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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

May 8, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 49

Hoylman: Hit-run cyclists should be treated like drivers BY SAM SPOKONY

A

fter a state Senate staffer was nearly killed last month by an unidentified bicyclist who hit him and fled the scene, state Senator Brad Hoylman is calling for much stiffer criminal penalties for hit-and-run cyclists.

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

In Union Square, on May Day, a demonstrator brandished a plastic-protected Guy Fawkes “V for Vendetta” mask.

BY ALBERT AMATEAU

I

n an Occupy Wall Street case that has received heavy coverage, a Manhattan jury on Tuesday convicted Cecily McMillan, a 25-year-old New School graduate student, of felony assault of a police officer. On St. Patrick’s Day 2012, at the six-month anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street protests, police cleared activists from Zuccotti Park. McMillan’s

defense is that while she was exiting, Officer Grantley Bovell grabbed her breast from behind, and she reacted by jerking her elbow into his face, not realizing he was a cop. On Tuesday, Judge Ronald Zweibel remanded McMillan to custody at Riker’s Island without bail, pending sentencing on May 19. She could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison, but also could get probation with a suspended sentence and no

jail time. Her attorney, Martin Stolar, is filing a bail application. Stolar will request that, if granted, McMillan’s release on bail continue while her appeal is processed. After three hours, the jury returned its verdict. Some McMillan supporters cried out in grief and shed tears. Several repeatedly chanted, “Shame!” A man angrily shouted, “Bulls---!”

BIKE BILL, continued on p. 23

Closing in on 100, Professor Corey still cracking wise

Occupy activist found guilty of assaulting cop at Zuccotti P BY BETSY KIM

The Senate staffer, John Allen, 70, who lives on the Upper West Side, was walking across West 40th St. at Sixth Ave. on Mon., April 7, around 2 p.m., when he was mowed down by the speeding cyclist, according to police. The crash was so serious

rofessor Irwin Corey, in his frock coat, string tie and wild hair, emerged again last month to deliver another lecture. Corey’s appearance, for 20 minutes at the April 24 showing of Jordan Stone’s documentary “Irwin &

Fran” at the East Village’s Anthology Film Archives, brought the house down. Laughter has followed Corey for at least 80 years in a career of stand-up comedy, political satire and as an actor on stage, film and television. At the age of 99 (he was born in July 1914), Corey COREY, continued on p. 14

MCMILLAN, continued on p. 8

L.P.C. O.K.’s church tower; Cool on ‘cube’.........page 2 Downing St. devastated by domestic murder....page 4 www.TheVillager.com

Focus on Union Square....pages 15-22


L.P.C. O.K.’s church tower; Cool on Pastis ‘cube’ BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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fter decreeing that a previous tower plan was too tall, the Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday unanimously approved a retooled, somewhat smaller building for the Church of St. Luke in the Fields block. The commission also O.K.’d, with only one “no” vote, a rooftop addition for St. Luke’s School. The new designs were presented to the commissioners by the project architects, but this time no testimony from the public was allowed. The St. Luke’s block is bounded by Hudson, Barrow, Greenwich and Christopher Sts., which is within the landmarked Greenwich Village Historic District. The residential tower, a portion of which will be for affordable housing, is planned for the block’s southwest corner, currently an open-air parking lot. At 121 feet tall, the tower is now 32 feet, or three stories, shorter than the original design. A campanile, or slender tower, was removed from atop the earlier design. However, the building’s overall size has actually increased by 1,400 square feet, though the number of apartments is the same. The structure’s setback top portion will be clad in bronze with an oxidized finish that will age to a patina to match the roof of the historic church. Reverend Caroline Stacey, the rector of St. Luke’s, issued a statement following the approval of the project, which the church says it needs for its financial survival. “We are thrilled that that the Landmarks Preservation Commission agrees that the new residential building will be an appropriate contextual addition to the historic district,” Mother Stacey said. “We are delighted that 20 percent of the units will be affordable housing. We are also pleased that the approval of the school addition will enable more than 100 new seats to be added and will augment the church’s partnership with St. Luke’s School into the future. “This has been a community effort,” she said. “We appreciate the input our neighbors gave us as we pursued the redevelopment of our parking lot. The L.P.C.’s decision today will mean great things for the St. Luke’s community. The church will be able to enter the next chapter of its history with a stronger financial footing and an enhanced capacity to serve the community.” The church’s long-term goal includes building a new mission center at the block’s northeastern corner, where L.G.B.T.Q. homeless youth and H.I.V.-positive individuals could receive meals and shelter. The church currently has a Saturday night feeding program for this population that accommodates 80. But the program is outgrowing the space — which is why St. Luke’s wants to build a new mission center on the site of the school’s current playground at the corner of Hudson and Christopher Sts.

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May 8, 2014

A rendering of the new, approved design for the “100 Barrow St.” tower, center, on the St. Luke’s block.

Depending on how soon the project gets built, it could be the first affordable housing created in the West Village in years. Toll Brothers will construct the residential tower and receive a 99-year lease for it. Under the 421a program, in return for including the affordable units, the developer will receive a tax break. Commissioners voiced their approval of the redesign. The new version “feels much more akin to its neighbors,” said Michael Goldblum, adding, “I think that it is quite appropriate to the location, much more restrained. I can support this.” Nevertheless, another commissioner noted, “I would have liked to have seen it a floor or two shorter.” After giving all the other commissioners their turn to comment, L.P.C. Chairman Robert Tierney had the final word. “Greatly improved,” he said. “It’s appropriate for the district and it’s important for this institution.” However, Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, slammed the commission’s vote, as well as the lack of public input at the end of the process. The public had been allowed to weigh in with testimony on the original design earlier during the commission’s review. “We are deeply disappointed that the L.P.C. approved this revised design today,” Berman said. “The new design is substantially different than the old one, and yet the public was given no opportunity to review or comment upon this new application, which will have a profound visual impact upon the neighborhood. While we are grateful that the height of the tower was lowered somewhat, many of the other concerns we and many others expressed about the proposed new building and the additions to the school were not addressed. I think both the process and the outcome were flawed in this case.” In addition, the L.P.C. commissioners on Tuesday heard an initial presentation of a proposal to add a two-story, “cast glass” rooftop addition atop 9-19 Ninth Ave., in the

Gansevoort Market Historic District, a property that currently includes Keith McNally’s Pastis restaurant. George Schieferdecker, of BKSR architects, presented the design for the rooftop addition, while Elise Quasebarth, of Higgins Quasebarth and Partners, gave the history of the building. Schieferdecker said the Meatpacking District has a “robust discord” in its architecture, due to the many additions over the years of its use as a working marketplace. Gansevoort Plaza, as the five-way intersection that the property fronts on is known, has seen many changes since the Ninth Ave. El was demolished in 1940, he noted. “The source of the district’s evocative grit came from a distinct set of uses — but uses have changed,” he said. Quasebarth said the building’s “historical record is extremely complicated.” For example, in old photos, it’s often impossible to see what its first-floor uses were because they’re in shadow from an overhang. “There was a lot of construction, demolition, partial demolition, which gives a very ragtag appearance to the district,” she noted. At the same time, this offers an “exciting palette for new construction design ideas,” she added. In short, the proposal is to strip away much of the first-floor brick to expose castiron piers, and add the glass addition on top. The new rooftop structure would better enclose and define the plaza, Schieferdecker said, making the property “more of a player in the square.” The addition “helps to strengthen the character of that urban space,” he added. A 1-foot-by-1-foot prototype of the glass was carried around for the commissioners to look at. Another member of the presenting team added, “The character [of the glass] is a rawness and a texture that is akin to the Belgian blocks” that line the Meatpacking District’s streets. This time, the public was allowed to voice their opinions. Local residents were decidedly cool on what they blasted as a giant

and noncontextual “ice cube” that would be plopped on top of the key site. “A landmarked district is not supposed to be a palette for experimentation,” said Penny Mintz. “It will overwhelm Gansevoort Plaza,” said Zack Winestine, co-chairperson of the Greenwich Village Community Task Force. Drawing laughter, he added, “I’ve never heard anyone say, ‘You know, this plaza needs to be contained.’ ” Winestine said the community opposed an outdoor restaurant / nightclub scene that would surely occur on the new structure’s rooftop, but Schieferdecker said there are no plans for that. Martica Sawin said the light glaring out of the New School’s new building on 14th St. at Fifth Ave. at night has been a problem and the same thing could happen with this “glass ice cube.” “I was one of the people who got this district landmarked in 2003, and when I saw this design I nearly cried,” said Elaine Young. However, one person did speak in favor of the proposal, Rob Garcia, a local resident and partner in Urban Reality. “With other buildings, such as the Gansevoort Hotel, I think it brings a great mix,” he said. “I’m all for any enhancement to this district.” But Chris Terrio spoke to the need to previous “true grit” rather than grit in name only. “My grandfather worked for 40 years as a Teamster six block from that site,” he said. “It’s more than generic grit, theme-park grit.” The L.P.C. commissioners extensively discussed the application among themselves, and clearly felt it needs work. “I think the idea of using glass on the second floor is a little uncontextual, a little out of left field,” Goldblum offered. Frederick Bland said he was concerned about “the hovering of the big ice cube.” Joan Gerner said ripping out the firstfloor brick and putting on the glass addition made the building look like it was “teetering on high heels.” Again, Chairperson Tierney had the final word. “I think the nature of this discussion proves the importance of the district,” he stated, adding that Gansevoort Plaza is “the only true piazza in New York. It’s certainly a critical location,” he stressed. There was no vote. The applicant will have to present a redesigned plan if they hope to win approval. G.V.S.H.P.’s Berman said while the property is apparently still owned by the William Gottlieb company, the applicant has leased the site, and Gottlieb apparently has no involvement in the project. Whether Pastis would reopen in the renovated property is unclear. But it certainly wouldn’t seem to mesh with the kind of retro Belle Époque-style decor for which McNally is known.

TheVillager.com


DUANE WRITES: We hear from Fred Stabbert, III, publisher of the weekly Sullivan County Democrat, that former state Senator Tom Duane has become a familiar presence around the Upstate county. Stabbert tells us Duane is using his impressive height to get the, literally, top-shelf cans of tuna that no one else can reach. He also said that Duane is doing political consulting and writing a book. We’ll definitely be looking forward to reading Duane’s insider take on city and state politics — and, of course, we look forward to some juicy dish, such as, say, on his longtime ally Christine Quinn’s mayoral bid.

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FREED SADDLES UP FOR CAMPAIGN: Civil Court

Judge Kathryn Freed is running for State Supreme Court judge. We caught up with the former District 1 city councilmember at the Downtown Independent Democrats’ swanky fundraiser on Sunday at, of all places, the New York Athletic Club. The event was fittingly billed “Downtown Heads Uptown.” Freed said she’s doing great and loves living on Grand St., which she noted, “still has some places that have an edge.” As for why Freed is aiming to “move on up” in the judicial system, her friend Sean Sweeney of D.I.D. offered, “They just do that. You get better cases, more important cases. Article 78’s [legal challenges of government decisions] go to State Supreme Court.” Also, while we were up there we couldn’t help but notice, of course, all the horse-drawn carriages. We had forgotten — or never really fully appreciated — just how many of them there are, stretching all along the south side of Central Park from Fifth Ave. to Seventh Ave. An army of grimly trudging beasts, with blinders clamped on and pathetically prettified with little pink plumes stuck on their heads. No, not the out-of-towners, the horses! It’s no wonder the tourist-towing equine industry is fighting like mad to maintain their “hoof-hold” on Central Park South. Oh, yeah, and there was that simply wonderful aroma, too...of horse doo. Pee-yoo!

HERE WE GO AGAIN! Under former Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Council Speaker Christine Quinn, the city’s Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications made a couple of aborted tries at selling .nyc Web addresses to New York businesses or even for personal use, if we recall correctly. But, as we’ve reported many times before, Paul Garrin, the East Village connectivity guru, claims full ownership of .nyc and scores of other “top-level domain names” that he created before the Internet boom, and which are available for use, albeit on an “alternate root,” i.e. not the main Internet that most of us use, which is known as the “main root.” Now, Mayor Bill de Blasio is giving it another try, the New York Post reported on Tuesday. “There is no shortage of New Yorkers ready to claim their exclusive dot.nyc identities,” he said. According to the Post, “trademark holders with a physical address in the city will be able to apply through June 20.” We didn’t hear back from Garrin yet on what he thinks about this latest challenge to what he maintains are his legally protected domain-name rights.

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LOVIN’ BROTHERS JAM: Greenwich Village hometown

boys John, center, and Mark Sebastian performed together for the very first time in public on Sat., May 3, at the Cutting Room, on E. 32nd St., celebrating the release of Mark’s new album, “The Real Story.” Joining them for a surprise encore of “Summer in the City,” the No. 1 hit Mark co-wrote for John’s band, the Lovin’ Spoonful, was Mark’s nephew, singer/songwriter Ben Vita, far left. PHOTO BY GERARD FLYNN

AGENT OF P.I.Z.Z.A.: Actor Clark Gregg was spotted in the East Village Monday, at First St. and Avenue A. Gregg, Agent Phil Coulson of “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and Marvel superheroes flicks fame, was chowing down on some super-’za.

TheVillager.com

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OUCH! We’ve been getting some increasingly panicked phone calls from the JASA senior residence, at E. Fifth St. and the Bowery, about the fate of the Beth Israel painmanagement clinic in Zeckendorf Towers, on Union Square East. It seems some changes are afoot — or are rumored to be — now that Continuum Health Partners, Beth Israel’s umbrella health organization, has merged with Mt. Sinai Medical Center. Our source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said she relies on the clinic for regular shots to manage her back pain. If this top-notch facility changes too much, it will seriously be a real pain for her and many others, she said. May 8, 2014

3


Downing man who killed girlfriend had been troubled BY TEQUILA MINSKY AND LINCOLN ANDERSON

L

May 8, 2014

Dennis Guglielmo at his arraignment in Manhattan Criminal Court on Fri., May 2. He is charged with murder and criminal weapon possession.

he went to the apartment, saw the scene and called the police. Guglielmo is said to have known a lot of musicians from decades ago. As for Birnbaum, the neighbor said she was a designer of women’s eveningwear, selling it on the Internet. She had an apartment she got from her father, a retired doctor, in the E. 50s on Madison Ave. She was “sweet, very sweet,” the source said. “I asked Alice once, ‘Why is a nice girl like you with him?’” the neighbor recalled. “She said, ‘He has a heart of gold.’” A local merchant said Birnbaum had been very concerned during Guglielmo’s hospital stay, and that she had been monitoring his health. Guglielmo had admitted himself into the hospital because he had been unable to sleep for the two weeks prior. In the hospital, they put him on medications, but his condition was deteriorating and got worse, the storeowner said. Birnbaum was concerned and worked hard to get him out, the merchant said, adding that she kept in touch with the merchant, calling him daily. In a telephone interview, a friend of Birnbaum’s said they were part of a clique of women, friends from the music and fashion scene in the ’70s, who would get together regularly for lunch. She told The Villager that Birnbaum was “the most laid-back person” and wouldn’t have done anything to push Guglielmo’s buttons.

A January 2012 photo of Alice Birnbaum from her Facebook page.

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

4

PHOTO BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL

ast Thursday evening around 6:20 p.m., police responded to a 911 call of a female stabbed inside 38 Downing St. Upon arrival, they found Alice Birnbaum, 59, with multiple stab wounds to the chest. According to reports, she also had first been hit on the head with an ax. She was pronounced dead on arrival at the scene. Her boyfriend, Dennis Guglielmo, 69, was arrested and charged with seconddegree murder and criminal possession of a weapon. Like the rest of Downing St., the block, between Bedford and Varick Sts., is quiet and peaceful. Outside the second floor of 38 Downing St., an American flag hangs from the fire escape. Guglielmo, a former owner of Carmine Street Guitars, was described by neighbors as a “character.” The New York Times reported that Guglielmo had lost his rights to the guitar store after unsuccessfully suing his business partner. According to DNA info, Guglielmo had told neighbors he checked himself into Bellevue Hospital a week before the killing, but left days later because he may have had a bad reaction to medications he was prescribed. David Gruber, chairperson of Community Board 2, who lives a few blocks away, said he knew Guglielmo from the neighborhood, and that the man was extremely strong. He said when Guglielmo would shake his hand, he would basically crush it. Apart from Gruber, local residents and merchants spoke to The Villager about Guglielmo and Birnbaum only on condition of anonymity. One local man described Guglielmo as “a guy who wanted to be somebody and could have a menacing facade.” He called Birnbaum’s killing a brutal act of madness on an intimate block — but said nobody had felt Guglielmo was really capable of such a thing. He said Guglielmo had been married at least once and had at least four children, one of whom, Cachagua a.k.a. “Cush,” died at age 22. Guglielmo and Birnbaum were a familiar sight hanging out together at Carmine St. restaurants Numero 28 Pizza and Greenwich Village Bistro. Another neighbor told The Villager that Guglielmo recently told him he was feeling anxious and that he was checking himself into the hospital. He said Guglielmo’s brother, Peter, who also lives in the building, saw Guglielmo sitting on the stairs inside and asked him what was going on. Guglielmo reportedly answered, “I just killed Alice.” As the neighbor tells it, the brother said

Dennis Guglielmo is charged with murdering his girlfriend inside his third-floor apartment at 38 Downing St., above.

TheVillager.com


D.A. adds murder charge for driver in florist’s death BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

M

FILE PHOTO

anhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, Jr. on Tuesday announced that an intoxicated driver who crashed into a Second Ave. grocery store last June, injuring several employees, one of whom later died, has now also been charged with murder. Florist Mohammed Akkas Ali, who was in his early 60s, died earlier this year as a result of his injuries from the crash six months earlier. The driver, Shaun Martin, 33, now has been additionally charged in New York State Supreme Court, not only with murder in the second degree, but also two counts of aggravated vehicular homicide. Martin was initially slapped with seven charges, but that has now been boosted up to 15. He faces 25 years to life in jail. Other charges against him include assault in the first degree, aggravated vehicular assault, reckless endangerment in the first degree, driving while ability impaired by drugs, driving while ability impaired by combination of drugs and alcohol, assault in the third degree, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. “This defendant is charged with seriously

injuring multiple pedestrians, killing Mr. Ali, due to his extraordinarily reckless behavior,” Vance said in a press release on Tuesday. “Intoxicated driving, whether by drugs or alcohol, is completely at odds with the prospect of making New York streets safe for pedestrians and drivers alike. My office will continue to aggressively prosecute vehicular violence whenever supported by the evidence.” Martin is charged with speeding through the East Village in a white Nissan Altima at around 6:50 a.m. on June 19, 2013, while impaired by phencyclidine, commonly known as PCP, and methamphetamine. He reportedly cut across three lanes of traffic and drove onto the sidewalk. He struck multiple objects, including a fire hydrant, a pay phone, a muni-meter and a tree, before crashing into the flower stand at East Village Farm and Grocery, at E. Fourth St. and Second Ave. Three deli employees were struck, including Ali. The florist was in a coma for a couple of weeks, before regaining consciousness. But he never spoke or moved again, and eventually died due to his injuries. In a prior case, in 2007, Martin was convicted of operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs.

The out-of-control driver’s car that struck Mohammed Akkas Ali and two other deli employees last June 19 sat in a wreck near the store hours after the crash.

After the June 2013 crash, he was initially released on $100 bail. Then he was arrested for another incident, possibly drug-

related, and his bail was set at $1 million. But he was eventually held without bail, and remains in jail.

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Your contributions and volunteer work will help rebuild our beautiful garden TheVillager.com

May 8, 2014

5


POLICE BLOTTER as numerous other Newport cartons and scratch-offs) in his six previous robberies, has apparently been moving from north to south across the borough. His first four crimes, between last November and this February, all occurred on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side, police said. His next two hits, in late February and March, were in Midtown East and Gramercy Park, before his May 4 West Village robbery, according to cops.

Townhouse burglar busted A surveillance image provided by police of alleged suspect in convenience-store armed robberies.

Armed robber

Police are hunting for a cigarette-smoking bandit who has allegedly robbed seven Manhattan convenience stores at gunpoint since November, and whose latest escapade took place in the West Village. The suspect, pictured above in surveillance footage, entered the Two Friends store, at the corner of Eighth Ave. and Jane St., around 10:20 p.m. on May 4, police said.

He then reportedly displayed a handgun, ordered the store cashier to lie on the floor and zip-tied the victim’s hands together. The alleged thug then pulled out a taser and shocked the defenseless clerk several times, according to police. The suspect then reportedly grabbed $1,800 in cash from the register, along with seven cartons of Newport cigarettes and 29 scratch-off Lotto cards, and fled the scene. The gun-toting suspect, who had already bagged a total of more than $16,000 (as well

COMMUNITY MEETING! Proposed Meatpacking Area BID!

An effort is underway to create a business improvement district (BID) for the Meatpacking area and parts of southwest Chelsea that would continue and expand MPIA's current work in the neighborhood. Join us for an informational session to share feedback and ask questions.!

!

Wednesday! May 21! 6 – 8pm! Notre Dame School! Commons Room! 327  West 13th St! Proposed BID boundaries!

Questions?! www.meatpackingbid.org! BID@meatpacking-district.com! Meatpacking Area BID Formation Steering Committee!

6

May 8, 2014

Police arrested Dennis Altamirano, 30, early on May 5 after he allegedly broke into a West Village townhouse. The resident of the 151 Charles St. townhouse, a 76-year-old man, told cops he woke up around 12:30 a.m. after hearing the sound of breaking glass downstairs. Upon walking down to the ground floor, he was startled by the sight of Altamirano, who was climbing through a window after having bashed it in with a large cobblestone, according to the police report. “What are you doing here?” the senior reportedly asked, leading Altamirano to turn around and flee the building, police said. After the resident quickly called 911, cops canvassed the area and caught the crook several hours later nearby. Altamirano was charged with burglary, criminal mischief and possession of burglar’s tools.

Taxi trouble

A crazed cabbie tried speeding away from police during a routine traffic stop early on May 4, but all he wound up spending a night at the precinct. Officers said they first pulled over Sukhpreet Singh, 25, around midnight, while he was making a left turn from Washington St. onto Horatio St. But when they asked him to hand over his license, the cabbie reportedly said, “F--- you, I’m leaving!” and hit the gas. Singh blew through a stop sign trying to get away, but he soon gave up near the corner of Greenwich and Horatio Sts., just a block away, after he realized that cops were hot on his tail. The police immediately placed him under arrest. Singh was charged with reckless endangerment and obstructing governmental administration.

edly attacked a man who refused his panhandling pleas. The victim, 25, told cops Martinez approached him near the corner of W. Fourth St. and Sixth Ave., around 3:45 a.m., and asked for cash. When the man declined, the beggar reportedly rushed at him, pulled out a sharp scrap of metal and tried to slash him, police said. Nearby officers on patrol quickly spotted the incident and intervened before the victim suffered any injuries. Martinez was charged with attempted assault and criminal mischief. After being booked at the precinct, he was also linked to an East Village theft in October, and was slapped with an additional charge of petty larceny, police said.

Surprise attack

Police arrested William Curtis, 52, early on May 2 after he allegedly pummeled another man near Sheridan Square and stole his neck chain. The victim, 48, told officers he was walking along Christopher St., near Seventh Ave., around 3:45 a.m. when Curtis suddenly walked over and punched him in the face, dropping him to the pavement. Curtis then reportedly whacked the fallen man several more times, after which he snatched the chain and ran away, police said. But after the victim flagged down a passing police cruiser, officers canvassed the area and soon apprehended Curtis nearby. He was reportedly carrying the stolen chain, and was charged with robbery and grand larceny.

Subway snatch

Police arrested Daniel Giler, 29, early on May 2 after he allegedly snatched a man’s cell phone while riding the subway out of the Meatpacking District. The victim, 18, told police he was on a Brooklyn-bound L train that had just left the Eighth Ave. station around 4:30 a.m., when he felt a tug on his pants. After checking his pockets and looking around, he realized his Samsung Galaxy was no longer in his, but was instead in Giler’s hands. The alleged thief dashed into a different car. But it was to no avail, as he was apprehended by transit police after the train pulled into the Sixth Ave. station. Giler was charged with grand larceny.

Prickly panhandler

Police arrested Francisco Martinez, 48, early on May 5 in the Village after he alleg-

Sam Spokony

TheVillager.com


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May 8, 2014

7


Occupy activist found guilty MCMILLAN, continued from p. 1

8

May 8, 2014

PHOTO BY BETSY KIM

several times. McMillan’s supporters and reporters had filled the courtroom to its maximum capacity. About 30 court officers hastily cleared the courtroom and hallways. Near the courthouse steps, protesters erected a 10-foot-tall puppet — a defaced, blind figure of Justice with an upsidedown pink hand on its breast. Lucy Parks, read a statement written by McMillan and her supporters. “We are devastated by the jury’s verdict today,” it said, in part. “It has been clear from day one that Cecily has not received a fair and open trial. The job of a judge during a jury trial isn’t to guide the verdict to fit his opinion. Judge Zweibel, who consistently suppressed evidence, has demonstrated his clear bias by consistently siding with the prosecution. …” Midway through the trial, the judge issued a gag order on talking to the press. Stolar noted one basis for an appeal will be the exclusion of the information of two witnesses. They claim Bovell, on the night of McMillan’s arrest, intentionally banged the head of a handcuffed protester — one of the two witnesses — on the steps of a bus, according to Stolar. The other witness claims to have observed this. The judge ruled such evidence inadmissible as mere allegations. But the attorney asserts the information could have shed light on the officer’s conduct that night. McMillan remembered getting jerked up and back by someone grabbing her right breast from behind, then her head slammed into the ground. Stolar says police used excessive force in arresting McMillan, and that she suffered memory loss, seizure-like conditions and post-traumatic stress disorder. Bovell testified that while escorting McMillan from the park, she said, “Are you filming this? Are you filming this?” and that McMillan then crouched down, and jumped up, throwing her elbow into his eye. The officer said McMillan then ran off, and, in trying to stop her, he fell on top of her, while she had her hand above her breast. Assistant District Attorney Erin Choi accused McMillan of wanting to be “the face of the O.W.S. movement,” purposefully striking Bovell, exaggerating injuries, faking seizures and lying. During deliberations, the jury requested to view the video and medical records again. The prosecution introduced into evidence a short, dark and grainy video clip that showed McMillan swinging her elbow into Bovell and running a few steps before police descend upon her. The clip did not show what happened before she elbowed Bovell. Choi also introduced McMillan’s medical records, showing no concussion, no broken bones and a doctor’s diagnosis that McMillan’s conditions were most likely caused by hyperventilating and anxiety. The defense introduced into evidence photos of McMillan’s bruised and scraped body. A picture shows a hand-shaped

Cecily McMillan on Mon., May 5 — outside court as the jury was deliberating — the day her verdict was announced.

bruise above her right breast. Stolar called the photo, “the smoking gun in the case.” O.W.S. protesters charge police used excessive force to discourage voices of dissent on issues like advocating for income equality and decreasing corporate political power. Choi repeatedly tried to separate the elements of the charges — striking an officer, intending to interfere with his official duties — from any larger social movement. “This is a very simple assault case,” Choi said in closing arguments. “This is not about rich or poor or anything related to Occupy Wall Street. Our founding fathers did not create a right to free assembly so people could commit crimes and hide behind their right to protest. This is a sacred right that should be preserved and protected.” David Graeber, an anthropology professor at the London School of Economics, is often called an Occupy Wall Street founder. He is credited with coining the movement’s slogan, “We are the 99%.” He disagreed with Choi, saying the McMillan case sent a chilling message: “You do not have the right to freedom of assembly. Do not show up at a protest unless you are willing to face the possibility of torture, physical injury and years in jail.” The evening of the verdict, demonstrators gathered in Zuccotti Park to show support for McMillan. The Justice4Cecily support team sent out invitations for a Friday night potluck, so that people could socialize, discuss future actions and raise bail money. A Justice4Cecily core team member, Stan Williams, reflected on the heavily watched case. “Cecily went through the system, this meat grinder, like thousands of people do every day,” he said. “She went through this process and was spit out. The difference was that she had a support team and the media there, covering her case every day. I hope this helped shed a light on what happens in the criminal justice system.”

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Hudson Square BID speaks out, condemns Greenhouse BY SAM SPOKONY

A

fter initial silence regarding the crime-plagued Greenhouse nightclub, the Hudson Square business improvement district has decided to act against the interests of one of its own board members by opposing a new liquor license for the 150 Varick St. club. In an April 29 letter to the State Liquor Authority, the BID, known as the Hudson Square Connection, called on the S.L.A. to deny the club’s application to renew its liquor license, which expired on April 30. “Sadly, Greenhouse has an abysmal record of maintaining a safe, incident-free space and is more known for violent occurrences that mar its reputation,” the letter reads. “Any operation which endangers and severely discomfits our workers, residents and visitors is not acceptable and threatens to compromise all the progress we have made in recent years.” That letter was sent five days after The Villager published an article on Greenhouse, featuring quotes from a lengthy interview with John Maltz, who is both the nightclub’s landlord and a BID board member. In that article, Maltz largely dismissed local residents’ and elected officials’ condemnations of Greenhouse, while also defending the club’s new management,

which is apparently planning to renovate and rebrand the club after closing it down on April 21 following a spate of brawls and subsequent pressure from police. (No applications for construction permits have yet been filed for the club since the shutdown, according to city records.) The Hudson Square BID had declined to comment for the April 24 article, and at that point had not taken any public action against Maltz’s interests in the Varick St. building.

‘We’re hoping they never open up again.’ Richard Blodgett

Also in that earlier article, Maltz claimed that no commercial tenants within Hudson Square had complained to him about Greenhouse. But that was almost immediately proven to be false. On April 24 — the same day on which

this newspaper’s article published — one of the district’s most prominent businesses, the Trump Soho condo hotel, wrote a strongly worded letter to the S.L.A. opposing the club’s application to renew its liquor license. “The safety of the community, including guests of Trump Soho, has been jeopardized by violence at the club,” wrote Andreas Oberoi, the hotel’s general manager. Maltz did not respond to a request for comment for this article. Meanwhile, contrary to reports in various other media outlets, which stated that Greenhouse never applied to renew its liquor license before the April 30 expiration, the club’s management is still attempting to renew the license. William Crowley, an S.L.A. spokesperson, told The Villager on May 5 that Greenhouse did, in fact, submit a “timely” renewal application before its previous license expired. However, consideration of that application was initially delayed due to the S.L.A.’s ongoing legal proceedings against the club. The proceedings came to a close May 6, when the S.L.A. slapped the club with a $10,000 fine for, among other things, “failure to conform to [liquor license] application” and “failure to comply [with] health regulations,” according to S.L.A. documents and confirmed by Crowley. The club had previously received mul-

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tiple fines from the S.L.A. in recent years. It was also notably shut down for 10 days last year, on the order of a Manhattan Supreme Court justice, due to numerous violent incidents, including a 2012 brawl between famed rappers Chris Brown and Drake at Greenhouse’s downstairs club, W.i.P., located in the same building. The clubs had also been shut down briefly in 2012, immediately following the rappers’ altercation. Based on Crowley’s comments, it appears the S.L.A. is now in the process of considering the club’s renewal application. But the agency did not respond to a request for comment after the $10,0000 penalty was handed down on May 6. Greenhouse’s management could not be reached for comment. At least for now, residents around Greenhouse are enjoying the newfound tranquility as the club remains closed. “People who live here are so much happier now, especially the ones living right next to [Greenhouse] on Vandam St.,” said Richard Blodgett. Blodgett is president of the Charlton St. Block Association, which represents residents who have long railed against the club’s noise and violence and the alleged drug dealing that goes on outside it. “It’s just so much quieter at night,” he added. “We’re still hoping that they never open up again.”

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Bartender’s

Hard hats and masks at May Day rally in the square In Union Square, on May Day, an ironworker and City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito forged a brief connection as they took a selfie together, left. A demonstrator brandished a plastic-protected Guy Fawkes “V for Vendetta” mask, right. Though the mask is used by some as a symbol of anarchy and Occupy Wall Street, the image is licensed by a multinational corporation, Warner Bros., which earns royalties on each mask sold. Immigrant rights was the main issue of the “99 percent” at this May Day’s rally.

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Headdresses and hopes for help Women came to Union Square wearing headdresses for a “Rock A Crown for #234” rally this past weekend. They sought to bring awareness to the 234 teenage female boarding-school students abducted at gunpoint April 16 by Boko Haram Islamic militants in Nigeria, who reportedly want to sell the girls as brides.

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A vision for a safe Canal St., long overdue Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF LINCOLN ANDERSON

ARTS EDITOR

SCOTT STIFFLER

REPORTER

SAM SPOKONY

CONTRIBUTORS IRA BLUTREICH TERESE LOEB KREUZER JEFFERSON SIEGEL JERRY TALLMER

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR TROY MASTERS

SENIOR DESIGNER MICHAEL SHIREY

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CHRIS ORTIZ ANDREW GOOS

SENIOR VP OF ADVERTISING / MARKETING FRANCESCO REGINI

RETAIL AD MANAGER COLIN GREGORY

EDITORIAL

I

t almost seems as if there’s been a Canal St. traffic study for every car on the street. The roadway has long been a source of government-funded efforts — some with catchy acronyms like CATS, the Canal Area Transportation Study — so it was not surprising Canal is one of the 13 streets the city is trying to make safer with an “arterial slow zone.” Of the targeted areas, Canal is the deadliest per mile, according to the statistics the city Department of Transportation released with last week’s announcement about the zones. While other city streets, like Queens Boulevard and Atlantic Ave. in the Bronx, have seen many more deaths since 2008 (23 and 25, respectively) than Canal’s six, they’re about a death-per-mile lower than the 4-to-1 ratio on Canal’s shorter, one-and-a-half-mile stretch. And although there were six deaths too many on the Lower Manhattan street, that was actually a vast improvement over some years ago when there were 14 deaths over the six years ending in 2001.

The slow zone will have a modest drop in speed limit from 30 to 25 miles per hour, but even more important, there will be speedlimit signs, more enforcement and focus. The last one is probably the most important, because the reality is speeding is not the big problem on Canal. No doubt, many frustrated drivers turning off the West Side Highway waiting to get into the Holland Tunnel, or stuck as they wait to cross the Manhattan Bridge, would be willing to pay the price of a speeding ticket if that would get them moving faster. The street is a clear physical barrier that also literally divides Community Boards 1 and 2. That is one of the reasons that Lower Manhattan school advocates don’t see a proposed school just near Canal as a solution to school overcrowding problems because it would mean students as young as age 4 would be crossing the thoroughfare. Vehicles so dominate the area that they overwhelm pedestrians trying to cross the five to seven lanes of two-way traffic, or the long intersection at Hudson St. that sandwiches the tunnel entrance. There have been minor tweaks to the street over the years, which probably have helped reduce the death rate. Still, what is clear is that daily many people are visibly in fear because they walk so

cautiously when crossing. What’s needed is larger, more prominent crosswalks to send the unmistakable Ratso Rizzo message to drivers: “Hey! I’m walkin’ here!” (Dustin Hoffman’s most famous line from “Midnight Cowboy” was ad libbed when an impatient New York cabbie almost ran him over during filming.) Northern Boulevard, the site of D.O.T.’s slow zone announcement, will also be getting safer crosswalks at an intersection near a school. It is almost undoubtedly needed there, although it is notable that the boulevard’s zone is almost three times the length of Canal but has had one fewer death since 2008, five. As of now, there are no plans for additional safety measures in Lower Manhattan. The focus and stepped-up enforcement on Canal will unquestionably help. It’s all part of Mayor de Blasio’s worthy Vision Zero goal of eliminating all traffic deaths. In a practical sense, adding signs will make the speed limit drop infinite since many city drivers are unaware of a specific limit because they rarely see a sign. The arterial slow zone will be a big improvement, nevertheless, more will still need to be done. However, the city is thankfully moving in the right direction by implementing the Canal St. slow zone.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ALLISON GREAKER MIKE O’BRIEN ANDREW REGIER REBECCA ROSENTHAL JULIO TUMBACO

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Classic ‘menu speech’ To The Editor: Re “Renato Migliorini, 82, partner in Hudson restaurant” (obituary, May 1): Renato was one of my favorite New York City people — maybe even the absolute favorite. I’ll miss him, like everyone who ever had the honor of meeting, speaking and listening to his wonderful “menu speech.” I’d like to think I had more of a bond with him since Piccolo is my all-time favorite restaurant of anywhere. And I’ve been everywhere, man. Yale Gurney

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May 8, 2014

Mounds, Migliorini... To The Editor: Re “Park toilet tally” and “Gotta have park” (Scoopy’s Notebook, May 1 and April 24)

and “Renato Migliorini, 82, partner in Hudson restaurant” (obituary, May 1): Thanks, Scoopy and The Villager, for this coverage and update on the Washington Square Park bathrooms. Before the discussion of the park renovation’s phase three and the new building came to Community Board 2’s Parks and Landmarks committees, Rebecca Ferguson, the park’s former administrator, took a bunch of people on a tour of the existing three buildings, including the bathrooms, which many of us had never been in! The women’s bathrooms were in such disrepair and I can only imagine what the men’s room looked like. However, those discussions about phase three were chaired by then-Parks Committee Chairperson Tobi Bergman and there was never, to my recollection, discussion as to how many stalls there would be in the bathrooms. The “discussion” was

mainly on the building’s look, not the interior’s specifics. I always thought the building, from the architects’ design, looked like a suburban train station — and, indeed, it does. It’s pretty, in a sense, but I’m not sure it fits into Washington Square Park or its surroundings. Thanks also for the coverage of the park’s new “mounds” replacement, which Alan Gerson should feel good about. He and mounds advocates helped retain a similar play structure there, though the Parks Department did not want it. You can see how it’s one of the redesign’s most unique aspects. It encourages “spontaneous play,” which is what the original mounds set out to do. I used to live on Hudson St. one door down from Piccolo Angolo. Renato was always a smiling face and warm presence. One early morning, the heater or something in the basement

of my building started smoking. There was smoke in the groundfloor hallway and the fire alarm went off. I called the Fire Department and left the building with my one cat in a carrier. I could not get my other cat to come with us, so I just hoped, if it was a fire, that the firefighters would arrive in time. I was sitting on a bench outside the building at around 5 a.m. while, I think, the firemen were inside, when Renato (whose name I did not know) came in to work. He invited me into Piccolo Angolo, gave me espresso and talked to my cat. It was so sweet, he was so kind, and he allayed my fears. Although I have not lived at that address for a while, it is something I will never forget and a very “New York” moment. Cathryn Swan LETTERS, continued on p. 24

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Shoot! Who stole our historic iron coal chute cover? NOTEBOOK

heads in the early morning. You could order fresh milk delivered to your door. A stable for police horses was nearby, and a riding ring with ponies was on Charles St. It was a real Village. And you could buy a house for $30,000. These streets are no longer clogged with horse manure and dirty with coal and coal ash. And our houses are warm, as my “progressive” great-great-grandfather apparently hoped. But the mess hasn’t gone away. It has just gone elsewhere. Mountaintops are blown off. Streams are smothered in coal ash. Skies are blackened. Fracking poisons the land and water. I like to think my “progressive” great-great-grandfather would be pleased that at least some of his descendants — my older daughter, Neall, and her family — have turned from coal to solar power for all their electricity. As for the thieves — what use is a cast-iron coal chute cover bereft of its function and its history? Put it back!

BY OTIS KIDWELL BURGER

O

n Sat., March 15, a couple perhaps from around Westbeth was seen walking down Bethune St. and taking photographs. The man, tall and fiftyish, kicked the coal chute cover on the sidewalk in front of 27 Bethune St. and found that it was loose. About two hours later, around 2 p.m., another tall man was seen taking an orange D.O.T. cone from a car and placing it beside the fence in front of No. 27, then driving off. The witnesses — including myself — ran over and found ourselves staring at a 15-inch-wide round hole in the sidewalk. A police car happened by. They thought D.O.T. had taken the coal chute cover for repairs. Then five large firemen came and pushed a heavy planter over the hole. Then E.P.A. came, but the hole was now blocked. A policeman strode about my living room shouting into a cell phone, “No, no, not a manhole cover.” A family friend said, “These sell for $2,000 to collectors. There is a black market in historic ironwork.” (And, indeed, in 1960 two ornamental cast-iron pillars had been stolen from our front stairs.) The police finally decided to treat this as a crime.

Once, these sidewalks were brightened by many coal chute covers, in many designs.

It was a handsome cover, like a small manhole cover, cast iron with “Hudson River Iron Works” and stars on it. It came with the house when we bought it in 1959, but it was no longer in use; the old coal-burning furnace had already been converted to oil. In 1821, when my great-great-grandfather William Henry Willcox was born on Cedar St. in New York City, central heating “was far in the future.” He wrote his memoirs when he was in his 80s, describing life in the city. Heating came from fireplaces, and “cooking was done in a fireplace provided with a great crane and hooks...holding pots and kettles over a wood fire.” But “father was somewhat of a progressive,” and soon installed a coal-burning cast-iron range instead, and later a “Nott’s stove” in the hall near the parlor. But “its promise quite out ran its performance.” The parlor, dining room and bedrooms had fireplaces, but the attic rooms, where the boys and servants slept, were “as frigid as the streets,” in winters so cold the Hudson froze from shore to shore. The kitchen was the warmest room in the house. One hundred years later, when I was born, my grandmother’s Staten Island house did have a coal-burning furnace, but her cooks still used a coal-burning cast-iron range. Coal was kept in a bin in the cellar. It was impressively black and beautiful. Magic stones that burned! No.’s 27 and 29 Bethune St. were built in 1836 as an “Uptown Speculation.” They stand on landfill, where

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This coal chute cover on W. 11th St. is similar to the one — also made by Hudson River Iron Works and sporting stars — that the writer says was filched from in front of her Bethune St. home two months ago.

there was once a farm belonging to Joanna and Divvie Bethune. No. 27 has a big coal storage space beneath the coal chute which opens on the sidewalk. Our coal-burning furnace had been converted to oil, but one neighbor on Bethune St. still remembers coal rattling down the chute of her family’s house in the ’30s and the problems of disposing of the ash. The house next door, No. 25, never did have central heating and was renovated with electric heat in each apartment. Its coal chute cover was stolen 20 years ago, and like many others, the hole was cemented over. I think my cover was the last on the block. Once, of course, these sidewalks were brightened by many coal chute covers, in many interesting designs. …. Coal-burning furnaces lingered here and there for a while. In 1959, a store on Barrow St. still sold coal, ice and kerosene. The West Village was a waterfront area, with rooming houses and seamen’s bars. The rag-andbone man rode a horse-drawn cart with a bell. A scissors grinder proclaimed his services as he walked. “White Wings” sanitation men pushed carts full of brush brooms and a couple of garbage cans. The Meat Market had street-side barrels full of entrails and calf

Fear and loathing in ’88

FLASHBACK

T

he top story in The Villager’s Jan. 7, 1988, issue, “Fear Demolition Will Ruin Neighbor,” detailed how Joe Roberto, longtime curator/director of the Old Merchant’s House, at 29 E. Fourth St., worried that an abutting building’s upcoming demolition and new parking lots could harm the then-155-year-old landmark. The other Page 1 story, “Effective Crack Busts Clean Up the Jane Street Area,” reported on robberies, drug dealing and prostitution around the old Jane West Hotel. However, the problem apparently hadn’t been wiped out. Sandy Anderson, manager of the freshly renamed Riverview Hotel, said, “If [police] do a sweep of Washington Square Park, they (the dealers) come over here. If they do a sweep of that park on Eighth and Gansevoort [he probably meant Jackson Square], then they come here. It’s like spraying for cockroaches, and they don’t have enough Combat.”

EVAN FORSCH

May 8, 2014

13


‘World’s Foremost Authority’ still going strong at 99 COREY, continued from p. 1

14

May 8, 2014

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

shows few indications of slowing down. He went to the film showing with his son, Richard, and Jim Drougas, a friend and the owner of Unoppressive Non-Imperialist Bargain Books, on Carmine St. “He climbed the three flights of stairs to the auditorium,” Drougas said, “and after the film he got up holding his walker in one hand and the microphone in the other and had everyone in stitches.” “An audience always gives him a surge of energy,” his son said later. The film, about Corey and his wife of 71 years, who died in 2011, features the comedian Dick Gregory and is narrated by Susan Sarandon. Last Sunday, Corey entertained Drougas and two visitors from The Villager at his home in East Midtown where the conversation turned to show business, show reviews and politics, the latter a frequent topic with Corey, who embraces the radical left with both arms. “Jim, show them the picture with Richard and Fidel Castro,” he called to Drougas. “You know, Obama has Alzheimer’s,” he told his guests with a straight face. “He forgot all the campaign promises he made.” Corey was blacklisted in the 1950s. “When I tried to join the Communist Party, they wouldn’t have me because they said I was an anarchist,” he said. “I think I am.” A middling review in Variety of “Irwin & Fran” didn’t seem to trouble Corey. “Kenneth Tynan [a distinguished theater critic] came to see me at The Establishment in London, the place where Lenny Bruce recommended me,” Corey recalled. “The Variety reviewer said I was the worst failure he had ever seen and that I ought to change my act — I was held over for seven weeks.” Tynan, however, had written that Corey was “a cultured clown, a parody of literacy, a travesty of all that we hold dear and one of the funniest grotesques in America.” Corey took on the comedy persona of “The World’s Foremost Authority” early in his stand-up career. The act opens with him franticly searching his pockets for notes,

Irwin Corey with a photo binder of family members in his Sniffen Court residence.

losing them again and opening with the word, “However… .” “I was playing the Village Vanguard in 1942 when Richard Dyer-Bennet [a renowned folk singer] introduced me as ‘professor’ because I was giving a lecture on Shakespeare that began with, ‘In the play, “Othello,” which we know as “Hamlet,”’” he recalled. “The Vanguard paid me $40 a week — that was four times the average annual salary at the time, and they raised me to $60,” he said. Corey’s conversation, especially about politics, is full of statistics. How does he remember all those facts and figures? “I make up what I don’t know,” he confessed. Corey was born in Brooklyn, one of six brothers whose parents had to give them up periodically to the Hebrew Orphan Society. “In 1933 I went to California and got into a school, Belmont High in Hollywood,” he said, recalling that he had a part in the school production of “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” a popular play written by George M.

A framed photo of Corey embracing Fidel Castro in 1993. Castro signed the piece of paper that goes with it, “For Irwind [sic] Corey, with admiration, gratitude and affection.”

Classic Professor Corey.

Cohan 20 years earlier. In 1934, the budding actor returned to New York. It was the beginning of the Great Depression, and Corey became involved in left-wing politics, show business auditions and boxing in the Golden Gloves as a featherweight — 112 pounds. Corey said he doesn’t remember when he became aware of politics, but one of his many scrapbooks has an article dated 1927 about Sacco and Vanzetti, two anarchists executed for murder. They were a cause célèbre in the late 1920s; Corey was 13 at the time of their deaths. Around 1938, Corey landed a minor part in a Borscht Circuit show, “Pots and Pans,” and his career began in earnest. He is proud of his role as the gravedigger in “Hamlet,” directed by Zoe Caldwell. “I played another Shakespeare character, Christopher Sly [“Taming of the Shrew”], a drunken tinker who thought he was a lord,” he recalled. Corey is satiric and skeptical about religion as well as politics. “Yip Harburg — he wrote ‘Finian’s Rainbow’ — wrote a play called ‘Flahooley’ that

I was in,” he recalled. “It was picketed by Catholics for being anti-religious but it ran for 44 performances. “I played the Copacabana in 1947 or 1948. Joe E. Lewis [a comedian and singer of the time] refused to play on Yom Kippur, so he recommended me because he knew I didn’t give a kipper about any of that,” Corey recalled. He likes to say, “I’m a Jew but I’m not Jewish.” In 1974 he bought the house in Sniffen Court, in the E. 30s, where he still lives. The duplex’s ground floor is full of memorabilia, including paintings by his son Richard. One of Corey’s grandsons, the son of his daughter Margaret, who died in 1997, looks after him. “When I bought the house, the taxes were $3,000 a year. Now they’re $18,000,” he said. “That’s illegal. The Constitution says that Congress may levy taxes, not the city or state. If I live another 10 years, it will cost me $180,000 to live here.” Corey is optimistic about his future. “I saw on television,” he told his guests, “that a man in India was 200 years old. Another guy was 250 years old.”

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A Salute to Union Square INSIDE Tulips and tech......pp. 16-17 Park eatery prevails.....p. 18 The 411 on 4th Ave.....p. 19 Slidin’, not slippin’......p. 20 The juice is loose!.......p. 21

A SPECIAL VILLAGER SUPPLEMENT A farmer selling wheatgrass in the Union Square Greenmarket, above. PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

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PAGES 15 TO 22 May 8, 2014

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Celebrating the strength of our community, from tech to tulips BY JENNIFER E. FALK

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ere at the Union Square Partnership, we work with our community and government partners to support the district’s growth and showcase what makes our part of town one of the most dynamic 24/7 neighborhoods in the world. Through a series of targeted investments, including our clean and safe programs, our beautification efforts, our community programming and capital projects, we dedicate ourselves year-round to ensuring Union Square remains vibrant. Those efforts have kept the area buzzing with energy, as a mix of cutting-edge businesses, diverse retailers and delicious restaurants have moved into the neighborhood over the past year. As one of the city’s highest-trafficked retail destinations, Union Square draws nearly 350,000 pedestrians daily and more than 35 million annual subway riders. The neighborhood’s popularity has kept the ground-floor retail vacancy rate at a low 2.9 percent. This past year, 50 new businesses opened, from critically acclaimed restaurants, such as All’onda, The Fourth and ABC Cocina, to retailers, such as Athleta and Scotch & Soda. Complementing the new gyms and juiceries that are building the square’s reputation as a health and wellness hub, Elizabeth Arden also premiered its next-generation spa and beauty boutique, The Red Door. The technology and creative-services sectors continues to take root in Union Square, as Yelp expanded its office, Spotify grew its headquarters location and MasterCard and Mashable have both signed leases. According to Jones Lang LaSalle, Midtown South saw the Big Apple’s largest share of tech leasing, accounting for 43.9 percent of the city’s activity, and Union Square is most certainly at the heart of the city’s booming digital growth. To keep up with this influx of businesses and the expansion of existing ones, the Union Square Partnership has brought more amenities to the area and ensured that the neighborhood remains clean and inviting. Last summer, we continued our work in the community by increasing our free public Wi-Fi network capacity eightfold to accommodate more users than ever before. We also expanded our popular Summer in the Square program with additional fitness classes and performances for all ages in the park. And during the winter months, we lit up 14th St. and the area surrounding the park with 80 festive holiday lights. The culmination of our work so far in 2014 has been the completion of the northend renovation project with the opening of The Pavilion, a beautiful new seasonal

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May 8, 2014

Jennifer Falk.

restaurant open to all park visitors. When patrons enjoy al fresco dining in the park at The Pavilion, they are also helping support vital city services — like the salaries of teachers, firefighters and police officers — as a portion of the revenue generated by the concession goes directly back to the city. Also in the square’s north end is the treasured Evelyn’s Playground. It’s hard to believe it opened five years ago! The playground has seen a ton of foot traffic during its first five years of operation, so we were happy to dedicate $150,000 in donations from local residents and businesses to install a brand-new safety surface for our littlest constituents this spring. All of this work helps ensure our park will endure as the city’s favorite place to recreate. In everything that we do, we work with a long list of partners. We are deeply grateful to Mayor de Blasio and his administration, our local Councilmember Rosie Mendez, the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, and Community Board 5 for their ongoing support, and to all of our property and business owners, our residents and area employees, our city and state representatives, our board of directors, and our staff and vendors, for their collective contributions to our work over the years to make Union Square a neighborhood for everyone. Please check our Web site, unionsquarenyc.org, for upcoming community events on both the north and south plazas this summer. We look forward to welcoming you to the Square! Falk is executive director, Union Square Partnership

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

The Union Square station is the city’s fourth busiest subway stop on weekdays and second busiest on weekends.

Apple, Yelp, Mashable all dig the new Digital District BY LAUREN VESPOLI

P

alo Alto, San Francisco…Union Square? At the rate tech companies have been gobbling up 14th St. real estate, Lower Manhattan is on track to become the next Silicon Valley. According to Scott Hobbs, deputy director of the Union Square Partnership business improvement district, the area’s tech real estate boom took off around 2011. First, Apple iAD, Apple’s advertising business, signed a lease at 100-104 Fifth Ave., at 15th St. Yelp signing its first 10,000-squarefoot lease in the same building later that year. Then came Knewton, an education technology company, leasing another 10,000 square feet in the building. Fast-forward three years later, and the Yelp office has grown seven times over, to 70,000 square feet. Union Square, conceived in the 19th century as a physical link between Broadway and the Bowery, has become Manhattan’s Digital District, and the tech industry’s appetite for real estate in the district is practically insatiable. In December, MasterCard signed a 10year lease for a 58,000-square-foot space at 114 Fifth Ave., at 15th St., to house a tech lab focused on research and development, as well as software design. Days later, digital media company Mashable signed a 10-year deal for 38,580 square feet of space for its new headquarters in that same building. Urban Compass, a tech-focused real estate brokerage startup, recently expanded into a second office, a 9,000-square-foot space at 19 Union Square West. “Tech companies are excited by the creative energy in the 14th St. area,” said

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Hobbs. Companies are drawn to the fact that the Union Square area is a mixed-use neighborhood with an intersection of residential, commercial and retail spaces. “Many of these companies — they’re not working nine-to-five,” he noted. “They need nightlife and activities for their employees to take part in when they’re getting out of work late at night or in the morning.” According to Hobbs, leasing this year has been “incredible,” in Midtown South, the real estate term for the area including Union Square. The district’s commercial vacancy rate has hit a recent low of 7.7 percent. Part of what contributes to the area’s vibrancy is Union Square’s role as a transit hub for commuters and pedestrians. According to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Union Square subway station is the fourth busiest subway stop on weekdays and the second busiest on weekends. In 2013, 34.6 million riders passed through the 14th St. Union Square station. The area also has a remarkable pedestrian headcount. In 2012, the last year for which such data is available, an estimated 350,000 pedestrians passed through the square on a summer Greenmarket Friday. Despite the district’s existing advantages, such as commuter convenience, the BID continues to focus on making the area an appealing environment for tech offices.    “If you don’t want to sit in your office and work, you can bring your laptop down to the park and work on our complimentary WiFi,” Hobbs said. “I don’t know that there are many districts where you have the ability to have so many spaces to come and work.” May 8, 2014

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Restaurant finally opens in Union Square pavilion BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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May 8, 2014

In a major renovation project, the Union Square pavilion has been spruced up inside and out.

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

ell, in the end, Mayor de Blasio didn’t nix the contract for the new seasonal restaurant concession in the renovated Union Square pavilion. Local advocates and politicians, at recent rallies outside the historic park building, had vocally called on him to do just that. As public advocate, de Blasio had written a letter to the State Liquor Authority urging that a liquor license for the place be denied. But the new eatery called, fittingly, The Pavilion Market Cafe, opened late Thursday afternoon for dinner. However, some call it the “most controversial restaurant in New York” due to the protracted legal battle. The private concession had been approved under former Mayor Bloomberg, but was then tied up by a community lawsuit that sought to block it, on the grounds that it represented an illegal use of public park property. The pavilion would first need to be “alienated” — or removed from park use by the state Legislature — the lawsuit plaintiffs argued, ultimately unsuccessfully. Shortly after 10 p.m. last Thursday evening, the place was pretty packed with patrons, both at the tables, as well as at the full bar, in the pavilion’s southeast corner. Waiters and staff, a seemingly disproportionate number of them male, were whisking about in light-green green aprons. The place was suffused with light from white globe fixtures hanging from the ceiling, as well as light glowing up through opaque white glass-block floor tiles. The evening’s warm temperature was, well, just about perfect for dining in the open-air pavilion. There are heat lamps for when it turns colder. Maitre d’ Paula Nielacna said the 160seat eatery will be open seven days a week, from 11 a.m. to midnight. In the coming weeks, they’ll be adding lunch, she said, then brunch on weekends and, finally, breakfast, when the place will start opening at 8 a.m. The outdoor seating area in front of the pavilion would be open as of Monday at 11 a.m., she added. The chairs and tables were already out there last Thursday night, but they weren’t being used. Right now, she said, they are taking only walk-in customers, but will eventually be moving to reservations. Theater producer Frank Zuback was exiting after a satisfying dining experience. He said he knows the chef and the owner. “My wife writes a food blog,” he added. “The tuna tartare was spectacular,” he said. For his entrée, he had short-rib ravioli — also tasty, he said.

“The butter here is really good, too,” he raved. “It’s got saffron in it, and it’s really creamy.” He enjoyed a glass of pinot noir, and topped it all off with a devil cake featuring pistachios and raspberry sorbet. The bill came to $60, plus tip. That didn’t include the two Scotches he knocked back at the bar. But the tab didn’t seem to faze Zuback, producer of “Moulah,” which he’s hoping will make it to Broadway. “Not on your cheap list, but not very expensive either,” he offered, giving his overall assessment. “Mario, the chef, has done himself well.” He said he knew that, admittedly, there had been some controversy when the previous chef bailed. “It’s going to be a good place,” he predicted. “I’ll be coming back, and bringing friends.” Former City Councilmember Carol Greitzer has been a leading critic of the pavilion restaurant plan. She and her fellow opponents spent 10 years fighting the eatery initiative, both in and out of court. “The legal case is over, but I’m not so certain that the issue is altogether over,” she said this week. “The mayor took the easy way out by not doing anything, but he does have the power to stop the restaurant and close it down.” Greitzer and her allies feel the pavilion should be used for children’s activities and other community-oriented purposes. “Ironically, the playground is closed now for repairs due to heavy use,” she said. “Disabled kids could have used the pavilion. It could have been a sheltered recreation space during summer storms.” Greitzer also objected to a liquor-licensed premises being located right next to a playground. “I could see beer bottles being thrown over the top,” she said. “It’s probably not going to happen — but it’s a possibility. “The pavilion was also used for freespeech activities,” she added, “like the first Labor Day celebration in 1892. It was these activities that made Union Square a national landmark.” However, Jennifer Falk, the executive director of the Union Square Partnership, sees only good in the new gustatory presence. “This terrific new amenity enlivens the park, activating the north end and making it safer for all who visit,” Falk said. “The restaurant has also created 100 jobs, and patrons should know that a portion of the revenue generated goes back to the city and will fund vital services, like the salaries of teachers and firefighters. “We are grateful to the de Blasio administration for supporting this effort,” Falk said. “And whether it’s to play in our wonderful 15,000-square-foot playground or grab a delightful meal al fresco at the seasonal concession, we look forward to welcoming everyone to Union Square Park this summer.”

Waiters were bustling about in the busy new The Pavilion Market Cafe on opening night last week.

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With Hyatt and more, Fourth Ave. becoming second to none PHOTO BY ALAJOS SCHUSZLER COURTESY NYC DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

BY LAUREN VESPOLI

F

Snapshot of snack scene On May 5, 1934, in Union Square, a vendor was selling bananas, soda, cigars and cigarettes, Graham crackers and vanilla Milky Way bars.

ourth Ave. has long been known as a pipsqueak among Manhattan’s boulevards. However, this eightblock stretch has recently been enjoying a renaissance, and is closer than ever before to holding its own against its more illustrious and lengthy neighboring avenues. “Fourth Ave. has seen an enormous amount of growth in the past couple of years,” said Jennifer Falk, head of the Union Square Partnership. At the end of last April, the Hyatt Union Square opened at the corner of Fourth Ave. and 13th Street, along with its two in-house restaurants and a bar. Visitors to The Fourth, an American brasserie, will be struck by the hanging sculpture of wooden bedframes and chains by artist Brinton Jaecks. Singl Lounge, the hotel’s first-floor bar, takes its name from its selection of 100 single-malt Scotches. At the subterranean level is Botequim, a South American restaurant serving small plates. “The Hyatt has spurred a lot of businesses to move in,” Falk said, “but many of the existing businesses also took notice.”

Perhaps Walgreens was inspired by the Hyatt’s gourmet cuisine when it reopened its remodeled Fourth Ave. flagship store this January. This two-story outpost of the nation’s largest drugstore chain has its own made-to-order food counter — Up Market — with a sushi chef crafting fresh seaweed rolls, in addition to offering juices and frozen yogurt. Upstairs, amidst the toothpaste and deodorant, customers will find yoga mats for sale. Further south, popular fast-casual restaurants, such as taco joint Dos Toros, Glaze Teriyaki Grill and Pie Face, which opened last year, are enjoying the growth of the neighborhood. “Many of these businesses, like Dos Toros, are doing extremely well,” Falk said. After all, tech workers on the square and a few blocks south need somewhere to pick up lunch. South of the square near Astor Place, 770 Broadway houses Facebook’s New York office. Last May, the social-networking giant took 100,000 square feet in the building, and added 60,000 square feet to its office at the end of March. “Lease signing in the tech industry is driving secondary improvements throughout the district,” said Falk.

BUCHBINDER & WARREN SALUTES THE SPIRIT OF UNION SQUARE ALWAYS CHANGING AND ALWAYS VIBRANT

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Brokerage Services 212-243-2200 Director: William Abramson wabramson@buchbinderwarren.com

www.buchbinderwarren.com May 8, 2014

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

Looks like the fix is in for the children’s playground Union Square’s Evelyn’s Playground has been closed for a few weeks for a $150,000 renovation of its safety surface. Generous contributions of local residents and businesses who support the Union Square Partnership’s work in the park is making this happen. This work is necessary because of the heavy use that the popular play space has experienced since opening in December 2009. Work started at the end of April and should finish by next week, so the playground will be open for use before the start of the busy spring/summer season.

PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Farmers showcased their fresh produce at the Union Square Greenmarket. The Greenmarket is open on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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May 8, 2014

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Juice and gyms give boost to a healthy-living area BY LAUREN VESPOLI

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

ith the park and the Greenmarket, which was founded in 1976, Union Square has a history of facilitating healthy living for New Yorkers. Now, high-end juice shops and niche fitness centers have infiltrated the neighborhood, and it’s easy to connect these developments to the youthful corporate culture of tech companies, known for emphasizing a work-life balance and active, healthy lifestyles. The new Union Square fitness centers are not your regular gyms, but rather studios for the practice of current workout trends. Walking up to 14th St. along University Place, it’s hard to miss signs for the new Reebok FitHub, slated to open this month at 1 Union Square West. FitHub is Reebok’s 4,800-square-foot ground-floor retail space, combined with a 6,800-square-foot basement cross-fit center. In addition, the neighborhood’s second SoulCycle recently opened at 8 W. 19th St., a mere one block from the popular original Union Square location, at 12 E. 18th St., where celebrities such as Jake Gyllenhaal have been known to attend classes. Accordingly, the number of places at which one can grab a post-workout kale juice or quinoa bowl is also on the rise. Per-

Jump-ropers got some exercise on Union Square’s south plaza on 14th St.

haps, after a rigorous cycling cession, you crave a “pre-industrial” meal? Hu Kitchen, at Fifth Ave. and 14th St., specializes in dishes created with food ingredients that could have existed before the Industrial Revolution. The restaurant, which opened in fall 2012, includes menu items such as an “Organic Primal Kale Salad” and chocolate chia pudding. Feel Food, a cafe and juice bar that advertises yucca puffs and hibiscus crackers in its salad bar, opened last October and is located on Sixth Ave. in between 12th and 13th Sts. However, those in the mood for a freshly pressed juice won’t have to go all the way

over to Sixth Ave. Liquiteria, the coldpressed juice chain that began in New York in 1996, this year signed leases on two spaces on either side of Union Square Park. On the west side of the park, a store opened in February at 17th St. between Broadway and Fifth Ave., and a Union Square East shop is slated to open later this spring at the corner of 13th St. and Fourth Ave. “The fact that they think the Union Square area can support two locations on either side of the park speaks to the strength of the district,” said Jennifer Falk, executive director of the Union Square Partnership. For those in search of a free workout,

Falk’s business improvement district also runs fitness classes in Union Square Park as part of its “Summer In the Square” weekly entertainment series. Last summer, the Partnership partnered with Paragon Sports to offer fitness classes, including a weekly running club, a boot camp class from Circuit of Change, and yoga classes from Jivamukti, a popular local yoga school. And, in keeping with Union Square’s role as a transportation hub, according to Falk, since Citi Bike’s installation last spring, Union Square is the number one location for bike drop-offs and pickups, with 485 docking stations in the district. But the area’s desirability runs deeper than fancy workout classes or high-end juice bars that draw visitors. A the center of it all, is the park itself, along with the Greenmarket. On a recent spring day in Union Square Park, the tulips and cherry blossoms were in full bloom. Tourists sat on benches perusing guidebooks, while shoppers browsed the Greenmarket, in search of a wine from Upstate or cheese from Vermont. The BID constantly works to keep the park looking great with plantings and ongoing gardening and maintenance. “We believe that the health and wellness of the park is a reflection of health and wellness of the district as a whole,” Falk said. “We are working right now to make Union Square looks its very best for the spring and summer.”

www.reddenfuneralhome.net

JUNE 9 TO AUGUST 22 BOYS & GIRLS · AGES 5-14 FROM

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May 8, 2014

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THE UNION SQUARE PARTNERSHIP IS PROUD TO PRESENT

FITNESS South Plaza at 7 AM and 8 AM, North Plaza at 6 PM, 6:30 PM and 7 PM.

KIDS South Lawn (behind George Washington statue) at 10 AM & South Plaza at 11 AM.

JAZZ West Side Seating Area at 12:30 PM Performed by The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music.

THURSDAY JUNE 12

THURSDAY JULY 3

THURSDAY JULY 24

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Gazillion Bubble Show Baby Loves Disco Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Performance by Peridance Contemporary Dance Company CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

THURSDAY JUNE 19 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids CPF Marionette Show - Little Red’s Hood Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Salsa with Baila Society CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

THURSDAY JUNE 26 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Rolie Polie Guacamole Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Hip Hop with Princess Lockerooo CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Shira & Friends Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Salsa with Baila Society CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

THURSDAY JULY 31

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Joanie Leeds Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Zumba with Sifa CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

THURSDAY JULY 17

THURSDAY AUGUST 7

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM

7:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Story time with OLIVIA™ Hot Peas ‘n Butter Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Performance by Peridance Contemporary Dance Company CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Suzi Shelton Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Salsa with Baila Society CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

Note: schedule subject to change *class is from 6 PM – 7 PM

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 SUMMER IN THE SQUARE SPONSORS FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT Sponsors:

Connect

With support from:

with us!

www.unionsquarenyc.org www.facebook.com/summerinthesquare www.unionsquareblog.org @UnionSquareNY @UnionSquareNY

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May 8, 2014

South Plaza at 5 PM Learn to dance with our partners at Peridance.

Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Karen K and The Jitterbugs Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Hip Hop with Princess Lockerooo CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

THURSDAY JULY 10 Wake Up Yoga with Atmananda CrossFit with Reebok Yoga StoryTime with Karma Kids Mike Messer of the Dirty Sock Funtime Band Lunchtime Jazz with The New School Hip Hop with Princess Lockerooo CrossFit Bootcamp with Brick New York* Running Club with Paragon Sports Wind Down Yoga with Om Factory

DANCE

Free!

WE’RE HERE TO SERVE YOU. Proudly serving the neighborhood for over 37 years, the Union Square Partnership is the leading advocate for the Union Square-14th Street community, working collaboratively with area residents, businesses and cultural and academic institutions to ensure the district’s continued growth and success. Our mission is to enhance the neighborhood’s quality-of-life by creating a safer, cleaner and more enjoyable environment.

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Hoylman: Treat hit-and-run cyclists like drivers BIKE BILL, continued from p. 1

that the senior was left with a fractured skull, and briefly had to be placed in a medically induced coma after being rushed to Bellevue Hospital that day. Allen is also a personal friend of Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. A former Upper West Side city councilmember, Brewer initially explained the incident to Hoylman — along with dozens of Chelsea residents — at an April 21 forum at the Hudson Guild community center on W. 26th St. Brewer’s recounting of the hit-and-run crash came in response to a question from Chelsea seniors — residents of the nearby Penn South housing complex, who frequently raise concerns about cyclists who they claim blow through red lights or ride the wrong way in the Eighth and Ninth Aves. bike lanes around their development. Speaking afterward, Brewer said that Allen has since made positive steps on the road to recovery, and is now back at home, doing outpatient rehabilitation. Yet, while police have since released a grainy image of the cyclist taken from video surveillance footage near the scene of the incident, he has yet to be caught or identified. “I have worked with John, his family and police in trying to find the perpetrator,” said Brewer. “We’ve looked at every video camera’s footage, and police have canvassed every delivery establishment in the area,” she continued. It’s believed that the perpetrator — who was carrying a plastic bag in the video surveillance images recovered by police — may have been a food deliveryman. “This is a sad case, and we want to make

sure it doesn’t happen again,” Brewer said. A police investigation into the incident is ongoing, according to a New York Police Department spokesperson. Under current New York State law, if the cyclist who nearly killed Allen is eventually caught and arrested by police, he would be charged with a Class B misdemeanor, which carries a maximum sentence of three months in prison or one year of probation. And if Allen had died from his injuries, the cyclist would still only be charged with that same misdemeanor. State Senator Hoylman — whose district includes the Midtown site of Allen’s injury, as well as Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen the West Village and the East Village — says he believes the current penalties are too light. Instead, he thinks that hit-and-run cyclists should face the same criminal charges as drivers of motor vehicles who hit pedestrians and flee the scene. If a car driver is caught after a hit-and-run in which the pedestrian suffers only minor injuries, that driver would be charged with a Class A misdemeanor, which carries up to one year in prison and a $1000 fine, according to state law. In a case in which the pedestrian suffers serious injuries, such as Allen’s, a driver who fled the scene would be charged with a Class E felony, which carries up to four years in prison and a $5,000 fine. And if the pedestrian is killed, the hitand-run driver would be charged with a Class D felony, which carries up to seven years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Hoylman — who is, in fact, a frequent Citi Bike rider — said he will soon introduce legislation that would change state law to make hit-and-run cyclists liable for

Canal St. to be a slow zone BY SAM SPOKONY

C

iting numerous traffic fatalities along Canal St.’s 1.5-mile stretch, the city’s Department of Transportation announced Thursday that the key cross-town artery will become a slow zone by this June. That move will lower the speed limit along all of Canal St. — which runs from E. Broadway to West St. — to 25 miles per hour. Canal St. currently sports the city’s standard speed limit: 30 miles per hour. The hazardous pedestrian stretch has entrances to the West Side Highway, the Holland Tunnel and the Manhattan Bridge. Canal St. is Lower Manhattan’s first street included in D.O.T.’s new “arterial slow zone” program, which specifically targets major streets. The department has said that while these traffic­-heavy, arterial roadways comprise 15 percent of city streets, they account for 60 percent of traffic fatalities.

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There have been six fatalities along Canal St. since 2008, according to D.O.T. “Sometimes it seems as if Canal St. is a perpetual slow zone — but slowing down traffic on Canal, which bustles with bicycles, pedestrians and vehicles all day long, is the right thing to do,” state Senator Daniel Squadron, whose district covers the street’s eastern portion, said on Thursday. State Senator Brad Hoylman, whose district covers the street’s western portion, also applauded the new, calling Canal St. one of the “most dangerous roadways in my district.” Thursday’s announcement also included several other planned arterial slow zones in the city, including an 8.3­ -mile stretch of Broadway from Columbus Circle to W. 220th St. The first two arterial slow zones were launched earlier this month, in Brooklyn and the Bronx. Eleven others — including Canal St. — have been announced. D.O.T. plans to introduce 25 arterial slow zones by year’s end.

those much steeper criminal penalties. “This bill, recognizing that the gravity of the injuries is the same regardless of whether the accident was caused by an automobile or a bicycle, would bring parity to instances where someone flees an accident scene after maiming or killing someone,” the state senator explained. He added that the bill is “largely informed” by the April 7 hit-and-run that left John Allen in a coma. Hoylman’s office stated that the bill will be introduced within the next several weeks. And in advance of that introduction, Transportation Alternatives, the city’s top cycling advocacy group, is already voicing support for Hoylman’s effort — albeit somewhat guardedly. “We support the intent of his initiative, because we support anything that brings justice to injured pedestrians,” said Paul Steely White, executive director of Transportation Alternatives. “Regardless of how a pedestrian is injured, and regardless of the type of vehicle, if someone leaves the scene of an accident, they should be held accountable.” But another prominent cycling advocate, Steve Vaccaro, who last year founded the pro-bike political action committee StreetsPAC, wasn’t so quick to throw any measure of support behind the planned bill. “I would want to see some empirical evidence regarding [the reasoning for the legislation] before leapfrogging over education and other measures and going straight to strengthening criminal penalties,” said Vaccaro. He added that he would still need to be convinced about why the existing penalties are perceived as inadequate. Although there appears to be very little concrete data at this point regarding hitand-run cycling incidents, when it comes to statistics on the number of pedestrian fatalities caused by bikes versus cars, the picture is lopsided. Between 2000 and 2013 in New York City, 2,291 pedestrians were killed from being struck by motor vehicles, according to city Department of Transportation statistics. During that same period, only eight pedestrians were killed after being struck by a cyclist, according to the same data. Meanwhile, White did stress that he will want to take a “closer look” at Hoylman’s legislation once it’s introduced, to make sure it can actually achieve the aims of “getting justice” for pedestrians. He further stated that, regarding the issue of hit-and-run cyclists, Transportation Alternatives is currently more focused on urging the N.Y.P.D. to utilize its Collision Investigation Squad to review bike crashes and collect forensic evidence at the sites of those incidents. Currently, the Collision Investigation Squad is only used for motor vehicle crashes.

White said that, over all, he believes that evidence-collecting strategy will have a “more immediate” impact on this issue than Hoylman’s bill would. However, Hoylman did mention that he also supports urging the police to deploy the Collision Investigation Squad to review bike crashes. Police did not respond to request for comment on that particular issue. And with regard to Hoylman’s planned bill for increased criminal penalties for hit-and-run cyclists, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office — which would be implementing those penalties within the borough — declined to comment. “I think the bill is a step in the right direction, because it makes it clear that it’s not about us versus them, bikes versus cars,” said Will Rogers, a W. 16th St. resident. Along with being an avid Citi Bike rider, Rogers is also a board member of CHEKPEDS, which advocates for safer streets throughout Chelsea and Hell’s Kitchen. “It’s important to make the same set of rules for bikes and cars, because it shows that we should all abide by the same laws on the road,” he said. But another Chelsea resident, Eleanor Horowitz, who lives on W. 22nd St. and who has been riding her bike “since the ’50s,” wasn’t convinced by Hoylman’s plans. “How’s increasing the penalties going to have an effect when you can’t identify the [perpetrators]?” she asked. “We need to have licensing, especially for the commercial cyclists, and they need to be registered, so they can actually be identified.” Currently, D.O.T. requires businesses — generally, restaurants that deliver — to provide their cyclists with a bright vest that displays the business name and a unique three-digit ID number on the back. However, those ID numbers are managed by the individual businesses, and not registered with the city. D.O.T. enforces the commercial cycling requirements through its Commercial Bike Unit, which currently has a staff of six inspectors covering the entire city. That unit has issued more than 3,300 summonses to rule-breaking businesses over the past year, a D.O.T. spokesperson said. “It’s led to a big improvement in terms of getting them to behave,” said Horowitz, of the rules for commercial cyclists. “But I really think that we still need licensing.” At the April 21 forum at Hudson Guild — moments after he’d heard from Brewer about the incident that nearly killed John Allen — Hoylman also brought up the idea of licensing. “I hope this isn’t headed toward licensing of all cyclists, or other laws that will restrict the rights of cyclists,” he said then, “but if things don’t get better [in terms of pedestrian safety], then everything should be on the table.”

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 12

P.O. mobile unit M.I.A. To The Editor: Re “Customers become unglued after postal truck stays shut” (news article, April 24): We read with interest Tequila Minsky’s article on the mobile unit at the Patchin Station Post Office, because we were there on Sat., April 26, at around 2 p.m., and no one was there then, either. We waited with two other people (one with a walker) for more than an hour, but the mailman never showed up. So we walked around looking for a mailbox, at least, and found one on Greenwich Ave. I was worried about the woman with the walker, but she mailed her letter and went home. The person supposedly operating the mobile unit is not there every day except Sunday until 4 p.m. Don’t believe the signs. Jane Heil and Michael Usyk

C.B. 3 numbers don’t lie To The Editor: Re “C.B. 3 lacks leadership diversity, member charges” (news article, May 1): The fact that the membership of the Executive Committee of Community Board 3 is diverse wins Ayo Harrington’s argument. Fifty members of the community board voted for these appointments. This is precisely why more diversity and balance exists. On the other hand, the committee chairpersons are appointed exclusively by board Chairperson Gigi Li. Ms. Harington has handled this with grace and dignity. She gave statistics. Numbers do not lie. The appointed committee chairpersons under Li (and, I suspect, equally under her predecessors, Dominic Berg and David McWater) do not reflect the diversity of the 50 board members. For context, it was former Borough President Scott Stringer and now his successor, Gale Brewer, along with Councilmembers Margaret Chin and Rosie Mendez, who have been responsible for creating the board’s diversity. It was up to Li as board chairperson to make sure these elected officials’ commitment to diversity and representation was upheld. In the aftermath of all this, some commentators are now portraying Ms. Harrington (I’m paraphrasing) as a loud

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black woman who is using the race card to get something she doesn’t deserve. This to me is disturbing and sobering, a reminder of just how far we have to go to end a legacy of slavery, race and segregation in this country. Finally, there is no way to have an honest conversation about race relations, institutionalized racism, inadequate representation or prejudice, if you cloud the discussion with a false premise. That Ms. Li is an Asian-American woman does not exclude her from the same scrutiny a Caucasian man or woman may have experienced in these same circumstances. Ms. Li was in a position of power and influence — what did she do with it? Ms. Harrington’s statics provide the answer. Erin Harvey

It’s a collective concern To The Editor: Re “C.B. 3 lacks leadership diversity, member charges” (news article, May 1): The struggle to end racism is a collective one. The momentary relief of finding “the” racist is the work of tabloids. It is a counterfeit fight. And worse, it is ineffective in ending racism because it confuses people into thinking that the depth and mass of the problem is being tackled. The Executive Committee of C.B. 3, in part, is composed of an African-heritage man who is the first vice chairperson; a Latina who is the secretary; and a Chineseheritage woman who is the board chairperson. How you best fill the committee chairperson posts to reflect racial diversity that is inclusive of African heritage, Latino and, I assume, indigenous peoples is the task at hand. The woman who brought the complaint wants that, the chairperson wants that, and the rest of the board wants that. If achieving this goal is happening too slowly, if it’s not going well, if there is disagreement about it — that is something the group, collectively, is responsible for. Personalizing a systemic difficulty of the magnitude of racism to one person, even if that person is the leader, is destructive to the group’s functioning, is not accurate and is hurtful. Targeting the person of color who leads this group as “the” racist? Completely off. It reminds me of blaming President Obama for the fact that racism still exists in the U.S. And to clarify: Prejudice is different from institutional racism. We all carry preju-

dice — we live in a society that exploits any difference to divide and conquer. But racism is the one-way, institutionalized, mistreatment of people of color — with white people acting as the agents of that oppression. People of color might carry internalized racism — brought on by racism — but that’s very different in terms of real institutional power relations. K Webster

Tribes, the real deal To The Editor: Re “Steve has left the building, but takes a piece of it” (news article, April 17): A Gathering of the Tribes, Steve Cannon’s salon-style aerie cum gallery, was the real deal in a world of hype and spectacle. Sarah Ferguson’s article was a welcome tribute to a scruffy haven that will be dearly missed. Those of us who frequented Tribes count ourselves lucky to have been a part of L.E.S. history. Steve Cannon truly empowered people. Like so many others, I benefited greatly from his array of programs. I showed art at Tribes. I had the privilege to contribute to Tribes Magazine #10 in the capacity of arts editor. I read poems there and wrote blurbs for several of the dozens of books that Cannon published through his Fly By Night imprint. I heard great music there. All courtesy of the “Blind Professor.” The atmosphere at Tribes in the last days and hours was a mix of nostalgia, defiance, grief and pride, all crowned by a potent sense of fraternity. Tribes as we knew it has undergone a sea change, but the community it served lives on, as does the one and only Mr. Steve Cannon. His is a legacy of love — built not on what he did for himself but what he did for others. Jeff Wright

Cannon is the L.E.S. To The Editor: Re “Steve has left the building, but takes a piece of it” (news article, April 17): I am a former back-room tenant of Steve’s. I lived there in the winter of ’93. Later on, I would send friends. Amiri Baraka would stop by. I met Max Roach on the front steps, as he was a friend. Bob Holman and Steve held poetry workshops on the third floor, among them Reggie Gaines. I’m sure “Bring in ’da Noise, Bring in ’da Funk” got its start in those workshops. Jim

Jarmusch would come by and grace us with his cagey cowboy glare. This house has seen nearly every significant New York cultural figure pass by at one time or another since the ’60s. Steve’s house was a cultural institution. After the fire, I plastered the stairwell, tore down the plaster-and-horsehair roof in the back gallery. We all pitched in. Every night was full of talk, and I got my first real cultural and cosmopolitan education. Now, of course, the building is a real estate opportunity in an increasingly hightoned market, and nobody cares. Shame on you, Zhang. Another classic case of moneygrubbers using their tight-assed legalese and standards of decency to evict any real vibrancy out of the Lower East Side. Steve Cannon is the Lower East Side, and Steve Cannon is New York City. David Jager

A retail red herring To The Editor: Re “Too small to let fail: Helping local mom-and-pops” (talking point, by David Gruber, May 1): Villager readers, do not be fooled by this talking point piece. This was written to hide the only real solution to stop the closing of small businesses — the 25-yearold bill bottled up in the City Council and never allowed a vote by the full Council, the Small Business Jobs Survival Act. Business owners know that the problem centers on when their leases expire and that they have zero rights to negotiate the new terms or to even say if they can stay in business. The solution to stopping businesses from closing is simple: Give the tenants equal rights with the landlords to negotiate fair terms, and if they can’t agree, then an arbitrator will decide. The real estate industry wants government-controlled programs and regulations because real estate, through its massive campaign contributions, controls our government. Steve Null Null is director, Coalition for Fair Business Rents E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

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Music borne of Sandy’s blackout and Hopper’s ‘Nighthawks’ Bonebridge Quartet’s sophomore CD is slick, yet searching

MUSIC ERIK FRIEDLANDER’S BONEBRIDGE QUARTET CD RELEASE CONCERT Thursday, May 22 At Subculture 54 Bleecker St., btw. Bowery & Lafayette Doors at 7pm, show at 7:30pm PHOTO BY KATIE KLINE

$15 in advance, $20 day of show For tickets: subculturenewyork.com For artist info: erikfriedlander.com

BY SAM SPOKONY

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hen Hurricane Sandy struck New York City on October 29, 2012, the cellist Erik Friedlander, now 53, was in the middle of writing music for the second recorded meeting of his Bonebridge quartet. It had been about a year since their first album (an eponymous one) began the band’s texturally unique exploration of Americana via the avant-garde, with Friedlander’s signature plucked tone speaking, as in a meeting of brothers separated at birth, alongside the sympathetic slide guitar of Doug Wamble. And ever since that release, the cellist — with ears long-honed and tempered by his wide array of experimental sideman work, most notably with the composer John Zorn — had known that another album would have to follow soon, to continue the thought.

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Cellist Erik Friedlander's Bonebridge band will release “Nighthawks” on May 20. From left: Drummer Michael Sarin, Friedlander, bassist Trevor Dunn and guitarist Doug Wamble.

So as the storm surged and the lights went out, Friedlander stayed put inside his home for the past 30 years — a Soho apartment by the corner of Grand and Crosby Streets — and he lit some candles. “Once I realized we were going to be alright, I just kept writing,” said Friedlander. “I’d already sketched out some pieces before that point, but the hurricane really influenced the direction of the record, and some of the more moody pieces were written during that blackout period, as it got me thinking deeply about the nighttime, the darkness and how the city changed without power.” One of those tunes, with deeply resonant opening phrases that instantly reveal the provocative timbre of the cello/guitar tandem, would become “Nighthawks” — a title the leader also went on to give to the entire album. The name, perhaps

unsurprisingly, came from the iconic 1942 painting by Edward Hopper, which starkly portrays the late-hour customers at a semi-fictional Greenwich Village diner. For Friedlander, Sandy’s impact on the city provided a new layer of introspection atop thoughts of that famous American scene. “I was looking at some Hopper pictures and thinking more about the blackout, because I’d just never expected that curtain of black to fall over Lower Manhattan,” he said. “Then one day, during all the darkness, there was this guy who used a generator to set up his falafel stand on an empty street. It was the only light around, and some people started lining up to eat. And I thought, you know, this is a modern-day Hopper.” That additional connection — to other places of quiet, of solitude — soon com-

pleted the psychological foundation of the record, which at times presents a kind of back-alley slickness alongside the more ethereal, searching elements of the specifically Sandy-inspired tunes. The result, throughout the 10-track “Nighthawks” — which will be released on May 20, and premiered live at Subculture on May 22 — is a masterfully crafted follow-up to the original Bonebridge album, with the balance and interplay between the strings of Friedlander and Wamble inching ever closer to elusive perfection. It only takes a few notes of the opener, “Sneaky Pete,” for the cello and guitar to nimbly climb to the top of the action, supported capably by bassist Trevor Dunn and drummer Michael Sarin (both returning from the first Bonebridge album). Unison riffs from Friedlander and Wamble quickly transition into solos that speak with a comfortably jazz-tinged vocabulary over the active rhythm section, before finishing out and stepping seamlessly into a relative swinger of a tune, “Clockwork,” which continues to feature strong solo phrasing from the cellist, who remains supremely relaxed without ever sounding tired. From there, things become more intimate as we delve into the meat of those directly blackout-inspired tunes, with “Hopper’s Blue House” leading the way into longer, sweeping tones and tightly controlled, medium-soft dynamics that always serve to strengthen the imagery of the scene. Increasingly sensitive exchanges between the cello and guitar continue in “Nostalgia Blindside” and “One Red Candle,” both largely written in Sandy’s aftermath (with the latter’s title coming from Friedlander’s method of lighting his workspace at that time). Alongside NIGHTHAWKS, continued on p.29

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Bodies in motion, driven to extremes PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN GOODMAN: BOXERS + BALLERINAS Through May 31 At Rick Wester Fine Art 526 W. 26th St. | Suite 417 (btw. 10th & 11th Aves.) Hours: Tues.-Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 11am-6pm Call 212-255-5560 Visit rickwesterfineart.com

BY NORMAN BORDEN

May 8, 2014

Rock solid and determined: “Elysia Fridkin, Swan Lake” (2004).

‘Boxers + Ballerinas’ deftly juxtaposes life in the ring and on the stage fists as if preparing for battle or ethereal figures captured in doorways or windows. There is beauty, though, perhaps most evident in “Terrorize,” one of my favorite images in the show. We see a boxer’s head protected by a helmet, bathed in shadow and framed by a window. The “terrorize” that’s reflected on part of his head adds another element of mystery and danger, and sends a frightening but appropriate message. Another intriguing image is “Tuxedo Couple.” Goodman uses the shadowgraph technique so they seem to be mystical, ethereal figures — but they’re just two people he captured in the gym’s doorway. Who are these people? What are they doing? We’ll never know. I also liked “Headless + Bag,” in which a boxer on the gym floor is taking jabs at a punching bag, his head obscured by a ray of sunlight. In “Ring,” all that’s

visible is the back of a heavily muscled broad-shouldered boxer who is punching an imaginary opponent. The slight blurriness that Goodman uses to convey motion seems to take an edge off the boxer’s strength. So does the earring that he’s wearing — it helps to humanize him. Of course, he’d never wear it in the ring. The ballerinas shown here are part of Goodman’s 2004 photo essay about the Boston Ballet. Photographing them backstage while they were getting ready to perform, he used shadowgraphs — the same technique he used for the boxer images — to show movement. It’s an approach that reflects the influence of Goodman’s mentor. “Minor White taught me the difference between seeing and looking,” says Goodman. Simply put, White believed the experience of looking at a specific image was of more

© JOHN GOODMAN

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© JOHN GOODMAN

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he thought of boxers and ballerinas coexisting in one photography gallery might sound like an odd coupling, but that’s not the case in John Goodman’s first New York solo exhibition. He sees both as bodies in motion, driven to extremes by sweat and sheer determination. Drawn from two acclaimed bodies of work chronicling the Times Square Gym and the Boston Ballet, “Boxers + Ballerinas” is a deft juxtaposition of people seeking recognition in the ring or on a stage. Goodman says, “I explore the contest between light and dark, power and grace, grit and tenderness.” After viewing the 25 images here, it seems clear that he has scored either a knockout or a bravura performance — it just depends on what corner you’re in. In 1993, Goodman began documenting the last 18 months of the Times Square Gym, a legendary New York institution where boxers of every stripe — the famous, the faded and the unknown — had trained since it opened in 1976. When Goodman, who lives in Boston, spotted a sign for the gym while walking through Times Square, he persuaded the manager to let him take a few photographs that day. He came back a few weeks later with prints. The manager liked what he saw and said, “Take as many pictures as you want.” When the monograph of 60 images was published in 1996, Pete Hamill wrote in his introduction, “The Times Square Gym… represents that rarest of artistic achievements, a monumental homage to the lower working class. Its poignancy owes to its unflinching lack of sentimentality.” Goodman’s magnificent selenium-toned silver gelatin photographs reveal the grittiness and decay of the gym and its visitors. There are no fight scenes here, no victory celebrations — just men caught in a moment of reverie, warriors wrapping their

“Terrorize” (1991) sends a frightening but appropriate message.

importance than the object or forms being photographed. Goodman shows us bodies in motion that satisfy our need to witness something BOXERS, continued on p.27

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H 4T W. 172

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Exhibit finds kinship in the world of punches and pirouettes S

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HAPPY MOTHER’s DAY

© JOHN GOODMAN

WE DELIVER COMPLETE DINNERS CALL:677-3820/475-9828 106 West Houston Street 677-3820 475-9828

Light and shadow create something magical, in 2005’s “Enter La Sylphide.” BOXERS, continued from p. 26

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© JOHN GOODMAN

beyond reality. His use of blurring, shadows and darkness provide a sense of mystery and greatness. We like the experience of viewing these images. It’s almost as if we’re voyeurs, peering into a world we can’t possibly know. In many ways, these images are similar to some of the boxers. Their bodies in motion hint at greatness. You wonder about their struggles to succeed, but you sense some of the isolation that the boxers experience. There’s something magical about the image “Enter La Sylphide.” Goodman’s use of light and shadow puts the focus on the ballerina and makes this image very painterly, even more so here than in some of his other work. In “Odette/Swan Lake,” the ballerina is silhouetted and isolated. Her face is hidden. She has no identity, and we can only imagine her beauty. In some of the other pictures, we see ballerinas practicing alone, their grace and fortitude shining through. That seems clearly evident in the image, “Elysia Fridkin, Swan Lake” — her hand on her hip seems to make her rock solid and determined. These are mesmerizing, thought-provoking photographs. Whether you think boxing is just a blood sport or ballet is too ethereal, the pictures will ground you. Norman Borden (normanbordenphoto.com) is a New Yorkbased writer and photographer. The author of more than 100 reviews for NYPhotoReview.com and a member of Soho Photo Gallery and ASMP, he currently has an image in the juried show, “Juxtapose,” at the Darkroom Gallery, Essex Junction, VT.

A broad-shouldered view from the back: 1993’s “Ring” humanizes its subject with blurry motion (and an earlobe accessory). May 8, 2014

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The three dates of Mother’s Day Because she deserves more than just May 11 BY SCOTT STIFFLER

In the 19th century, the home was regarded as “the throne of woman,” where mothers exerted their influence on society by molding the character of its future citizens. Eliza Tredwell, who by all accounts excelled in the role of loving parent and moral compass, raised eight children in an elegant East Fourth Street row house which stands today as the only local home of its era that’s been preserved intact. This Mother’s Day tour of the Merchant’s House Museum puts the Tredwell matriarch’s role in perspective, by discussing the realities of domestic life from 1835-1865. See the family’s original furnishings and personal possessions — including Eliza Tredwell’s 1820 empire-style embroidered cotton wedding dress (part of an exhibit on display through June 30, called “Tredwell

WANTED: A FEW MOMS FOR A TOAST Famous

Dylan Thomas Watering Hole

MOM’S DAY

Happy Mother’s day from all of us: White Horse Tavern 567 Hudson St. • 243-9260

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COURTESY OF CYMA SHAPIRO

COURTESY OF THE MERCHANT’S HOUSE MUSEUM

A museum quality tour: learn about 19th century motherhood, at The Merchant’s House Museum.

A MOTHER’S DAY TRIBUTE TO ELIZA TREDWELL

PHOTO BY KAI BEVERLY-WHITTEMORE

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” is for the many things she gave you — and what have you done for her lately? If the cards and flowers are already in cue for May 11, that’s a very good start. But containing the celebration to one mere day seems rather unambitious, considering the fact that you came into this world with nine month's worth of debt. This year, make your birth the gift that keeps on giving, when you extend mom’s special day all the way into June!

The Pen Parentis Literary Salon seasoncloser features young mom Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, reading from her novel “Bittersweet.”

Cyma Shapiro and five contributors from her “The Zen of Midlife Mothering” anthology read from their work, at Bluestockings Bookstore.

Brides: Changing Wedding Traditions in the 19th century”). The “Mother’s Day Tribute to Eliza Tredwell” tour takes place at 12:30, 2 and 3:30pm on Sun., May 11, and is included with regular admission. Mothers, if accompanied by their child, visit free. The Merchant’s House Museum is located at 29 E. Fourth St. (btw. Lafayette & Bowery). For info: merchantshouse.org. Regular hours: Thurs.-Mon., 12-5pm ($10 admission, $5 for students/seniors).

Free and open to the public (21+). At 7pm on Tues., May 13, at ANDAZ Wall Street (75 Wall St., enter on Water or Pearl Sts.). Visit penparentis.org. Season twelve kicks off on Sept. 9, with David Gilbert, Julia Fierro and Mira Jacob.

PEN PARENTIS LITERARY SALON

Enjoy a slightly late Mother’s Day (and celebrate Father’s Day a bit early) by participating in a unique take on the written word as treasured child — when Pen Parentis, the nonprofit literary organization that provides resources to authors who are also parents, closes its Literary Salon for the season. This cocktail and conversation-infused event features Miranda Beverly-Whittemore (whose “Bittersweet” publishes the day of the Salon), Andre Dubus III (of the bestseller “House of Sand and Fog”), Alexi Zentner (of the forthcoming “The Lobster Kings”) and award-winning memoirist, essayist, novelist and scholar, Andre Aciman. After reading from their work, they’ll discuss balancing a literary life with an active young family — at an informal roundtable hosted by curator Brian Gresko (editor of the literary fatherhood anthology “Until I Held You”) and fiction writer/longtime Downtown resident, M. M. De Voe.

THE ZEN OF MIDLIFE MOTHERING

You’ll find a lecture, author reading, film screening, open mic or community activity most nights of the week at Bluestockings Bookstore — and even though this June 7 event puts quite a bit of calendric distance between itself and the standard Mother’s Day outing, the timing is a perfect match for the theme. Cyma Shapiro, founder of Mothering in the Middle (“the blog for new midlife mothers”), reads from her own work — then welcomes five others whose essays from that popular blog have been published in “The Zen of Midlife Mothering.” Among those who chose motherhood after age 40: Janice Eidus (author of “Urban Bliss”), New York Post columnist Tina Traster, Randi Hoffman (a past contributor to The Villager), Barbara Herel (founder of the Improv Mom blog) and Joanie Siegel (who adopted a teenager from the foster care system). From 7-9pm on Sat., June 7, at Bluestockings Bookstore (172 Allen St., btw. Stanton & Rivington). Free (suggested donation, $5). For info, call 212-777-6028 or visit bluestockings.com. Also visit motheringinthemiddle.com.

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Just Do Art BY SCOTT STIFFLER

“RETROGARDE” EXHIBIT

Once a month for the past 25 years, a group of professional artists have been meeting in each other’s studios to share ideas, discuss methods and find new ways to expand the mission of Retrogarde: “using the idea of the past (retro) to go forward (as in avant garde).” The participating artists in this current exhibit are Barbara Bachner, Hallie Cohen, Tony DeBlasi, Millie Falcaro, Lindsay, Hilda O’Connell, Jean Promutico, Beth Shipley and John Whittaker. Free. Through May 18, at Westbeth Gallery (55 Bethune St., at Washington St.). Hours: Wed.-Sun., 1-6pm. For info, visit westbeth.org or call 212-989-4650.

THE AFFORDABLE PHOTOGRAPHY FAIR

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Established in 1971 by a group of newspaper photographers, the collaborative spirit is still going strong at Soho Photo — where the artists who run this fine art photography gallery participate in workshops and discussion groups, while challenging each other to develop a clear vision. “Visit us. Talk with us,” they say, noting, “We’re always looking for talent and support.” You can walk away with a piece of that talent, when Soho Photo Gallery presents its first-ever Affordable Photography Fair. Dozens of fine art photographs from gallery artists will be on display, with all prints priced at $100. "It’s a great way to start building a collection,” says Gallery member and Fair coordinator, Bob Leonard. The event runs in conjunction with TOAST (TriBeCa Open Artist Studio Tour), a self-guided tour of neighborhood workspaces. May 9-12. From 1-8pm on Fri., then 1-6pm on Sat., Sun. & Mon. Opening reception: 6-8pm, May 9. At Soho Photo Gallery (15 White St., btw. W. Broadway & Sixth Ave.). For more info, visit sohophoto.com or call 212-226-8571. For TOAST info, visit toastartwalk.com.

Open Studio event continues its tradition of welcoming the public into creative spaces generally accessible by appointment only. There, you’ll meet the artists and learn about their chosen mediums and unique creative processes. If you like what you see, make a purchase directly from studio inventory. In partnership with the concurrent Vulture Festival and the Contemporary Art Fair NYC, several Open Studio artists are giving tour participants the chance to immerse themselves in the creative process. At the studio of Scotto Mycklebust, create a print on a small studio press and then take it home. Veronique San Leandro will provide several collective canvases, paint and other materials for visitors to use freely. The finished works will be posted on veroniquesanleandro.com. Ejay Weiss demonstrates how runnels of paint produce unique effects — then lets you try that technique. It’s your pick of markers or crayons, when you add color to a large black and white print of Adrienne Leban’s BioGeo drawings. She’ll also lead a paper sculpture-making exercise. Free. Sat. & Sun., May 10-11, from 12-6pm. Start your self-guided tour by picking up a tour map and artist info, in the lobbies of the West Chelsea Arts building (508 & 516 W. 26th St.) and Westbeth Artists Housing (55 Bethune St.), or at DaVinci Artist Supply (132 W. 21st St.). For more info, visit westchelseaartists.com. Also visit vulturefestival.com and contemporaryartfairnyc.com.

PHOTO BY BOB LEONARD

Bob Leonard’s “Woodstock 1” is on display, and up for grabs, at Soho Photo Gallery’s Affordable Photography Fair (May 9-12).

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Hallie Cohen’s “hy·drog·ra·phy II” (2013; 11x14; Ink on YUPO paper) is part of the “Retrogarde” exhibit, on display through May 18 at Westbeth Gallery.

WEST CHELSEA ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO

Blue skies, warm air, windows open, veil lifted: If this is the second weekend in May and you’re strolling West Chelsea with a map in hand, chances are you’re not lost — just deciding which of the seven buildings are next on your self-guided tour of over 30 private artists’ studios. This year’s edition of the annual West Chelsea Artists

Paint what you please, in the studio of Veronique San Leandro — then see the work posted on her website.

Guitar and cello blend reaches new heights NIGHTHAWKS, continued from p. 25

Wamble’s subtle slides and twangs, the sheer emotion in Friedlander’s playing — which sometimes compels him to pick up the bow — even reaches points at which he seems to be wistfully recalling those quiet days of darkness, which, amid their disastrous effects, brought a briefly placid temperament to his home streets. Wamble particularly shines on two of the album’s more Hopper-inspired tunes, carrying the late-night haunt names of “26 Gasoline Stations” and “Poolhall Payback.” The guitarist shows himself to be both a savvy accompanist — with a beefy

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tone and solid time that often helps drive Friedlander’s improvisational flights — while also remaining alternately fresh and snappy or rich and soulful in his solos, depending on the mood required. The cello/guitar collaboration reaches one of its top peaks in the title track, as both players lower the volume even further and dig most deeply into that intimate feeling of post-storm calm that permeates the album. Here, along with flashes of brilliance on the closing track, “The River,” is where Friedlander most shows his maturity, as a player who can carry the flag of the avant-garde without drowning in noise or notes.

“When I was younger I was more interested in bravado, and I really wanted to wow the audience,” said the cellist, thinking of his personal development in the context of the new album. “Fireworks are exciting and fun, but there's another side, which is to be vulnerable, to allow yourself to be open to something rather than crushing it with strength and speed, and that’s what can give an audience a really new and different sense of what I’m about it.” Friedlander also pointed out that one of the most important parts of completing that feeling on “Nighthawks” was, effectively sharing the lead playing once again with Wamble.

“It's always been a source of complete joy for me, that interplay between the cello and slide guitar,” he said. “Sometimes I even feel like I’m a straight man for Doug’s guitar, because it has lot of humor and soulfulness, and the guitar also sets off the soulfulness of the cello in a unique way. I’m just turned on by that chemistry, and it’s really the heartbeat of the band.” It’s a heartbeat that doesn’t need to beat loudly to show the strength of its pulse — and “Nighthawks” is a decidedly low-key album that deserves as much praise, for its conception and execution, as any more ostensibly complicated work coming out of the jazz or avant-garde music scenes.

May 8, 2014

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1277990 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 248 East 52nd Street, New York, NY 10022 for on-premises consumption. NEW SEASON FOODS CORP. Vil: 05/08 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by DoYou Like Comedy? LLC d/b/a New York Comedy Club to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 241 East 24th Street NY, NY 10010. Vil: 05/08 - 05/15/2014 ELITE 106 LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 4/17/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to SMMW Consulting Corp., 220 Bristol Terr., Edgewater, NJ 07020. General Purpose. Vil: 05/08 - 06/12/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF FFP ACQUISITION I, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Florida (FL) on 8/4/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in FL: 3300 Corporate Ave., Ste. 104, Weston, FL 33331. Arts of Org. filed with the FL Secy. of State, Clifton Bldg., 2661 Executive Center Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/08 - 06/12/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF DIGITAL EXPANSE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 4/4/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 33 Whitehall St., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10004. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o Capitol Corporate Services, Inc., 1111B Governors Ave., Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/08 - 06/12/2014 AMITALIE LLC Arts. of Org filed NY Secy of State (SSNY) 3/27/14. OFC in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 225 Rector Pl #9K, NY NY 10280. Purpose: any lawful act.1928233 Vil: 05/08 - 06/12/2014

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PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for LUPE’S EAST L.A. KITCHEN, INC to continue to maintain, and operate an small unenclosed sidewalk Cafe at 110 SIXTH AVENUE in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/08 - 05/15/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF STEVEN HARPER, ARCHITECT PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of PLLC: 310 W. 122nd St., 4E, NY, NY 10027. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ingram Yuzek Gainen Carroll & Bertolotti LLP, Attn: Larry Gainen, 250 Park Ave., NY, NY 10177. Purpose: To practice the profession of architecture. Vil: 05/01 - 06/05/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VAISHALI FANTASY DIAMOND LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 6 E. 45th St., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/01 - 06/05/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEST 37TH YYY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/1/10. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Joy Construction, 40 Fulton St., 21st Fl., NY, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/01 - 06/05/2014

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PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, June 04, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition forTATANE CORP. to establish, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk Cafe at 203 MOTT STREET in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/08 - 05/15/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AP PRODUCE LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Alex Badillo, 1314 Elder Ave., Apt. 3B, Bronx, NY 10472. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF K & D U.W.S., LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/18/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o DeGaetano & Carr LLP, 488 Madison Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NEW YORK RHINOS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Foral, LLC, 12325 SW 131st Ave., Miami, FL 33186. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NAS INSURANCE SERVICES, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/28/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CA on 12/30/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. CA and principal business address: 16501 Ventura Blvd., Ste. 200, Encino, CA 91436. Cert. of Org. filed with CA Sec. of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CS 570 GP PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/13/2014. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 545 5th Ave., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10017, Attn: Daniel Ghadamian, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Term: until 12/31/2054. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF OLD ORCHARD CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LP Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/14/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/08/14. Princ. office of LP: 90 Park Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Ross Jackman at the princ. office of the LP. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF OMNIVERE, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/8/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1008 Asbury Ct., Winnetka, IL 60093. LLC formed in DE on 8/28/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014 NOTICE OF FOREIGN REGISTRATION OF SIKICH LLP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/4/14. Office location: NY County. LLP registered in ­­­IL on 9/3/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, principal office address. Cert. of Org. filed with IL Sec. of State, 501 S. 2nd St., Rm 351, Springfield, IL 62756. Purpose: practice the profession of public accounting. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014

AMORE PRESS LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/12/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 119 W. 72nd St., #339, NY, NY 10023. General Purpose. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 EMANYC LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/17/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Legalinc Corporate Services Inc., 8857 Alexander Rd., Ste. 100A, Batavia, NY 14020. General Purpose. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 MERCURIAL, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 03/17/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. Ira Nesenoff designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 363 7Th Avenue, 5Th Floor, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ATERIAN INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT, LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/7/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 8/28/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Aterian Investment Partners, 1700 Broadway, 38th Fl., NY, NY 10019, Attn: Michael Fieldstone, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/24 - 05/29/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF THIS&THAT, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 3/7/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Barlevi & Co., 11601 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 1840, Los Angeles, CA 90025. Address to be maintained in DE: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AUTONOMY HOLDINGS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/07/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/03/14. Princ. office of LLC: 385 Fifth Ave., Ste. 500, NY, NY 10016. NYS fictitious name: AUTONOMY HOLDINGS INTERNATIONAL, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Alfred Sutton at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with State of DE, Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RENMAC GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/19/14. Princ. office of LLC: 116 E. 16th St., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10003. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Steven Hash, 116 E. 16th St., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10003. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BELLA TALENT GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/07/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 310 E. 74th St., Apt. 4F, NY, NY 10021. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BAXTER OF CALIFORNIA LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/03/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 575 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for MSD ENTERPRISES, INC to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk Cafe at 118 SECOND AVENUE in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OFTHE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSEDTO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/01 - 05/08/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 5 GUNPOWDER LANE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/19/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Menaker & Herrmann LLP, 10 E. 40th St., NY, NY 10016, Attn: Robert F. Herrmann. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 ESSAR CAPITAL LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 03/13/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o The Law Offices of Mitchell J. Devack, PLLC, 90 Merrick Avenue, Suite 500, East Meadow, NY 11554. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PAUL FRANCIS FINANCIAL CONSULTING GROUP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/28/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 Riverside Blvd., Ste. 12M, NY, NY 10069. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SOUL DOC PRODUCTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/1/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Bronson Lipsky LLP, 630Third Avenue, 5th Fl., NY, NY 10017-6705. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TRIMMINGS BEER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 107 W. 20th St., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TRIMMINGS WINE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 111 W. 20th St., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FLEUR WOOD LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/30/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 30 Main St., Apt. 11F, Brooklyn, NY 11201, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 206-210 W. 77TH, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/2/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1001 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20004. LLC formed in DE on 4/24/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NOVOCURE USA LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/3/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 195 Commerce Way, Portsmouth, NH 03801. LLC formed in DE on 12/3/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF QSQUARED CAPITAL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 2/24/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PIA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/20/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 11/25/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 95 Morton St., Ground Fl., NY, NY 10014, principal business address. DE address of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/address of genl. partner available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/17 - 05/22/2014 GG4 PRODUCTIONS LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/12/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 160 W. 66th St., Apt. 39D, NY, NY 10023. General Purpose. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BLS2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/27/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 509 W. 24th St., NY, NY 10011. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JD 257 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/02/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 120 E. End Ave., NY, NY 10028. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSEBUD HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/24/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Moses & Singer LLP, 405 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10174-1299, Attn: Daniel S. Rubin, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INSTANT VOCAL TRANSFORMATION, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 115 W. 82nd St., Apt. 2R, NY, NY 10024. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2021 LEXINGTON AVE REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 500 5th Ave., Ste. 1400, NY, NY 10110. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 4 DUNE ROAD, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/10/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 500 Park Ave., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10022, Attn: Michael Barry, Esq. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SDF87 PENNYFIELD AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/20/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 825 3rd Ave., Fl 37, NY, NY 10022. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SHEEPSHEAD BAY ROAD OWNER, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/26/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 671 N. Glebe Rd., Ste. 800, Arlington, VA 22203. LLC formed in DE on 3/18/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE – WASHINGTON HEIGHTS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for MOZ RESTAURANT INC, to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk Cafe at 581 HUDSON STREET in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OFTHE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSEDTO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 05/01 - 05/08/2014

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C.B. 2: Low-rent tenants deserve gym access, too BY SAM SPOKONY

C

ommunity Board 2 isn’t sold on a developer’s scheme to include affordable housing in a planned residential building at 261 Hudson St., believing that low-rent tenants will be “rudely” priced out of being able to use the building’s gym and computer lounge. After demolishing a one-story warehouse that sat on the Hudson St. lot, between Canal and Spring Sts., Related Companies filed plans for construction of the 12-story rental building last July. The city’s Department of Buildings approved those plans on April 15, according to online records. In February, Related also submitted an application for 261 Hudson St. to enter the city’s inclusionary housing program, which provides a development bonus in exchange for making 20 percent of a building’s units permanently affordable. The developer’s current plans call for 201 total units: 160 market rate and 41 affordable. The affordable units will be available to households making less than 60 percent of the area median income (A.M.I.) — or less than $51,540 for a family of four, less than $46,440 for a three-person family, less than $41,280 for two people and less

than $36,120 for an individual. Initial monthly rents in the affordable units will be $1,017 for a two-bedroom, $838 for a one-bedroom and $781 for a studio, according to Related’s April presentation to C.B. 2's Land Use Committee. (One committee member, Doris Diether, later declined to support the committee’s resolution on the project because she believed those rent levels are not low enough to be considered affordable.) If Related gains city approval for inclusionary housing, the developer would gain a floor-area bonus of about 30,000 square feet — equal to the total area of its 41 planned affordable units, or 23,772 square feet, multiplied by 1.25, according to the inclusionary program. However, since 261 Hudson St. is in a zoning district that does not allow for use of that inclusionary bonus, the developer would instead be able to transfer the additional square footage — or sell it — toward the creation of a potentially massive luxury building within the neighboring Hudson Square Special District, which does allow for use of the bonus under its recent rezoning. In any case, those details were all kosher in the eyes of C.B. 2, which has vocally supported the use of the inclusionary housing program around Hudson Square as a prime way to bring affordable housing

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to the neighborhood. The problem, according to the board, is that Related is unwilling to provide low-rent tenants with affordable access to certain amenities planned for 261 Hudson St. Although the building’s rooftop terrace and library will be available free of charge, other amenities — including a gym, locker room and computer lounge — will be available at the same price for all residents, rather than at a discounted rate for low-rent tenants, according to Related spokesperson Jessica Scaperotti. She added that the exact flat-fee rate hasn’t been decided yet. The C.B. 2 Land Use Committee called on Related to commit to providing discounted rates for low-rent tenants. Tobi Bergman, the committee’s chairperson, said that, during Related’s April presentation, company reps told him they believe the fee for the Hudson St. building’s priced amenities will be around $500 per person per year — a cost likely unaffordable for low-rent tenants. “It creates an unpleasant feeling among neighbors if parts of the building are for market-rate tenants only, as these amenities effectively will be,” Bergman said. “Everyone living in affordable housing knows they are not money rich, and people can live with that happily and proudly. But excluding them from parts of their own building seems an unnecessary strike at something that runs deeper. “Plus, it is rude,” he added. Bergman’s committee passed a resolution — later approved by C.B. 2 at its April 24 full board meeting — calling on the city to deny Related’s application for inclusionary housing unless the developer changes course on the amenities pricing.

The resolution states that the committee would “prefer” free access for affordable tenants, but would support prices of no more than a total of $40 per month for all occupants of a two-bedroom unit, and no more than $30 per month for all occupants of a one-bedroom or studio. Councilmember Corey Johnson has also weighed in, saying he believes Related’s plan, if approved, would set a bad precedent for future inclusionary housing proposals in the area. “Inclusionary housing should give equitable access to all tenants,” said Johnson, “and those who live there as a part of the 80/20 program [80 percent market-rate and 20 percent affordable housing] should not be required to pay the full cost for use of facilities which may be financially out of reach for them.” However, asked whether the councilmember supports Related’s overall plan, Johnson’s office said he does, since it would create new affordable housing. Meanwhile, Related counters that the inclusionary program has no requirements regarding building amenities or their cost. A spokesperson for the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development — which administers the inclusionary program — said the developer is indeed currently following all the program’s requirements. Related spokesperson Scaperotti also stressed that the developer is actually exceeding certain requirements of the inclusionary program, namely regarding apartment appliances. According to the developer’s plans, low-rent tenants will get the same array of appliances as their market-rate counterparts, including individual washers and dryers.

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Numbers add up...for C.E.O.’s In Union Square on May Day, the figures on a woman’s sign put the argument for raising the minimum wage into context.

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G.V.L.L.’s pitcher blazed a fastball past a Furies batter. In the end, though, the hot-hitting East Side team’s bats couldn’t be silenced.

Furies beat Cowgirls, 14-7, in cross-town clash SPORTS

I

n an exciting East-meets-West softball showdown, the Lower East Side’s Lady Furies topped the Greenwich Village Little League Cowgirls last Saturday. The marathon five-inning game lasted a full two hours, and when it was over, the Furies were feelin’ it.

They doubled-up the Girls, 14-7, behind the pitching of Kayla Acevedo. She got the win and the game ball for her eight strikeouts over three innings of pitching. Another highlight saw Joey Ortiz smack her second grand slam of the season with a blast in the third inning deep into the outfield between the left fielder and left center fielder. But it was a total team effort, with each Furies player getting at least one base hit.

The East Side squad didn’t commit a single error. However, the speedy G.V.L.L. runners did swipe four stolen bases, though the Furies caught one. This Saturday, the Furies will play against another Greenwich Village team, at 3:30 p.m., again on East River Park’s Field 5. The Furies, ages 9 and 10, face their biggest challenge in two weeks, when they take on Downtown Little League’s

Lady Furies putting on eye black before the game to help cut glare. Hey, it might have helped — they didn’t make a single error!

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All-Star team on Sat., May 17, at noon on D.L.L.’s home turf in Battery Park City. “We expect that to be a pitchers’ duel as I know they will have their best pitcher versus our hardest thrower, Athena Robles,” said Furies Coach Damien Acevedo. He noted that for next year they plan to start 12U (age 12 and under) and 14U (age 14 and under) Lady Furies teams during their winter clinics starting in November.

Furies runners on base look in to home plate.

May 8, 2014

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May 8, 2014

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SHEEPSHEAD BAY ROAD PARTNER, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/26/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 671 N. Glebe Rd., Ste. 800, Arlington, VA 22203. LLC formed in DE on 3/18/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF UNITED CALVERTON ENERGY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 2/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 823 Eleventh Ave., NY, NY 10011, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

From left, Randy Guzman, Lucia Lengal and Deziree Lengal.

Winging it and exploring with Lucia

PET SET BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

D

eziree Lengal, Randy Guzman and their pigeon pal, Lucia Lengal, make a terrific team. They were getting a snack at the Quick Stop Deli, at Sixth Ave. and Bedford St., last Thursday afternoon. Deziree, 17, and Randy, 22, met as students at Julia Richman Educational Complex on the Upper East Side eight years ago. “We’re best friends,” Randy said. “We’re both autistic,” added Deziree. He’s from Soundview, in the Bronx. She’s from the East Village. Lucia, 8 months old — who was calmly perched on Deziree’s shoulder — came along more recently. They found her on South St., abandoned by her mother. She was dehydrated, starved, squealing. They took her to a vet. Now she just coos a lot. The two youths are the only family she

knows. They take her to Washington Square Park where she likes to stretch her wings and go for a spin, literally. “She’s neutralized, so she flies in a circle,” Randy said, adding, “She’s legally blind.” Lucia’s right eye is sightless, the unfortunate result of flying into a branch in Washington Square. That’s why she usually spirals when she flies, Randy said. But she also had paramyxovirus, which short-circuits the nervous system, and probably also contributed to the problem, said Deziree, who used to raise pigeons. Even so, sometimes Lucia still flies straight. Randy said he graduated from Pace. Deziree trained as a veterinarian for the Marines. “They won’t let me go out because of my disability,” she said, meaning she can’t serve in combat. “But I know how to use a gun.” Asked what they do now, they said they enjoy hanging out together. “We just chilling,” Deziree said. “We just like exploring,” said Randy. “We go to parks, the ferry. We explore.” And wherever they go, Lucia is along for the ride.

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF POINT72 ASSET MANAGEMENT, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/13/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 3/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o S.A.C. Capital Advisors, Inc., 72 Cummings Point Rd., Stamford, CT 06902. Regd. agent upon whom process may be served: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LP: c/o The CorporationTrust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, Federal & Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/10 - 05/15/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BROADWAY 4D PRODUCTIONS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/20/14. Office location: NewYork County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/5/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 9300 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 200, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 South Dupont Hwy, Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COMCAST NY ONE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Comcast Corporation, 1701 JFK Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19103. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to C T Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 35 WEST 12TH STREET, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/17/14. Princ. office of LLC: 35 W. 12th St., NY, NY 10011-8501. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ARS ADVISORS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 500 Fifth Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10110. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARCP FEMGYNY01, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/19/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 1114 6TH AVENUE OWNER LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State 3/26/14. Off. location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE 3/21/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LEITERSDORF HAW DESIGN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/11/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 10 E. 53rd St., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10022, Attn: President. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WARRIOR POETS PILOTS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/20/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 407 Broome St., Ste. 7B, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AP 3L, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/17/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CT on 4/17/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Edward P. Nolan, Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP, 156 W. 56th St., NY, NY 10019. CT and principal business address: c/o ATC, LLC, 73 Arch St., Greenwich, CT 06830. Cert. of Org. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30 Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06115. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 5081 BOLIVAR ROAD SBL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5404 Wisconsin Ave., 2nd Fl., Chevy Chase, MD 20815. LLC formed in DE on 3/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

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TheVillager.com

May 8, 2014

35


20th anniversary!

also... Over 70 of Tribeca’s best restaurants!

Tickets: $45 online or $50 day of Premium Seating: ($350, $680, $950 for tables of two, four and six), includes personal food runners, reserved seating, designer t-shirts and a gift bag from the Taste of Tribeca sponsors.

501(c)3 benefit for local schools PS 234 and PS 150 36

May 8, 2014

Taste of Tribeca Kick-Off Party at Bouley Botanical

Please join us for the 2014 Taste of Tribeca Kick-Off Cocktail Party honoring our 20-year Golden Participants on Friday, May 2 from 6:00 to 9:00 PM at Bouley Botanical, 281 Church Street. Price per person is $90 which includes one Taste of Tribeca ticket. Specialty cocktails and hors d’oeuvres will be served. TheVillager.com

MAY 8, 2014, THE VILLAGER  

MAY 8, 2014, THE VILLAGER

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