan Sanders, 12 W. 18th St. #8-W, NY, NY 10011. General Purposes. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of CHRISTIAN ZAMORA STUDIO LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 04/11/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: CHRISTIAN ZAMORA STUDIO LLC, C/O UNITED STATES CORPORATION AGENTS, INC., 7014 13TH AVENUE, SUITE 202, BROOKLYN, NY 11228. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 Notice of Formation of Cascabel Hospitality Group LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1538 Second Ave., NY, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 Notice of Formation of Lisa Verde LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/8/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 134 E. 93rd St., Apt 11C, NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 Notice of Formation of Stanley Senior Housing Developer LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/13/10. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CPC Resources, Inc., 28 E. 28th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10016, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013

Notice of Qualification of GSO Capital Solutions Fund II LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/14/12. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 4/20/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr. of the LP: c/o GSO Capital Partners LP, 345 Park Ave., 31st Fl., NY, NY 10154. Regd. agent upon whom process may be served: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., PO Box 309, Ugland House, S. Church St., Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Companies, Citrus Grove Bldg., Ground Fl., Goring Ave., Georgetown, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/30 - 07/04/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1270842 has been applied by the undersigned to sell wine at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 412-414 East 9th Street, New York, NY 10009 for on-premises consumption. CAGEN JAPANESE LLC Vil: 05/23 - 05/30/2013 Notice is hereby given that an eating place beer license, #TBA has been applied for by Ernst Klein 6th Ave. Foods Inc. d/b/a Amish Market to sell beer at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 53-55 Park Place a/k/a 37-59 West Broadway NewYork NY 10007. Vil: 05/23 - 05/30/2013 Notice of Formation of Tre Monelli LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Linda Marini, 9 Murray St., #7SE, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 ARIANE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 01/30/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 261 Madison Avenue, Fl 9, Suite 964, New York, NY 10016. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 Notice of Formation of 1315 SEABURY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/07/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Pembroke Companies, 70 E. 55th St., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013

Notice of Formation of BREWSTER MEWS DEVELOPER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 Notice of Qualification of 146 MULBERRY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/14/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/04/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Hendrie Lane Partners, LLC, Attn:Tony Calabrese, 411 LaFayette St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10003. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, New Castle Cnty., DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Townsend Bldg., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 Notice of Qualification of 425 Lexington Realty Company LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/6/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 5/3/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 Notice of Qualification of 54 East 64th Street Townhouse, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/9/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/15/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Kelley Drye & Warren, LLP, 101 Park Ave., NY, NY 10178, Attn: John J. McDonald, Esq. DE addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013

Notice of Qualification of RS Funds Distributor LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/6/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 388 Market St., Ste. 1700, San Francisco, CA 94111. LLC formed in DE on 9/6/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: brokerdealer, securities and other lawful business. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 Notice of Qualification of IVP CIF II (AIP A), L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/14/12. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 12/11/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Insight Venture Associates Coinvestment II, L.P., 680 Fifth Ave., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10019. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/23 - 06/27/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: PACIFIC 4, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/08/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Vincent Boitier, 431 Broome Street, New York, New York 10013. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Application for Authority for a Foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: STORY SHELTER, LLC. Application for Authority filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/23/2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O STORY SHELTER, LLC. 635 West 42nd Street, Apartment 4H, New York, NY 10036. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013

Notice of Qualification of ATALAYA SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES FUND (CAYMAN) IV LP Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/01/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 06/16/11. Princ. office of LP: 780 Third Ave., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Companies, P.O. Box 123, Ground Fl., Citrus Grove Bldg., Goring Ave., George Town, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Formation of EAST 74TH STREET BRIDGE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/30/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP, Attn: Jay Neveloff, 1177 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Qualification of 53 FRONT STREET, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/26/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/19/13. Princ. office of LLC: 5 Hanover Sq., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10004. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of NEW WAVE DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY, PLLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/06/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: The PLLC, 400 Jericho Tnpk., Ste. 100, Jericho, NY 11753. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, YES LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 290Third Avenue, #30A, New York, NY 10010. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013

SANDEMAR CONSTRUCTION, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/1/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Moss & Kalish, PLLC, 122 E. 42nd St., Ste. 2100, NY, NY 10168. General Purposes. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 UNITY YOGA LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/10/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 311 W. 127th St. #807, NY, NY 10027-1892. General Purposes. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Qualification of JZ REIT Fund Flatbush Portfolio, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/26/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 767 5th Ave., 48th Fl., NY, NY 10153. LLC formed in DE on 4/11/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Qualification of Screaming Spirit Productions, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/26/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/12/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Home Box Office, Inc., 1100 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10036, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013 Notice of Qualification of Valar Ventures LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/25/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/22/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, Attn: CT Corporation System, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/16 - 06/20/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of MARMELADE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/26/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 281 Hollow Tree Ridge Road, Darien, CT 06820. Purpose: any lawful activity. The LLC is to be managed by one or more managers. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Carlo Balestri Architect, PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/24/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Carlo Balestri Architect, PLLC, 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: CMT BOOTCAMP LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/01/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 111 Broadway, Suite 1702, New York, New York 10006. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 Application for Authority of 114 5th AVENUE NEW YORK CITY, LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/23/13. The LLC was formed in DE 4/19/13. Office loc.: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The principal business loc. and address SSNY shall mail copy of process is 600 Madison Ave., 20th Fl., New York, NY 10022. The office address in DE is 203 NE Front St., Ste. 101, Milford, DE 19963. Cert. of Formation filed with DE Div. of Corporations, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 Notice of Formation of WellGen Power, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 330 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 Notice of Formation of 150th Debt LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013


May 30 - June 5, 2013

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publ ic notice S NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AGENTE CREATIvO, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Ana Leshen, 451 Broadway, 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAPHA RACING Ny LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Salans LLP, Att: Jody Saltzman, Esq., 620 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10020. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TWG OE FUNDING LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/22/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 2/20/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MAKI bAR LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/13/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Yaniv Shaky Cohen, 451 Broome St., #5E, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF LONG JOHN SILvER’S, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/6/69. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SHANER INDUSTRIES, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/12/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 48150 bOxWOOD HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/29/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o The Community Preservation Corp., 28 E. 28th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10016, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 48152 CHESTNUT HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/31/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o The Community Preservation Corp., 28 E. 28th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10016, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/09 - 06/13/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF bESAME MUCHO LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Rothstein Kass, 9171 Wilshire Blvd., 5th Fl., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AEC POWERFLOW, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 3/15/07. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF bERKSHIRE ACQUISITION II, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/19/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/17/13. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Hanover Sq., 20th Fl., NY, NY 10004. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 156 EAST 33RD STREET LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/17/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o CORIGIN, 505 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of the State of DE, Corp. Dept., Loockerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 bIG GULP HACKING LLC, A DOMESTIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/15/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 415 W. 127th St., NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LOOKOUT POINT FILMS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o S. Reid Kahn, Esq., Kane Kessler, P.C., 1350 Ave. of the Americas, 26th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF bARCLAy 7 REALTy LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Goldberg Weprin Finkel Goldstein LLP, 1501 Broadway, 22nd Fl., NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Mb 1200, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/27/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marisa Bellis, 182 Poppasquash Road, Bristol, Rhode Island 02809. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MCFARLAND DEWEy COMPANy, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 300, NY, NY 10170. LLC formed in DE on 3/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PARTNERS vII/98 AvENUE A OWNER LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o AEW Capital, Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02210-2021. LLC formed in DE on 4/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SELECT MEDIA SERvICES, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 18th Fl. - 1067 W. Cordova St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V6C 1C7. LLC formed in DE on 12/23/97. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FOREIGN LIMITED LIAbILITy COMPANy (LLC) Name: Prevention Metrics Advisors LLC Application for Authority filed by the Department of State of New York on: 10/26/12 Jurisdiction: Delaware Organized on: 2/15/12 Office location: County of New York Principal office: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware 1209 Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801 Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building 401 Federal Street, Suite 4. Dover, DE 19901 Purpose: any and all lawful activities Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FORTIS bARA LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 1196 PARK PLACE, BROOKLYN NEW YORK 11213. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

CAPE END EAST HOLDINGS, LLC Arts., of Org., filed with NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) 03/28/2013. Office in New York County; SSNY designated agent for service of process with copy mailed to Cape Advisors, Inc., 483 Broadway, 5th Fl. New York, NY 10013, Attn: Curtis Bashaw, All lawful business purposes. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MORTENSEN MIDATLANTIC OF Ny LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIAbILITy COMPANy. NAME: HARPER SPIN LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/17/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 214 W. 21st Street, Apt. 5A, New York, New York 10011. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF EMPIRE STATE DENTAL MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 577 Isham St., 1G, NY, NY 10034. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Ysabel Ulerio at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MPP #9 ACQUISITION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Millhouse Peck Properties LLC, 420 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10170. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 bENITO ONE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP, Christian Moretti, 2 Wall St., NY, NY 10005. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

SAMANTHA LITZINGER LUTZ, PH.D. PSyCHOLOGIST PLLC, A DOMESTIC PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/22/13. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Ronald Lawrence Crane, Esq., 5 Farmers Rd., Great Neck, NY 11024. Purpose: Psychology Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 ARExA RURIK EKSTROM AND ASSOCIATES LLC a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/20/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 35 Canal St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10002. General Purposes. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF EPHOCUS CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Kustal & Kustal, PC, 237 W. 35th St., Ste. 1001, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WALLEyE TRADING ADvISORS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/20/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in MN on 3/24/05. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 16-18 W. 22nd St., NY, NY 10010, Attn: Peter Goddard. MN address of LLC: 14601 27th Ave N, Ste. 102, Plymouth, MN 55447. Cert. of Org. filed with MN Sec. of State, 60 Empire Dr., Ste. 100, St. Paul, MN 55103. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ZENTIS SWEET OvATIONS HOLDING, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/12/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in IN on 11/22/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. IN and principal business addr.: 2050 North Oak Rd., Plymouth, IN 46563. Cert. of Org. filed with IN Sec. of State, 302 W. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46204. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

TO PUBLISH A LEGAL AD, CONTACT JULIO TUMBACO 646.452.2490 • JULIO@THEVILLAGER.COM

PUbLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from FRANCIS LOUIS, LLC to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 570 HUDSON STREET in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/23 - 05/30/2013


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May 30 - June 5, 2013

Long after Sandy, park struggles to restore power Continued from page 1 are continuing to close the park every day at dusk, fencing off the entrances with movable metal gates. Not only has this deprived people of use of the park’s Village section in the evenings, but it’s caused the adjacent bike path to become seriously overcrowded at night, flooded with joggers who can’t use the park’s esplanade, who the cyclists in turn have to swerve around. After a cold spring, the weather is finally warming up — in fact, extremely high temperatures are predicted for later this week — so there will naturally be increasing demand for use of the park in the evenings after its long closure. Speaking last week, the spokesperson said that, “by Friday, anything east of the bulkhead should be open,” referring to the so-called “upland” portion of the park, east of the Hudson River’s edge. This would include the park’s riverfront esplanade, meaning it would be open again for joggers in the evening, so they won’t have to use the bike path. The spokesperson said, however, that he wasn’t sure if the park piers — including the popular Christopher St. Pier — would also have power back as of last Friday evening. As for the bike path that runs next to the park on its eastern edge, it is actually under the jurisdiction of the state Department of Transportation, and does have its lights back for the most part. However, this Tuesday evening around 11:30 p.m., most of the park’s Village section was still dark. The park was once again empty — except for the occasional couple sitting together on a bench in the darkness toward the northern end of the section — and, again, was closed well before its 1 a.m. curfew. Just as the week before, none of the blue bollard lights along the esplanade fence in the Village section were lit, except oddly four that glowed very faintly around Bethune St. However, in a slight improvement, as opposed to a week earlier, when the entire Village section had been dark at night, the upland park lights were on between the north end of Pier 40 and the Christopher St. Pier, but again, not the blue bollard lights along the fence. Also, while a week earlier the Christopher St. Pier, Charles St. Pier and Jane St. Pier were all dark when The Villager toured the park about 1:30 a.m., this past Tuesday evening, two of the three piers — Christopher St. and Charles St. — did have their lights back on. Yet, just like the previous week, the two park buildings at Christopher St. were still dark. On the other hand, just as the previous week, light could be seen glowing through the windows at the top of the park building near the children’s Jane St. Pier. Gansevoort Peninsula, where a city Department of Sanitation facility is located, has its electricity. Chelsea Piers, of course, has its lights back, and so does the park’s Chelsea section north of it. Last week, though, a few blocks of the park’s Chelsea section south of the W. 30th St. Heliport were without power at night. But this past Tuesday evening, the lights in that section had been restored, save for three lights that ring the table sculpture at this section’s

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

On Tuesday night at 11:30 in Hudson River Park, temporary floodlights powered by a portable generator illuminated the park’s esplanade near Bank St., where the park’s AIDS memorial is located. Most of the park’s Village section, however, was without any electrical light at all and the park remained closed during evening hours. Normally, the park is open until 1 a.m., but has been closing at dusk ever since Hurricane Sandy knocked out its electrical power seven months ago.

northern end. As for why some park sections had light and others didn’t, a PEP officer in an S.U.V. parked on the bike path north of Chelsea Piers, just shrugged that it’s the park’s “wiring.” Tobi Bergman, a park activist and Community Board 2 member, said the Trust really could have used some help restoring power, especially given the way the bike path was so heavily impacted by the park’s closing. “I think the Trust has done an admirable post-Sandy job, given the hit the park took and their financial situation,” he said. “But I think the city should have stepped in with an emergency response to repair the lighting, which is really a safety issue. The park having to support itself financially was the Hudson River Park Act deal — but that doesn’t mean the city and state should leave it in the lurch when a disaster causes damages beyond its resources. It is still an important public resource, even if a self-supporting one, and the city should take ultimate responsibility for its return to safe use after a hurricane.” Rich Caccappolo, chairperson of the C.B. 2 Parks and Waterfront Committee, noted that lack of power not only affects lighting, but also

other things that park users have been complaining about, such as bathrooms. The Trust spokesperson confirmed that electricity is needed to run the pumps to supply water for the park’s bathroom facilities. On Monday, Jules Kohn, a Village resident, told The Villager that the bathroom situation in the park on Memorial Day was a nightmare: The Village section of the park was extremely crowded but the bathrooms at Christopher St. and at the children’s playground at Jane St. were closed. “There was only one portable toilet at the children’s playground and it was overflowing and unusable,” he said. “There were only two portable toilets on Pier 45 [Christopher St. Pier] where there was a constant line.” However, Kohn subsequently was happy to report to The Villager that Madelyn Wils, the Trust’s C.E.O., personally returned his distressed phone message from Memorial Day the following day. “She said the power problems should be corrected and bathrooms open this weekend,” Kohn said. Speaking this Wednesday, Wils told The Villager that power was restored throughout

the park shortly before Memorial Day, but that there subsequently was a “brownout,” which hit the Village section from Christopher St. to Pier 51, the Jane St. children’s pier. She said this was basically due problems in the cabling throughout the park, and that workers were going into the park’s many manholes in this section to find the problem and fix it. That the Jane St. Pier was without power Tuesday night could be part of this brownout, she said. “There are over 30,000 linear feet of cable up and down the esplanade,” she noted. “We had to repair and inspect over 100 splices. “So far, the lights in the rest of the park are holding,” she said. As for the bathrooms, these were backed up and flooded by the storm, and so everything has to be replaced: sewer ejectors, toilets and all the hardware. Everyone up and down the Eastern seaboard is replacing these parts, as well, so there is simply a time lag to get these parts, according to the Trust. “The bathrooms will be operating Friday,” she assured. The electrical problems have also plagued the park’s programming, specifically, kayaking outrigger boating and community sailing at New York River Sports, at Pier 66. Nancy Brous, who runs the Pier 66 facility, said their power was basically restored only two weeks ago and their office electrical outlets last week, a couple of days before Memorial Day. “We still do not have working plumbing,” she said. “Our exterior water has been on and off for the last several weeks, but now seems to be working with an additional source ‘hosed in’ from a source further out on Pier 66. It’s a boathouse, so the ability to rinse with fresh water is critical.” According to Brous, hosing off is important because the Hudson’s water is deemed safe for secondary contact, such as boating, but not primary contact, such as immersion or swimming. Most of the boathouse’s doors are electrically operated, as well — and many of them quite heavy — which posed serious operating difficulties for the facility. “This has been a nightmare for tenants, many of them small businesses, and many others which serve the public through volunteer-run, free and low-cost programs with few resources, who couldn’t get their own systems back up, as Chelsea Piers and some of the larger ones did,” Brous said. “And it was a sad thing for neighborhood residents, since our only open space closed at 5 p.m. over the winter and is just now, seven months after the storm, seeing some real improvements.” The sailing and kayaking facilities both offer winter programs, she noted, which obviously suffered due to the power issue. The sailing program did temporarily relocate. But things, at last, appear to be tacking toward a return to normal for the boathouse. “So our offices are functioning again,” Brous said. “Our main overhead lights seem to be on the blink but hopefully will be fixed soon — hard to say if it’s a simple or serious problem. We have two porta-potties — and a source of fresh water for rinsing after boating. So we’re operating, getting back on our feet, finally.”


May 30 - June 5, 2013

Honoring L.E.S. avant-garde with first annual Acker Awards tAlkinG point BY CLAYTON PATTERSON As the tide of gentrification and the money it brings in its wake continues to wash away the creative culture that made the Lower East Side a world-renowned artistic center, I feel the need to somehow save, at least, an impression of what made the L.E.S. such a creative force. Creating my L.E.S. archive gave me an overview of the community, which inspired me to produce, with the help of others, three history anthologies: “Resistance: A Radical Social and Political History of the Lower East Side,” “Captured: A Film/ Video History of the Lower East Side” and “Jews: A People’s History of the Lower East Side.” The basic idea behind the books is to pick subjects that are of interest to me. Then, the next step is to find editors and writers who are related to the subject of the book or had an interest in the material. Next, develop a general history showing where the content fits into the history of the neighborhood. Finally, try and collect as much information that defines the subject of the book. My approach in these works was to layer the more publicly recognized between the lesser-known people. For example, when a reader is looking for an Allen Ginsberg, they can come across Ira Cohen or Lionel Ziprin. By placing everyone shoulder to shoulder, it makes everyone equal and opens the door to discovering new people, ideas and subject matter. The next step in preserving the area’s cultural history came about in an odd way. The writers organization PEN was soliciting a list of names for a recipient of the Benjamin Bradlee Editor of the Year Award. I heard about this award, suggested Jim Feast, and started a mini-campaign pushing Jim. One of the first people I contacted was Alan Kaufman. Born and raised in the Bronx, and now living in San Francisco, Alan is a writer, and has published a number of anthologies and books. His latest book, “Drunken Angel,” is drawing comparisons to Bukowski. Alan immediately got involved. But as we discussed campaign strategies, the idea rose to the surface: Let’s create our own award. We both agree that one of the major components that fueled so much of the creatively in New York City and San Francisco was the cheap rent and the chance to live an inexpensive lifestyle. And now gentrification has basically killed the muse. Our world has changed, so let’s find a way to bring recognition and honor to the creative individuals who inspired so much of what N.Y.C. represents and who have made, and continue to make, a significant contribution to our avant-

Clayton Patterson.

garde culture. Alan suggested we call the award the Acker Awards. It was agreed. Kathy Acker (1947-1997), born in New York City, had lived on the border of the L.E.S., was a radical thinker, had an original voice, produced novels, plays, essays, and was a performance artist. The Acker Awards are a tribute given to members of the avant-garde arts community who have made outstanding contributions in their discipline in defiance of convention, or else served their fellow writers and artists in outstanding ways. The award’s novelist namesake, in her life and work, exemplified the risk-taking and uncompromising dedication that identifies the true avant-garde artist. Acker Awards are granted to both living and deceased members of the New York or San Francisco communities. The cities were chosen for their historic linkage as centers for the avant-garde. In time, though, communities in other cities will be asked to participate. The providers of the Acker Awards are Alan Kaufman (San Francisco) and Clayton Patterson (New York City). The recipients were determined through extensive discussion with members of the arts communities in both cities. This year’s recipients will have the opportunity to both nominate and vote for future recipients of the Acker Awards. For more information go to: http://www. ackerawards.com. The Acker Awards ceremonies will be held in New York City and San Francisco, Thurs., June 6, 7 p.m. local time. The New York event will take place at the Angel Orensanz Foundation, 172 Norfolk St., and the San Francisco event will take place at VIRACOCHA, 998 Valencia St. at 21st St., in the Mission District. Both ceremonies are open to the public and free!

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May 30 - June 5, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

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DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00 PM MAIL 515 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212-229-2790 REAL ESTATE PALM SPRINGS, CA. TOWNHOUSE CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Please visit this link: www.alwaysonvacation.com and type in 809752 in the "where are you going" search bar for details about the property, include pictures IF INTERESTED, CALL 323-493-3114.

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francesco@thevillager.com 646-452-2496


May 30 - June 5, 2013

27

Photos by Anna Sawaryn

Crazy cab crash on 1st Ave. On Sunday at around 4:30 p.m. a cab drove into the fence at the Village View apartment complex at 40 First Ave., at E. Third St., above. The taxi then flew into reverse and sped across First Ave., mowing down a school-crossing sign and plowing into D.B.A., between Second and Third Sts., below. The bar’s sign came down, the awning was left dented and the wood frame around the window was broken. The hack reportedly had a seizure. Fortunately, no one was hurt.

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FREE

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May 30 - June 5, 2013

THE

CITY WINERY PRESENTS

5 THA

After Work

NNU

AL

Backyard

PARTY JUNE 4- AUG 27

MUSIC

TUESDAYS 5:00-7:30 LOCATION ENTRANCE ON SPRING ST.

BETWEEN VARICK & HUDSON SPRING ST.

6.4

DAVE DAVIES of The Kinks

6.11

LOS STRAITJACKETS

6.18

THE ENGLISH BEAT

6.25

BEN TAYLOR

JULY 7.2 7.9 7.16 7.23 7.30

8.6 8.13

1ST ANNUAL HOT STRINGS FEST: Michael Daves, Tony Trischka, Cynthia Sayer, Andy Statman

8.20

LOST BAYOU RAMBLERS

THE PIETASTERS 8.27 EILEN JEWELL w/ The End of America TIM O'BRIEN TULIPA RUIZ Presented In Association with Brasil Summerfest RASPUTINA

KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD

AN EVENING WITH

JOHN WATERS (ONE-MAN SHOW)

6/2 6/3

6/28 6/29

EARLY ELTON: A Tribute To Early Elton John

VARICK ST.

AUGUST

HUDSON ST.

JUNE

PARKING LOT VANDAM ST.

ALL AGES FOOD AND BEVERAGES AVAILABLE

CAROLYN WONDERLAND w/ Sasha Dobson

FOR PURCHASE

SUMMER MUSIC & JOHN FORTE' & 6/8 6/16 WINE PAIRINGS: LE CASTLE PRESENT: SUNSEY THE SUMMER OF LOVE - "MONTEREY POP"

LOUIS PRIMA JR. 7/22

IRIS DEMENT

& THE WITNESSES

155 VARICK ST. @ VANDAM • CITYWINERY.COM • 212.608.0555

7/25

CORY CHISEL

BLACK PRAIRIE W/ MICHAEL HURLEY

6/26

7/29


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