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Special section

A Salute

TO

U N I O N S Q U A R E pages 13 - 24

Volume 82, Number 48 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

May 2 - 8, 2013

Bikes on the brain as cycle-share is about ready to roll BY LINCOLN ANDERSON New York is going completely bonkers over bikeshare — and the bicycles aren’t even here yet! But the bike-station docks are, and they’re sparking a million reactions — make that 8 million — from support to opposition and, in at least one case, a lawsuit. Residents of 99 Bank St. in the Village last week filed a lawsuit seeking the removal of a 31-bike dock in front

A mosaic flag of many colors

of their building, between Greenwich and Hudson Sts. The suit charges that the bike station violates the city’s own rules for placement of street furniture. But a judge rejected the 100-unit co-op’s plea for an injunction. However, early Tuesday morning, the city gave some ground — literally — removing a fourbike segment of the dock from the end closest to the

Continued on page 4

Photo by Q. Sakamaki

Ydanis Rodriguez, Northern Manhattan city councilmember, marched in Wednesday’s May Day parade, helping fly a mosaic flag representing some of the many countries from which immigrants to the U.S. hail. For more photos, see Page 2.

Mayoral candidates make their case at Village forum BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL Four Democratic candidates for mayor were welcomed to the Village Monday night to offer their visions for the city. The forum, at the L.G.B.T. Center on W. 13th St., was sponsored by the Village Independent Democrats, Village Reform Democratic Club, Downtown Independent Democrats and several other clubs and groups. The candidates who participated — City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, former Councilmember Sal Albanese, Comptroller John Liu and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio — didn’t meet face to face. The format allowed each candidate 10

minutes to state his or her case, followed by a 15-minute Q&A before departing the meeting. Half an hour before the forum began, 10 Quinn supporters stood outside the Center holding signs and passing out fliers. Their presence foreshadowed the enthusiastic greeting Quinn would receive from a room filled with many longtime friends and supporters. Before the forum began, District Leader Keen Berger admitted she was excited. “I’m a political junkie,” she said. “The thing I care about and know the most about is education,” she noted, mention-

ing one of the many topics the candidates would expound on. Other issues dominating the evening’s conversation included affordable housing, stop-and-frisk, hydrofracking and the Spectra pipeline. Several in the audience confessed to being undecided about whom to vote for. But West Village resident Ellen PetersonLewis had already made up her mind and was proudly sporting a “Christine Quinn” sticker on her dress. “She is on the right track on women’s issues, education, affordable housing,” Peterson-Lewis said. When asked about

Photo by Tequila Minsky

This new bike-share station for 40-plus bikes on West Broadway is planted next to a strip coveted by sidewalk artists on weekends.

Continued on page 31

5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

editoRial, letteRS PAGE 10

cuMMinG SoloS in ‘Macbeth’ PAGE 25


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May 2 - 8, 2013

Photos by Q. Sakamaki

Marching for workers’ rights, safety and immigrants

Marchers in the May Day parade on Wednesday made their way down from Union Square to City Hall. The big issue, along with of course workers’ rights, was immigrants’ rights. A Japanese group called attention to the Fukushima nuclear disaster of March 2011. Marchers condemned Arizona’s harsh “SB 1070” anti-illegal immigration act.


May 2 - 8, 2013

Scoopy’s

notebook MEADOWS BUCKS THE PRESSURE: City Council District 3 candidate Alexander Meadows recently told us that he has been asked, in strong terms, to drop out of the race for Christine Quinn’s Chelsea/Village seat. The Cuban-American candidate told us two individuals have asked him to do it, and that one is an elected official currently serving in office. Meadows would not divulge any names, but said there’s no way he’s dropping out, and that he definitely won’t ever succumb to pressure. “They have to earn it,” he stated defiantly of the upcoming primary, which also includes two other candidates, Yetta Kurland and Corey Johnson. Johnson told us he didn’t know anything about anyone asking Meadows to butt out of the race. Meadows is a late entry into the field, and apparently the thinking is that he would pull votes from Johnson, the other gay male candidate, helping the chances of Kurland, who is openly lesbian. District 3 is known as the Council’s “gay seat.” Meadows also told us his understanding now is that, despite recent rumors, Tom Duane is not going to enter the fray in an effort to recapture the Council seat he held before going on to become a state senator, only to retire from the senate last year. In addition, we’re hearing Kurland and State Committee member Arthur Schwartz recently had a “heart-to-heart” talk and have patched things up after a falling-out a while back. Yet, Schwartz — who is running for district leader versus Jonathan Geballe — denied reports that he and Kurland are now “combining forces.” PASSING THE (TELESCOPING) BATON: After two years leading Greenwich Village’s Sixth Precinct, Deputy Inspector Brandon del Pozo on Wednesday moved on to work for the Police Department’s newly appointed Chief of Department, Philip Banks III. “I will be turning command of the Sixth Precinct over to Deputy Inspector Elisa Cokkinos, a 22-year veteran who has previously commanded [Chelsea’s] 10th Precinct and P.S.A. 6, which is a command in the Housing Bureau,” del Pozo said in a message to the community. “Rest assured, you are in excellent, experienced hands and I have no doubt that you'll welcome her into this community. I can't overstate how much of a privilege and honor it has been to serve the Village and lead some of the best and most dedicated officers in the N.Y.P.D.,” he said, adding, “This is a truly special place, both demanding and complex, and the rewards have been commensurate. There is no doubt that I'll look back on the time I spent here as one of the best I've spent on the N.Y.P.D.”   COMIC TIMING…OR NOT: We were passing by Nonimperialist Bargain Books on Carmine St. on Monday and just as we were arriving, we glimpsed Jim Drougas, the

shop’s owner, ushering an elderly patron into a car, and then ferrying him off. Joseph, formerly of the Yippie Cafe, who was working the register inside, told us the senior was none other than Professor Irwin Corey, 98, “The World’s Foremost Authority,” who had just stopped by to buy some books, notably the “Dylan Encyclopedia.” We noticed that the store was undergoing some major renovations, with a bookcase dividing the place down the middle. Joseph said that the eastern side will be for comic books while the western side will remain for, well…nonimperialist bargain books. In fact, as we later read on DNA.info, it turns out that the comic book side will actually be a full-fledged comedy club. If we had arrived a few minutes earlier, we’re sure Drougas would have told us that, but he was off taking Corey home.

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Reshma Saujani, right, and Twitter founder Jack Dorsey at the Poisson Rouge on Bleecker St. last week, getting ready to address the crowd at Saujani’s fundraiser.

HOW TWEET IT IS: The Poisson Rouge fundraiser last week for Reshma Saujani’s public advocate campaign was peopled with many tech industry professionals and other young New Yorkers — primarily in their 20s to 40s — from finance to medicine and other professions. Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s founder, was the night’s highlighted Saujani supporter. Also on hand was her husband, Nihal Mehta, C.E.O. of Local Response, a social media company that “leverages the hundreds of millions of public posts across social media each day.” As part of the formal program, infomercial videos were projected. The first was a biographical piece about the 37-year-old candidate. The second video profiled Girls Who Code — a program founded by the advocate candidate — which addresses the gender gap in the tech industries by providing intensive training for young girls in computer programming skills. Unfortunately, technical difficulties diminished the impact of this interesting video. There was no mention of her previous campaign, a 2010 primary challenge to Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, in which Saujani, running as a pro-Wall Street Democrat, lost badly to the

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longtime incumbent. Following her graduation from Yale Law School in 2002, Saujani worked as a hedge fund lawyer. Saujani told the audience of her refugee status as a child from Uganda, having fled dictator Idi Amin, and then identifying with the hard work and struggles of immigrant families in this country. She recalled, as a minority, getting beaten up in her neighborhood. She recently worked in the office of Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, and also helped found the DREAM Fellowship, which gives scholarships to undocumented students. Saujani repeatedly emphasized her “platform,” of jobs, education, housing and women. SCHOOL’S CLOSING, BY GEORGE! East Village activist Anna Sawaryn told us she thought she’d heard at the Palm Sunday Mass last weekend (that’s when Ukrainians observe Palm Sunday) at St. George Church — but wasn’t sure she’d heard correctly — that St. George School, at E. Sixth St. and Taras Shevchenko Place, would be closing. She heard right. The school will close in June due to low enrollment, at least that’s the reason the Basilian fathers are giving. The school, from pre-K to grade 12, has 90 students. La Salle High School is using most of the building, with St. George School on the ground floor. But a source tells us La Salle will eventually likely move back to its E. Second St. building, which needed repairs, which was why La Salle relocated. “We think probably it will be taken over by N.Y.U. or Cooper Union,” the St. George School source told us of the E. Sixth St. school building. Local “Uke” parents (to use a term Ukrainians call themselves) are furious, and are burning up Facebook, condemning the church and the brothers for the closing. Next week is their Easter, when they give the school an envelope with cash. But at least one said he’s only going to put $1 in the envelope. “One parent who owns a game shop on Sixth St. is livid,” our source told us. Sawaryn said the school’s first floor could easily be converted into a Ukrainian nursing home or a residence for new Ukrainian immigrants. PORN FREE: Charlemagne, a swank new American-style bistro, has replaced the former porn video store at the corner of Christopher and Greenwich Sts. All the place’s interior wood is salvaged from old brownstones, and the floor is the original tile. The new bistro continues the transformation of this block of Christopher St. from sex shops and gay bars to, well…something a little more tame. Watering holes like Chi-Chiz have been replaced by a sushi place and the Path Cafe, where mellow live acoustic music can frequently be heard — always played at a very modest volume. … A bit west at Cornelia St. and Sixth Ave., the Real Deal reports that Papaya Dog, Crazy Fantasy Tattoo and sex-novelty shop Fantasy Party will get the boot from new landlord the Jackson Group, which recently purchased the retail space for $16.5 million. The Real Deal lamented that the strip’s Times Square-like “true grit” will be replaced, if Jackson Group is successful, with upscale chains like Victoria’s Secret, Sephora, Aeropostale or Under Armor. However, most neighborhood residents actually would welcome the change.


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May 2 - 8, 2013

Bike-share idea doesn’t exactly ring everyone’s bell Continued from page 1 building’s entrance, and setting down a big hunk of rock in its place. The two-wheeled tumult also steered its way straight into a plan by Community Board 2 to show an informational “Streetfilms” movie on bike-share this Thurs., May 2. Initially, the film, “Bike Share: In Action There / Launching Here,” was set to screen at N.Y.U.’s Casa Italiana — which has a capacity of 100 people — on W. 12th St., with C.B. 2 and New York University as

‘The bikes could bring clients to the sidewalk artists. Let’s give it a chance.’ Andrew Moore co-sponsors. A flier the community board e-mailed out announced that state Senator Brad Hoylman would give opening remarks, and that two Department of Transportation officials would lead the presentation and discussion: Kate Fillin-Yeh and Stephanie Levinsky, the director and the planner, respectively, of the city’s bike-share program. On Monday, however, C.B. 2 sent out another e-mail announcing that due to “an outpouring of community interest,” the venue for the May 2 “bike-share discussion” (it no longer mentioned the movie) had been switched to a larger space, P.S. 41, at 116 W. 11th St., starting at 6:30 p.m. The flier also no longer mentioned the two D.O.T. bike-share officials — and there were, in fact, reports that the pedal-pushing pair had backed out of the event, fearing having to face up to the venting by opponents who planned to attend. Hoylman also was no longer listed on the revised notice. Tuesday evening, The Villager asked Shirley Secunda, chairperson of the C.B. 2 Traffic and Transportation Committee, about reports that the D.O.T. officials would no

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Workers installed a large hunk of rock on Mercer St. north of Spring St. Tuesday morning to protect the new bike-share station recently sited there from oncoming car traffic.

longer be attending. “This was David Gruber’s call,” she said, referring to the C.B. 2 chairperson. “You’re right — it’s a completely different format now, to get public feedback.” The following day, Secunda put out an e-mail blast telling people, “I just wanted to let you know that that program is being

replaced by a forum for community input on bike-share stations, i.e., there will not be a film, nor a D.O.T. slide presentation or opening remarks by Senator Hoylman, but instead an open forum for people to come voice their concerns about bike-share, as well as their support.” (For more on the thinking behind why Thursday night’s bike-share event’s format was changed, see Editorial, Page 10.) Meanwhile, those who make their living at the sidewalk’s edge have their own issues with the installation of the new bike-share docks. In Soho, more than 40 of the heavyduty metal bike holders were set up on West Broadway’s east side between Spring and Prince Sts., prompting a protest from activist Robert Lederman, president of ARTIST (Artists’ Response to Illegal State Tactics). Lederman — who has frequently sued the city on behalf of sidewalk vendors’ rights — said the bike docks will remove spots where artists vend on weekends, when they crowd West Broadway. Under city regulations for vendors and “street furniture,” the artists must set up a certain distance away from the bike station. “At least eight artists or more would be losing these spaces,” Lederman said. In turn, according to the city’s infor-

mational brochure on bike-share, the bike docks “must observe standard D.O.T. street furniture clearances” from such features as crosswalks, fire hydrants, bus stops, building entrances and subway entrances. Lederman is forever battling the city’s efforts to commercialize public spaces used by art vendors. New York’s bike-share program — dubbed Citi Bike after its financer, Citibank — is merely another commercialization scheme, in his view. “The whole thing is nothing but an ad,” he scoffed. “It’s just another example of corporate privatization of public space — moving ads, all over the city.” Asked if he would litigate against the West Broadway bike station, Lederman said no because the sidewalk artists “don’t have standing.” “Some store owner or landlord would have the right to sue,” he said. “That’s where I would guess the significant opposition would come from.” Also, Lederman said, he’s too busy right now battling the Parks Department’s restrictions on artists and musicians in parks.

Continued on page 6


May 2 - 8, 2013

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Artie Stewart, the ‘Heart of the Park,’ dies at 68 obituaRy

Photo by Gary Behrens

Artie Stewart in Washington Square Park singing and sporting his Saturn “halo” hat.

entertaining world. A unique, kind and wonderful person, Artie had a welcoming, positive, nonjudgmental, upbeat spirit, a pure energy. There was no pretense

about the man. He was charismatic and charming, a Village character, but he also

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BY SHARON WOOLUMS It was a sad day on April 5 in Washington Square. Artie Stewart, the “Heart of the Park,” quintessential crowd pleaser, passed away into the park’s annals of those forever loved and never forgotten. His wonderful, zany antics will no longer make us giggle. Artie’s fellow park musician Sage Logan expressed what many felt: With Artie gone, it’s like showing up at the park and the arch is missing!" Arthur “Artie” Stewart was born June 21, 1944, to George and Lady Stewart on Riverside Drive. Al Heitzer, who knew and sang with Artie, told of the early years. “Lady Stewart was a stereotypical stage mom, pushing her son into music,” he recalled. “Artie frequented the Inwood YMCA, where musicians rehearsed. In 1958, with Artie one of the leads, The Sinclairs, our doo-wop high school quintet of varied ethnicities — African-American, Jewish, Puerto Rican, Italian and Lebanese — was formed. Singing in courtyards, George Washington High School hallways and subways, finally we were hired for birthday parties, churches and Y’s. “Later, donning dandy attire, we sang in Downtown clubs and venues — Tony Pastor’s, The Gold Bug and Trude Heller’s in the Village. “Word of mouth traveled about our band,” he continued, “and in 1961 The Sinclairs were close to signing a recording contract with Dice Records. Thinking that recording recent covers was wrong, we returned the contract unsigned.” In 1960 Artie began hanging out in Greenwich Village with the likes of Richie Havens and Joan Baez. He became a fixture in Washington Square Park, singing folk songs as a tenor with the new Sinclairs band. Artie lived in the East Village, then moved to Soho, where he resided for four decades. At a memorial jam for Artie on April 7 in Washington Square Park, many spoke. What follows is a summation of their comments: Colorful, fun-loving and creative, Artie, the most off-the-wall, high-spirited, energetic presence in the park, lifted spirits. When you heard the slide whistle, you knew “Artie the Party” was coming, and before you knew it, Artie had you swaying to his rhythm and you were smack in the center of Artie’s always amusing and

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had character. If he happened upon a skirmish, Artie would exclaim, “Show a little love!” Always in good humor, his indomitable spirit transcended any problem as he roller-skated and biked down life’s sometimes difficult paths. “A free musical cat,” Artie moved to the music that was in him and around him. An inspiration to musicians, he coached, encouraged and supported them. Artie, whose heart beat to a different drum, could make any song his own, coming from the rhythm, embroidering on a theme and coming back to it. He wanted everybody to be happy and harmonize — in more ways than one! Artie, you may rest in peace knowing that your music lives in all those lucky enough to have gathered round you: musicians who got to play with you; tourists from around the world who got even one glimpse of a true free “Village” spirit; all the little children who danced with sweet abandon to your playful, joyful noise; and all who saw — no, experienced! — you singing in the sun with colorful umbrellas, your utility belt with bells, whistles, tambourines — “the look”: goggles, Saturn summer hat — aviator glasses in winter and blinking lights. Artie used to include splits in his act until the last split, when he ripped his pants. Someone has a photo of that somewhere since there are countless photos of Artie all over the world. Talented musician friends sang an Artie signature song, “Have You Ever Seen the Rain.” Karen Bartolo spoke for many, when she said, “My tears are like the rain coming down on a sunny day but I know he will be with us still at every jam — when he’s not directing the angels in song”…in his Saturn hat — Artie’s halo. Artie Stewart’s siblings, George Jr. and Patty, both predeceased him. He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Mary Stuart. Details about a memorial will be announced. For a commemorative video of Artie, see http://youtu.be/KKj9PbQvd7k .

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www.reddenfuneralhome.net


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May 2 - 8, 2013

Gearing up for bike-share’s arrival Continued from page 4

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Similarly, some sidewalk food vendors are also being forced to vacate their usual spots by the new bike docks. Merchants — those in storefronts — near the recently installed 42-bike station on West Broadway had mixed reactions to it this week. Andrew Moore, owner of Stuart Moore jewelry boutique, said it seems like a good idea to him. “I was just in Amsterdam,” he said. “They have a really nice bike-share program there. In this age of bikes, it’ll bring tourists here. It’ll be interesting.” (He also noted he was recently in San Francisco where people are currently in an uproar over “pop-up cafes” in the streets, sometimes two or three per block.) Moore likes the vitality of the street artists and thinks they actually might benefit from the new bike-share station. “The bikes could bring clients to them, too,” he noted. “Let’s give it a chance — it isn’t even summer yet.”

‘It gets crazy at 4 a.m. Can you imagine all the drunk people coming out of the bars and trying to bike home?’ Marianne Hyde A local gallerist, however, who requested her gallery’s name not be printed, was skeptical. “We only got a notice a week before it was installed,” she complained of the Soho bike depot. “I think it’s highly dangerous where it’s located. It’s a busy, two-way street.” She admitted with a laugh that she’s not much of a cyclist, though, not having rode a bike in the past five years. Cara Faris, a sales associate at the MO851 fashion boutique, said everyone is just watching and waiting — with some customers wondering if the bike station is an art installation. “I think right now people are just trying to figure out when the bikes are going to show up,” she said. “Yesterday a few people came in and said, ‘What exactly is that?’ They thought it was like a sculpture or something or some sort of exhibition.” Just as with merchants, it’s not hard to get residents to share their views on the new bike-share stations. Within just a 20-minute period early Tuesday evening The Villager found a wide range of opinions among passersby at the bike-share dock on Renwick St. at Spring St., just steps from the newspaper’s office.

Claudia Perez, 17, said she was “neutral” on the issue. “I don’t really mind,” she said of the metallic bike corral plopped down in front of her home. She said her friends at Millennium High School aren’t really talking about bikeshare. Cristina Botero, 25, walking her dachshund, Mambo, around the block, said she’s really looking forward to the public pedaling program. “I lived in Paris where they have a very established [bike-share] program,” she said, “and I used it every day to go to school. It’s impossible to get cabs there.” Botero, a consultant for nonprofits, said she would use Citi Bike to go to brunch and visit museums, and also to ride on the Hudson River bikeway. A half hour pedal on the park path would be plenty, she said, when asked about the program’s time limit. Also, with bike-share there’s no fear about one’s own bike being stolen off the street, she added. But architect Marianne Hyde, another block resident, said the bike station being stuck in front of her building — and right at the corner, no less — is a problem. The other day, she said, a U.P.S. truck driver couldn’t make the turn onto Renwick St. and had to remove one of the bike station’s white plastic bollards. Plus, the new structure takes away residents’ ability to park their cars in front of their own building, she added. And how will the building’s garbage be picked up, she wondered, with the bike station there? “The whole building is unhappy,” Hyde said. “It’s a narrow street — and there are three construction projects on it. This adds more complexity to the street. “And we have several bars, Emerald Inn, Anchor Bar and Sway,” she added. “It gets crazy at night at 4 a.m. Can you imagine all the drunk people coming out and trying to bike home?” (According to “Tipsy on Wheels,” an Aug. 7, 2010, article in The New York Times, biking under the influence is not explicitly illegal, but a drunk cyclist can be charged with reckless endangerment or public intoxication, just as a pedestrian can.) Hyde said she definitely planned to attend Thursday’s C.B. 2 bike-share forum where people will air their concerns. Sean Sweeney, director of the Soho Alliance, sees another looming problem, specifically for the bike-share kiosks, where users will swipe their credit cards. He said he recently noticed the Citi Bike kiosk at the corner of LaGuardia Place and W. Third St. had been plastered with a KATSU tag, by the ubiquitous sticker fiend of the same name. “You watch it — it’s a graffiti magnet,” Sweeney predicted of the kiosks. “Why didn’t they put above the Citi Bike logo ‘Deface Me’? — because that’s what’s going to happen.” Sweeney also said it would have been smarter to start the bike-share program smaller, and then, based on the results, decide whether to expand it.


May 2 - 8, 2013

Photos by Sam Spokony

AIDS Walk is making great strides toward funding goal Advocates, donors and volunteers gathered in the Village on April 25 to kick off the final weeks of the campaign leading up to the 28th annual AIDS Walk NY, which will be held in Central Park on May 19. The Walk is largest AIDS-related fundraising event in the world, and last year raised more than $5.8 million for New York City-based Gay Men’s Health Crisis (G.M.H.C.) and 40 other tri-state-area AIDS service organizations. The kickoff event, which was held at the Center for Architecture, at 536 LaGuardia Place, featured an appearance

by Broadway star Nick Adams — acclaimed for his recent role in the musical “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” — pictured above, who was also cheered for his continued efforts as a volunteer and fundraiser for the AIDS Walk. Notable appearances were also made by state Senator Brad Hoylman, who began his first term representing the Village earlier this year, and Dr. Marjorie Hill, the C.E.O. of G.M.H.C., pictured together, below. To learn more about contributing to this year’s AIDS Walk NY, visit aidswalk.net/ newyork.

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May 2 - 8, 2013

Police BLOTTER Bogus bouncers busted

Purse picker caught

Police arrested two bouncers employed by a West Village nightclub after it was found they carried fake security licenses. During an inspection on Sun., April 26, around 1:30 a.m., officers questioned the socalled guards, Willie Jones, 41, and Dennis Kennedy, 35, and asked them to show proper ID. But both licenses — which are supposed to be granted only by the state’s Division of Licensing Services — were clearly falsified, police said. Jones and Kennedy were both charged with forgery.

A woman, 29, told police she was sitting at the bar at Market Table, a restaurant at 54 Carmine St., around 11:30 p.m. on April 27, when she turned and saw a woman — later identified as Kathy Pierre, 41 — putting her wallet back into her purse. When the victim checked her wallet after Pierre dashed out of the restaurant, she realized it was missing $40 and her credit card. Luckily for the victim, the restaurant manager also witnessed the crime, so both were able to provide police reports — and during a canvass of the area two hours later, officers were able to track down Pierre. She was charged with grand larceny.

Spilled the coke Police spotted Michael Barnes, 41, inside Washington Square Park around 1:30 a.m. on Wed., April 24, which is after the park’s closing time. He acquiesced to the officers without incident, and was being driven back to the precinct to deal with his charges, when Barnes apparently decided to take a chance on getting rid of some alleged cocaine in his back pocket. While handcuffed in the cruiser’s back seat, Barnes was eventually able to remove the bag of drugs from his back pocket and spill it out — but when the officers opened the door, they saw everything. In addition to trespassing and criminal possession of a controlled substance, Barnes was charged with tampering with physical evidence.

Loko to have stolen card Police said they found an illegal knife and a stolen Social Security card in the pockets of a man they stopped for public drinking on the night of Sat., April 27. Christian Sevilla, 25, was spotted by officers holding an open container of the alcoholic beverage Four Loko near the corner of W. 14th St. and Eighth Ave. around 11 p.m. After stopping and searching him, cops found

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a box cutter, along with a Social Security card belonging to a woman who had previously reported it stolen. Sevilla was charged with criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of stolen property and an open container violation.

Phone snatchers Police arrested two men early Sun., April 28, after seeing them steal a young woman’s cell phone as she walked on the sidewalk.

The woman, 19, was walking past the corner of Bleecker St. and LaGuardia Place around 4 a.m., when police said they witnessed Allen Nolan, 25, and Utley Kavanaugh, 26, team up to snatch the iPhone from her purse. The two crooks took off running, but the officers quickly apprehended them. Nolan and Kavanaugh were both charged with grand larceny.

Sam Spokony

Judge snorts at coke-ring clients Alicia Elett appeared at her arraignment in Manhattan Supreme Court, above, on Fri., April 26. Elett, 25, a bartender at the Bowery Hotel, was one of 16 people arrested for buying drugs from a ring that operated out of the Baruch Houses in the Lower East Side and Campos Plaza in the East Village. Two weeks earlier, 41 people were arrested, including the drug dealers and livery car drivers who made the deliveries. As each of the buyers appeared before Justice Edward McLaughlin, he held up photos of the dealers, saying to each buyer that the “kingpins" of the drug rings would very likely go to jail for 15 years to life. “There are gun battles” in the Lower East Side because of drugs, McLaughlin told them. “Cocaine and its problem has been in all the newspapers. “In the Lower East Side, two police officers were shot at because of drug gangs shooting each other in order to control the selling of drugs to idiots,”  the

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

judge said, glaring at the buyers. “You,” he said to each defendant, including Elett, “are a contributing factor in the Lower East Side problem.” The 16 had made cocaine purchases totaling from $430 to $2,400. They are due back in court this month.

Jefferson Siegel

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Pathmark site developer commits to building replacement supermarket By Lincoln Anderson Local elected officials announced that the developer of the former Pathmark site on the Lower East Side has agreed to build a replacement supermarket as part of the project. Much to the community’s dismay, the Pathmark was closed in December to make way for the new development. Last Friday, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, state Senator Daniel Squadron and Councilmember Margaret Chin issued a joint statement on the agreement: “As part of our ongoing effort to ensure that our Lower East Side neighbors have access to fresh food and other

essentials,” they said, “we met with the developer of the former Pathmark site at 227 Cherry St. and received a commitment that a full-service supermarket will be built as part of the project. “This is an area that is underserved when it comes to the availability of fresh and affordable food. That is why we fought plans to close the Pathmark and have been advocating for another supermarket to replace it. Extell Development Company has assured us that a food market will be built,” the politicians said, “and we look forward to seeing it open. We are also advocating for a temporary market to open while construction is underway.”


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May 2 - 8, 2013

editoRial

Bike-share backlash As our Page 1 article in this week’s issue notes, a plan to show a movie by Community Board 2 on bike-share has been scrapped in favor of a large discussion forum on bikeshare, and specifically the new bike-dock strips that have sprung up all over Downtown. The movie — actually, reportedly two short films about bike-share in other countries — was to be accompanied by a presentation by two Department of Transportation officials who lead New York’s bike-share program, known as Citi Bike. But, like the plan for the movies, these D.O.T. officials have vanished, and unfortunately apparently may not attend the discussion tonight, Thurs., May 2, at P.S. 41, at 116 W. 11th St., starting at 6:30 p.m. David Gruber, C.B. 2 chairperson, explained to us that the event’s change of format was made after the board’s office was “inundated with calls and concerns” from nearly 100 local residents about the size and placement of the new bike-share stations. As a result, the venue was moved from an earlier N.Y.U. location with a 100-person capacity to the P.S. 41 auditorium, with space for 350 to 400 people. Gruber, who will lead the forum, told us he’s perturbed that D.O.T. — as of our press time — was saying it would not send a representative to the meeting. So, Gruber will do his best to allow people to express their feelings, in hopes of reaching some solutions. “It’s disappointing,” he told us late Wednesday afternoon. “As of right now, D.O.T.’s deciding not to come. I’m going to run the meeting — but I don’t have answers. I’m not D.O.T. Ask me the day after the meeting, and I may have answers. “A lot of what we’re hearing is that people are O.K. with the bike-share program,” he explained, “but that they didn’t expect it to be this large or in these locations.” In short, many folks feel blindsided by the long metallic strips of bike docks suddenly slapped down around the neighborhood. “Certainly, people didn’t see the scale or the volume,” Gruber noted. “People are saying, ‘Can it be broken down into smaller units?’ ” Clearly, the city is anticipating high demand for the new eco-friendly and affordable transportation alternative, and feels bike docks of a certain size are needed. We, for one, do eagerly look forward to using Citi Bike. Sure, there are issues to be ironed out — and, yes, some real safety concerns — but we’re hopeful it will be a great program. And a lot of the bike stations actually do seem to be sited in good, appropriate spots. But, for example, in the case of bike stations bolted down in front of residential buildings, we certainly can understand people’s trepidation, to put it mildly. “I get it, but it doesn’t have to be so many in one place,” Gruber said of the multi-bike stations, summing up many residents’ thinking. In short, he said of the reason for the forum, “People need to vent and they need to say what the problems are.” Gruber has invited residents from neighboring Community Boards 3 and 4 to the forum, since similar concerns are shared across Downtown neighborhoods. The main unease, he said, of bike-share is “where it starts to interfere with the flow of life. … In Europe, these bike-shares are integrated into the fabric of the city — not like these massive barricades.” Again, we support bike-share. But many residents have concerns — many quite legitimate — about the siting and size of the bike stations. Thursday’s discussion hopefully will help steer us in the right direction to kick this program off on the right foot. Let’s give bike-share a chance at least to start rolling. But D.O.T. must not hide from concerns about a program that will dramatically reshape — has already reshaped — our landscape.

letteRS to the editoR Pristine grass...and Segways

Whoa! Bad ’60s flashback

To The Editor: Re “Conservancy will keep Washington Sq. looking good” (talking point, by William Castro, April 25): I recently had the experience of working in Los Angeles in a sparkly new building adjacent to a corporate park. In the park, every blade of grass was a brilliant green. There was a pond and various structures for “play.” A security guard patrolled the park on a Segway. But no one played in the park except for a local soccer team that was practicing. It seemed uncomfortable there because how you were supposed to interact with the park was very scripted. Parks in New York are such paradise because the city has very little nature otherwise. They are for everyone to enjoy. Please don’t turn them into corporate parks that welcome some people and forbid others. Even privileged professionals don’t enjoy feeling constricted by an undue number of park rules.

To The Editor: Re “Artist fights on as Parks set to put new limits on buskers” (news article, April 25): Well, this is cheerful. I remember in the late ’60s a friend of mine was busted for “playing a musical instrument in a public place.” She was wearing an ankle bracelet. What goes around sometimes, unfortunately, comes back around.

Julian Meale

Is this all just a coincidence? To The Editor: Re “Conservancy will keep Washington Sq. looking good” (talking point, by William Castro, April 25): “Looking good” is a matter of personal taste. Apparently, Borough Commissioner Castro and the park conservancy thugs who are remaking Washington Square Park in their own sterile corporate image, think that musicians, performers and artists are an eyesore that must be eliminated. Is it coincidence that the conservancy is announced at the same time a secret amendment to the park rules is passed that removes virtually all performers from the park? Does eliminating free expression count as the “fruit” of the conservancy’s efforts? Doesn’t having a conservancy director that is also a high-ranking Parks Department official count as a conflict of interest, or is that just a feature of the wonderful publicprivate partnership in crime that Commissioner Castro and the new conservancy director Sarah Neilson are just very small cogs in? Robert Lederman Lederman is president, ARTIST (Artists’ Response to Illegal State Tactics)

iRa blutReich

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Schwartz was radical — on park To The Editor: Re J’accuse! McCarthyism, Village politics and Pier 40 (talking point, by Arthur Schwartz, April 25): It was confounding to me that Arthur Schwartz would paint himself the victim of “McCarthyism” in the debate over the future of Pier 40. I know the term well because my father was a named individual in a suit fighting McCarthyist “have you ever been” affirmations required of professors, a suit that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. It was one of my father’s proudest moments, but not one that was without fear of right-wing demagoguery. The dispute over Pier 40 is something altogether different. It boils down to this: Should protective legislation that prohibits residential development in Hudson River Park be changed? In the 1990s I was a member of Community Board 2 and a vocal supporter of the determined and unwavering position of the Federation to Save the Waterfront and Great Port, and politicians like Assemblymember Deborah Glick, to prohibit any residential use in the park. It was a hard-fought battle but that protection became a pillar of the Hudson River Park Act. Arthur Schwartz should own his support for a radical legislative amendment that would erase that protection, a change that would have moved the luxury tower plan for Pier 40 to reality, and who knows what park-eating residential development that would follow. He should own his belittling of those of us who fought the luxury tower plan, and not run and hide from his words as he is doing now. The Villager’s Scoopy’s Notebook, on Feb., 7, reported, “As for the waterfront, Schwartz said, frankly, he doesn’t believe there’s that much opposition out there to the residential plan — save for the same few activists from decades ago who turn up at meetings on the issue,

Continued on page 12


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Full circle for the A&P; A personal shopping saga notebook BY CAROL GREITZER R.I.P. Food Emporium — Sixth Ave. at 12th St. (a.k.a. the A&P). For those who don’t know, both chains — A&P and Food Emporium — are owned by the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company. The A&P — once the leading food chain in the country — came first; the Food Emporium stores were created much later and were an attempt to be more upscale. Or maybe that was an excuse for higher prices. The Village location started life as an A&P, only to be upgraded many years later to a Food Emporium. But habit dies slowly, and in my family it was always referred to as the A&P. My first encounter with an A&P came when I was a little girl, long before supermarkets existed. In those days it was just a grocery store. This one was on 198th St. in the north Bronx. We didn’t go there often because it was pricier than the other groceries on the block, but I can still invoke the lovely smell of the coffee beans being ground right on the spot. No canned Maxwell House or Chase & Sanborn for us! Little could I guess back then that one day I’d be writing about the coffee and other A&P products for the ad agency that had the A&P account, and where I was a copywriter. But more about that later. Years later, when I moved to Abingdon Square, there were no supermarkets in the West Village. At the intersection of W. Fourth and W. 12th Sts. there were three small food stores — a Peter Reeves grocery, another grocery and on the third corner, what was then called a “vegetable store.” But imagine my surprise to discover, in a time when large A&P supermarkets dotted the countryside, a relic of the past in the form of a little, old-fashioned A&P grocery on the east side of Hudson St., I believe between Jane and Horatio. To this day I recall with delight the sign on the front door informing customers: “Closed for lunch 1 to 2,” or maybe it was “12 to 1.” I’m not certain of the exact time, but I know for a fact that quaint custom did exist. There was one other interesting food option for those willing to lug their packages to the West Village from Village Square

(as the intersection of Greenwich and Sixth Aves. and Eighth St. was known). It was the old original Balducci’s — then just a vegetable store — on Greenwich Ave. (We hadn’t learned to use the term “produce” then.) There were no shopping carts, no plastic bags. You’d find a little ledge somewhere and collect your items there. One of the sales staff would come over, grab a brown paper bag and tote up your purchases, without identifying them. You’d see a row of penciled figures 89, 39, 22, 65, 47, 38, etc. for a total of $3.00 — maybe. Happily, this store had food not found elsewhere. One day I picked up an unfamiliar bunch of greens and asked Mr. Balducci what it was. “Arugola,” he told me. “It’s like an Italian watercress.” He also introduced me to Cranshaw melon. It was delicious, worth the cumbersome 5-pound tote to Abingdon Square. But back to the A&P. When the company opened the supermarket at 12th and Sixth, sometime in the late ’50s, the little, oldfashioned store on Hudson St. was closed, and soon the other corner stores followed suit, to be replaced by trendy restaurants. And other supermarkets moved into the far West Village. Somewhat later, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company saw fit to open a Food Emporium on 13th St. and Sixth Ave., making things very convenient for us. By then I had moved to 12th St. near Sixth. Food shopping in New York City is not like shopping in other parts of the country. About 10 years ago we were visiting in California and happened to mention that we didn’t own a car, but rented when necessary. “But how do you do your marketing?” asked one incredulous listener. “Well,” I responded triumphantly, “within a block or two we have two supermarkets, and a couple of blocks further we have two gourmet food stores [Jefferson Market and Balducci’s]. So a few times a week on the way home from work we pick up any needed items.” She just couldn’t envision that kind of lifestyle. Despite its preeminence in the field, there was a certain stodginess and marketing timidity about the company that might have predicted its ultimate decline. For example, the ad agency I worked for that had the A&P account also represented a

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large number of other food clients. For that reason, we had a test kitchen presided over by a professional dietician. So when A&P decided to launch its own brand of frozen foods, said dietician and I collaborated on the package copy. In flagrant opposition to the standard practice, at the time, of cooking vegetables to mushiness, our directions opted for short cooking times. The A&P brass (to a man) was horrified. When we gave these men a taste test of al dente green beans and peas, they acknowledged that the food tasted good…but no, they didn’t want to deviate from the longer preparation times that Bird’s Eye and Snow Crop frozen brands advocated. The only compensation was that they let me feature herbs and spices as serving suggestions. Nevertheless, I will always be grateful to the A&P for something having absolutely nothing to do with food. The A&P taught

my daughter how to read! Yes, it’s true. As a preschooler, she knew the alphabet and could even pick out the letters on the typewriter. We were driving past a commercial strip and she was calling out letters she saw on store signs. At one point she routinely sang out “A&P,” then, more excitedly, “A&P!” I could practically see the light bulb go off as she recognized A&P as a word. When we got home she rushed to the bathroom to pick up the big container of Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder. “Baby,” she pointed proudly. From then on there was no stopping her. So, for many reasons — notably the convenience — I will miss this store. But as I write this the company has yet to announce future employment plans for the employees, many of whom have worked there for years and are now middle-aged. I hope they will be provided for.

Photo by Elissa Stein

The Sixth Ave. Food Emporium on the morning of Fri., April 26.

PUBLISHER Jennifer Goodstein EDITOR IN CHIEF Lincoln Anderson ARTS EDITOR Scott Stiffler

SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING Francesco Regini

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Troy Masters

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.

RETAIL ADVERTISING MANAGER Colin Gregory

SENIOR DESIGNER Michael Shirey

CONTRIBUTORS

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Arnold Rozon PHOTOGRAPHERS Tequila Minsky Jefferson Siegel Clayton Patterson

Terese Loeb Kreuzer

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Allison Greaker Julius Harrison

PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Alex Morris

John W. Sutter

Julio Tumbaco

Marvin Rock Ira Blutreich Patricia Fieldsteel Bonnie Rosenstock Jefferson Siegel Jerry Tallmer


12

May 2 - 8, 2013

þ Choose to live the life you want.

letters to the editor Continued from page 10 like Ben Green and Marcy Benstock.” The prohibition against residential is the bulwark that has shielded the Hudson River Park from the march of luxury residential waterfront towers. It must remain. Arthur Schwartz’s effort to remove this restriction has been soundly rejected by all of our local elected officials, and abandoned by the one local assemblymember who favored it. Arthur, if you have reversed your position and joined the ones you belittled, then admit it and move on. But don’t point fingers at those of us who stand firm behind our vision of the park as the right place for playgrounds, youth leagues and sorely needed green space — but the wrong place for residential towers. Jonathan Geballe Geballe is Democratic district leader, 66th Assembly District, Part A

Let’s stick to real issues

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To The Editor: Re J’accuse! McCarthyism, Village politics and Pier 40 (talking point, by Arthur Schwartz, April 25): Arthur Schwartz’s comparison of our alleged misrepresentation of his position on residential development on Pier 40 to McCarthyism and blacklisting — which destroyed the reputations and livelihoods of hundreds of Americans — is typical Schwartzian hyperbole. It is unfortunate because it diverts attention from real issues, like open space and neighborhood preservation, which voters in this year’s Democratic district leader race deserve to know about. Particularly in this important citywide election year, candidates should be focusing on issues and their ability to work with others to get things done, not on manufactured insults and personal attacks.   Tony Hoffmann Maria Passannante Derr

blacklisted and loses his income because he is unlawfully stripped of his license to practice law (or teach, as my father was), and driven to despair and possible suicide as many were, his comparison to the 100,000 true victims of political persecution in the 1950s is nothing but the insipid whining of a deluded egomaniac. Carl Rosenstein

Who’s picking bike sites? To The Editor: Re “Fagan Park site was better” (letter, by Merle Kaufman, April 18) and “Citi Bike set to roll in May; Some say No to Petrosino Site” (news article, April 11): As the chairperson of the Hudson Square Connection business improvement district’s traffic task force, I want to comment on Merle Kaufman’s letter, where it was mentioned that the original proposed bike-share station site along Sixth Ave. would have made more sense than MacDougal St. She insinuated that the the original site had been moved to MacDougal St. Nearby, there will also be a bike station for 35 bikes located on a sidewalk — albeit an extra-wide sidewalk — on Houston St. just west of Hudson St. In addition, there will also be a bike station on Renwick St. just south of Spring St. for 39 bikes. Keep in mind that Renwick St. is even narrower than MacDougal and that Spring St. has become the main boulevard of the Hudson Square community. Unfortunately, the process of “picking and choosing” locations has been left to the city in the form of the Department of Transportation, with very little real input from the community and the organizations that serve it. Sometimes this could be a good thing in order to expedite the process, and sometimes you have other things like Hurricane Sandy and software glitches that say “not so fast buddy.” Let’s see what happens “sometime in May.” Phil Mouquinho

No sense of proportion

What genius put this here?

To The Editor: Re J’accuse! McCarthyism, Village politics and Pier 40 (talking point, by Arthur Schwartz, April 25): Arthur Schwartz is obviously a dedicated activist but he has no sense of proportion with his declaration that he is a “victim of McCarthyism” because he didn’t receive the Village Independent Democrats’ endorsement for district leader — whatever that is, and who really cares? Unless Mr. Schwartz is imprisoned for invoking the Fifth Amendment, is

To The Editor: Re “Invasion of the bike-share docks” (front-page photo, April 25): While I can get onboard with clean transportation alternatives, I wholly object to the destruction of residential life in service to tourists. The station on Renwick St. in Hudson Square blocks access to three local businesses and two residential buildings! Does Mr. Bloomberg feel that Manhattan is so much a “luxury product” that no one

Continued on page 33


May 2 - 8, 2013

A Salute

13

TO

U N I O N S Q U A R E

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

A SPECIAL VILLAGER SUPPLEMENT

Photo by Tess Colwell

Pages 13 to 24


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May 2 - 8, 2013

New residential by 3rd Ave. sparks eastern renewal By Lincoln Anderson Union Square’s renaissance is one of the city’s ongoing success stories, and now the eastern side of the district is starting to share in the area’s ongoing makeover. A notable new presence is The Jefferson, an eight-story, 83-year unit luxury condominium building at 211 E. 13th St. The project was developed by joint venture partners Charles Blaichman, Abram and Scott Shnay and Ironstate Development Company’s Michael and David Barry. Sales for the building are already underway. The building takes its name from the Jefferson Theater, a vaudeville mecca that once occupied the property, but which was demolished about 15 years ago. The spacious lot sat vacant for years, but now is home to a luxury building with “a commanding view” of the area. The promo materials tout the spot as being in the hip East Village, as much as on the eastern edge of hot Union Square. “There is no more charming, lively and exciting neighborhood in Manhattan than the East Village,” The Jefferson’s promotional copy reads. “It is alive with history, culture and creativity — but living here can be a challenge. Most residential buildings are over 100 years old and built to a scale unsuited to contemporary lifestyles. Many find the compromise worth it. But The Jefferson provides the perfect answer, with no compromise required: an ultra-contemporary, doorman building with all the amenities located in the most desirable area of the East Village. … The Jefferson also offers luxurious common areas: a gym, a lounge, a business center and a roof garden that exploits its lofty command of the neighborhood.” Studios are starting at $850,000, while a 12,333-square-foot penthouse with a spacious rooftop deck is priced at $2.4 million. Jennifer Falk, executive director of the Union Square Partnership — a business improvement district and local development corporation — said the construction of The Jefferson has already had a ripple effect on the surrounding neighborhood, as a number of new business have opened up along Second and Third Aves. near 14th St. “It’s really been a boon having a new building come along,” she noted. “The transformation has been remarkable and we expect additional businesses to open in the coming year, including the two spaces at the base of The Jefferson, totaling 4,500 square feet of new retail space.” Also, a new residential sliver building is going up north of the N.Y.U. residence on the northeast corner of 14th St. and Third Ave. “I don’t even know how people are going to live in there,” Falk said, incredulously, of the pencil-thin high-rise. Along with the new residential construction in the eastern part of the BID

tree pits for spring, Falk noted, adding that once the weather is consistently warm, landscapers will replant the 46 planters scattered throughout the district. The Partnership is also adding more street furniture in and around the park, since, as Falk said, seating is the number one request the Partnership gets in user surveys about the area. In June, the BID will also start its free summer programming in the square, from yoga to kids’ activities to music and dancing.

‘The East Village is alive with history, culture and creativity — but living here can be a challenge. Many find the compromise worth it. But The Jefferson provides the perfect answer, with no compromise required.’ Promotional brochure

The Jefferson is a commanding new presence on E. 14th St.

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

The renovated Union Square pavilion will likely continue to sit vacant this summer, pending a court decision on the city’s appeal of a lawsuit seeking to block a restaurant from going into the space.

district, the area is experiencing historically low office and retail vacancy rates, far below the city average. The tech sector is booming in Union Square, and the area boasts five of the city’s top 10 venture capital firms, as well, Falk noted proudly. Burlington Coat Factory last year moved into the 92,000-square-foot, former Filene’s Basement space on Union Square South, providing a firm retail anchor.

School construction is also marching onward and upward, with completion nearing on the New School’s University Center at 14th St. and Fifth Ave. A new, 720-seat public school is also under construction at 10 E. 15th St. Slated to open in fall 2014, it will house the Clinton School for Writers and Artists Middle School, plus a high school. Meanwhile, the Partnership continues its work keeping the district looking good. The BID recently spruced up 100

The Partnership’s big annual foottasting event under a white tent, Harvest in the Square, brings in up to $400,00 a year, all of which goes toward improving and beautifying the park. “As we enter into the busy spring and summer seasons, the Union Square Partnership team is hard at work beautifying the district for the millions of people who live, work and visit the area,” Falk said. “From power-washing to painting street furniture to the installation of spring plantings and lawn work, our goal is to make Union Square a neighborhood for everyone to enjoy.” In that vein, Falk, for one, says she’s pleased with the city’s enforcement of its new rules on expressive matter vendors in parks and how this is affecting Union Square Park and the plaza area around it. “Since the regulations went into effect, the quality of life over all in the park has improved,” she said. “It just reached a tipping point where there wasn’t a fair balance between vending and the rest of the public’s ability to use the park. And the artists are an important part of the fabric of Union Square, so we’re very pleased the new rules have created a balance between the two constituencies — the artists and the general public.” On another hot-button issue, Falk said she understands the court this month will hear the city’s appeal of a ruling on a lawsuit against the plan for a restaurant concession in the Union Square pavilion. A decision isn’t expected before the fall, she said.


May 2 - 8, 2013

15

High tech makes life in square a bit easier, tidier By Heather Dubin Locals could be tempted to set up an outdoor office this summer in Union Square Park, thanks to innovative technologies provided by the Union Square Partnership. Faster free Wi-Fi, handheld devices used to monitor sanitation and quality of life issues, and solarpowered trash compactors will make the park a more enjoyable space this season. While complimentary Wi-Fi has been available in the park and surrounding area for a few years now, more people than ever now use handheld devices, and the system was due for an upgrade. A revamp of the equipment is being conducted by Sky-Packets, a Wi-Fi installation company, to be completed by June. “It’s terrific about the new system,” said Jennifer Falk, executive director of the Union Square Partnership. “It’s so robust that it will accommodate side streets around the park,” she added of the beefed-up broadband. An extra antenna on the park’s north side near 17th and 18th Sts. will enable access at a cafe. Funding for the Wi-Fi comes from the Union Square Partnership’s budget — and the Beth Israel Medical System, one of the largest institutions in the neighborhood, will sponsor the program for its first two years.  The new system has worked out a glitch, to Falk’s relief. “I’m really glad that the Apple 5 users will now stop calling and saying they can’t hook up to the system,” she said with a laugh. “We’re

really looking forward to providing as many people as possible with this service.” Sponsorship money will allow for a marketing campaign to alert the public about the free service, which the business improvement district was unable to do in the past, claims Falk. Users can get onto the system through the “USP Park Wi-Fi” network, and then agree to the terms and conditions. “We’re limiting the speed to 2 megabytes per second per user, actually faster than a T-1

‘I’m really glad that Apple 5 users will now stop calling and saying they can’t hook up to the system.’ Jennifer Falk line, which is typically used in an office,” said Henry Quintin, C.E.O. of Sky-Packets. There will be more total bandwidth for people to use, resulting in faster speed. Equipment is strategically mounted on rooftops in the area and points back down at the park for people to get a signal, explained Quintin. He hopes to segregate Internet traffic

between those with older and newer devices.  “Anyone with an iPad 2 or higher will automatically connect to 5 gigahertz,” Quintin explained. This will prevent most users from being on one channel at the same time, and create a better experience for all. There are typically about 250 users per access point, and Quintin estimates about 1,000 people on the whole system at one time. “We hope that people are smart enough to go to Union Square to not go to the park and do their banking,” he advised. “It’s for fun, not for serious stuff.” In other wired doings around the square, a newer high-tech invention involves a handheld device that uses geo-coding to keep track of maintenance repairs needed around the park. From cracked sidewalks to broken streetlights, specific details can be electronically reported to the appropriate city agency, which will increase the pace of resolving problems. “For the business improvement districts, sanitation and quality of life issues are a huge part of what they do,” Falk said. This includes sweet sweeping, as well as monitoring graffiti and 100 trees in the district, along with many other issues. The BID’s employees have had to test phone booths for dial tones, inspect kiosks and examine trash receptacles, all manually, which amounts to, as Falk put it, “lots of man hours and foot time on the street.” With the geo-coder, a worker can stand in

front of a broken fire hydrant, and point the handheld device at it. A drop box will appear for the address, a description of the problem, and allow the worker to take a photo. The Fire Department is then later alerted through the system. “We can electronically track these problems in the system, along with internal reports, and additional reports to tailor to send to our partners,” Falk said.  Designed by CDM-Smith, an engineering firm, this technology is a boon for cities, according to the BID executive director. “The handheld system will streamline our process,” Falk said. “It’ll be easier to generate reports and get the information to an agency that can address it in a much more coherent fashion.” Also targeted to be implemented in June, the device will be used by four employees on a weekly basis, and all the BID’s staff will receive training.    “We’re hoping that it’ll make the staff more efficient to get these surveys done quicker, so we can focus on other things,” Falk said. Also on the high-tech infrastructure front, there are seven BigBelly solar-powered trash compactors throughout the park, which have already been in use for a number of years now.  “They can take 10 times more than a regular can,” said Falk of the bins’ capacity. “And the benefit is that it’s not only compacting the trash, it alerts you with a light on the can when it needs to be emptied.” 


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With retro décor and restaurants, hotels are in the mix By Heather Dubin The quest to find a room in Downtown Manhattan just got a whole lot easier thanks to the recent openings of the Jade Hotel and the Hyatt Union Square, along with the completion of renovations at the W New York - Union Square. In its second month of business, the Jade Hotel, on W. 13th St. near Sixth Ave., is reminiscent of another era with its 1920s art deco style. Designed as an upscale boutique experience, the Jade has carved out a niche that is a bit of step back in time, blending well into the area, which sits between Union Square and Greenwich Village. A doorman stands before a flight of backlit onyx stairs that lead straight down to the lobby, where a gas fireplace flickers with a large mirror over the mantel. There are several couch and chair areas to hang out in, bookshelves to peruse, and art to view on loan from the Lower East Side gallery The Hole, which is on a six-month rotation. The front desk is virtually unnoticeable, tucked behind the stairs in a nook. The hotel owns one piece of artwork, a large black-and-white photograph of a bird and a man that is Hitchcock-esque. It hangs over a blue velvet couch, sitting on which Philip Cham, the hotel’s general manager, spoke recently about the Jade and its “more inviting, cooler and approachable vibe.” “Other hotels, sometimes it’s too trendy, there’s a huge DJ when you walk in,” said Cham. “If you’re here for business or to be with family, it’s not the same kind of atmosphere — it’s different.”  The building was completely redone, even down to the tin ceilings, but according to Cham, the hotel looks like its been around for a while, and fits in with the history of the Village. The 18-story hotel has 113 rooms, priced from $300 to $600 per night. There is a 24-hour fitness center, and room service, a doorman and bellman round the clock.  All rooms have a throwback rotary phone, free Wi-Fi and a flat-screen TV, which can be hidden with an art deco covering.  An old-style alarm clock radio sits on a desk with ample space for two leather chairs. Subway tiles line the bathroom, and C&O Bigelow, the famed local apothecary, supplies bath products. Staff uniforms are made by Against Nature, another local business.  Grape & Vine, an American-style restaurant at the Jade, is found past the lobby through two brick archways. Created with hotel restaurant partner Frederick Lesort, Grape & Vine’s local market-driven menu is diverse, and also includes some French-inspired offerings. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served, as well as tea and brunch. The restaurant is filled with red velvet Hollywood-style booths, plenty of tables and a long wooden bar, and is open till 2 a.m. Fred McDarrah’s photography from Chelsea’s Steven Kasher Gallery covers the walls with portraits of famous neighborhood figures like Robert De Niro and Andy Warhol, all underneath red lamps and a skylight. Jazz bands play once a week. In the works are a walking tour and even a television channel, according to Cham. The Jade refers guests to local places, and wants to provide a true New York experience. 

The Jade Hotel has a dramatic entrance leading down a flight of black stairs to a lounge area with a working fireplace.

“We want this to be a neighborhood spot for friends and special occasions,” he said. A few blocks east, the Hyatt Union Square,

on 13th St. near Fourth Ave., officially opened on April 22. The 11-story building boasts 178 rooms, with prices ranging from $379

to $1,300. As for the hotel’s culinary offerings, the Fourth, an American Brasserie at the Hyatt, run by Jo-Ann Makovitzky and Mario Moreira, is slated to open later this spring. Botequim, South American cuisine, also a creation of the husband-and-wife team, will open late this summer. Singl, the lobby bar, is curated by master sommelier Roger Dagorn. The W - New York Union Square, on Park Ave. South near E. 17th St., received a $15 million renovation a year ago, resulting in a sleek urban look. The hotel’s ground-floor Living Room has tons of leather couches and comfortable chairs for people-watching through long glass windows that look out onto the street. The hotel decor is Uptown meets Downtown, and consistent throughout 273 rooms on 21 floors, with prices from $329 to $1,500. The Extreme Wow Suite is designed in black-and-white with red accents, and is cutting-edge, literally, with a “split” through the room, with different styles in rug patterns and furniture on each side. It’s a cool concept that works. A large flat-screen TV graces the room, as do spectacular views of Manhattan.  Olives, the restaurant by Todd English, features Mediterranean cuisine, and has been here since W’s beginnings in 2001. The dining room has been expanded with more seating options, such as a large communal table, banquettes and vignettes. A family table can be reserved in the marble kitchen for front-row seats as the chef creates. A new spiral staircase was also added to reach the wine room and private dining area. The updated menu is farm-to-table from the Greenmarket, with a focus on small plates, either shared or for a single traveler. There is full-service breakfast, lunch and dinner, and patrons can also be served in the Living Room. 

Surfin’ safari in the park with better Wi-Fi Beefed-up free Wi-Fi in Union Square Park has enough capacity to let about 1,000 people surf the ’Net to their hearts’ content on their laptops and handheld devices.


May 2 - 8, 2013

WE’VE HAD

ANOTHER

GREAT YEAR! THANK YOU

Courtesy of Studio SM

Pining for some new public art

The Parks Department and Cynthia-Reeves Projects, in cooperation with the Union Square Partnership, will debut “Lotus,” above, by Seoul-based artist Jaehyo Lee, in Union Square Park this month. Located at the park’s southeastern triangle, the exhibition will be on view through October. Lee exhibits internationally, with recent works included at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design, London’s Saatchi Gallery and Korea’s Sungkok Museum. “Lotus” follows Lee’s signature use of Korean big-cone pine. For this work, the artist meticulously carved, shaped and burned the individual wood elements, which are attached to a steel armature that stretches 12 feet high.

We thank you for your contributions. We could not have accomplished so much without you and we are committed to making the coming year an even better one for all.

Union Square’s Renaissance is over three decades in the making and supported by a network of organizations committed to its success. With millions of visitors each year, the Union Square Partnership works with our community and government partners to ensure the district remains clean and inviting, and continues to deliver results in core service areas of sanitation, public safety, marketing, economic development and park beautification.

ConneCt With Us www.facebook.com/unionsqpartnership @UnionSquareNY flickr.com/groups/unionsquareny www.unionsquareblog.org www.unionsquarenyc.org Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Chants meeting in the park

Sitting not far from Union Square’s Gandhi statue, a group of Hare Krishna joyfully sang and played their instruments on a recent evening. The music repeatedly ebbed and flowed from slow drones to ecstatic crescendos.

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Greenmarket ramps up for spring and summer season By Maeve Gately Last Wednesday, the Union Square Greenmarket was “on a rampage.” At least it was, according to GrowNYC volunteers, who were showcasing ramps, a wild, young green vegetable that only grows for three weeks a year. Like a cross between leeks and garlic, ramps resemble spring onions and can be eaten raw or in pasta, or used to season an omelet or soup. As a result of their short growing season, they are seldom seen on restaurant menus and inspire a cultish following among marketgoers, who view them as “the harbingers of spring.” Under crisp blue skies and in weather that had barely lost its winter bite, the vendors of New York’s most famous farmers’ market showcased their wares and celebrated the new season. The Union Square market, now in its 37th season, opened in the fall of 1976, which was the year the Greenmarket program was launched. It is open year-round and constitutes the central hub of Greenmarket, a division of GrowNYC, which operates 54 markets in all five boroughs of the city. The nonprofit organization works with 250 producers within a 200-mile radius of the city, ensuring that all of the markets are “producer-only,” meaning that the vendors there bake, grow or catch everything they sell. The goal of the organization as a whole, publicity manager Liz Carollo said, is “helping small family farms in the region stay in business and giving them the opportunity to sell

Photos by Tess Colwell

Selling organic local meat at the Greenmarket.

directly to a New York City market.” Greenmarket aims to give every New Yorker access to fresh, seasonal food, regardless of neighborhood or income level, and to create destinations with its markets, where families

LaPlaca Cohen 212-675-4106 4.85 x 5.6375 4C NP

can go to shop for produce, watch a cooking demonstration or meet a vendor. This direct connection the organization creates between New Yorkers and their food is fulfilling and mutually beneficial. Ramps were the highlight on a recent visit to the Union Square Greenmarket, but Carollo explained, that was just the beginning. Asparagus will come next, followed by

strawberries, greens and eventually the corn, tomatoes and watermelons of summer. In April, the Greenmarkets highlighted foraged vegetables, but now that the growing season is ready to go back into full swing, cultivated crops are the new focus. With the arrival of May and Mother’s Day, the market vendors will be doing floral-arrangement demonstrations and cooking classes, teaching marketgoers to cook gourmet, natural food and even edible flowers. This time of year is especially exciting as vendors who have been Upstate all winter come back for the spring and summer months. By June and July, the market will be at full capacity with more than 80 vendors. Carollo encouraged new visitors to take advantage of this early spring rush. “Start going now and continue to throughout the season,” she urged. “It will be a new surprise every week with what’s coming in.” On a recent visit to the market, groups of students took a tour of the stalls, pausing to watch a composting demonstration near the north side of the park. These tours are led by Youth Director Samantha Hill, as well as by volunteers, and take 5,000 to 6,000 students a year through the markets — mostly Union Square — engaging them in classes, demonstrations and informational talks. Parents pushed babies in strollers. Chefs visited their favorite vendors to gauge the seasonal produce, gain inspiration and pick up varieties not available in commercial supermarkets. Visitors flocked around buckets of bright red tulips and branches of peach blossoms. The spring air was full of promise, and it smelled like ramps.

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There are so many kinds of onions — including ramps, in season — at the Greenmarket, it could make a person cry for joy. And of course there’s an abundance of other produce, too. 4/24/13 12:13 PM


May 2 - 8, 2013

Barnes & Noble Salutes Union Square Partnership.

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May 2 - 8, 2013

Your doctor retired to where?

Another reason to call.

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Master baker Uri Scheft with a tray of tantalizing treats at Breads Bakery.

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By Rey Mashayekhi Since it first opened 12 years ago, Lehamim Bakery has become famous in Tel Aviv for the delectable creations of its founder, Uri Scheft. Scheft, an Israeli national born to Danish parents, learned the art of baking bread in Europe, and caused a mild sensation upon returning home to open a bakery of his own. With a salivating variety of breads all baked on site — from crisp loaves of rye and sourdough to sweeter treats like rugelach and cheese sticks — Lehamim soon became the talk of Tel Aviv. One of the bakery’s fans was an Israeliborn, New York-raised businessman named Gadi Peleg, who came across Lehamim while in Tel Aviv. Peleg “came to love that bakery,” as he put it, and was introduced to Scheft through a mutual acquaintance. Eventually, the two discussed the possibility of bringing Lehamim — which is Hebrew for “breads” — to New York City. “I knew the level of quality was one that New Yorkers would appreciate,” Peleg told The Villager. Two years ago, as Lehamim continued to grow in popularity, Scheft and Peleg put plans in motion to open a bakery in New York. This past January, after much time spent scouting locations and ironing out the practicalities of bringing Scheft’s unique methodology across the ocean, the two men finally opened Breads Bakery — located at 18 E. 16th St., right across from Union Square.

Upon entering the very large, 9,000-square-foot space, it becomes apparent why the arrival of Breads Bakery has proven so notable among bread enthusiasts in New York. The scent of freshly baked dough hangs in the air, while the walls are covered with racks filled with a seemingly endless assortment of rolls, buns, cakes and sweets. Despite its size, the bakery only seats about 20 people — which can be explained by the massive baking operation that takes place in the back of the room, in an enormous kitchen that produces all of the products on display. So far, Breads has received a rapturous reception from patrons and food critics alike. Local food blogs have heralded it as the latest in the city’s line of boutique bakeries, such as Maison Kayser on the Upper East Side and Bien Cuit in Brooklyn. “I’m extremely flattered by the reception New York has given us,” Peleg said. “New Yorkers are spoiled by the options available to us.” Peleg mentioned that Union Square was a “no-brainer” for the bakery’s location, characterizing it as a place frequented by “people who care about food.” When asked about the possibility of further Breads Bakery locations in the city, however, Peleg said that he and Scheft “haven’t thought so far ahead” and are only focused on the Union Square location for the time being. “If things continue this way, we’ll be extremely pleased,” Peleg added. “It’s all we could have ever hoped for.”


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Where the legend of Washington Irving lives on By Rey Mashayekhi As a born-and-bred New Yorker who became one of America’s first and greatest literary icons, Washington Irving’s legacy is ever present. Stories like “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” are firmly embedded in the popular consciousness, while terms like “Gotham” and “Knickerbocker” are inescapably associated with Irving’s hometown. In Downtown Manhattan, the locus of Irving’s legacy is found one block east of Union Square, on the street that bears his name — Irving Place. The imposing limestone facade of Washington Irving High School towers over the block between E. 16th St. and E. 17th St. The high school, by 2015, will be phased out of the building, which also contains the new Academy for Software Engineering, among other schools, and is slated to get a new Success Academy charter school this August. Outside the school building, at the corner of Irving Place and E. 17th St., is a distinguished bust of the writer himself. This lies directly across the street from the Washington Irving House — an elegant, historic, 19th-century townhouse that bears both Irving’s name and a plaque dedicated to the writer, though there’s no evidence he ever actually resided there. Irving Place is, however, home today to upstart businesses that continue to honor Irving’s status as a New York icon. And none do it as well as a pair of establishments that not only share the same owners and street corner, but also clever homages to Irving’s work in their names. Ichabod’s, at 15 Irving Place, and The Headless Horseman, at 119 E. 15th St., are the creations of Eric Sherman and Brian Krawitz, who also operate popular, local nightlife spots like The Royal and Revival. And while both places tip their hat to “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” they serve two distinct purposes for clientele. “They’re totally different experiences,” general manager Frank DeBellis told The Villager, and he’s right. The Headless Horseman, which opened last December, is a beautiful, rustic watering hole featuring 24 beers on tap, with an emphasis on craft beers like Avery Salvation and Stoudt’s Pilsner. DeBellis said that the bar is meant to appeal to “beer nerds,” and with three taps dedicated to “nitro beers,” the appeal is certainly there. What’s more, all but two beers on offer are brewed in the United States. “I don’t think you need to go out of the States to find good beer,” DeBellis said. Right next door is Ichabod’s, which opened in February and specializes in what DeBellis called “casual fine dining.” Chef Matthew Etchemendy, formerly of the Midtown hotspot Koi, crafted a menu virtually exclusive to American cuisine and featuring a large raw bar component. Jeremy Strawn of Little Italy’s Mulberry Project helmed the cocktails. Keeping with the restaurant’s theme of homage, DeBellis said the menu itself, with its emphasis on poultry, fish and root vegetables, pays tribute to the tradition of American gastronomy. Still, the most striking aspect of both Ichabod’s and The Headless Horseman — at least as far as Washington Irving is concerned — is the decor, and how astutely it evokes the

The interior of Ichabod’s features exposed brick and wood beams, as well as a large raw bar.

Washington Irving was America’s first literary superstar.

past. The interiors of both establishments feature exposed brick walls and refurbished wood paneling collected from barnyards across the country. At The Headless Horseman, the more rustic vibe is emphasized with perched gas lamps, huge wooden booths and bar stools handcrafted in Ireland. Ichabod’s, meanwhile, takes a more refined approach with large, contemporary windows that let light flood into the space. But down to the vintage wallpaper in the bathrooms, the establishments’ proprietors overlooked no detail in ensuring their project succeeded in its aesthetic, history-driven goals. “The owners were very adamant about paying homage to Irving,” DeBellis said of Sherman and Krawitz’s vision for Irving Place’s latest tribute to its namesake.

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May 2 - 8, 2013

The write stuff for people seeking a quiet workspace By Maeve Gately Halfway down 14th St., between Fifth and Sixth Aves., a nondescript door leads up two flights of stairs, past a bartending school and onto a landing. The sign on the door reads, “Paragraph: Workspace for Writers.” Tucked away from the sirens and the grime of the busy thoroughfare, this is a place of serenity, of escape. It is a place, above all else, of words. Paragraph, a members-only co-working space for writers, was founded in 2005 by Lila Cecile and Joy Parisi, two graduates of The New School’s M.F.A. program who sought a consistent, quiet place to work and a community like the one they had in graduate school. The space is composed of two sections: the kitchen, in which members can make short phone calls or chat with one another, have a cup of tea or a meal; and the writing space, which feels like a cross between a library and a living room. A long, lofted space with skylights, couches and bookshelves, the writing room is divided by soundproof walls into 38 cubicles for the writers to work in. Paragraph’s members include freelance writers in need of their own offices, journalists, academics, novelists, poets, teachers and graduate students seeking a quiet, dedicated space in which to work. Amy Meng, the organization’s office manager, describes it as “a space built for grad school writers — the kind of place you can’t really get anywhere else in New York.”

‘You’re like, “Everyone is fighting the same good fight as me.” ’ Amy Meng As Meng explained it, there are two different levels of membership, depending on the writer’s budget and time requirements. All members are given a key to the door downstairs and an access code to the space itself. The full-time membership allows the writer to come in at any time, while the part-time membership gives access from 6 p.m. to 11 a.m. during weekdays, and 24 hours on weekends. The part-time membership is geared toward writers who have full-time jobs or classes and can only come in during the evening hours. Depending on whether the writer opts for a month-to-month membership or commits to a quarterly or semi-annual enrollment, the rates vary, ranging from $93 per month (semiannual part-time) to $178 (month-tomonth, full-time). The online application is intended to determine whether the applicant is a full-time writer and asks for the names of the writer’s current projects and published works, as well as three

Paragraph provides cubicles for writing and a comfortable seating area for silent reading, along with a kitchen and other amenities.

references. Intended to “gauge seriousness of intent,” the application is designed to screen out members who may be disruptive or disrespectful of the space. Though many of its members are published and well-respected, Paragraph accepts beginning writers as well, as long as they are dedicated and able to work well in a shared setting. But why pay $100 per month to do what could arguably be accomplished in a living room or cafe? Meng explained that the space itself is silent and free of the distractions of a home office, and the productivity that members experience is unparalleled. After trying Paragraph out for a month, writers say they are amazed at the uptick in their productivity — after returning home, they notice the small distractions (footsteps from an upstairs neighbor, a cat that demands to be fed) that had been keeping them from getting work done. In a cafe, or even their own homes, writers tend to find “everyone else’s intentions coming up against [their] own,” a fact that is distracting unto itself. Members return to the space, she said, because “they do not realize how much more they can get done” until they experience it. There is another productivity boost, however, one that comes from the communal nature of the space. Surrounded by other writers working on their own projects, members experience “more guilt or more inspiration, depending on the person.” Meng laughed. “It’s great,” she said, “you’re like, everyone is fighting the

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same good fight as me.” Novelists tack up parts of their current books to the walls of their cubicles. Others bring inspirational postcards. The couches by the nonfunctioning fireplace are big enough to take a nap on, and books on writing and revision, dictionaries and literary journals fill bookshelves and cover coffee tables. It is a cozy space, at once familiar and purposeful, allowing members to relax while they settle into a productive routine. In addition to keeping up the space and providing members with complimentary coffee, tea and candy (the latter which is apparently wildly popular), Paragraph organizes roundtable classes, a newsletter with announcements of publications and deals from members and monthly readings of members’ work at the KGB bar in the East Village. Some writers come and go without interacting, working on their projects and then leaving, while others find a true community at Paragraph. They strike up a conversation in the kitchen; become each other’s babysitters, workshop partners, genuine friends. “You could live your life in here,” Meng said, and laughed. At the end of my visit, I went and sat in a cubicle for a few minutes, to see what it felt like to be one of the members. The space is quiet, save for the percussive tap on computer keyboards, the occasional creak of wooden floorboards and the soft rustle of various members sitting down and standing up. I wrote in my notepad for a few minutes, and then closed my eyes, feeling the floor move beneath me, listening to stories being born.


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SPECIAL BONUS 2013

MAIL TO: NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC. 515 CANAL ST. STE 1C NEW YORK, NY 10013 ATTN: SUBSCRIPTIONS Photo by Rey Mashayekhi

Making all the right moves

The renovation of Washington Square Park several years ago cramped the style of chess players there, leading to a new chess scene quickly developing in Union Square’s southern plaza. Saravuth Inn has earned a living playing chess in Union Square since 2008. He says his earnings are inconsistent, but enough to allow him to rent a $15-aday room in Brooklyn.

Espresso, booze or shoes, all fail at ‘doomed corner’ BY ELISSA STEIN Last summer, with a fair amount of fanfare, a successful European espresso bar chain established its first outpost in New York City. Reportedly spending thousands upon thousands of dollars on renovations, Segafredo opened its sleek, upscale doors, planning to make a splash in the Village. Locals knew better. At the first signs of work being done at the northeast corner of 13th St. and Sixth Ave., people were already betting whatever business moved in would last less than a year. They were right. Mere months after sophisticated hostesses waited in vain behind a podium to seat people, the restaurant/coffee bar stopped opening during the day. Management tried to recreate the space as a trendy cocktail outpost they’d had resounding success with in Miami. That didn’t work either and soon the doors stopped opening altogether. If that had been the first, or even second time a business failed in a location, most wouldn't have noticed. But at this point, 504 Sixth Ave. has the reputation of being doomed. In 2011 eater.com named it the number one cursed restaurant spot in the city. Could a location simply be slated for failure? Steve Jacobson, president of Hopkinson Real Estate said it’s not the spot, and that this bustling corner should definitely be successful. He pointed out French Roast, a block away, which just celebrated 20 years in the Village. Bar 6 and Murray’s Bagels, mere doors down, are perennially crowded. It seems as if the issue is twofold — tenants not analyzing the neighborhood to gauge what businesses fit in well, coupled with a landlord charging exorbitant rents few can pay.

Before Segafredo failed to make its mark, Rockography, a Hard Rock Cafe rip-off, announced its arrival with signs that read: “PARENTAL ADVISORY. KEEP OUT — POSSIBILITY OF EXCESSIVE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION. EXTREME NOISE POLLUTION.” After blaring music and overpriced fries didn’t win Villagers over, a quick renovation led to Blitz! Brasserie, a blatant copycat of Bar 6. Before the paint of that reboot had time to dry, A Pint of No Return came. And went. Maximo Pino, the sterile Italian gelateria with fluorescent lighting, mediocre fare and pricey ice cream, didn't capture an audience either. Brief stints as a Ricky’s Halloween outlet and a shoe sample-sale store intermittently filled the space that had been left vacant by Cosi (formerly Cosi/Xando, originally Xando), which seemed to do well but rising rent forced them out. Kenny Roger’s Roasters inhabited the spot, but neighbors knew once pizza was added to the menu, its time was limited. A Greek family-run market preceded Cosi but they too were forced to close as rent rose. The stark, white storefront now stands empty again, its front entrance significantly damaged from a cab jumping the curb and crashing into it shortly after Segafredo shut down. New tenants will have to take on extensive repairs, along with regular renovations, to rehabilitate the so-called cursed location. Perhaps what can turn it around is a landlord not looking to fill the space with the first checkbook that comes along, and prospective renters spending time exploring the area and thoughtfully considering what would work there, instead of rushing to reinvent the corner into something it isn’t.

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May 2 - 8, 2013

THE Union SqUarE ParTnErSHiP iS ProUd To PrESEnT

summer in the

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south plaza starting at 7 am Open to all levels. Presented in partnership with Paragon Sports.

THURSDAY June 13 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids Baby Loves Disco new school Jazz performance by peridance Contemporary Dance Company Zumba with Zifa

THURSDAY June 20 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids Cpf marionette show – red riding hood new school Jazz performance by peridance Contemporary Dance Company salsa with Baila society

THURSDAY June 27 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids meg’s melodies new school Jazz Club Dance with peridance

KiDS pavilion starting at 10 am & south plaza starting at 11 am

MUSiC West side seating area at 12 pm Performed by The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music.

THURSDAY JuLy 11

THURSDAY august 1

7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 6:00 pm

7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:15 am 12:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids randy kaplan new school Jazz Zumba with Zifa

THURSDAY JuLy 18 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids rolie polie guacamole new school Jazz salsa with Baila society

THURSDAY JuLy 25 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids key Wilde & mr. Clarke new school Jazz Club Dance with peridance

FRee

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids story time with oLivia™ Barry g with ramblin’ Davey new school Jazz Zumba with Zifa

7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:15 am 12:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids gazillion Bubbles show – the next generation Baby Loves Disco new school Jazz performance by peridance Contemporary Dance Company salsa with Baila society

THURSDAY august 8 7:00 am 7:00 am 8:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 12:00 pm 5:00 pm

morning running Club with paragon sports Boot Camp with Circuit of Change yoga with Jivamukti yoga storytime with karma kids hot peas ‘n Butter new school Jazz performance by peridance Contemporary Dance Company Club Dance with peridance

thank you to our 2013 summer in the square sponsors for their generous support

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south plaza starting at 5 pm Learn to dance with our partners at Peridance.

THURSDAY august 8

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May 2 - 8, 2013

25

THEVILLAGER:arts&ENTERTAINMENT Cumming’s ‘Macbeth’ not quite worth going to This Scottish play is a bunny on the run

And why does our Macbeth now have mimed sexual intercourse with his hospital bed? The last person I saw doing that was Lenny Bruce, a somewhat different cup of tea. Adding it all up, when Macbeth informs his lady: “I have done the deed,” you could fool me. Let him go play with his voices, and his dog-trots and the doll that is his son in its old-fashioned, full-length nightgown. Not murder a monarch. What is lost, or buried, or subsumed is the greatness and the fierceness and the immortality of the language, from “Who would have thought the old man had so much blood in him” to “She should have died hereafter” to:

THEATER MACBETH

Written by William Shakespeare Directed by John Tiffany & Andrew Goldberg Through June 30 At the Ethel Barrymore Theatre 243 West 47th St. (btw. Broadway & Eighth Ave.) Mon., Tues., Thurs. at 7pm Fri. & Sat. at 8 pm Sun. at 3pm For tickets ($69.50-135, $199 for VIP), call 212-239-6200 or visit telecharge.com Photo by Jeremy Daniel

Have apple, will emote: Alan Cumming’s “Macbeth’ is totally mental.

BY JERRY TALLMER Is this a dagger I see before me? Oh no, it is an apple. The apple that Alan Cumming tosses from hand to hand, nervously, ritualistically, throughout much of his one-man “Macbeth,” is like Cagney or Bogart or George Raft flipflopping a silver dollar against tedium and the fates in something less auspicious than Shakespeare. One also thinks of Nina in Chekhov’s “The Seagull” — the young runaway would-be actress who never knew what to do on stage with her hands. Here, Nina, here’s an apple to occupy your hands. “One-man” means that at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre — in a “Macbeth” that has been chopped down to a longish two hours running time — the Scottish born-and-bred 48-year-old all-purpose actor plays all the roles, male and female (i.e., Lady Macbeth) with the nominal support of one actual living male (Brendan Titley) and one actual female (Jenny Sterlin) who speak only a few lines each, but are otherwise omnipresent as a doctor and his lab assistant in some unidentified Dunsinane of a nuthouse — where the only patient seems to be our hallucinating friend, Mr. Macbeth. The whole drama is set in one large clinical room of that mental institution — a metallic hospital bed to our left, a locked door at the head of a metal flight of stairs to our right, a large observation window for the doc and his assistant to peer through at dead center and

three pretty useless television screens above all that. Also, upstage, beneath the observation window, an old-fashioned free-standing bathtub. Keep your eyes on that bathtub. The sound and lighting effects are to suit — loud, intermittent, illogical, scary alarums of varying shock effect. As the patient strips down, the lab assistant draws blood from his arm, the doctor takes a few notes and the drama (as reconceived by directors John Tiffany and Andrew Goldberg) begins with Macbeth/Cumming speaking the lines of the three witches — “When shall we three meet again?” — as he runs around in little puppy-dog circles to indicate changes of time and place. Watching this, I had a flashback to a happier  “Macbeth” experience, way back in the 1950s in Central Park, when Joe Papp's youthful New York Shakespeare Festival company, long before there was any such thing as a Delacorte Amphitheater, dared defy the elements by opening its everything-on-a-truck production of the Scottish play in the teeth of a gathering thunderstorm. Precisely on the line “So foul and fair a day I have not seen,” the heavens opened wide, the lightning struck, the thunder cannonaded upon us and the rain flooded down as a laughing Lady Macbeth — lovely Colleen Dewhurst — led everybody else in a frantic footrace back to the shelter of the truck. Would that anything as exciting as that

was happening these nights and matinees on West 47th Street. There is a lot of dressing and undressing in this production, sometimes to indicate changes in gender, sometimes not, but it also comes permeated with what I should think is a very un-Scottish petulance. And by the way, I cannot believe that Stratford Will hurled forth this most virile thunderbolt of the English language with a knotty Scots intonation in mind. I mean, we know he could do that when he wanted to (“Henry V”). Speaking in an exaggerated manner that reminds me of my mother playing “Funny English Lady,” it was difficult, at least for me, to tell whom this versatile actor was playing at any given moment. Who is he now?  And now?  And now? Ah yes, now he’s in the bathtub saying: “Take my milk for gall” and “I have given suck and know how tender it is to love the babe that milks me” — that has to be Lady Macbeth, yes — who now is commanding her husband to screw his courage to the sticking place and murder their effeminate guest, the king? Why effeminate? Your speculation is as good as mine. The last time I ever saw a bathtub on stage was at director Ivo van Hove’s assault on “A Streetcar Named Desire,” for East Fourth Street’s New York Theatre Workshop. Blanche Dubois took a lot of baths, so why shouldn’t Elizabeth Marvel take one right there on stage?

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To the last syllable of recorded time, And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more: it is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing. If that was good enough for William Faulkner (“The Sound and the Fury”), it’s good enough for me. But you have to hunt for it at the Barrymore. Alan Cumming has been everywhere in British films and television for some 20 years. He did good work on stage, mostly through silences, as the master of ceremonies — the Joel Grey role — in the 1998 “Cabaret” revival that starred Natasha Richardson. One cannot say the same for Joe Mantello’s over-obvious “Design for Living” of 2001, in which Cumming had to soul-kiss his male counterpart for emphasis. And now we have this “Macbeth.” The audience the night I attended the show gave it a double standing ovation at final curtain, so mine is a minority vote. Mr. Cumming’s tragic hero of many voices puts me in mind of nothing so much as the Energizer Bunny darting frenziedly here, there, everywhere. I am reminded of the injunction of Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784): “Sir, a woman’s preaching is like a dog’s walking on his hind legs. It is not done well, but you are surprised to find it done at all.” Just so.


26

May 2 - 8, 2013

B Y MAEVE GATELY & SCO T T S T I FFLE R 14TH STREET Y FREE SUMMER THEATER CAMP PREVIEW WORKSHOPS Created in partnership with Amas Musical Theatre, MCC Theater and the Red Fern Theatre Company, the 14th Street Y’s Teen Theater Summer Institute offers students entering sixth to ninth grades the opportunity to study with theater experts from a variety of fields and perspectives. Through programs such as master classes, physical theater and script analysis, students will receive discipline-specific instruction in the areas of musical theater, acting and theater for social justice. At the conclusion of the July 8-19 Institute, graduates will present their work for an audience of family and friends (in the Y’s newly renovated, state-ofthe-art black box theater). At the free D.I.Y. Theater Workshop (1-2:30pm on Sun., May 12, learn how to create theater about what matters most to you, with the help of the Institute’s teaching artists. At The Theater at the 14th Street Y (344 E. 14th St., btw. 1st & 2nd Aves.). To register for the workshop or learn more about the summer program, call 646-395-4322 or visit 14streety.org/teens. The cost of the Teen Theater Summer Institute is $900. THE WASHINGTON MARKET SCHOOL BLOCK PA R T Y E n j o y a d a y o f f u n o n S a t . , M a y 4 , f r o m 11am-3pm. This fundraising event will include classroom and parent-led games and crafts, face painting and balloon-making and exciting performances by the Mariachi Citialli Band, Grammy-award winn e r m u s i c i a n O r a n E t k i n , p o p u l a r c h i l d r e n ’s m a g i cian Amazing Max and the Tone Academy. Since The Washington Market School is a neighborhood preschool, the activities are geared towards children 2-6. The suggested donation for those outside of the WMS school-community is $5 per person at the door, and additional tickets can be purchased for children to participate in various activities (including spin art, beaded necklace making, a recycled arts and crafts project with Playgarden and more). The block party will be held on Duane St. (btw. West Broadway & Church Sts.).

THE CHILDREN’S ROOM AT POETS HOUSE is a bright and vibrant space that encourages literacy and creativity. In addition to housing many poetry books by classic and contemporary authors, the Children’s Room is designed to stimulate the imaginations of young ones and drive them to create poems and art of their own. From Thurs.-Sat., children are free to draw inspiration from the room’s card catalogue full of quirky objects and type up their own masterpieces on vintage typewriters. Every Thurs. at 10am, “Tiny Poet Time” offers poetry readings and music for toddlers. At 10 River Terrace (at Murray St.). Hours: Children’s Room open Thurs.-Sat., 11am-5pm. Admission: Free. For info, call 212-431-7920 or visit poetshouse.org SATURDAY FAMILY PROGRAMS AT THE SKYSCRAPER MUSEUM Explore tall buildings as objects of design, products of technology, sites of construction and places of work and residence at The Skyscraper Museum. Their spring “Saturday Family Program” series (taking place from 10:30-11:45am) features workshops designed to introduce children and their families to the principles of architecture and engineering through hands-on activities. On May 11, kids of all ages are invited to a Mother’s Day Card Workshop to construct architecturally-themed cards for mom. On May 25, “Body Buildings: Woolworth” gives kids ages 3-9 the chance to turn their silhouettes into buildings, working together to make a unique New York City skyline. On June 8, the all-ages “Sidewalk Art” event takes place in front of the museum — where colorful chalk will be used to draw buildings based on blueprint sketches of buildings they know. And on June 10, the “Archikids” workshop, lead by architect Yves Roger, gives kids ages 9-13 the chance to make their own soaring structures (inspired by images, vintage film and models of actual skyscrapers of the past and present) All workshops ($5 per family) take place at 10:30am. Registration is required. Call 212-945-6324 or emaileducation@skyscraper.org. At 39 Battery Place (btw. First Place & Little West St.). Regular museum hours are Wed.-Sun., 12-6pm. Admission is $5 ($2.50 for students/seniors).

“A Taste of Mexico on the Lower East Side”

Celebrate Cinco De Mayo (May 3rd - 5th) and Madres Day all under one roof! Now you can order on line our famous homestyle cooking without leaving your casa.

Open for Lunch, Brunch & Dinner. www.elmagueyylatunamex.com Tues-Thurs 12pm-11pm • Fri-Sun 11am-midnight 321 East Houston St (bet. Attorney & Ridge Sts) 212-473-3919

Photo by Michael Hickey

THE GREAT STRUGGLE FOR CHEAP MEAT “The Great Struggle for Cheap Meat” is Downtown Arts’ passionate, funny, 29-song, 10-block tribute to the Kosher Meat Boycott. Organized by Jewish housewives to protest the high price of meat, that 1902 action was one of the earliest community organizing efforts — and a seminal event that would soon inspire women to take leadership roles in the labor movement. A cast of teen girls, many of whom live in the neighborhood, take you back in time to a world of picket lines in front of local butcher shops, tenement-to-tenement recruitment, food fights in the streets, invasions of the male sections of the synagogues and front page headlines. “The Great Struggle for Cheap Meat’ is almost entirely set to music, which draws upon elements of Jewish folk music, 70s rock and 1920s jazz. Sat., May 4, 11 & 18, at 1pm & 4pm. The 65-minute performance takes place throughout a 10-block area on the Lower East Side. For tickets ($12 general, $10 for students/seniors), call 212-868-4444 or visit downtownart.org.

TRINITY CHURCH PRESENTS FAMILY FRIDAY PIZZA & MOVIE NIGHT Every so often, every family should get together for pizza and a movie. To help make that noble goal a regular thing, Trinity Wall Street hosts this third-Friday-of-the-month event for kids who are hungry (for food and entertainment) and adults who are too tired to cook (or even dial for delivery!). On May 17, it’s Dr. Seuss’ “The Lorax.” On June 21, it’s the Steven Spielberg classic “E.T.” Free. From 6-7:30pm, at Charlotte’s Place (107 Greenwich St., rear of 74 Trinity Place, btw. Rector & Carlisle Sts.). For more info, call 212-602-0800 or visit trinitywallstreet.org/calendar. Twitter: @CharlottesPlc. Facebook,: facebook.com/CharlottesPlaceNYC. LA MAMA KIDS Shadow puppets, dance, music, storytelling and mask-making for youngsters and their families all figure into the schedule of events that are part of “La MaMa Kids.” This new series, La MaMa’s first such regular programming for family audiences, is sure to inspire a love of theater — and likely help launch a whole new generation of theatrical performers! The next installment in the series (which runs through June) is “Mask Making,” a workshop led by Federico Restrepo, where children will build animal masks and create their own dances. It takes place on Sat., May 11, at La MaMa Galleria (6 E. 1st St., btw. Bowery & Second Ave.) On Sat., June 8, Perry Yung will lead a “Mindful Music” workshop, in which families will learn to use traditional Japanese instruments, craft their own and tell a story (at La MaMa’s Ellen Stewart Theatre, 66 E. 4th St., 2nd floor, btw. Bowery & Second Ave.). All workshops take place at 11am. Admission is $10 per family. For a full schedule of events and more info, call 212-475-7710 or visit lamama.org.

THE SCHOLASTIC STORE Held every Saturday at 3pm, Scholastic’s in-store activities are designed to get kids reading, thinking, talking, creating and moving. At 11am every Tues., Wed. and Thurs., the Scholastic Storyteller brings tales to life at Daily Storytime. At 557 Broadway (btw. Prince & Spring Sts.). Store hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-7pm and Sun., 11am-6pm. For info, call 212-3436166 or visit scholastic.com/sohostore. THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE ARTS The Museum celebrates its quarter century of promoting selfexpression and esteem — by presenting a new exhibit that offers a fascinating exploration of self-identity through still, moving and living portraits, as portrayed by children using traditional methods of painting and drawing, as well as technology. On view through June 9, “Face to Face” features 40 portraits selected from CMA’s Permanent Collection of children’s art from over 50 countries, dating back to the 1930s. To incorporate CMA’s philosophy of hands-on art-making, the exhibit will be accompanied by a variety of interactive installations that examine the texture, shape and sound of portraits. Hands-on stations encourage visitors to become part of the exhibit, including reimagined versions of a typical self-portrait station. At the CMA Media Lab, visitors can take photos that will be projected on the wall. These photos will stream into a montage that will be accessioned into the collection and will also serve as a fascinating time-lapse of the exhibit as a whole. At 103 Charlton St. Hours: Mon. & Wed., 12-5pm; Thurs. & Fri., 12-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 10am5pm. Admission: $11 (Seniors and 0-12 months, free from 4-6pm). Thursdays are pay-as-you-wish. For info, call 212274-0986 or visit cmany.org


May 2 - 8, 2013

27

Just Do Art! LADY AT THE O.K. CORRAL

Rustle up your questions and mosey on down to the Museum of Jewish Heritage — because Ann Kirschner, author of “Lady at the O.K. Corral: The True Story of Josephine Marcus Earp,” will be appearing in conversation with MJH’s Manager of Institutional Projects. That’s Caroline Earp, pilgrim, and she’s a descendant of Wyatt Earp — which makes her the perfect moderator for this evening in which Kirschner will discuss her new biography of Wyatt’s fourth and final wife. A New York-born daughter of Prussian Jews (and an aspiring actress), Josephine became a frontierswoman. Although she lived with the legendary gunslinger for nearly 50 years, she’s been all but erased from Western lore. Kirschner aims to change that, and we’re pretty sure she’s going to hit her target. Wed., May 8, at 7pm. At the Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust (Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place). Free with suggested donation. Tickets will be available at the box office on 4 10 GFiat Aprila Sell-Off 4C GCN 4/5/13basis 12:50 PM Page 1 first come, first served starting at 4pm on the day of the program. For info, call 646437-4337/4202 or visit mjh.org.

NOTHING PERSONAL: AN AFTERNOON WITH THE DARK ROOM COLLECTIVE

Founded in Boston in 1988 by a group of African American poets led by Thomas

Photo courtesy of Rachel Eliza Griffiths, for the Dark Room Collective

Get to know the Dark Room Collective: May 11, at Poets House.

Sayers Ellis and Sharan Strange, The Dark Room Collective (based in Cambridge, Massachusetts) was a forum to promote, exchange and foster community between emerging and established writers of color. Originally conceived as a reading series, the Collective became a small community of poets. This Poets House event features a panel moderated by Rochelle

Image courtesy of the publisher (Harper)

Spencer, then a reading with Tisa Bryant, Major Jackson, John Keene and Sharan Strange. After that, a musical interlude with Janice Lowe is followed by a reading with Thomas Sayers Ellis, Tracy K. Smith, Sharan Strange and Natasha Trethewey. Sat., May 11, from 12-6pm. At Poets House (10 River Terrace, at Murray St.). $10 for adults, $7 for stu-

Who knew? Author Ann Kirschner reveals “The True Story of Josephine Marcus Earp,” May 8, at the Museum of Jewish Heritage.

dents/seniors and free to Poets House members. For more info, call 212-4317920 or visit poetshouse.org.

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28

May 2 - 8, 2013

Little Girls

“Matilda” is pure Broadway magic on every level THEATER MATILDA

At the Shubert Theatre 225 W. 44th St. (btw. Seventh & Eighth Aves.) Tues. & Thurs. at 7pm Wed., Fri. & Sat. at 8pm Wed. & Sat. at 2pm, Sun. at 3pm For Tickets ($32-$147), call 800-432-7250 or visit telecharge.com

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE A significant measure of Roald Dahl’s genius was his ability to understand the darkness inherent in childhood from a child’s perspective. His 15 novels are beloved by young readers for what they perceive as his honesty — expressed in abstract comedy and absurd situations — about what they experience in the world. His characters — Charlie Bucket from “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” James Henry Trotter from “James and the Giant Peach,” and Matilda Wormwood from “Matilda” — are his best-known characters from these quintessentially Jungian fables. Each must overcome disconnected, selfish, and chaotic adults to survive and grow. Of all of these, “Matilda” is perhaps Dahl’s most searing critique of selfinvolved adults whose values are askew and inimical to the growth and education of children. Written at the end of Dahl’s career, it offers all his trademark humor and whimsy but his indictment of mainstream culture is more pointed and angry

than in his earlier works. Matilda is a freak in the Wormwood home. Her parents barely acknowledge her, and when they do it’s to belittle her native intelligence and curiosity and her devotion to — gasp! — reading. Matilda’s mother is a vacuous ballroom dance competitor and her father is a corrupt car salesman trying to foist off clunkers on some Russian businessmen. Her brother is nondescript and dull, besotted with television. Matilda, though, is no wimp; she gets back at her family by playing nasty practical jokes. Like any real child, she’s not perfect. When Matilda is sent to Crunchem Hall (clearly a nod to Dickens’ Dotheboys Hall from “Nicholas Nickleby”), she ultimately becomes a hero, using her gifts and intelligence to prevail over the villainous headmistress Agatha Trunchbull, as well as everyone and everything else that holds her back. In adapting this story for the stage, book writer Dennis Kelly and composer and lyricist Tim Minchin have created nothing less than a masterpiece of musical theater. Combining the sensibilities of a British pantomime with delightfully garish music hall moments and oddly affecting characters, the piece is rich and sophisticated — a children’s tale for thinking adults. At the same time, there’s plenty to delight any child over age 8, making this a bona fide family show. Minchin’s score is varied and highly musical, marrying different styles to fit the dark situations of Matilda’s rebellion, particularly in “Naughty,” and in the ironically lyrical “When I Grow Up,” which opens the second act. Minchin has written lyrics sensitive to how kids express themselves — which is a rare talent. The company is uniformly excellent. Gabriel Ebert as the nefarious Mr. Wormwood is hilarious throughout, and he has one of the best songs in the

Photo by Joan Marcus

Bertie Carvel represents the worst of life for the title character in Dennis Kelly and Tim Minchin’s musical adaptation of Roald Dahl’s “Matilda.”

show, “Telly,” an indictment of the braindead consumption of entertainment. As his wife, Leslie Margherita is somewhere between Carmen Miranda and Lucy the Slut from “Avenue Q.” Bertie

Carvel is brilliant as Agatha Trunchbull, Crunchem Hall’s evil and vindictive headmistress who is a former hammer throw champion. Each performance is informed by the fact that we’re looking at them through Matilda’s eyes, and their grotesque Grand Guignol style is exactly at the pitch that an overly imaginative child would take them in. All three are brilliant. Four young actresses rotate as Matilda. I saw Oona Laurence, and it would be hard to imagine anyone more perfect in the role. Whether nasty or heroic, it’s impressive to see a child hold a Broadway audience in the palm of her diminutive hand. Lauren Ward is a sublime Miss Honey, and if she sometimes seems just too, too sweet, well, she serves as the counterpoint — or antidote — to the venal adults in Matilda’s mind. Peter Darling’s choreography is inspired, at times hip hop-infused and consistently bold and original. Rob Howell’s Scrabble-tile sets and insanely imaginative costumes are great in every way. Matthew Warchus has directed this with a keen sense of the piece’s pantomime and music hall elements, balancing the abstract and magical elements of the tale with the story of a little girl’s wounded heart seeking a safe haven. The original production of “Annie” inspired a generation of girls to pursue their theatrical dreams. “Matilda” is very likely to have the same affect on the current crop of little girls. At the very least it will be wowing audiences on Broadway for a long time to come.

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

MARIQUITAS

Written by EDUARDO MACHADO Directed by MICHAEL DOMITROVICH

MAY 2 - 19

THE UPPER LIP

Based on the novel “ROCK WAGRAM” by William Saroyan Adapted & Directed by DAVID WILLINGER

Thursday - Saturday 8pm, Sunday 7pm Wednesday 5/8 & 5/15 at 8pm All Seats $15/tdf Students/Seniors $10

Thursday - Sunday, May 2 - 19 Thu-Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm All Seats $15/tdf Students/Seniors $10

Adapted & Directed by RAMIRO SANDOVAL Original Music by SAMUEL TORRES

Written & Directed by BINA SHARIF

WHERE THERE WAS FIRE Thursday - Sunday, May 2 - 19 (Perfs on May 18 & 19 in Spanish only)

Thu-Sat at 8pm, Sun 3pm All Seats $15/tdf Students & Seniors $12

COMEDY NIGHT LIVE

Thursday - Saturday, May 2 - 19 Thu - Sat at 8pm, Sun at 3pm All Seats $10/tdf

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts


May 2 - 8, 2013

29

Buhmann on Art

Image courtesy Robert Mann Gallery, New York

Margaret Watkins’ “Pan Lids” (1919).

MARGARET WATKINS: DOMESTIC SYMPHONY

In the 1920s, Margaret Watkins (1884-1969) was an instructor at the Clarence H. White School of Photography — the most prominent American pedagogical institution for pictorialism at the time. Her photographs are characterized by the nuanced interplay of light and shade. Inspired by Cubism, their overall aesthetic is distinctly modernist, while their subject matter is usually rooted

Courtesy of the Artist and Zürcher Studio

Wang Keping’s “Moon Goddess” (2012, plane tree, 21 x 24 x 9 in.).

in the domestic environment. Born in Canada, Watkins’ professional success in New York in the 1920s was cut short when she moved to Scotland in 1929 to care for elderly relatives. Stranded by circumstance and then the arrival of war, she never returned to North America. Through May 11 at Robert Mann Gallery (525 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.-Fri., 10am6pm and Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 212989-7600 or visit robertmann.com.

WANG KEPING

Born in 1949 in Beijing, Wang Keping currently lives and works in Paris. In 1979, he was one of the founding members of “The Stars” (Xing Xing) — one of the first non-conformist artist’s groups in China. Including Huang Rui, Ma Desheng, Li Shuang, and Ai Weiwei, “The Stars” set the stage for avant-garde art in China. Keping’s wooden sculptures juxtapose vivid emotion with introspection. In that, his work relates aesthetically to

totemic African sculpture as well as the work of Constantin Brancusi, for example. While Keping’s forms reveal a heightened sense of eroticism, his sculptures also covey a distinct sense of melancholy. May 8-June 23 at Zürcher Studio (33 Bleecker St., btw. Lafayette & Bowery). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm, and Sun., 2-6pm. Call 212-777-0790 or visit galeriezurcher.com.

—Stephanie Buhmann

West Chelsea Artists Open Studios Dozens of West Chelsea artists who operate out of private studios are opening their doors, and inviting the public to step inside — then look, learn and linger at their own pace. The unique open format of this art walk encourages dialogue between artists and enthusiasts, allowing visitors to gain first-hand knowledge about the creative process (and pick up some bargains right off the walls). “This year,” says organizer Scotto Mycklebust, “we are able to take the event to a new level with the addition of Westbeth Artist Housing opening their studios to the public and potential buyers.” Located at 55 Bethune Street (mere blocks from the beginning of the High Line, at Ganesvoort St., south of 14th St.), Westbeth Housing is the perfect point at which to start your free, selfguided tour. Or, begin at the other end — by picking up a map at the West Chelsea Arts Building (526 W. 26th St., btw 10th & 11th Aves.). To preview the participating artists, and custom-make your own tour, visit westchelseaartists.com.

Photo by Scotto Mycklebust

Adrienne Leban’s studio, at 278 W. 25th St., 2nd floor.

Photo by Scotto Mycklebust

David Hales’s studio, at 526 W. 26th St., Studio 717.


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May 2 - 8, 2013

Publ ic Notice s Notice is hereby given that license #1270506 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, NY 10017 for on-premises consumption. AMMOS NYC LLC d/b/a AMMOS ESTIATORIO Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that a Tavern Wine license, #TBA has been applied for by NH F + B. Inc. d/b/a Neuehouse Collective to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 104110 East 25th Street NewYork NY 10010. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Antler Dispensary Inc. d/b/a Antler to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 123 Allen Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by WhiskeyBarrelBar LLC d/b/a American Whiskey to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment with one additional bar. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 247 West 30th Street New York NY 10001. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by La Quinta Group LLC d/b/a Peix to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 151B Elizabeth Street NewYork NY 10012. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Cafe Habana Inc. d/b/a Cafe Habana to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 229 Elizabeth Street aka 17 Prince Street New York NY 10012. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Beep Beep NYC LLC d/b/a Jeepney to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 201 First Avenue New York NY 10003. Vil: 05/02 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of Besame Mucho LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Rothstein Kass, 9171 Wilshire Blvd., 5th Fl., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

Notice of Qualification of AEC PowerFlow, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 3/15/07. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of BERKSHIRE ACQUISITION II, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/19/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/17/13. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Hanover Sq., 20th Fl., NY, NY 10004. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of 156 EAST 33RD STREET LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/17/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o CORIGIN, 505 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of the State of DE, Corp. Dept., Loockerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 BIG GULP HACKING LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/15/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 415 W. 127th St., NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Formation of Lookout Point Films, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o S. Reid Kahn, Esq., Kane Kessler, P.C., 1350 Ave. of the Americas, 26th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

Notice of Formation of Barclay 7 Realty LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Goldberg Weprin Finkel Goldstein LLP, 1501 Broadway, 22nd Fl., NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Formation of MB 1200, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/27/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marisa Bellis, 182 Poppasquash Road, Bristol, Rhode Island 02809. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of McFarland Dewey Company, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 300, NY, NY 10170. LLC formed in DE on 3/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of Partners VII/98 Avenue A Owner LLC uthority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o AEW Capital, Two Seaport Lane, Boston, MA 02210-2021. LLC formed in DE on 4/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of Select Media Services, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 18th Fl. - 1067 W. Cordova St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V6C 1C7. LLC formed in DE on 12/23/97. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013

Notice of Qualification of Walleye Trading Advisors, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/20/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in MN on 3/24/05. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 16-18 W. 22nd St., NY, NY 10010, Attn: Peter Goddard. MN address of LLC: 14601 27th Ave N, Ste. 102, Plymouth, MN 55447. Cert. of Org. filed with MN Sec. of State, 60 Empire Dr., Ste. 100, St. Paul, MN 55103. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Qualification of Zentis Sweet Ovations Holding, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/12/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in IN on 11/22/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. IN and principal business addr.: 2050 North Oak Rd., Plymouth, IN 46563. Cert. of Org. filed with IN Sec. of State, 302 W. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN 46204. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 05/02 - 06/06/2013 Notice of Formation of foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Prevention Metrics Advisors LLC Application for Authority filed by the Department of State of New York on: 10/26/12 Jurisdiction: Delaware Organized on: 2/15/12 Office location: County of New York Principal office: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware 1209 Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801 Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building 401 Federal Street, Suite 4. Dover, DE 19901 Purpose: any and all lawful activities Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Delancy Diner, LLC d/b/a Retro Bar & Grill to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 148-150 Delancey Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that a Tavern Wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Immigrant Tap Room Inc. to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 341 E. 9th Street, West Store New York NY 10003. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013

Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by 88 Orchard Coffee LLC d/b/a Irving Farm Coffee Roasters to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 88 Orchard Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #1270292 has been applied for by Astraea Management Inc. to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 163 Bleecker St. New York NY 10012. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1269715 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a café under the alcoholic beverage control law at 243 East 14th Street, New York, NY 10003 for on-premises consumption. 243 E. 14th Café Inc. d/b/a The Winslow Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 CAPE END EAST HOLDINGS, LLC Arts., of Org., filed with NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) 03/28/2013. Office in New York County; SSNY designated agent for service of process with copy mailed to Cape Advisors, Inc., 483 Broadway, 5th Fl. New York, NY 10013, Attn: Curtis Bashaw, All lawful business purposes. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of FORTIS BARA LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 1196 PARK PLACE, BROOKLYN NEW YORK 11213. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: HARPER SPIN LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/17/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 214 W. 21st Street, Apt. 5A, New York, New York 10011. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 Notice of Formation of Mortensen MidAtlantic of NY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013

Notice of Formation of EMPIRE STATE DENTAL MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 577 Isham St., 1G, NY, NY 10034. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Ysabel Ulerio at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 Notice of Formation of MPP #9 ACQUISITION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Millhouse Peck Properties LLC, 420 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10170. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 BENITO ONE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP, Christian Moretti, 2 Wall St., NY, NY 10005. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 SAMANTHA LITZINGER LUTZ, PH.D. PSYCHOLOGIST PLLC, a domestic PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/22/13. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Ronald Lawrence Crane, Esq., 5 Farmers Rd., Great Neck, NY 11024. Purpose: Psychology Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 AREXA RURIK EKSTROM AND ASSOCIATES LLC a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/20/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 35 Canal St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10002. General Purposes. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 Notice of Formation of EPHOCUS CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Kustal & Kustal, PC, 237 W. 35th St., Ste. 1001, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 287A WEBSTER AVENUE LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 01/11/2013. Off. Loc.:NewYork Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Ian DeFronze, 1396 Third Avenue, #1B, New York, NY 10075. Purpose:Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013

Notice of Qualification of US VC PARTNERS GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/08/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/11/13. Princ. office of LLC: 900 Third Ave., 19th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of SNOWPLOW HOLDINGS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/04/13. Princ. office of LLC: 950 Third Ave., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o The Worldwide Group, Attn: David Lowenfeld at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of SNOWPLOW LH LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/04/13. Princ. office of LLC: 950 Third Ave., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o The Worldwide Group, Attn: David Lowenfeld at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 A.C. LAWRENCE WEST, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/4/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leonard Franzblau, 729 Seventh Ave., NY, NY 10019. General Purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 D28 CAPITAL LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/16/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Douglas A. Lobel P.C., 28 W. 44th St., Ste. 1205, NY, NY 10036. General Purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Nelson, Robinson & El Ashmawy, PLLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 342 Broadway, #164 NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of formation of Gretchen & Waters LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York. SSNY on 03/12/2013, Office located in New York County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC at 1509 Broadway, Suite 1920, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of FBS Education, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/8/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Formation of Leslie Earl Robertson, Structural Engineer, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/5/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 100 Riverside Blvd., (18-D), NY, NY 10069. Purpose: practice the profession of engineering. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Formation of 22 BNDO LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Wachtel Masyr & Missry LLP, 885 Second Ave., 47th Fl., NY, NY 10017, Attn: Mitchell Fenton, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of Fluent Medical LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/2/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 377 Broadway, 11th Fl., NY, NY 10013. LLC formed in DE on 8/1/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013


May 2 - 8, 2013

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Mayoral candidates make their case at Village forum Continued from page 1 Quinn’s vote to overturn the term limits law, giving Mayor Bloomberg and others in the Council — including Quinn — a third term, Lewis demurred. “I think the term limits issue was a hotbutton issue,” she said. “It’s a nonissue today.” Attorney and former Council candidate Peter Gleason, however, expressed shock at the expressions of support for Quinn. “This building stands in the shadow of St. Vincent’s,” he said, referring to the shuttered hospital. Nodding at the vocal Quinn supporters, he added, “If you know you’re walking into hostile territory, you bring a posse of supporters because perception is reality.” Quinn didn’t get a single question on term limits or, for that matter, the other elephant in almost every room she’s debated in, potential mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner. She began her remarks with education; specifically, the accomplishment of getting the city to buy 75 Morton St. “It’s going to be the definition of what a 21stcentury middle school will be,” she enthused. Quinn touched on the necessity of providing affordable housing, updating the landmarking process and saving community gardens. “We cannot let the Hudson River Park, in small ways, be taken away from us,” she said to cheers. During the Q&A, Quinn admitted to having “concerns” about fracking and the Spectra pipeline but said she hasn’t made a final decision. She called the city’s Rent Guidelines Board a “kangaroo court” and said open areas, like parking lots, on New York City Housing Authority grounds should not be auctioned off for private development to the highest bidder. In contrast to Quinn’s confidence, Sal Albanese’s tone was more measured. In a jab at Quinn, Albanese said he was not accepting contributions from developers. He called for universal pre-K in schools and for teachers to “stop teaching to the test.” If elected mayor, he would develop a “Department of Early Learning.” Albanese zeroed in on the economy, saying he wants to incentivize businesses to hire more unemployed. “We have politicians who spend more time at cocktail parties than listening to their citizens,” he said. “Our political system is flooded with big money.” Asked about government tax incentives, Albanese said he’s no fan. The Barclays Center is a great place, he suggested, but the jobs and housing promised after its opening never materialized. He lamented the loss of St. Vincent’s Hospital while promising, if elected, to provide healthcare in every neighborhood. Asked about stop-and-frisk, Albanese said no one should be stopped in violation of the Constitution. As mayor, he would call for hiring 3,800 more police officers and work to establish better rapport with communities. He also proposed reform of the drug laws, calling marijuana arrests “ridiculous.” Albanese admitted to being skeptical of selling off parcels in public housing complexes to pay for repairs to the existing buildings.

Photos by Jefferson Siegel

After speaking at Monday night’s mayor candidates forum, Bill de Blasio greeted audience members, including Little Italy activist Sante Scardillo, right, and Elaine Young, far left.

Council Speaker Christine Quinn strode toward the podium to give her remarks at Monday night’s candidates forum.

Asked about the term limits extension, Albanese bristled. “I think it’s one of the most outrageous miscarriages of justice in the last 20 to 30 years,” he declared. He supports Bloomberg’s large-soda ban, but questioned the mayor’s priorities. “We’ve got people who don’t have homes,” he said. As he does at most public events, city Comptroller John Liu shook the hands of all those he passed on his way to the stage. Exuding confidence, Liu energized the crowd with his opening statement, “Jobs are more of what we need.” After describing his years growing up in the city, he curiously recounted an event that has been called into question, and even ridiculed, by the media. “My mom did spend many years working in a sweatshop,” he said, noting it’s a claim \ the Daily News keeps trying to debunk.

Calling the term limits extension a “subversion of democracy,” Liu said he also took issue with Bloomberg’s approach to city government. In his first week in office, Liu learned of CityTime, a program to computerize timekeeping of city employees. CityTime’s cost subsequently ballooned to more than $700 million, more than 10 times its original estimate. Liu claimed he helped recoup $500 million of that through audits and contract scrutiny. The comptroller was also critical of the Council’s “slush fund” and lulus, calling them “a subversion of the open budgeting process.” He then digressed to talk about the federal investigation of his former campaign treasurer and a fundraiser. Noting the four-year-long inquest and a trial that coincides with campaign season, Liu declared himself, “proud of my campaign fundraising,” adding he didn’t accept contributions from Wall Street or those doing business with the city.

“Come what may, I’m going full steam ahead,” he said to applause. “Investigate! I have nothing to hide.” During the Q&A, Liu said that as mayor he’d seek out “new blood” and would look to “clean house” of city commissioners. Asked about the yearly $16 million tax exemption for Madison Square Garden, Liu said he’d get rid of it. “How many of you get tax exemptions?” he asked. A question about the South Street Seaport had Liu suggesting the crowd stay tuned, since his office is preparing to release a full-blown audit of the property in June. When East Villager Georgina Christ asked about renewable energy and the Spectra pipeline, Liu suggested that the city does little to encourage installation of solar panels, adding that he believes in harnessing the energy of rivers and winds. “To build a pipeline underneath the densest residential area in the country? Against it!” he declared. Public Advocate Bill de Blasio also decried the term limits extension, claiming anyone in his or her third term would not respond to the people’s economic needs. “We fought for a Living Wage Bill,” de Blasio said. “Mayor Bloomberg fought it tooth and nail. Speaker Quinn watered it down.” Saying the current economic crisis rivals the Great Depression, de Blasio called for stopping “the endless giveaways to the real estate community.” He also advocated for an end to Bloomberg’s attempts to “privatize everything in sight.” He suggested taxing the wealthy to pay for pre-K classes and early childhood education. Asked about the proliferation of bike lanes, de Blasio said he favors even more expansion, calling the lanes, “good for the city,” while also backing stricter enforcement for those cyclists who disregard safety. De Blasio admitted he was not familiar with the topics of the Hudson River Park Neighborhood Improvement District, or NID, and the Spectra pipeline and wanted to learn more before discussing them. Asked about stop-and-frisk, de Blasio said, “I absolutely think we need a new police commissioner,” though adding he appreciated what Ray Kelly has accomplished. He said the average cop doesn’t like stop-and-frisk because it’s basically a quota system. Fielding more questions, de Blasio said New York University needed to keep its territorial ambitions in check. He said there had been a way to save St. Vincent’s but the powers that be didn’t want to do it. “Oh, and by the way,” he added, “their good friends in real estate did quite well in the bargain.” V.I.D. will hold a forum for public advocate and borough president candidates on Tues., May 7 at the L.G.B.T. Center. They will meet to vote on and announce their endorsement for mayor, as well as for public advocate and borough president, on Thurs., May 9, at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 83 Christopher St., at 6:30 p.m. V.I.D. has already endorsed in local City Council primary races, backing Corey Johnson and Jenifer Rajkumar, as well as Rosie Mendez for re-election.


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May 2 - 8, 2013

Publ ic Notice s Notice of Qualification of GOLF RIVERHEAD, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/28/13. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/20/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th Floor, NewYork, NY 10011. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 160 Greentree Drive, Ste. 101, Dover, Delaware 19904. Arts. Of Org. filed with DE Secy. Of State, Corporate Div., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, John G. Townsend Bldg., Dover, De 19901. Purpose: Acquisition, Development & Management of Real Estate and operation of a golf club. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Furious Flames Films, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 601 West 26th St., Ste. 1762, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Case Real Estate Funding, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Seyfarth Shaw LLP, 620 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10018, Attn: Lester Bliwise, Esq. Principal Office: c/o Case Real Estate Capital, LLC, 340 West Passaic St., 3rd Fl., Rochelle Park, NJ 07662. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Offshore) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/03/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 09/11/12. Princ. office of LP: 630 Fifth Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10111. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Limited Partnerships, Government Admininstration Bldg., Grand Cayman, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

Notice of Qualification of ROTHSCHILD INNOVATORS GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/28/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/22/13. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: David D. Rothschild, 477 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of RA 70 PINE DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/01/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 200 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rose Associates, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of ROTHSCHILD CORNERSTONE GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/29/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/29/03. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: David D. Rothschild, 477 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Yola Colon LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 200 E 64th St., #26AB, New York, NY 10065. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 RD LEGAL GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 03/21/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Irena Leigh Norton, Esq. C/O Law Office of Roni Dersovitz, 295 Madison Ave., 39th Fl, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Wall Street Cross Border Alternative Equity Index, LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 52nd Fl, The Trump Building, 40 Wall St, NY NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful act. 2062154 Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 340 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 500 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 504 East 12th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 435 East 12th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 338 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 211 Avenue A LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

Notice of Qual. of Valinor Capital Partners SPV IX, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/8/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/7/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qual. of Valinor Capital Partners SPV X, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/8/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/7/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 V. STEWARD GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 201 E. 17th St., #11H, NY, NY 10003. General Purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of VHA Mid Atlantic, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 220 E. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 5/7/99. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of VHA MidAtlantic Purchasing Coalition, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/21/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 220 E. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 10/8/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Halo Direct, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/22/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Halo Direct, LLC, 832 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, New York 10003. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Lord Jane LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Lord Jane LLC, 200 West 16 Street, Apt 11K, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: 338 JEFFERSON LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 228 Park Ave S #42608, New York, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Offshore Feeder) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/21/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 09/11/12. Princ. office of LP: 630 Fifth Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10111. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Limited Partnerships, Government Administration Bldg., Grand Cayman, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KRAUS LAW PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New mi (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Kraus Law PLLC, 131 E. 81st St., No. 15, New York, NY 10028. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

Notice of Qualification of GEM Holdco, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/13/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/10/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Madison Ave., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office. Address to be maintained in DE: 1811 Silverside Rd., Wilmington, DE 19810. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of G and C Arts, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: G and C Arts, LLC 370 Lexington Avenue, Suite 509, NY NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/05/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC, 44 Wall Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Mundaca Artese LLP. Certificate filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLP may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against LLP is to: Business Filings Incorporated, 187 Wolf Rd, Ste 101, Albany, New York 11205. Purpose: To engage any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 AUTHOR LEVIN LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/16/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Charles Hopfl, 2211 Broadway, NY, NY 10024. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

GA REP LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/5/12. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dorf & Nelson LLP, 555 Theodore Fremd Ave., Rye, NY 10580. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 GENESIS CAPITAL LEGACY AND ESTATE, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 80 Maiden Ln., Ste. 303, NY, NY 10038. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 97 NOBLE LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Donna Jones Marfino, 401 2nd Ave., NY, NY 10010. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 MOKSH PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/11/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Meghana Giridhar, 347 W. 57th St., #28F, NY, NY 10019. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 DESTROYHIPSTERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 02/21/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kantor Davidoff Wolfe Mandelker Twomey & Gallanty, P.C., Attn Thomas E Kass, 51 East 42nd St. (17th Fl), NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of CA EAST HOUSTON LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 41st Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of twentybridge LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Sharon deMonsabert, 14030 Thunderbolt Place #900, Chantilly, VA 20151. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

CERTIFICATE OF CONTINUED USE OF PARTNERSHIP NAME PURSUANT TO 81 OF THE PARTNERSHIP LAW OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK The undersigned, desiring to continue, after the close of business on January 24, 2013, the business previously transacted under the firm name of Cede & Co., a general partnership under the laws of the State of New York, with offices located at 55 Water Street1, New York, New York 10041, do hereby certify: 1. The name of the Partnership is Cede & Co. 2. The names and respective places of residence of each of the partners are set forth below: Name Residence Address Andrew Barnes 360 Furman Street Apt. 941 Brooklyn, NY 11201 Philip Braverman 505 East 79 St. New York, NY 10075 Joseph Brennan 457 Benito Street East Meadow, NY 11554 Debra Cook 4704 W. Neptune Street Tampa, FL 33629 John Faith 7425 Minnow Brook Way Land O Lakes, FL 34637 James Fernia 64-68 83rd Street Middle Village, NY 11379 Peter J. Gleeson 27 Greenwich Drive, Jackson, NJ 08527 Joseph Graziano 5 Claymore Rd., Fort Salonga, NY 11768 Robert T. Hensey 97 Harriman Woods Drive, Harriman, NY 10926 Kurt P. Holweger 64 Old Estate Road Manhasset, NY 11030 Ellen Fine Levine 13B Hillside Avenue Port Washington, NY 11050 Jeanne Mauro 14901 Heronglen Drive Lithia, Fl 33547 Donna Milrod 1 Leroy Street, Apartment 5A New York, NY 10014 Isaac Montal 19 Princeton Road Elizabeth, NJ 07208 Eric N. Miller 404 Apache Trail Brandon, FL 33511 Manuel Pires 331 Raccoon Hollow Mountainside, NJ 07092 Chad Richman 19 Beacon Crest Drive Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 Joseph C. Trentacoste 32 Pell Terrace Garden City, NY 11530 LoriAnn Trezza 191 Reid Avenue Breezy Point, NY 11697 Michael J. Tulaney 228 90th Street Brooklyn, NY 11209 Jeffrey T. Waddle 14 East 17th Street New York, NY 10003 1 Formerly at 7 Hanover Square, NewYork, N.Y. 10004 Related to file #M294/86 The foregoing Certificate duly signed and acknowledged by each of the Partners is on file at the office of the clerk of the County of New York, 60 Centre St., New York, NY. Vil: 04/11 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of Leslie Lane, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013


May 2 - 8, 2013

letters to the editor Continued from page 12 should actually live here? He has used his stolen third term to plunder city life. And the only good thing one can say about Janette Sadik-Kahn is that her term in office will soon be over, too. Rosemary Kuropat

There goes Tompkins Square To The Editor: Re “Scaled-down dorm pitched for embattled CHARAS site” (news article, April 25): Great — and our community’s beautiful park will be their playground — the way Union Square Park is for the dorm on 14th St. near there. Thanks, Gregg. Eve Cusson

Unleash the hungry hellcats! To The Editor: Re “Scaled-down dorm pitched for embattled CHARAS site” (news article, April 25): The selling-of-diplomas racket is big business. We were promised that the building was designated for community use. The community must come together again and fight like hungry hellcats to turn this building back into a broad community services station. David Leslie Leslie is a member, East Village Community Coalition E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

Boston’s ‘Odd Man Out’ 2013 TALKING POINT By JERRY TALLMER On the night that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, marathon bomber on the run, was found bloodied and half-dead in a boat in the back yard of a house in Watertown, Massachusetts, I suddenly realized I had seen this movie before. Indeed I had seen it a number of times over the years since its cinematic birth in 1947 (66 years ago!) because it is one of the greatest movies ever made — some would say the greatest — and, as it turned out two weekends ago, one of the most eerily predictive. The film is Carol Reed’s “Odd Man Out,” tracing the long night’s journey of young Johnny McQueen (the great James Mason, then 38), Irish revolutionist and wanted killer — a bank robbery gone wrong — on the run through the entire locked-down city of Belfast, Northern Ireland, where every face is either closed against him or trying to exploit him or to turn him in. Every face except one, that of the woman (Kathleen Ryan) who loves him. It is impossible not to see the parallel but also not to see the differences. The most glaring parallel is that the driving force in both cases is political passion, or, if you like, political craziness — the quasi-religious fervor that leads you to kill anything or anybody (a marathon spectator, a bank teller) who can be seen as standing in the way of Irish freedom, Chechen freedom. The differences also involve matters of faith, for the wrenching high point of “Odd Man Out” comes when bleeding, hallucinating Johnny McQueen, dragged into the studio of a nutty artist (Robert Newton) who wants to paint the fugitive as Christ, suddenly totters to his feet and starts shouting out 1st Corinthians 13:

Publ ic Not ice s

“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels “And have not charity “I am as sounding brass, or the tinkling of a cymbal…” “When I was a child, I spake as a child, I thought as a child, I believed as a child… When I became a man, I put aside childish things… .” It does not seem likely that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev or big brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, now deceased, cared much about 1 Corinthians 13 one way or the other. Indeed, one wonders whether the Islamic Chechens who have been bombing Moscow to pieces and terrorizing theaters full of women and children these recent years, have any moral sense whatever. Or not any moral sense that one can equate with normal, rational thought processes. The most normal, rational figure in “Odd Man Out” is neither Johnny McQueen or the girl who loves him — loves him to death actually — but the tall, quiet, contemplative police inspector (Denis O’Dea) who has to find him and bring him in, dead or alive. You can guess which. Reminds me of the several astonishingly levelheaded Massachusetts authority figures — cops, the mayor, the governor — whom we gratefully got to know so well over shootout weekend. One does not have to sympathize with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who is now being held at a federal medical center. But it is easy to sympathize with the drama of one isolated human being on the run through an entire locked-down city of Boston and environs. There are those who will say that “The Third Man” was Carol Reed’s greatest film. Well, that was a pretty good movie too. Even had its own man on the run: Orson Welles as Harry Lime. But “Odd Man Out” got there first — by two years.

Notice of Qualification of Pliant, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/15/10. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/29/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 875 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001. Principal office: 200 East Main St., Macedon, NY 14502. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of YORK MANAGED HOLDINGS II, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 767 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10153. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest/Michigan Investment Fund, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/29/11. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of P3 & G DONUT HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 135 W. 18th St., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10011. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Notice of Qualification

Notice of Qualifica-

of AlpInvest Secondaries

tion of Napier Park

Fund (Onshore) V, L.P.

Railcar Lease Fund

Authority filed with Secy. of State

LLC

of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office

Authority filed with NY Dept.

location: NY County. LP formed in

of State on 3/12/13. Office loca-

Delaware (DE) on 07/16/12. SSNY

tion: NY County. LLC formed

designated as agent of LP upon

in DE on 3/7/13. NY Sec. of

whom process against it may be

State designated agent of LLC

served. SSNY shall mail process to

upon whom process against it

Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80

may be served and shall mail

State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543.

process to: c/o Napier Park

Name and addr. of each general

Global Capital LLC, 399 Park

partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful

Notice of Formation of LHL HOLDINGS NY, LLC

purposes. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/14/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 183 Madison Ave., NY, NY

Notice of Qualification of Secoya Partners, LLC

10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Bennet L. Schonfeld at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/14/13. Fictitious name in NY State: Secoya Partners of Delaware LLC. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/8/12. SSNY designated as

Notice of Formation of

agent of LLC upon whom pro-

Kroesser + Strat Design

cess against it may be served.

LLC

SSNY shall mail process to:

Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of

c/o United Corporate Servic-

NY (SSNY) on 2/26/13. Off. loc.: NY

es, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560,

County. SSNY designated as agent

White Plains, NY 10606. DE

of LLC upon whom process against

address of LLC: c/o Incorpo-

it may be served. SSNY shall mail

rating Services, Ltd., 3500 S.

process to: 227 E. 87th St., NY, NY

DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901.

10128, Attn: Amelia Setar, the reg-

Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of

istered agent upon whom process

State, Townsend Bldg., Dover,

may be served. Purpose: any lawful

DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful

activity.

activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

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May 2 - 8, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

www.thevillager.com

sea Chelnow www.chelseanow.com

DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00 PM MAIL 515 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212-229-2790 REAL ESTATE PALM SPRINGS, CA. TOWNHOUSE CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Please visit this link: www.alwaysonvacation.com and type in 809752 in the "where are you going" search bar for details about the property, include pictures IF INTERESTED, CALL 323-493-3114.

TRIBECA... Basement storage with elevator street access. Space can be divided to accommodate requirement. Secure space beneath neighorhood bar. Send email to schedule visit. Info@m1-5.com

ARTIST'S SPACE ARTIST'S ATELIER 2000 SQ FT CENTRAL SOHO LOFT Professional Artist only. No living Sun Drenched, High Ceiling 5 fl walk up // $5000 per mo. Call 212-343-2881

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE SPECTACULAR MEDICAL OFFICE TO SHARE Beautful Architectual Space in the heart of TriBeca. 2 or 3 examination rooms available most days. Call 917-213-7494

EMPLOYMENT

BROWNSTONE WANTED BROOKLYN/HARLEM please email details/photos to: mykonos55@yahoo.com

LOOKING TO BUY

SOUTH BEACH CONDO 1 bedroom or large studio mykonos55@yahoo.com LIC PETITE 3BR DPLX LRG STUDIO RM

ACCOUNTANT 12 mos. Experience. BA, Cockpit USA, 15 W 39th St., NYC 10018

CONSTRUCTION

COMPUTER SOFTWARE ENGINEER BA + 3 mos experience. Global Works Group LLC, A. George, 220 5thAve. NYC 10001

FOR SALE

BIDS WANTED FOR CONSTRUCTION

EVERYTHING MUST GO MOVING SALE

Chen Dance Center is soliciting bids for alterations to its space 70 Mulberry St, NY, NY. For more info go to our website: www.chendancecenter.org

11 Fulton So.St.Seaport, NYC 404-805-5287 Friday 5/3 & Saturday 5/4 8am-5pm LCD FLAT PANEL TV, MONITORS, AMPS, AUDIO, SPEAKERS, FURNITURE, BENCHES

DENTIST

Backyard,Walk to Subways, Shopping, Etc. Avail. August 1, $2195 per mo. MR M 718-426-2800 BTW 10 AM-4PM

SoHo SPACE 4 LEASE Six (6) Soho district manufacturing spaces for lease Ideal for service, industrial No retail or office users

Loc#1: 8,130SF gnd+cellar, Loc#2: 2,200SF gnd+cellar, Loc#3: 2,600SF gnd+cellar, Loc#4: 2,400SF gnd+cellar, Loc#5: 3,700SF gnd+cellar, Loc#6: 4,400SF gnd+cellar. $80/SF call ELIOT @ 212-431-7500

You Saw It...

You Read It...

And so did thousands of our Readers. To advertise, contact Francesco Regini

francesco@thevillager.com 646-452-2496

The 19th Annual

COMMERCIAL SPACE

West Village Commercial Space Avail.

SOHO MANUFACTURING SPACE

Considering Non Food Business at

Ground Floor aprox 1,550 sqft

present. Approx.550 sq FT w Bsmt.

$120k per Anum.

Call Owner 718-344-6468

Call 212-226-3100

Call now to reserve your space! CONTACT FRANCESCO REGINI Francesco@TheVillager.com 646 452 2496 • 212 229 2790 (fax) www.DowntownExpress.com

Now in its 19th year, Taste of Tribeca is an amazing day of food, fun, festivities and raising funds to support arts and enrichment programs for PS 150 and PS 234. Mark your calendars for this year’s event on May 18, 2013. No better way than to get your message to the 1,000’s of festival goers.... advertise in Downtown Express & DowntownExpress.com, “the premier publication serving the communities of Tribeca, Seaport, Financial District, Battery Park City.” ISSUE DATE: MAY 15 RESERVE BY: MAY 7


May 2 - 8, 2013

Free Electronics Recycling Events

Former DUSC player kicks it up a notch on climb to top

May 4

Manhattan Plaza, Manhattan

May 5

PS 29, Brooklyn

May 18 Penn South, Manhattan

SpoRtS BY DANIEL JEAN-LUBIN The moment Dugan Zier laced up his first pair of cleats for the Downtown United Soccer Club at the age of 5, he knew soccer was the sport for him. “I’m never nervous during the game. It all slows down for me and I can always think clearly,” Zier said in an interview. It’s that poise and feel for the game that have made the 16-year-old center back from Greenwich Village one of the highest ranked prospects in New York State. The 6-foot-tall defender, who attends Fieldston High School, spent some time developing his game on a travel team before being scouted and picked up by the New York Red Bulls developmental academy. Last year, as a first-year player, Zier experienced the proudest moment of his young career. After growing with his team as a developmental player throughout the season, Zier helped his club in the postseason win the Major League Soccer cup on the Red Bulls U-15 team. Zier recently verbally committed to one of the top soccer programs in the country, University of California, Santa Barbara. And he also has professional prospects on his mind. “It’s been my dream,” he said. He also knows what it is going to take for him to make those dreams a reality, “The hardest thing for me is always staying consistent,” he said. “The only way I will succeed in the game is to never have an off day.” A dedicated player, Zier practices hard multiple times a week, developing elite vision and excellent passing skills to go along with his drive to achieve greatness. “Never being called into a national camp is something that has always bothered me,” he said. “And now I use it as motivation, and

Events Are 10am to 4pm • Rain or Shine

May 19 Stuyvesant Town, East Village May 19 Morningside Heights, Manhattan

For details, visit tekserve.com/recycling

Recycle with us for a chance to WIN a MacBook Air® For questions about recycling, contact:

Dugan Zier is one of the top high-school center backs in New York State.

hopefully one day I will be able to wear the U.S. national team jersey.” He combines exceptional top-end speed with deft ball skills and a knack for playing in tight spaces, all of which allow him to be efficient in traffic as well as on the perimeter. With his terrific start this season, Dugan Zier has made a very strong bid for some international selections going his way. Zier and the Red Bulls look to pick up their second straight M.L.S. cup as the number one seed this postseason.

212.477.4022 • lesecologycenter.org

A Lower East Side Ecology Center program sponsored by

119 W 23rd St | 212.929.3645 | tekserve.com Apple, the Apple logo, and MacBook Air are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

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The Villager, May 2, 2013