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Volume 82, Number 47 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

April 25 - May 1, 2013

Lots of new ideas pitched for Astor/ Cooper renovation By LincoLn Anderson Should a redesigned Astor Place and Cooper Square have more skateboarding, new digital “wayfinding” kiosks and ping-pong tables, plus movies with the audience all listening in via wireless headphones? Or, should most of the above uses be avoided so the revamped area doesn’t become a place where people come to hang out — only inevitably to “freak out”? And what will happen to

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Invasion of the bike-share docks A man pondered a new Citi Bike information kiosk at MacDougal and Prince Sts., where bike-share docks were recently installed. The bike docks are popping up all over Downtown. The program is expected to kick off as soon as the end of this month.

Scaled-down dorm pitched for embattled CHARAS site

By sArAH ferGuson Ten years ago, developer Gregg Singer stirred up a fury of opposition when he proposed razing the old P.S. 64 school building on E. Ninth St. to put up a 19-story dormitory tower. Now Singer is pitching a downscaled dorm plan to house up to 529 students in the existing turn-of-the century school building, which was landmarked in 2006, after community members mobilized to block him from tearing it down. Last time, the city refused to approve

Singer’s dormitory tower because he did not have any actual leases with schools or universities to show proof of an “institutional nexus” for the property, which is zoned for community facility use. The courts upheld the city’s decision, saying Singer could not build an “onspec” dorm without any schools on board. This time, however, Singer says he’s confident his project “is going forward”— in large part because The Cooper Union has signed a 15-year lease to house up to 196 of its students on two of the build-

ing’s five floors. “Cooper Union is our anchor tenant,” Singer said proudly of his revamped “stateof-the-art” dorm, dubbed “University House,” which he’s aiming to open in fall 2014. In an hour-long interview on Tuesday at the offices of The Villager, Singer presented digital images of the new dorm scheme, showing students lounging in tree-shaded courtyards on the Ninth and

the iconic Mudtruck? Will it morph into a mere “shell” of its former self? And could that actually be the best possible outcome? These questions and ideas and more were considered by about 70 people who turned out last Thursday for a “placemaking” workshop for the city’s fast-approaching renovation of Astor Place and Cooper Square. Many were parents of

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A vision emerges: One middle school at 75 Morton St. By LincoLn Anderson The West Village is getting a building to convert into a school at 75 Morton St. This much is known. But, first, the big questions that need to be answered are: What grade levels and how many schools should the building include? A group of local school parents has hired its own facilitator and held three meetings to consider what would be the

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5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

best fit for the building, and for Community School District 2, as a whole. At Monday evening’s meeting of the 75 Morton Task Force, this group presented their findings thus far in a report on their “envisioning process.” Basically, the envisioning group thinks the best use for 75 Morton St. would be as one middle school with 900 students, from grades 6 to 8.

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FRAckinG SpellS tRouble PAGE 13


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

A vision emerges of one middle school at 75 Morton Continued from page 1 Of this number, about 90 would be special-education students. However, School Construction Authority officials previously stated the city felt two, smaller middle schools would be the best use. “We need middle school seats — that was the envisioning group’s consensus,” said Heather Campbell, a member of Community Board 2 who is also part of the envisioning group. Campbell said P.S. 41, for example, is one large school, with 800 students, and functions very well. On the other hand, when a school building is divided up into two schools, she said, “You get the ‘A’ level and the ‘B’ level — it just happens.” Also, co-locating schools in the same building poses its own challenges, she said, noting, “Sharing’s hard.” Heather Lortie, another member of the group, said School

District 2 is desperate for more space for students in the sixth to eighth grades. “We’re already at capacity with the middle school seats we have,” she said, adding that, in particular, “The West Side needs a middle school.” What educational slant a 75 Morton school might have isn’t yet known, and is a “next steps” issue to address a bit farther in the future. But representatives of the Whitney Museum and the Children’s Museum of the Arts spoke at Monday’s meeting, emphasizing the importance of arts education. Another local parent who is also a science teacher said not to forget about science, either. Next, the two branches of the 75 Morton Task Force — Community Board 2 and the District 2 Community Education Council — will make their recommendations on what grade levels and how many schools the building should have. S.C.A. needs to know this information before it starts construction on 75 Morton in June.

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Heather Campbell, left, and Heather Lortie, members of the 75 Morton St. envisioning group.

D.O.T. puts brakes on Play Street plan By Lincoln Anderson In a stunning setback for P.S. 3, the Department of Transportation has denied the public school’s request for a desperately needed Play Street on Grove St. between Hudson and Bedford Sts. The school is extremely squeezed for space and says it needs the street to give the children outdoor time. David Gruber, chairperson of Community Board 2, told The Villager he recently received a one-sentence e-mail from D.O.T. notifying him of the news. Shirley Secunda, chairperson of C.B. 2’s Traffic and Transportation Committee, said, “D.O.T. indicated they did an evaluation and decided that closing the street would cause problems for both drivers and local residents because the Village isn’t part of the typical grid system. Their reasoning was that it might be too complicated to circumvent the street closure, and because of that, they said they were concerned that drivers might move the barricades and drive through the street, making it a concern for the children’s safety.” How about simply posting a safety officer to keep rogue drivers from moving the barriers? “Don’t ask me to explain,” Secunda said, “because I don’t understand it. Mystifying. We’ve asked D.O.T. for a copy of the evaluation, but haven’t received anything. Not surprisingly, the P.S. 3 people are devastated.” C.B. 2 recently overwhelmingly approved the Play Street, despite Grove St. neighbors’ strident complaints that the noise and disruption for about one hour at midday would make their lives a nightmare. In a statement to The Villager on Wednesday, D.O.T. said, “Safety is D.O.T.’s top priority and the agency reviewed the location and traffic impacts related to the temporary closure. Given the layout of streets in this area, the Play Street could negatively affect mobility, and raised safety concerns for pedestrians, especially schoolchildren using Grove St.”


April 25 - May 1, 2013

how one defines ‘community park,’ and questions about accountability, community input, limiting vendors and special events, among other things.” Aaron said she had gathered that a big part of the pushback against a conservancy a few years ago was the fear that big donors would have undue influence over the park’s renovation project. “I wonder, with that capital project mostly behind us,” Aaron said, “what concerns remain today.” Aaron noted it’s her understanding that the conservancy hasn’t completed selection of its board of directors and that the new organization hasn’t been incorporated yet — nor even signed an agreement with the Parks Department. … Hmm, what’s next, a conservancy for Tompkins Square?!

Scoopy’s

notebook CONSERVANCY’S COMING: As you can read in this week’s issue, in an exclusive talking point from Bill Castro, the Parks Department Manhattan borough commissioner, plans are moving rapidly ahead to create a conservancy for Washington Square Park. The issue will be on the agenda of the Community Board 2 Parks and Waterfront Committee meeting on Wed., May 1, place and time to be assigned. Rich Caccappolo, the committee’s chairperson, tells us he recently reached out to Steve Simon, Parks chief of staff, for clarification after the issue was broached a bit cryptically at a meeting earlier this month, and Simon informed him the conservancy “is in formation.” Sarah Neilson, who has been tapped to be both the park’s new administrator and the conservancy’s director, will attend the May 1 meeting. Caccappolo told us: “We have asked Sarah to introduce herself and to be prepared to discuss her role (she will explain that similar roles exist in other parks) along with other topics that may come up, such as PEP officers, N.Y.U.’s support, other existing Washington Square Park organizations, the status of the park’s Phase 3 renovations, the recent pillow fight, crusties, etc., and the new “expressive matter” park performer rules — which I anticipate will be a significant discussion itself.” Caccappolo, who was not on C.B. 2 when talk of a conservancy last percolated, about seven years ago, said he’s quickly working to “get up to speed” on the issue and to understand why there was such intense opposition before. “We hope to create a common basis for understanding for all who participate — including Ms. Nielson, so she can be most effective moving forward,” he said. “I don’t expect that we will create a resolution coming out of the meeting; I think we may need iterations of thought and discussion on the topic. This news may seem to have come out of the blue, but it is actually very timely, because the park’s renovations are expected to be completed this summer,” he noted. “If the conservancy is going to help with maintenance, security, beautification and so forth, than it might be helpful to start soon after renovations are complete, or as close to that time as possible, though I am not aware of potential timeframes for its formation. So, I hope all interested members of our community come to the meeting, though the location has not yet been finalized.” Cacappolo quipped: “Tell them to bring sleeping bags and rations because I fear the meeting may go on for a long time...just kidding.” Susanna Aaron, the Parks and Waterfront Committee’s vice chairperson, added, “We will be looking for clarity on terms and conditions: Is there a distinction between the terms ‘con-

RIDE ON! We were walking down E. Ninth St. past the old P.S. 64 Sunday afternoon when J.K. Canepa came zipping along on her bicycle. The East Village environmentalist had just come from Union Square — with a detour at the Tompkins Square rhumba circle — after tabling against T.P.P., a.k.a. the Trans-Pacific Partnership. She explained to us that this trade agreement, between the U.S. and 10 other nations, will give foreign corporations the right to sue our government when the U.S. laws block their environmentally destructive projects and toxic exports — and that the multinationals would even be able to sue for millions of dollars in future profits they claim they’ve been denied. “T.P.P. is a time bomb ticking down to the finish line in October,” Canepa warned. “It would be the last trade agreement that would ever need negotiations. The president is just trying to fast-track this through Congress, which has not been privy to the language.”

Photo by Scoopy

J.K. says “No way!” to T.P.P.

servancy’ and ‘friends group’? I’ve heard that distinction made, but it seems just a point of nomenclature. How will the model of this soon-to-be-formed conservancy differ from longtime community groups active in Washington Square Park, or from other parks, like Central Park or Madison Square? Sarah Neilson will be able to address whether the formation of a conservancy diminishes the money the Parks Department will continue to budget for Washington Square Park,” Aaron noted. “The role of the Washington Square Park Conservancy will be defined by the license agreement it signs with Parks, so I think neighbors will want to know what the terms of that agreement will be. One person mentioned he wants Washington Square Park to continue to be operated by Parks, so as to remain a community park; so there are questions about

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RAY’S LEASE RENEWAL CRISIS: Ray of Ray’s Candy Store, at Avenue A and Seventh St., who just turned 80, tells us his lease is up for renewal July 15, and that it’s likely his rent — now $4,100 — will double. But he can’t afford to pay that without doubling his prices, and is now wondering if, after 40 years, he’ll have to “give up the business.” While some European countries have commercial rent control, he noted, New York never will. Three years ago, the community pulled together to help Ray pay his rent through the winter, until he finally could make it through to his peak summer season, and also finally get his long-delayed Social Security, which had been snagged in bureaucratic red tape. But this lease renewal is a serious new challenge. While Jerry Leshko, the store’s former landlord, had wanted to give Ray a 99-year lease, he died about 15 or 20 years ago before he could follow through on the pledge. … Meanwhile, on the bright side, Ray’s new specialty, fried Oreos, is selling like hotcakes, and they are, mmm-mmm good!!! For a video of Ray talking about his lease, his love (Kathy D., 71 — unfortunately, unrequited, because she feels Ray is too old to marry her) and other issues, visit www.thevillager.com .

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Police BLOTTER Molester gets 8 years The man convicted of groping a 10-yearold girl near Gramercy Park last May has been sentenced to eight years in prison, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced on April 22. Timothy Gillette, 63, was convicted of first-degree sexual abuse by a New York State Supreme Court jury on March 13. According to court documents, on May 25, 2012, Gillette approached the girl — whose mother was nearby — near the corner of E. 20th St. and Third Ave., and forcibly touched the girl’s genital area before running away. The victim’s mother was able to take a photograph of Gillette on her cell phone before walking to the 13th Precinct to report the incident, the D.A. said, which aided police in identifying the molester. In addition to his prison sentence, Gillette will face 10 years of post-release supervision.

the Meatpacking District. A witness told police he was walking down Little West 12th St. around 4:30 a.m. when he saw a man (later identified as Trent Patterson, 47) approach another man (later identified as Bilal Abdelkrim, 27) and say to him that the front door of the nearby Ted Baker outlet was unlocked, and he should “go inside and get some stuff.” The witness then saw Abdelkrim enter the store, at 34 Little West 12th St., remove an armful of clothing, and come back outside to hand it to Patterson, who was standing watch with the other perpetrators. Abdelkrim reportedly then entered the store one more time, gathering another heap of clothing and handing it this time to Aude Boukli, 25, another suspect standing outside. Minutes after the witness reported the crime, cops swarmed the location and were able to catch Abdelkrim, Patterson and Boukli red-handed, along with two other suspects whose names police did not disclose. All five were charged with burglary.

Meatpack boutique bust

Ate J — but had baggies

Police arrested a group of five suspects early on Fri., April 19, after they allegedly burglarized a trendy clothing boutique in

This guy ate his joint when he saw a cop coming to bust him — but it was a bitter pill to swallow.


 The Village Independent Democrats Calendar of Events: April 29, 2013- 7:00 PM- Mayoral Forum- LGBT Center-208 West 13th Street Co-sponsored by VRDC. DID, GLID, MYD, LMD nd

May 2 - 6:30 PM-9:30 PM- VID Awards Dinner, Spring ForwardVeselka Bowery- 9 East 1st Street; Tickets: www.villagedemocrats.org Honorees- Congressman Jerrold Nadler; State Senator Brad Hoylman; Clare Donohue-Sane Energy Project Founder; Roberta Kaplan- Attorney for Edith Windsor in her challenge of DOMA before the US Supreme Court. May 7, 2013- 7:00 PM- Borough President & Public Advocate ForumLGBT Center-208 West 13th Street Co-sponsored by VRDC. DID, GLID, MYD, LMD May 9, 2013- 6:30 PM- VID Endorsement Mtg.- Mayor, BP, PA, Civil Court St. John’s Lutheran Church-83 Christopher St. (between 7th Ave. & Bleecker St.) www.villagedemocrats.org 


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The officer said he saw Daniel Aviles, 25, smoking the marijuana cigarette near the corner of Bank St. and Greenwich Ave. around 11 a.m. on Thurs., April 18, and then witnessed Aviles swallowing the joint once the two men made eye contact. But Aviles had a lot more to hide than a simple reefer — and that became clear when the officer searched the stoner’s pockets and found three plastic bags stuffed with weed, which all tested positive back at the precinct. Aviles was charged with criminal possession of marijuana and tampering with physical evidence.

Hit her with a 40 Police arrested a man who allegedly stole $100 from a woman in the Village and then smashed a large beer bottle over her head when she tried to take it back. The victim and witnesses told cops that, while she was walking past the corner of Commerce and Bedford Sts. around 10:30 p.m. on Tues., April 16, the perp — later identified as Shaun Handy, 45 — snatched the cash right out of her pants pocket and then turned to run away. The woman said she attempted to rip the money out of the thief’s hands, but he responded by hitting her with a 40-ounce beer bottle, which left a cut on her forehead and a bruise around her left eye, before he fled scene. The victim was later treated at Beth Israel Hospital for minor injuries. But Handy didn’t get far. He was caught less than two hours later during a police canvass of the area. He was charged with robbery.

Camera grabs camera culprit A Village restaurant employee was arrested at work on April 21 after, according to police, he stole the camera of a customer who was busy enjoying a meal. Police said they identified William Threherne, 47, as the likely culprit after viewing surveillance video from inside Grano Trattoria, at 21 Greenwich Ave. Threherne is believed to have swiped a bag containing the digital camera and an extra lens — with a total value exceeding $1,100 — around 5 p.m., while he was on the job. Police arrived at the restaurant several hours later to cuff him. Threherne was charged with grand larceny.

Purse snatcher caught This gal made cops’ jobs easier by skillfully spotting, following and identifying the thug who allegedly stole her purse inside a Meatpacking District bar on Sun., April 21. The woman told police that she left the purse unattended momentarily while getting a drink at the Brass Monkey, at 55 Little West 12th St., around 4 a.m., and soon realized that someone had walked off with it. She said that, immediately after that, she noticed a man — later identified as Nicholas Tuths, 28 — walking quickly away from the bar’s seating area, toward the exit, and followed him until he’d left the premises, when she then called police to report the crime. Aided by her description, police were able to nail the suspect about an hour later during a canvass of the area. Tuths was charged with grand larceny.

Sam Spokony

Jackman and the razor’s edge Katherine Thurston appeared at her arraignment in Manhattan Criminal Court on Sun., April 14, right, after having been arrested earlier that day for accosting actor Hugh Jackman while he was working out at a West Village gym. She was charged with stalking. She had been waiting outside the place when the Aussie hunk arrived at 8 a.m. She told Jackman, “We’re going to get married, right?” according to police, before following him inside. Once inside she charged “The Wolverine” star and threw an electric razor — reportedly filled with her public hair — at him before his personal trainer intercepted her. On Sat., April 20, she was indicted on felony charges. Thurston, 46, from California, remains in jail. She is being evaluated to determine if she is mentally fit before her next court date sometime this month.

Photo by Jefferson Siegel


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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Artist fights on as Parks set to put new limits on buskers By Terese Loeb Kreuzer Over the last 20 years, Robert Lederman, an artist who makes his living in city parks, has brought eight lawsuits in federal courts to assert and defend the rights of expressive matter vendors to freely display and sell their wares. In addition to people who sell books and newspapers, expressive matter vendors include visual artists, such as painters, sculptors and photographers, and performers, such as dancers, musicians, jugglers and others. The Parks Department has tried to confine all of these individuals to strictly regulated spaces and to limit their numbers. On Oct. 2, 2012, Judge Richard Sullivan of the Southern District Court of New York handed down Lederman’s first legal defeat. Sullivan sided with the Parks Department saying that, “The Constitution recognizes that the city must be permitted to balance plaintiffs’ speech rights with other myriad demands on municipal resources.” Sullivan acknowledged that

‘The expressive matter vending rules were promulgated to address congestion and aesthetic concerns.’ Parks spokesperson “vending is not permitted everywhere,” but went on to say that “a significant amount of the Parks Department’s 2,700 acres of parkland in Manhattan is available to expressive matter vendors.” In Parks Department rules dating from June 2010, with a few exceptions, expressive matter vendors were ordered to stay 50 feet from any monument and 5 feet from any park bench, tree, wall, fence or sign. Vendors who did not make use of a cart or display stand and who did not occupy a specific location for longer than necessary to conduct a transaction were exempt. However, the rules also stated that “no vendor shall allow an item or items used or offered in conjunction with vending to touch, lean against or be affixed permanently or temporarily to any street or park furniture installed on public property or any rock formation, tree, shrub or other planting.” Lederman said that these rules meant that a guitarist, for instance, whose instrument case lay on the ground would be in violation and that, pragmatically, in some parks such as Washington Square Park, no space for vendors would be legally viable. In June 2012, Lederman and a co-plain-

tiff, Jack Nesbitt (also an expressive matter vendor), sued to make Parks rescind those rules and others that applied specifically to four heavily used Manhattan parks — the High Line, Union Square, Central Park and Battery Park. In these parks, expressive matter vendors were required to set up their stations on a limited number of 24-square-foot, medallion-marked spots. Lederman and Nesbitt have appealed Judge Sullivan’s decision to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, where it will be heard by a panel of judges. This is as far as their case can go in New York State. Should they lose, the next step would be the U.S. Supreme Court. The plaintiffs have filed their papers and are waiting for the city to file its defense, which will occur in early May. Then Julie Milner, Lederman’s attorney, will have two weeks to reply. Milner, said she was “shocked” by Sullivan’s decision. She described the judge as “extremely intelligent” and said he reads everything that comes before him. For a while, in fact, Parks did not enforce the rules against performers, although visual artists were strictly controlled as to where they could set up. Milner said that her argument to Sullivan was based on the fact that Parks has been saying all along, “that performers and artists were similarly situated, so if they were not going to enforce the rules against the performers, then they couldn’t enforce them against the artists.” On April 2, 2013, the Parks Department came out with a new set of rules that it stated were not a departure from what had existed before, but just a clarification. Now performers in the four large parks who ask for donations must set up on medallions as visual artists have already been doing. Philip Abramson, a Parks Department spokesperson, said, “The expressive matter vending rules were promulgated by the Parks Department in 2010 to address congestion and aesthetic concerns and to ensure that the city’s parks are available to the public for a wide range of activities. While it was always our intent that the rules include performers and entertainers who seek donations within the definition of an expressive matter vendor, the rules now state that explicitly. This clarification provides clearer information to both the general public and expressive matter vendors.” As of May 8, Parks can start ticketing and even arresting people who defy the rules. A fine of $250 is levied for a first offense but can go to $1,000 an offense for those who are repeatedly ticketed by Parks Enforcement Patrol officers. “Enforcement will continue in the same way it has since May 2011 with respect to

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Bike Share: In Action There/ Launching Here A Film Screening and Discussion on NYC’s Bike Share Program Community Board No. 2, Manhattan, and the New York University Office of Government & Community Affairs present an exploration of New York City’s new bike share system. Join us for a presentation about the bike share, a discussion with leaders from the Department of Transportation, and a screening of several Streetfilms shorts.

Thursday, May 2, 2013 6:00 - 8:00 pm Casa Italiano Zerilli-Marimò 24 West 12th Street Enjoy opening remarks from New York State Senator Brad Hoylman; a presentation and discussion with Kate Fillin-Yeh, Director, and Stephanie Levinsky, Planner, of the Department of Transportation’s bike share program; a screening of Streetfilms; and a Q&A. Please register online at www.nyu.edu/ogca or by contacting OGCA at 212-998-2400. Space is limited. This event is free and open to the public.

Image courtesy of the New York City Department of Transportation


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Cooper Union won’t be free By Lincoln Anderson Ending its cherished, 150-year-old tradition of free education for all, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art this week announced it will slash its full-tuition scholarships to 50 percent for all undergraduates, beginning with the class entering fall 2014. Tuesday, at a meeting at the Great Hall, a statement by the school’s board of trustees was presented by Mark Epstein, the board’s chairperson, to the student body, faculty and staff. “After 18 months of intense analysis and vigorous debate about the future of Cooper Union, the time has come for us to set our institution on a path that will enable it to survive and thrive well into the future,” the statement said. “Under the new policy, The Cooper Union will continue to adhere to the vision of Peter Cooper, who founded the institution specifically to provide a quality education to those who might otherwise not be able to afford it. Consequently, we will provide additional scholarship funding for those with need, including full-tuition scholarships to all Pell Grant-eligible students. We intend to keep admissions need-blind.” Current undergraduates, plus those entering in fall 2013, will receive full-tuition scholarships for their entire undergraduate education.  “Our priorities have been and will continue to be quality and access,” Epstein continued, reading from the statement, “so that we will remain a true meritocracy of outstanding students from all socio-economic backgrounds. “Being mostly alumni ourselves, we share

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your sense of the loss of this extraordinary tradition,” the trustees said of the school’s trademark, free-tuition tradition. “However, we found no viable solutions that would enable us to maintain the excellence of our programs without an alteration of our scholarship policy.” The trustees noted the school can’t rely on the rent from the Chrysler Building to solve its long-term problems. “Even though our rent income from the Chrysler lease is scheduled to increase dramatically in 2018-19, deficits are forecast to grow forever thereafter,” they said. “The board also considered the possibility of downsizing the institution while maintaining our current scholarship policy. We concluded that there are no viable downsizing options that would not involve closing one or more of our three schools. … Neither can the projected $12 million annual deficit be closed through budget-cutting.” The trustees noted that new programs proposed by the faculty are “innovative,” but will only cut about one-third of the school’s deficit. The board said the highly selective, elite school, despite having to operate more efficiently, won’t cut the quality of its education. The tuition debate has gripped the school for the past two years under its new president, Jamshed Bharucha, and even saw student protesters occupy the Foundation Building’s clock tower at the end of last year. After Tuesday’s announcement, about 200 students and faculty gathered outside the Foundation Building, and then, linking hands, gave it a symbolic hug.

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Woodstock icon Havens dies at 72 Folk singer Richie Havens died Mon., April 22, of a heart attack at his home in Jersey City. He was 72. A fixture on the Greenwich Village folk circuit in the 1960s, he is best known for his legendary opening performance at the Woodstock festival in August 1969. The photo above is of Havens performing at Madison Square Garden on Aug. 15, 1968, for a crowd of supporters of Eugene McCarthy, the anti-Vietnam-war presidential candidate, two weeks before the infamous Democratic National Convention. Havens, who grew up in Brooklyn, used to have an apartment on Jane St. in the Village.

Artist fights on as Parks set to put new limits on buskers Continued from page 5 those who sell or seek donations for books and artwork,” said Abramson. “The only change is that the agency will resume applying the rules toward performers and entertainers.”   There is no chance that the Second Circuit will have handed down an opinion by May 8. Milner said the performers would be well advised to get their own attorney and try to get an immediate injunction against the ruling. She noted that the performers and the artists have conflicting interests, and therefore would need separate representation. The larger issues have to do with First Amendment rights and 14th Amendment rights. “Here in New York,” Milner explained, “we have greater rights under the First Amendment because our state Constitution is more liberal than the federal government Constitution. We give more rights to artists and expression than other jurisdictions. In 1997,

a Second Circuit ruling in Bery v City of New York, paved the way for artists to have full First Amendment rights — not just of expression, but of speech. “We’re very worried about [the case now under appeal],” Milner said, “because if we lose in the Second Circuit, it will set artists’ rights back.” Artists got their rights in the beginning through the 14th Amendment, she explained, because they were being compared to booksellers. “That’s why non-original artists can sell other people’s artwork,” she noted. “You can sell copies and still be fully protected. “I think that's a source of contention with the Parks Department,” Milner added. “They don’t want nonoriginal artists coming in, cluttering up the place, selling knockoffs." She also said she thinks the Parks Department wants to corral the expressive matter vendors because it can make more money leasing park space to other kinds of users, such as corporations who stage promotional events in the parks.”

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

9

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Elena Madison, vice president of Project for Public Spaces, jotted down ideas from workshop participants in her group, which specifically focused on uses for the new “Village Plaza” area, which will project out from the existing sidewalk near Grace Church School.

Brainstorming for plaza uses Continued from page 1 students at the Grace Church School, which this year opened a new high school division on Cooper Square. The workshop was led by representatives of Project for Public Spaces, who were brought in by the Village Alliance business improvement district. P.P.S. will collect and distill the information from the workshop and present it to the BID as part of the ongoing planning for programming the new spaces. The participants broke up into eight smaller groups, then went out and surveyed specific areas of the landscape, then came back and drew up lists of recommendations. The renovation job will stretch from Eighth St. to Fifth St. along Cooper Square. The oneblock length of Astor Place between Cooper Square and Lafayette St. will be closed to car traffic under the city’s plan, so that “The Alamo” sculpture, i.e. “The Cube,” will no longer be on its own island, but will be attached to the block with the new Gwathmey Siegeldesigned, luxury, glass tower. The workshop groups each focused on one of the four major areas of the renovation: the Astor Place subway plaza; “The Alamo” plaza; the “Cooper Triangle,” or Cooper Park; and the “Village Plaza,” a new plaza area to be created south of Cooper Park. Basically, in addition to closing Astor Place and creating the new “Village Plaza,” sidewalks will be widened by about 15 feet around the subway island and on the western side of Cooper Union’s Foundation Building and Cooper Park. The thinking was that the new “Alamo Plaza” would be a place where performances and music events would be held. Participants said the southern end, Fifth St., is crying out for some kind of “anchor,” such as an interactive sculpture. One woman, a Cooper Union student, suggested making the “Village Plaza,” near the Grace Church School, a cool skateboarding park, but — when this was shared later during the recap with all the participants — it was met by loud boos from many in the crowd. Someone else suggested a “mini soccer field.”

Joyce Kuh, director of development for Grace Church School, said not to worry — the “Village Plaza” surface will specifically be designed to prevent skateboarding. Grace Church will maintain this new plaza, including four planters that its students will cultivate, and daily will put out and remove seats and tables for the plaza, she said. Grace Church School has already signed a contract with the city for this, she said. According to William Kelley, the Village Alliance’s executive director, the BID will be the “maintenance partner” for the subway island and the “Alamo Plaza.” It remains to be seen if Cooper Union will have a role in maintaining the new plaza area to the west of it. Noho activist Zella Jones warned that the new plazas would be deluged with food carts and food trucks unless regulations are put in place limiting them. However, there was wide support for some kind of public artwork. Another popular idea was for a “night market” that would stay open until 8 p.m. Other recommended uses were WiFi, theater, bike-share docks, moveable lounge chairs on tracks à la the High Line and “the piano guy.” A member of the group Bowery Moms advocated for playground space, noting, “Playgrounds in Union Square and Tompkins Square are so crowded, children are now waiting in line for swings.” However, one Fifth St. resident warned of the new, welcoming plazas, “Do we want to draw more people? We’ll have a really nice space for people to freak out in. You have to be realistic — this will happen. We want a nice space for people who are here.” The operators of the Mudtruck, the popular Astor Place coffee vendor, are concerned, because the expanded subway plaza means they won’t be able to park there. “Hopefully, it would be good if we could have a kiosk, and could even use the shell of the Mudtruck,” said Maria Cocchiara-Klein, the truck’s catering manager. “People look for us at the spot. People going to work, coming from east and west, get their coffee with us before going into the subway. A tourist DVD called the Mudtruck the ‘Gateway to the East Village.’ ” The Department of Transportation is set to start construction on the renovation project very soon, with the work slated to take 18 months.

Town & Gown Evenings presents

A Community Screening of the First Run Film Festival’s Winning Films In collaboration with the Kanbar Institute of Film and Television, NYU’s Office of Government & Community Affairs invites you to a special community viewing of the First Run Film Festival’s winning films of 2013.

Monday, April 29, 2013 6:30-8:00 PM. Doors open at 6:00. Cantor Film Center, 36 East 8th Street The annual First Run Film Festival showcases innovative works by students at the Kanbar Institute of Film & Television. Winners are selected from over 120 submissions. Past winners have included Spike Lee, Ang Lee, and Nancy Savoca. Register at www.nyu.edu/ogca, or contact us at community.affairs@nyu.edu / 212-998-2400. This event is free and open to the public with RSVP. Please be advised, no food or drink is allowed in the Cantor Film Center. All images copyright NYU Tisch School of the Arts


10

April 25 - May 1, 2013

editorial

Scouts’ badge of shame Perhaps after years of digging in their heels amidst mounting P.R. problems, the Boy Scouts of America thought they could garner some favorable press with the announcement last week that gay members would no longer be barred from their ranks. Late next month, the 1,400 members of Scouting’s National Council will vote on a motion put forward by the group’s leadership stating, “No youth may be denied membership in the Boy Scouts of America on the basis of sexual orientation or preference alone.” Some frenzied critics, noting that a sizeable chunk of Scouting groups are sponsored by Catholic and Mormon congregations, warned of a catastrophe awaiting the organization. But whether or not a troop here or there loses its sponsor, it’s doubtful that a large number of Americans are troubled by the idea that gay kids will no longer be ostracized by the Scouts. However, the larger issue regarding gays and the B.S.A. remains unresolved. And the message there may be more damaging to the psyches of gay youth than the policy being swept away. Openly gay men will continue to be barred from leadership positions in the Scouts. The implication couldn’t be clearer or uglier. The B.S.A. is telling the parents of Scouts, “Your sons will be all right if there are gay fellow Scouts among them. But don’t worry, we’ll protect them from gay adults.” And that is exactly what they are saying as well to every gay boy who wants to join the Scouts. B.S.A. officials, in fact, are making little effort to hide that motivation. Deron Smith, the group’s spokesperson, said the question of the role of gays in the Scouts is “among the most complex and challenging issues facing the B.S.A. and society today.” Other Scouting officials around the country, however, pointed to surveys the B.S.A. has conducted showing widespread unease about opening up the leadership ranks to gay men, suggesting the decision to continue the current policy on that question was an easy one. In explaining the “softened” position on gay youth joining the Scouts, the proposed May motion reads: “Youth are still developing, learning about themselves and who they are, developing their sense of right and wrong, and understanding their duty to God to live a moral life.” What’s more disturbing is the lead-up to the motion’s restatement that the B.S.A. bars adult leaders “who are open or avowed homosexuals or who engage in behavior that would become a distraction to the mission of the B.S.A.” A critical role played by Scout leaders, the motion explains, is in “teaching young people to make better choices over their lifetimes.” It’s all there in the motion that supposedly reflects progress in B.S.A. thinking on gays. The “better choice” for youth is heterosexuality. The utter banality of the B.S.A.’s position, however, becomes crystal clear when considering the example of Lucien and Pascal Tessier of Maryland, brothers who are both Scouts and gay. Before the B.S.A. made its announcement last week, Lucien, 20, an Eagle Scout, was fighting to change Scouting’s policy after being told that Pascal, 16, his brother, would not be allowed to become an Eagle Scout if he said publicly that he, too, is gay. “I’m thrilled that under the proposed resolution, after years of service and dedication to the Boy Scouts, my brother would be eligible to earn his Eagle award,” said Lucien, whose initial effort to reform Scouting involved a petition drive on Change. org. “But what I cannot understand is why the Boy Scouts of America believes that I’m not fit to lead my brother’s troop, even though I received the Boy Scouts’ highest honor just a few years ago. If a Scout has what it takes to earn his Eagle award, surely he has what it takes to serve as an adult leader.” A longer version of this editorial first ran in Gay City News, The Villager’s sister paper.

letters to the editor Letter on NID needs clarification

How about ‘moving on up?’

To The Editor: Re “NID is flawed, abuses law” (letter, by Nicole Vianna, April 11): I am an owner of a co-op in the proposed neighborhood improvement district (NID) for Hudson River Park and also serve proudly as co-chairperson of the NID Steering Committee and as vice chairperson of Friends of Hudson River Park. I would like to address some concerns raised by Nicole Vianna in her letter to the editor. First, the NID is required to provide a minimum of 60 percent of its budget directly to the Hudson River Park Trust on a yearly basis as stated in the NID district plan. The money will be allocated for approved maintenance and operations items in the Hudson River Park Trust’s budget. This budget is created and approved yearly through meetings that are open to the public.  Moreover, the board of directors of the NID can audit the Trust on a yearly basis to account for the funds provided. Second, debt service would not take precedence over budget items. The 60 percent of funds that are dedicated to the Trust cannot be superseded by debt service — this money is guaranteed to the Trust on a yearly basis. The option to borrow is an ability many improvement districts have in order to efficiently pay for cost-intensive capital projects. The NID foresees very few projects (if any) that would require borrowing — a pedestrian bridge over the highway might be one such project. However, the debt service on any project will never diminish the money that will go for park maintenance and operations. Third, the NID will actually strengthen the opportunity for neighborhoods to determine how resources are used.  The NID’s board of directors will be composed of members from your local neighborhood — residential and commercial owners, residential and commercial tenants, and community board representatives. Board members will be voted on at annual, open meetings. Moreover, the NID’s scope of services has been designed not to duplicate or replace the work that local groups and associations are already doing. Improvement districts actually empower local organizations, residents, and businesses by providing the resources to accomplish projects they identify to be of local need. I encourage everyone to visit our Web site: www. HRPNID.org for more information and to sign our petition in support of this very important project.

To The Editor: Re “Johnson and Rajkumar win V.I.D.’s backing for Council” (news article, April 18): I read your coverage of District Leader Jenifer Rajkumar’s intention to unseat City Councilmember Margaret Chin through a Democratic primary. Being a descendant of a Tammany Hall politician, I laughed: In Tammany’s “corrupt” system, if a district leader wanted to replace his alderman, he got them promoted to Judge. Can Rajkumar make Chin a judge? So much for the reform movement.

Scott M. Lawin Lawin is co-chairperson, Hudson River Park Neighborhood Improvement District Steering Committee

Billy Sternberg

Excited about charter school To The Editor: Re “Charges over charters fly as Eva enters Wash. Irving” (news article, April 4): The only critics of Success Academy are the teachers union. I live in Stuyvesant Town but not in the P.S. 40 zone. The school choices for my daughter are horrific. I am so excited that she has been accepted to kindergarten at the new Union Square location. Washington Irving has been an eyesore in the community for years. I hope the entire high school program goes away in that building and we can take back the neighborhood for the smaller children who need a clean, safe and challenging learning space. Ilene Frankel

G.O.P. club prez on CHARAS To The Editor: Gregg Singer has gotten approval from Community Board 3 for his plan to convert the old P.S. 64 — a 157,000-squarefoot building between Avenues B and C on Ninth St. — into private college dormitories. It is an exceptional building of great architectural significance, 106 years old. It has been vacant for 12 years since Mr. Singer bought it in a city auction for $3.2 million. Gregg later ripped the window treatments off to try to stymie landmarking efforts. The community was blocking his efforts to convert the building into a college dormitory for N.Y.U. and Baruch. The community wanted to extract amenities from the developer, like

Continued on page 24

EVAN FORSCH


April 25 - May 1, 2013

11

Conservancy will keep Washington Sq. looking good tA l k inG p oint By WiLLiAM cAsTro Spring has arrived in New York City, and the heart of the Village, Washington Square Park, is again blooming with flowers and teeming with visitors. Washington Square Park is known as one of our city’s most iconic destinations and as one of the world’s most dynamic public spaces. As residents of the Village and readers of The Villager well know, in recent years the New York City Parks Department invested in a major restoration of Washington Square Park that will be completed soon. When you visit the park today, you see new and expanded lawns, a fountain that has been restored to its original splendor, repaved and accessible paths, new benches, lighting and much more. As a result, the park looks better

The new park administrator will also be executive director of the new park conservancy. than ever, and we are excited to ensure the park’s continued success in the coming years. Our goal with Washington Square Park’s renovation was to create a renewed sense of place, with a design that restored and upgraded the park’s significant features, while preserving its rich history of diversity. The first phase included a renovated and accessible plaza, the restored fountain, and expanded lawns and new planting beds that dramatically increase the park’s green space. The second phase included an enhanced playground, a stage, petanque courts, a small dog run and a new chess plaza, as well as sitting areas, landscaping, fencing, light poles and paths. The third phase will soon be completed and will include a new park house with restrooms for the public and space for Parks maintenance staff, a large dog run, perimeter sidewalks and a new playground for older kids. The Parks Department looks forward to joining the community in cutting the ribbon on this final phase and to

seeing the realization of a fully restored Washington Square Park. As Washington Square Park enters the next chapter of its storied existence, I would like to take this opportunity to announce the appointment of its new administrator, Sarah Neilson. Sarah is a veteran of the Parks Department’s Capital Projects Division, with a background in city planning, public programming and nonprofit administration, and a lifelong enthusiasm for parks and public places. In the early 1980s, then Parks Commissioner Gordon Davis began appointing borough commissioners and park administrators. This was to ensure that parks would benefit from an increased level of experienced and skilled managers who would bring their expertise to upgrade physical conditions, organize recreation programs and obtain public and private funds for capital improvements. Administrators have overseen significant improvements to parks such as Battery Park, Riverside Park, Fort Tryon Park, Madison Square Park, Randall’s Island, Central Park, Prospect Park, Northern Brooklyn’s parks, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, Rockaway Beach, Van Cortlandt Park, Pelham Bay Park, Crotona Park, the Staten Island Greenbelt and more. To assist in this effort, traditional friends groups and nonprofit park conservancies were formed to help raise private dollars to combine with public funds for maintenance and programming enhancements. Publicprivate partnerships have also coordinated thousands of neighbors to become engaged and active in their local parks through volunteering. Many park administrators are also the executive directors of a park’s nonprofit group. This allows the Parks Department to ensure that the best interests of the park and the public are coordinated with those local residents who have volunteered their time helping to improve their park. At Washington Square Park, Sarah will hold a dual role as the executive director of a nonprofit organization that is currently being formed. A group of citizens who live and work in the community is seeking to raise funds for the park and engage neighbors to help the Parks Department care for the park’s lawns, plants and playgrounds, and to create programming. We look forward to working with the new group to encourage community involvement and volunteering. Visitors to Washington Square Park will soon see fruit from our partnership in the Member of the New York Press Association

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flowering trees, daffodils and tulips, and in annual maintenance, including our topdressing of the lawns. The Parks Department has increased maintenance staff to handle the springtime influx of visitors, while the new nonprofit group has pledged to bring in a playground associate for the summer months to conduct arts and crafts and other activities for children. The future of Washington Square Park is bright, and we look forward to joining forces with the community as we ensure that it remains an inviting oasis to our city’s residents and visitors.

Wa s h i n g t o n Square Park Administrator Sarah Neilson is happy to hear community members’ ideas and concerns about the park and the emerging conservancy. She will hold a weekly “Arch Hours” session on Mondays from 11 a.m. to noon at the Washington Square Arch, and encourages you to stop by and say hello. She can also be reached at Sarah.Neilson@parks.nyc. gov or 212-408-0297. Castro is Manhattan borough Parks Department commissioner

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Scene PUBLISHER Jennifer Goodstein EDITOR IN CHIEF Lincoln Anderson ARTS EDITOR Scott Stiffler

On Saturday, step dancers cut a…board in Washington Square Park.

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Marvin Rock Ira Blutreich Patricia Fieldsteel Bonnie Rosenstock Jefferson Siegel Jerry Tallmer


12

April 25 - May 1, 2013

J’accuse! McCarthyism, Village politics and Pier 40 tA l k in G p o in t By ArTHur z. scHWArTz I was a child when McCarthyism reached its height. As a child I heard stories about this or that entertainer or celebrity being charged with being a communist, or knowing or consorting with communists. Careers and reputations were destroyed. Once I had a long conversation about it with Barney Josephson, whose famous Sheridan Square nightclub, Café Society, was destroyed by allegations that he and his brother, a New Jersey litigator, were communists. He chuckled and marveled how well they came out of it, but his eyes were pained as he spoke.

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sT. pAUl’s ChApel Broadway and Fulton Street ChARlOTTe’s plACe 107 Greenwich Street btwn Rector & Carlisle Streets The Rev. Dr. James H. Cooper, Rector The Rev. Canon Anne Mallonee, Vicar

an Episcopal parish in the city of New York

McCarthyism, at least as applied to communists, is dead and buried. But its tactics are not. And in liberal-minded communities like ours, sometimes words like “racist” or “homophobe” get thrown around in similar fashion — allegations, based on very little, designed to smear, not to engage in principled debate. I don’t usually get to complain. I am a public figure, at times a controversial public figure, who is used to getting called names. I’ve learned to grin and bear it. And I certainly know how to dish it right back, although I rarely do. But a line got crossed in The Villager a month ago that still leaves me angry, because it reflects an effort by some political forces in the Village to retain or regain power, and a lack of principle as they do that. What was I called? I was labeled a “supporter of housing on Pier 40.” A whole page of ranting about this in a Scoopy column about the prearranged anointment of Jonathan Geballe to the Village district leader position. Tony Hoffmann, the Village Independent Democrats president, who himself was once the victim of smears decried by the late columnist Jack Newfield, announced that V.I.D. was running Geballe against me because I “supported housing on Pier 40.” Maria Passannante Derr, president of the Village Reform Democratic Club, who nominated me and then voted for Geballe, said the same thing: “Arthur supports housing on Pier 40.” But nothing could have been farther from the truth. Unlike Geballe, who has never had a word to say about Pier 40 and has never lifted a finger to support it, I worked for Hudson River Park going back 17 years, when I filed a lawsuit for the Greenwich Village Little League and the Downtown United Soccer Club, which established the application of the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) to Pier 40 and got the state to build a $2.5 million ball field on the roof. I helped draft and lobby for the

ApRIl 26-28

Stravinsky Festival

A festival celebrating the complete sacred works of Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). Days 1 and 3 are free. Day 2 tickets are $50 general admission and $20 students/ seniors. Complete schedule and tickets at stravinskyfestival.com. Trinity Church

music

ThURsDAY, ApRIl 25 & MAY 2, 1pM Concerts at One April 25: American Pianists Association Finalists; May 2: Ensemble ACJW. Trinity Church MONDAY, ApRIl 29 & MAY 6, 1pM Bach at One April 11: Minetti Quartett April 18: Flûte Alors Trinity Church WeDNesDAY, MAY 1 & 8, 1pM Pipes at One May 1: Gwendolyn Toth, Music Director, Immanuel Lutheran Church, NYC. May 8: Julian Wachner, Director of Music and the Arts, Trinity Wall Street St. Paul’s Chapel

Hudson River Park Act. I chaired the Community Board 2 Waterfront Committee for most of 15 years, and served as chairperson or vice chairperson of the Hudson River Park Advisory Council for most of that time. In the course of that work I chaired two public task forces that looked at Pier 40 proposals, one in 2002-2003 and one in 2006-2007. And I was part of the Pier 40 Partnership, an independent effort in 2007 to find a solution for Pier 40. Those task forces and the Partnership included community leaders, elected officials, youth league reps and waterfront activists. Anyone who attended these meetings knows that I

Shame on you, Tony Hoffmann, and shame on V.I.D. if it adopts such tactics, which belie its history. always took a nuanced approach, looking to build consensus and find solutions. Assemblymember Glick, former state Senator Duane and Council Speaker Quinn all signed on to the final task force recommendations both times, and generally supported the Partnership’s work. There was NEVER a recommendation to consider housing. Since December 2011 I have served on the latest Hudson River Park Trust Task Force looking for long-term solutions to for the park’s finances. Unlike the prior task forces, this one was chaired by the Trust’s president, Madelyn Wils. I

education

sUNDAY, ApRIl 28 & MAY 5, 10AM Discovery: Instruments of Grace Explore the history and practice of the sacraments. April 28: Holy Orders (Ordination); May 5: Holy Matrimony. 74 Trinity Pl, 2nd Fl, Parish Hall TUesDAY, ApRIl 30, 6pM Discovery: Lord, You Have Searched Me Out The Rev. Fletcher Harper, Executive Director, GreenFaith. 74 Trinity Pl, 2nd Fl, Parish Hall

community

sATURDAY, ApRIl 27 & MAY 4, 10AM-1pM Mosaic Art Project: Workshop Help design a large-scale mosaic for Charlotte’s Place. Facilitated by public artist Jackie Chang. Charlotte’s Place

Continued on page 13

worship sUNDAY, 8am & 10am St. Paul’s Chapel · Holy Eucharist sUNDAY, 8pm St. Paul’s Chapel · Compline – Music & Prayers sUNDAY, 9am & 11:15am Trinity Church · Preaching, music, and Eucharist · Sunday school and child care available MONDAY – FRIDAY, 12:05pm Trinity Church · Holy Eucharist MONDAY – FRIDAY, 5:15pm All Saints’ Chapel, in Trinity Church Evening Prayer, Evensong (Thurs.) Watch online webcast

sUNDAY, ApRIl 28, 5pM The Family Table Connect with your neighbors, dine on locally-sourced food, and touch on the spiritual at the Family Table dinner event. $25 minimum suggested donation per family. Reservations by email at trinityfamily@trinitywallstreet.org. 74 Trinity Pl, 2nd Fl, Parish Hall

Leah Reddy


April 25 - May 1, 2013

presents

BRINGING COMMUNITY BUSINESS DOWNTOWN Tuesday, May 07, 2013, 6 - 8 pm

Earth Day: Fracking go away! In celebration of Earth Day, District Leader Jonathan Geballe — with Celia Wu in photo above — on Saturday led a contingent of Village Independent Democrat club members in a demonstration against the Spectra gas pipeline and hydrofracking. The demonstration, from noon to 2 p.m., was held in front of the Bleecker St. Playground to symbolize that the planet must be saved for today’s children and future generations. Many V.I.D.’ers, community activists, state Senator Brad Hoylman and a number of candidates for local office joined the rally. Signatures were collected for a letter to Governor Cuomo to urge him to ban fracking in New York State.

Seeing red on the waterfront? Continued from page 12 chaired the C.B. 2 Waterfront Committee all of 2012, and the Hudson River Park Trust Advisory Council, and held numerous public hearings and meetings. No one who attended any of those meetings EVER heard me advocate for housing on Pier 40. What I did do was publicly speak and write about building into the process, through legislation, some sort of safety valve to protect community input, which would be superior to ULURP. Some safety valve like the one that let Assembly Speaker Silver block a West Side stadium after it had passed ULURP. And, I advocated, once such a safety valve was in place, allowing all sorts of proposals to be made all over the park, even casino gambling on the pier that is now a tow pound (Pier 76). One position I stated repeatedly was opposition to condos in the park — no one should own a piece of the park. But I also question why renting a parking space to a car, or an office to a “tech firm” — both real estate transactions — was

somehow preferable to renting an apartment to a family. I even dared to say that parking cars in the park was not a parkcompatible use, but that I could live with it, with appropriate restrictions (mostly long-term parking spots that didn’t disrupt bikes, joggers, etc.) But I NEVER said, “Build housing.” But the modern-day McCarthyites decided they could not beat me in a district leader election without a smear campaign. Heaven knows what they will come up with now that housing is off the table. Shame on you, Tony Hoffmann, and shame on V.I.D. if it adopts such tactics, tactics which belie its history. And to The Villager: Do a little factchecking next time, even for your gossip column. Housing at Pier 40 appears to be a dead item. Let’s hope that McCarthyism in 2013 doesn’t rear its ugly head again. Schwartz is vice chairperson of the Hudson River Park Trust Advisory Council and Democratic State Committee member for the 66th Assembly District

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Scaled-down dorm pitched for old P.S. 64 building Continued from page 1 10th St. sides of the H-shaped school building, which for two decades housed the CHARAS/El Bohio community center. “Once completed, the dormitory will feature amenities unavailable in modern apartment buildings,” a press release boasts. The new plans call for 95 suites housing four to seven students, at a cost of $1,550 per bed. Each suite would have its own kitchen, bathroom and dining room area with “large” flat-screen TV, and bedrooms furnished with bunk beds, desks and personal safes for the students to store their valuables. Some of the units show spiral staircases leading up to loft spaces, taking advantage of the 14-foot ceiling height on all floors. Many of the upper floor suites have views of the Empire State Building. The basement — formerly home to a 400seat auditorium where F.D.R. once riled the masses, and where the Fringe Festival was staged — would now house a bike room, fitness center, TV lounge and game rooms outfitted with pool, ping-pong and foosball tables, along with Xbox and PlayStation consoles. “This is the most advanced dorm in Manhattan as far as technology goes,” Singer claimed. In addition to wireless service throughout the dorm, each student would have their own Cat 6 cable to connect them to their school’s computer system, Singer said. Singer said the pricing was comparable to what New York University and the New School charge for dorm space. An in-house health center run by Beth Israel and staffed by a full-time physician’s assistant would offer free healthcare to residents. There would also be a cafe, study rooms and soundproof music rooms on four of the five floors — so students can jam on site. “We think we will have some music schools leasing from us,” Singer predicted. While the building would continue to be owned by Singer and his partners in 9th and 10th Street LLC, the dorm would be run by a management company that specializes in student properties across the country. There would also be 24-hour security and “lots of cameras throughout the building, so parents know it’s safe,” Singer assured. A brochure for University Houses notes the building’s “exceptional location next to the wireless Tompkins Square Park, farmers market, music and art festivals, summer film nights, basketball and handball courts, and open grass areas for lounging.” Students, it notes, will be able to take advantage of the M8 bus that stops on 10th St., along with Alphabet City’s “many affordable restaurants, cafes and nightlife venues.” All of which is sure to elicit outrage from area residents who have long feared a dorm would overwhelm the character of the neighborhood. On Tuesday, the East Village Community Coalition, which was founded to stop Singer’s previous dormitory tower, began circulating an online petition demanding that Cooper Union not house its students there. “Respect our community. Respect this community treasure,” the petition says of the old P.S. 64. “Dormitory use does not serve our

Renderings of the dorm plan for the old P.S. 64, showing students using the renovated front-entrance terrace on E. Ninth St., above, and new dorm rooms, at right.

community.” E.V.C.C. Director Sara Romanowski said that while the new University House plan is smaller than Singer’s previous tower scheme, “It’s still 500 students. It’s a large concentration, and not under the supervision of any one institution, which is even more nerve-wracking.” Singer shrugs off such complaints. “Manhattan has almost 2 million people. These kids are already coming to the East

‘These kids are already coming to the East Village.’ Gregg Singer

Village,” he said. “They are putting three to four students in studios around here,” he noted. “This is a safe and managed environment. Isn’t that better than cramming them in all these brownstones?” He points to a study he commissioned by Greenwich Realty Advisors that determined that Manhattan faces a shortfall of 57,000 dormitory beds. While N.Y.U. and the New School have already said they aren’t interested, Singer predicts he will have plenty of interest from small and midsize schools that can’t afford to build their own dorms. That’s certainly the case of the beleaguered Cooper Union, which this week announced it would be forced to charge undergraduate tuition starting in fall 2014 in order to sustain itself.

Currently, Cooper has just one dorm on Third Ave., housing 178 of its freshmen, out of a total student body of roughly 1,000. “Some of our students have had to move further and further away to find housing,” said Claire McCarthy, the school’s director of public relations. “Our students tend to work late into the night in their studios, so we were looking to find housing for them closer to our campus,” which is located at Astor Place and Cooper Square. McCarthy seemed unaware of the animosity that Singer has engendered since he bought the building out from under the old CHARAS community center at auction for a scant $3.15 million. Nor apparently did she or other Cooper officials fully realize the role they might now play in legitimizing Singer’s latest dorm scheme. “It’s not something that really was on our radar,” McCarthy said of the 16-year controversy over this property. “We’ve been focused in the last 10 years on getting our new buildings built, and now dealing with our financial challenges. We only recently looked at this opportunity.” On April 1, the Department of Buildings rejected Singer’s plans for the dorm conversion. But Singer said that was because the plans had yet to receive approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which is required because the building is landmarked. Singer has already met with L.P.C. staff to go over proposed exterior alterations, such as adding bulkheads to the rooftop, reducing the 10th St. raised plaza area to create an airy ground-floor courtyard, and replacing the big wheelchair ramp on the Ninth St. side with two smaller ramps that go directly into the basement. On May 7, Landmarks is holding a public hearing, where people can testify for or against the project. L.P.C. must indeed issue a permit

for the exterior alterations before any work can commence. However, L.P.C. spokesperson Elisabeth DeBourbon explained, “We have no jurisdiction over how the building is used, or over any interior alterations that don’t affect the exterior.” But the big question remains, is the lease that Cooper signed enough of a commitment to meet the standard for a legal dorm? In 2008, to stop developers from taking advantage of the so-called “community facility use bonus” to bulk up residential projects, the Buildings Department passed Rule 51-01, which requires developers to show proof of an “institutional nexus” in order to build a dorm. To meet the criteria, a developer must either show a long-term lease (minimum 10 years) with an accredited school for all or “part” of the building, or the establishment of a nonprofit entity to run the dorm, whose board members are all representatives of participating schools. In addition, there must be a “restrictive declaration” ensuring all of the property is used as a dorm. In this case, it’s unclear whether the “first priority lease” that Cooper signed meets that standard. According to Singer, Cooper agreed to lease

Continued on page 25


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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Church service blesses ‘the spirit in the wheels’ By Jefferson Siegel Last Saturday, several dozen cyclists rolled their bikes to the front of St. Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery for its first annual Blessing of the Bicycles. “It’s a riding neighborhood,” Reverend Winnie Varghese, the E. 10th St. church’s pastor, said as the cyclists gathered round with their three- and 10-speeds. “As a church, we value preservation of the environment,” she continued. “It reminds us of the agency we have here, to be part of an alternative economy.” Varghese wasn’t referring to socialism or even bitcoins. “Once you have a bike, it doesn’t take much to maintain it,” she added. “Regular life can feel out of our control. With a bike, the city is ours.” The informal ceremony started with a gentle call to services; the tinkling of bells attached to handlebars. Varghese then read a passage from the prophet Ezekiel: “When the living creatures moved, the wheels moved beside them. And when the living creatures rose from the earth, the wheels rose. The spirit of the living creatures was in the wheels.” More bikes on the streets may lessen, but not completely remove, the hazards of riding

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Reverend Winnie Varghese sprinkled holy water on cyclists’ rides at the first Blessing of the Bicycles.

alongside cars. The reverend offered several prayers of safety. “In a world groaning under the excesses of

consumption, we acknowledge the inherent goodness of non-motorized, human-powered transportation,” she said.

With the city’s new bike-share program set to begin as soon as later this month, bike docks have started springing up in many neighborhoods. On the program’s first day of online registration, more than 2,500 people signed up for an annual $95 membership. That entitles members to use a bike for up to 45 minutes at a time. Eventually, the program is expected to offer 10,000 bikes and 600 docking stations around town. As the cyclists bowed their helmeted heads, prayers for victims of road rage and those injured while cycling were offered. Varghese asked those who drive buses, cars and trucks to display wisdom and caution in operating their vehicles. The congregation then observed a moment of silence for those who have died while cycling before Varghese conferred the final blessing: “May the road rise to meet you, may all your journeying be joyous.” “It’s a symbolic way to start the bicycling season,” offered East Villager Rob Schoenbohm, an architectural lighting consultant. “Thinking about safety, thinking about the environmental advantages to cycling, thinking about how we can reconsider transportation in our city.” No word yet on if you can chain your bike to the pearly gates.

People going postal over 14th St. P.O. closure plan By Jefferson Siegel More than 100 people packed a town hall meeting Monday night to voice concern over the proposed relocation of the Peter Stuyvesant Post Office. The current E. 14th St. facility is scheduled to close in February 2014. Joseph Mulvey, facilities implementation specialist for the U.S. Postal Service, did little to quell the anger of locals demanding specifics. His opening statement, “We are proposing the relocation of the Peter Stuyvesant Post Office,” prompted calls of “Where?” from several in the audience. Mulvey continued to hedge, at one point admitting there was available space within a tenth of a mile in either direction of the current location. It would take more audience demands of “Where?” before he finally divulged, “333 E. 14th St. seems to be available.” That address, a block west of the current post office, is a former Duane Reade drugstore across the street from the Fire Department’s Ladder 5 stationhouse. Mulvey's own question, “Is that an acceptable location to the community?” was met with a resounding “No!” The audience’s mood escalated from agitation to anger as plans for postal services were grudgingly revealed. As Julius Caesar divided Gaul into three parts, the Postal Service proposal would send current services at the Stuyvesant P.O. to three other locations. The storefront at 333 E. 14th St. would offer retail services, such as stamp sales and P.O. boxes. The carriers who sort and deliver mail to homes and businesses would be moved to the Madison Square Station, on E. 23rd Street near Third Ave. Large parcel services would operate out of the F.D.R. Station at 54th St. and Third Ave. Georgina Christ, an East Villager for 42 years, suggested, “Are they going to walk their carts down here [from 23rd St.], because that doesn’t seem to be very cost-effective. That's just ludicrous.” “This is devastating to this community,” City Councilmember Rosie Mendez said, voicing alarm at the proposal. “As it is there are long lines — it’s a well-utilized post office in the area.” Mendez was especially concerned for the neighborhood’s many seniors who get medications in the mail and would have to travel

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

The Peter Stuyvesant post office on E. 14th St. is scheduled to close next February.

to pick up packages that don’t fit into their building’s mailboxes. “Either way, you’re talking about having to take a bus,” she said. “Either way it entails traveling.” Councilmember Dan Garodnick, a Peter Cooper Village resident, echoed her concerns. “This post office is providing a vital service to the residents of Stuyvesant Town all the way down to the East Village and Lower East Side,” he said. “If they need to move one door or a couple of doors over, we’re open to that, but the services must continue.” The situation of Eve Cusson, who has lived on Avenue C for 43 years, typifies the problem facing the community. “I have a grandson in the Army in Kuwait and I’m constantly sending him packages,” she said. “Where else am I going to send them from?” Valerie Heinonen, who has lived on Avenue C since 1977, was outraged, saying post offices mirror our society. “Post offices are a sign of a democracy,” she declared, “as are libraries, public housing and public schools, all of which are

being sold out from under us.” Joseph Hernandez, who grew up in the area, leaning on his cane, looked at Mulvey and warned, “We always find out the truth on the Lower East Side.” Hernandez was right, although it took almost two hours for Mulvey to finally reveal, in detail, how the current situation evolved. The building’s landlord, whom Mulvey would not identify, told the Postal Service he had other plans for the two-story structure. The current lease, set to expire in February 2013 was extended one year, to February 2014. The parties could not reach an agreement for the current location. Despite the audience’s demands, Mulvey refused to reveal the current rent. After a 15-day comment period from the public on the proposed relocation, a postal headquarters facility manager in Washington, D.C., will review all the comments. Next comes a window for appeal of any decision. “What month were you going to notify the community of the impact?” demanded Jonathan Smith, president of the New York Metro Postal Union. “Where are you going to find better property than the best you already have?” As he did for most of the town hall, Mulvey sat patiently listening. Gigi Li, chairperson of Community Board 3, who moderated the meeting with Sandro Sherrod, chairperson of C.B. 6, and Councilmember Mendez, said community members have till May 7 to submit their comments to U.S.P.S. In order to deal with its soaring debt, the Postal Service plans post office closings nationwide. In New York City it has proposed closing five branches; one in the Bronx and four in Manhattan, including the Stuyvesant branch and the Old Chelsea branch, on W. 18th St. Built in 1951, the 56,900-square-foot building on E. 14th St., between First Ave. and Avenue A, and the land underneath it have a reported market value of $8.1 million. Comments, which must include the name Peter Stuyvesant Post Office, can be sent to: Joseph J. Mulvey, Facilities Implementation, U.S. Postal Service, 2 Congress St., Room 8, Milford, MA 01757-9998.


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Quinn and city can’t omit 3 key South Village sites tA l k in G p o in t By AndreW BerMAn On April 15, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held a public meeting to present its draft proposed boundaries for a new South Village Historic District. This is a tremendously important step forward that the community fought for years to achieve, and is “Phase II” of the South Village Historic District first proposed by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation in 2006. But in May the “draft” proposed boundaries will become the final proposed boundaries, after which it will be impossible to expand them further. So the next few weeks are critical to ensure that all sites in need of landmark protections are included, and there will still have some work to do. In understanding how to proceed, it’s important to understand how we got here. After designating the first phase of the South Village Historic District in 2010, the city halted further progress, in spite of promises to proceed. This most recent advance on “Phase II” is the result of a campaign calling upon the City Council not to approve the recent Hudson Square rezoning — which would increase development pressure

Without landmark protections, N.Y.U. Law School’s Vanderbilt Hall, on the edge of Washington Square Park, could be replaced by a 300-foot-tall tower. upon the neighboring South Village — unless the city also agreed to move ahead with the entire proposed South Village Historic District as well. Council Speaker Christine Quinn approved the full rezoning for Hudson Square, but got just a partial South Village landmarking commitment from the city. The city agreed to vote, before the end of 2013, on landmarking the remaining section of the South Village north of Houston St., with boundaries to be determined later, and to “survey,” but not designate, the area south of Houston St. The draft boundaries then presented by L.P.C on April 15 were broad, and include about 85 percent of the nonlandmarked properties in the Phase II area we proposed for designation. But some key sites have been noticeably left out, including two New York University sites with enormous development potential. It’s now or never for preserving these sites, so it’s imperative that we push to get them included in the district. But it is especially incumbent upon Speaker Quinn, who brokered this partial landmarking deal and also led the City Council’s approval last year of N.Y.U.’s massive Village expansion plan, to ensure that these originally proposed sites, including those owned by N.Y.U., are landmarked by the city. The proposed boundaries do include nearly 250 buildings on almost a dozen blocks, in one of the most endangered and historically rich parts of our neighborhood. The district would protect scores of 19th-century houses and colorfully detailed tenements, and dozens of buildings that housed institutions that profoundly shaped the culture and history of our neighborhood and city. These range from the home of Bronson and Louisa May Alcott

Kevorkian Ctr. (NYU) Vanderbilt Hall (NYU)

No. side of Houston btw. MacDougal and Sullivan

The Landmarks Preservation Commission recently released this map, showing the boundaries it is considering for the South Village Historic District’s “Phase II.” The proposed district includes 240 properties, but omits three others that must be included, according to the talking point’s writer.

on MacDougal St. to the homes of coffeehouses and clubs on Bleecker St. that nurtured the careers of Eugene O’Neill, William Burroughs, Bob Dylan and Patti Smith; from historic businesses like Porto Rico Importing Co., to venerable institutions such as the Children’s Aid Society and the Little Red Schoolhouse. What all these sites share in common is a modest, human scale; solid, masonry materials; and a tangible connection to the story of how one of America’s most unique and innovative neighborhoods forged its sense of place and identity. That’s why the exclusion from the proposed historic district of three key sites that share these qualities is so perplexing, and should be corrected. The city eliminated from our proposed boundaries the row of nine 1844 houses forming the entire northern blockfront of Houston St. between MacDougal and Sullivan Sts., as well as N.Y.U.’s Vanderbilt Hall Law School and Kevorkian Center. The Houston St. houses were built as part of the same development as their next-door neighbors, the landmarked MacDougal Sullivan Gardens. By the early 20th century, the houses had become a center of the South Village’s Italian immigrant community, housing the wellknown speakeasy Luigi’s Restaurant and, since 1906, Rafetto’s Pasta. Without inclusion in the historic district, these houses could easily be destroyed for high-rise development that would tower over the South Village and the adjacent, historic MacDougal Sullivan Gardens. The full-block Vanderbilt Hall on Washington Square South between MacDougal and Sullivan Sts., also excluded, was built in 1950, but quite intentionally looks considerably older. N.Y.U.’s first entirely purpose-built structure

on Washington Square, it was the subject of considerable controversy when first proposed, as Villagers began their protracted struggle to protect their neighborhood from large-scale, post-war development and urban renewal. But as a result of considerable pressure from neighborhood activists, the university limited the height of the new development to four and a half stories, and chose materials and a design that related to the Village’s 19th-century architecture. N.Y.U. also chose an architect, Otto Eggers, who was born and raised in Greenwich Village and, as a member of the New York City Art Commission, had fought to preserve the character of Washington Square. In the post-war years, Eggers would come to be known for swimming against the architectural tide by creating contextual, historicist designs. In the end, leaders of the Save Washington Square Committee, who originally opposed the construction of Vanderbilt Hall, praised the building’s design when it was completed. Recently, renowned architectural historian Christopher Gray, writing in The New York Times, called Vanderbilt Hall “a neo-Georgian brick miniquadrangle of subtle sophistication,” citing it as one of earliest examples of modern historicist design in New York — an architectural approach once shunned, but which has since gained considerable fashion. Also excluded is the Kevorkian Center, built in 1972 on Washington Square South just across Sullivan St. from Vanderbilt Hall and designed by Philip Johnson. Called the “dean of American architects,” Johnson was one of the most honored and influential architects of the second half of the 20th century. He designed several controversial buildings for N.Y.U. in the 1960s that are considered among his lesser works, including Bobst Library. But with his final design for the university, he won great praise and admiration for a subtler and more sophisticated design. The stone Kevorkian Center deferred to the neighboring Judson Memorial Hall in scale and materials; architecture critic Paul Goldberger called it an “urbanistic success” with a “powerful monumentality.” Both these N.Y.U. structures reflect the highly contested development of Washington Square in the post-war era, and are the rare examples of such development building upon rather than destroying the fabric and character of the Village. Without landmark protections, both could also easily be razed by the university, and, under existing zoning, Vanderbilt Hall could be replaced by a 300-foottall tower. Given the city and the City Council’s recent approval of gigantic new developments by N.Y.U. on the nearby superblocks, it would be particularly unfortunate and unjust if these sites were not included in the new historic district. So while we have much to celebrate with this recent progress on South Village landmarking, we also have much work to do (including fighting for “Phase III” of our proposed South Village Historic District, south of Houston St.). Speaker Quinn and fellow elected officials have recently joined us in urging the city to consider adding these three excluded sites to the district, which is a good and important first step. But time is short, and more is needed. Every block in Hudson Square that developers asked for was rezoned and, in some cases, to even higher levels than the applicants originally requested. All we are asking is that these three sites, part of the original South Village Historic District proposal, be included as well. Speaker Quinn agreed to rezone all of Hudson Square based upon a commitment to landmark the South Village; it is imperative that she ensures that the landmarking is just as comprehensive, and includes these three sites, which are vitally important to the South Village’s history, and its future. Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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villager arts & entertainment Buhmann on Art Spring gallery offerings speak to Space Race, celebrity, machinery, weaponry BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN

EXHIBITION SPACE

Organized by Greg Allen, this exhibition features multiple images and objects from the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey and Project Echo. Both were prominent projects from the early days of the Space Race. Including one object and two seemingly unrelated series of photographs, the show reveals the sudden transition in mankind’s perception of outer space. As the launch of Sputnik heightened the Cold War’s contentious dynamic, the U.S.’s aggressive and highly visual response transformed space into a site of military, political and cultural activity. Through May 8, at apexart (291 Church St., btw. Walker & White Sts.). Hours: Tues.Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 212-431-5270 or visit  apexart.org.  

DAVID J. MERRITT

For his first solo exhibition with the gallery, Merritt presents new work from

his “Templates for a Machine Made From Earth” series. In addition to the featured gypsum cement tablets and objects made of wax, aluminum and magnesium, Merritt also works with sound and video. One of his site-specific projects involved the collaboration with a city utility locator. Demarcating various lines of flow throughout the gallery space, the work reflects the Brooklyn-based artist’s thesis that, “We are abstractions swimming through a concrete haze; constantly excavating, constantly sifting.”  Through May 12, at KANSAS (59 Franklin St., btw. Lafayette & Broadway). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 646559-1423 or visit kansasgallery.com.  

ELIZABETH PEYTON

Since the mid-1990s, when Peyton reached critical acclaim, she has been one of the most influential figurative painters of our time. Her subjects range from close friends and boyfriends to European monarchy and celebrities. Many of her stylized portraits of rock stars such as David Bowie and Kurt Cobain have become well-known and frequently publicized images in the media landscape. Small-scale, these works are usually executed in oil paint, applied with washy glazes, watercolor, pencil, and etching. This show features new works by the artist, who splits her time between Long Island and Berlin. Through May 13, at Gavin Brown’s enterprise (620 Greenwich St., at Morton St.). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. Call 212-6275258 or visit gavinbrown.biz.  

Image courtesy of the artist and apexart

Beacon satellites on display in the US Pavilion at Expo67, Montreal. See “Exhibition Space.”

ENGINES OF WAR

Image courtesy of KANSAS, New York

David J. Merritt’s “Instrument” (2013, single-channel video generated by a custom software algorithm, sound of artist breathing digitally and floor monitor speaker; an eight-hour timed sequence that auto-plays).

In this exhibition, curators Charles Dee Mitchell and Cynthia Mulcahy explore how the United States of America conducts war in the 21st century. Though images of drones and other material military equipment make up much of the content, Mitchell and Mulcahy’s show stresses that it is still the men and women who serve in the armed forces that remain the primary, highly trained yet fragile weapons of the United States military. Contributing artists to the exhibition employ a wide range of approaches. Through May 4, at Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert, Inc. (524 W. 19th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. Call 646-944-6197 or visit gassergrunert.net.

NABIL NAHAS

Nahas’ new paintings employ thick layers of acrylic paint and pumice to create colorful, spatially complex paint-

Image courtesy of artist and Gasser Grunert Gallery

From “Engines of War,” Benjamin Lowy’s “Iraq | Perspectives I” (taken from 20032008; Digital C-Print; 20 x 24 in., edition of 10 + 2 AP).

ings with a distinctive tactile quality. Gestural motifs rendered in saturated colors and geometric shapes cover these three-dimensional surfaces. Nahas’ highly textured lines and curves seem to extend beyond the edges of the canvas, drawing a metaphor to the contrast between macrocosms and microcosms. However,

according to the artist, his main concerns are the notions of process and perception as well as materiality in painting. Through May 4, at Sperone Westwater (257 Bowery, btw. Houston & Stanton Sts). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm. Call 212-999-7337 or visit speronewestwater.com.


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Family Festival keeps it fresh Short films, sports, Smurfs, bubbles and more BY KAITLYN MEADE Every year, the Tribeca Film Festival's free annual street fair attracts families from all over the city to its wide array of programs. This year, there are several exciting additions for young filmmakers and movie lovers. The fair takes place Saturday, April 27, 10am to 6pm, on Greenwich Street between Chambers and Hubert Streets, and at venues throughout Tribeca. “This year we are introducing special subject areas, like the Tribeca Back Lot and the Food Feast,” said Downing, as well as bringing back popular elements from previous years. The Tribeca Studios Backlot will bring elements of a real movie set to one Downtown street. Families will learn how to pitch an original movie, use a green screen, animate their stories and take workshops on stunts, makeup and editing. Demonstrations of high-tech filming and special effects will be given by Chicago’s Tribeca Flashpoint Academy and the Tribeca Film Institute will be holding movie hacking sessions where you can flip the script and take the lead role in a familiar movie. Also new this year, the Tribeca Food Feast will be a delectable section of the fair featuring city chefs who will provide entertainment, culinary secrets and, of course, tastings from food vendors from select local restaurants and food trucks from around NYC. Hands-on activities will be cake-icing, meatball-baking and tastetesting. Broadway will also be jazz-stepping its way Downtown this year with performances from the casts of “Annie,” “Wicked,” “Cinderella,” “Kinky Boots,” “Motown: The Musical” and “Hands On A Hardbody.” An exclusive sneak preview of “The Smurfs 2” (along with a free screening of “The Smurfs”) will be taking place at 11am at Borough of Manhattan Community College’s Tribeca Performing Arts Center, at 199 Chambers Street (between Greenwich and West Streets). There may also be a special appearance by cast member Christina Ricci. Hosted by Time Out Kids, admission is free on a first-come, firstserved basis. The line will form thirty minutes prior to showtime.

A number of booths offer unique arts and crafts for kids of all ages. Kids can make a “VIP Pass” which will then be stamped at each area of the festival they visit, with prizes awarded for filling up a pass completely. Learn about recycling by creating creatures from recycled materials at the ScrapKins booth, along with chalk art and face painting. Masters of the art of kiting will be at The Kite Place to teach kids how to make and fly their own kite designs. The Gazillion Bubble Garden, similarly, is a haven for bubbles (with wands of all shapes and sizes). Puppet shows and workshops will be offered by Puppetworks, Inc. and Noel MacNeal, whose book “10 Minute Puppets” teaches parents and kids how to make to make entertaining puppet partners anywhere, in ten minutes or less, using everyday materials. Other participants include CHESS NYC, the Young Storytellers Foundation, Victorian Gardens at Wollman Rink in Central Park and the New York Philharmonic’s Credit Suisse Very Young Composers.

Image courtesy of the Tribeca Film Festival

Play ball — on April 27, at ESPN Sports Day.

OUT OF THE CINEMA, IN THE BALL GAME

Also on April 27, from 10am to 6pm, the Tribeca/ESPN Sports Day will return to Tribeca for its seventh year. The beloved Downtown event has brought in sports heroes from across the city and encouraged kids and parents alike to get up, get out and play ball. This year, it will take place on North Moore Street, between Greenwich and West Streets. ESPN will give fans the chance to take home memorabilia and get their picture taken behind the ESPN New York desk. The NFL’s PLAY 60 campaign, designed to encourage kids to lead an active lifestyle, will be running football agility drills and doing periodic giveaways. Life-size cutouts of well-known professional athletes will be walking (well, standing) on the Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival red carpet for fans to pose with. Highlights include contests, interactive games and giveaways by the New York Rangers and New York Mets. It’s also an

Image courtesy of the Tribeca Film Festival

The Family Festival is back again this year, with some fresh new activities.

invaluable opportunity for kids to try out new activities. There is something for everyone, from inflatable lacrosse or Ultimate Frisbee to skateboarding or Double Dutch jump roping. Activities will be provided by the Downtown Giants Youth Football and New York Women’s Baseball. Olympians and elite athletes will teach kids the basics of safe fencing at the Fencing Club. The Staten Island Yankees mascot Scooter the Holy Cow will be around and most likely invite you to try your luck on the Baby Bombers skeeball inflatable. The up-and-coming Tribeca Sailing NYC, soon to launch from Pier 25, will have sailing games, knot-tying and prizes. There also will be demonstrations of cricket, newly reintroduced to TFF, and the award-winning Myachi Original Hand Sack.

SHORT FILMS ON LARGE SILVER SCREENS

The TFF program “Downtown Youth Behind The Camera” is putting filmmaking tools in the hands of elementary and middle school students for its tenth consecutive year. These young Downtown filmmakers produce their very own short films, which will be shown at a special screening at noon on Sunday, April 21 at the SVA Theatre (333 West 23rd Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues). The Film Fellows with Tribeca Film Institute is also screening a series of short films created by Downtown student filmmakers (ages 16-18). The program, recommended for those ages 12 and up, plays Saturday, April 27 at 11am at the Tribeca Film Center (375 Greenwich Street, at Franklin Street).


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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Silent tale ‘demonstrates the humanizing power of film’ Charles Lane’s low-budget ’80s comedy deserves to be rediscovered FILM SIDEWALK STORIES

Written & Directed by Charles Lane Runtime: 97 minutes Screening at the Tribeca Film Festival Sat., April 27, 2:30pm At SVA Theatre 333 W. 23rd St., btw. 8th & 9th Aves. For tickets & info, call 646-502-5296 or visit tribecafilm.com/filmguide Also visit carlottafilms.com

Photos by Bill Dill

By TrAV s.d. One of the highlights of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival will have to be the long-awaited re-release of Charles Lane’s 1989 “Sidewalk Stories.” Lane’s film, a silent black and white comedy with an African-American cast, won the Prix du Publique award at Cannes that year. Unfortunately, it has gone long unseen and has never been released on DVD. The film was recently restored by Carlotta Films and will be shown for the first time in many years on April 27. “Sidewalk Stories” is strongly influenced by Charlie Chaplin’s films “The Kid,” “A Dog’s Life” and “The Vagabond.” It stars Lane himself as a sidewalk caricature artist who lives in a squat and is forced to care for a two-year-old girl, after he sees her father murdered in a back alley mugging. Unable to go to police (his prints are on the knife), he is forced to play father to the little girl until he can locate the mother. Along the

Charles Lane, as the artist and Nicole Lane as the child.

way he meets and falls in love with a nice lady of some means, who helps him out. The film is full of the grittiness of its time, when the homeless filled New York City streets in record numbers, and the clean-up that began in the mid-90s had not yet begun. Much is filmed around Waverly Place, although it is re-envisioned as a Shangri La for busking performers. The cast of unknowns is terrific, especially the diminutive, Chaplinesque Lane (who proves a gifted mime) and the child, who is played by Lane’s actual daughter. Beautifully shot and edited and frequently quite funny, its memorable set pieces include a scene where Lane must pursue a couple of low-lifes who’ve snatched the girl. In order to do, he swipes a horse-drawn carriage while the driver takes a leak. The couple in the back seat never stop making out throughout the entire chase.

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Photos by Bill Dill

Charles Lane and Sandye Wilson.

Above all, Lane demonstrates the humanizing power of film, awakening our compassion for the sorts of people who are routinely demonized in the mainstream

press. One hopes that a DVD release will soon follow the restoration of this inspirational film — a work that should never be out of circulation.


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

‘Bending Steel’ an unexpectedly moving documentary Would-be strongman dreams of Coney Island glory FILM BENDING STEEL

Directed by Dave Carroll Runtime: 93 minutes Documentary Screening at the Tribeca Film Festival 4/27 at 10:30pm, at Clearview Cinemas Chelsea (260 W. 23rd St., btw. 7th & 8th Aves.) For tickets & info, call 646-502-5296 or visit tribecafilm.com/filmguide By TrAV s.d. “Bending Steel” is an unexpectedly moving documentary by director Dave Carroll about a guy with the quixotic dream of becoming an old-time circus strong man.

Chris Schoeck, the film’s subject, is a 43-year-old physical therapist and self-professed loner who literally spends all of his spare time in a storage room straining to bend pieces of metal. To be more precise, he actually accomplishes this seemingly impossible feat routinely. Before the camera, we watch him twist horseshoes straight like taffy, bend a pipe wrench over double and transform a thick steel bar into a “U” shape. When he says “That’s a good kind of nail to work on,” he’s not talking about carpentry — it’s either for bending in half or driving into a board using only his fist. And when he gets tired of metal, Schoeck tears phone books and decks of playing cards in half with his bare hands. Schoeck, by the way, only weighs about 150 pounds. It turns out that accomplishing such feats of strength is not only a matter of brute force, but of willpower. To help him realize his dream, Schoeck hires a Pennsylvania-based consultant, Chris “Haircules” Rider — so named because of his long, flowing mane, and the fact that he is able to pick up heavy weights that have been tied to it using his mighty scalpstrength. It’s Rider’s job to help Schoeck build his confidence by teaching him about performance, inspiring him and psyching him up. The film follows the two as they make a

Photo by Despina Spyrou

Third time’s charming: Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) reunite, among the Cypress groves of the southern Peloponnese.

pilgrimage to the home of a legend in their field, Slim the Hammer Man (whose specialty is lifting sledgehammers). Slim’s garage, in turn, is a shrine to the memory of sideshow

star The Mighty Atom (Joseph L. Greenstein). At a gathering of a club called the Steel Nuts, Schoeck is encouraged by one of the members to attempt to bend a quarter on his teeth — and he does, chipping one in the process. This is a group of friends founded on machismo, yet Schoeck is able to find more sensitivity, acceptance and understanding with them than he does from his own parents (whom ironically, are the only thing holding him back). Dismissive, truly horrible people, they can’t be bothered to support him or even pretend to take an interest in what he does, gazing unimpressed when he bends a steel bar an inch and a half thick in front of them in their back yard. (The father suggests that it might be a trick bar, and then points out that the son is out of breath). The climax of the film is Schoeck’s debut at the Coney Island Olde Time Strongman Spectacular, where he hopes to surprise everyone by bending a steel bar that is two inches thick. Even the experts tell him he won’t be able to pull it off. In the front row are two empty seats reserved for his parents. You won’t get any spoilers here but I will reveal that the outcome affected me greatly on an emotional level. Far from a silly topic, this is one man’s existential journey, and it packs a punch — right to the solar plexus.

‘Just a Sigh’ is romance done right Subtitled French flick equal parts joy and folly

www.TheVillager.com

By sAM sPoKony Now this is romance. The knowing glances, the swells and falls, the awkward moments, the utter silence. It’s always nice to experience a piece of fiction in which the depth of emotion is really shown rather than told, and “Just a Sigh” follows that old mantra of narrative in all the right ways. Jérôme Bonnell puts it all out there, displaying — with supreme confidence — an invigorating ability to navigate the folds of both tense social interaction and quiet introspection, while never losing his sense of humor and sheer imaginative spark. During a break from a theatre performance in Calais, 43-year-old French actress Alix (played by Emmanuelle Devos) is on her way back to her home in Paris to relax and spend some time with her boyfriend. But while riding the train into the city, a somewhat older British man (Gabriel Byrne) sitting in a nearby seat catches her eye. She catches his eye. It’s cute. And so

on. They speak briefly, but there’s an interruption, and the connection is lost…for the moment. From this point, it could have devolved into pure cheese, but it didn’t. Instead, it’s where (all innuendo aside) Bonnell really gets it in. It turns out that this handsome, nameless man is on his way to a church. But when Alix suddenly has an impulse to follow him, she soon realizes that Mr. Mysterious isn’t there for fun. He’s there for the funeral of a dear colleague (he’s a literature professor), and one for whom he had strong (yet unconsummated) romantic feelings. This is where it gets interesting. As Alix realizes that her own boyfriend is nowhere to be found (and, better yet, that she might even be subconsciously avoiding the guy, for reasons we find out later), these two characters just sink into each other — heaping upon each other the unbridled passion they’ve apparently both been bottling up. And it’s gripping stuff. As the film goes on, it’s one joy and folly after another, as Alix sorts out her demons — familial, professional, and otherwise — on the streets of Paris, while never losing the thought of this one strangely awesome guy who’s been thrust into her life. Meanwhile, Bonnell sprinkles the whole thing with generous helpings of vibrant color, classical music, absurdly funny coincidences and mistakes (and a strong narrative line that never lets us forget why we walked in the door). Devos and

FILM JUST A SIGH

Directed by Jérôme Bonnell Runtime: 104 minutes English, French with subtitles Screening at the Tribeca Film Festival 4/28, 2:30pm, at AMC Loews Village 7 (66 Third Ave., at 11th St.) For tickets & info, call 646-502-5296 or visit tribecafilm.com/filmguide

Byrne are both wonderful. They’re constantly outdoing one another with moments of intensity, longing and loss — but at the same time, they’re a perfect complement. If you’re looking to get hit right in the feelings, folks, then check this one out. In the end, it really is just a sigh, nothing more — but that’s why it’s good.


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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Flux ensemble examines friendship, loss Two plays, in rep, give voice to grief FLUX THEATRE ENSEMBLE PRESENTS TWO PLAYS IN REP HONEY FIST Written by August Schulenburg Directed by Kelly O’Donnell In previews April 30 & May 1, then May 2-18

SANS MERCI Written by Johnna Adams Directed by Heather Cohn In previews April 26 & 27, then April 28-May 17 At the 4th Street Theatre (83 East 4th St. btw. 2nd Ave. & Bowery) Tickets: $15 for all preview performances, then $18 ($15 for Students) For schedule & reservations, call 866811-4111 or visit fluxtheatre.org BY MAEVE GATELY An ensemble-driven company dedicated to the belief that “long-term collaboration and rigorous creative development can unite artists and audiences,” Flux Theatre Ensemble has presented 14 productions since its 2006 debut. During that time, it has received recognition from the NYC Fringe Festival and the NY Innovative Theater Awards, and was a 2011 Caffé Cino Fellowship Award winner, for "consistently producing outstanding work." This spring, Flux is presenting two plays in rep: August Schulenburg’s “Honey Fist” and Johnna Adams’ “Sans Merci.” Absurdity, dark comedy and a quiet des-

peration pervade these two works, each of which deal with friendship, loss and the redemptive power of remembrance in their own unique ways. “Honey Fist” follows a group of high school friends who gather once a year to drink, smoke weed and reminisce about Justin — a former member of the group who died in an incident no one cares to recall. When old high school rival turned Hollywood producer Joe shows up with his movie star girlfriend, what begins as a drunken commemoration evolves into an ill-conceived kidnapping that unearths a decades-old secret. In “Sans Merci,” social activist Kelly receives a visit from the mother of her college sweetheart, Tracy, several years after her death. As the two debate and dance around the story of Tracy and Kelly’s romance (Elizabeth, Tracy’s conservative mother, is hesitant to believe her daughter was gay), flashbacks to Kelly’s college days show the two falling in love and deciding to go to Colombia on an advocacy mission. The final revelation of what that mission became, and the circumstances surrounding Tracy’s terrible end, brings the Kelly and Elizabeth together in their shared grief — forcing the audience to question how, in the face of such horror, we carry on. In describing how the ensemble chose these two works, “Honey Fist” playwright and Flux creative director August Schulenburg emphasized that, “The process by which we make the work is almost as important as the work itself. And this voting process is really the heart of it.” Before agreeing to produce a play, the ensemble meets over several months in an intense, collaborative process during which members present the plays and debate which ones should be selected. This process takes into account whether the plays fit into Flux’s aesthetic, if there are roles that fit the members of the core ensemble and whether Flux has previously produced the playwright’s work. Schulenburg’s plays have been produced by the group before, but putting on a work of Johnna Adams has, he says, always been a dream of his. Both have written roles for one another, and Schulenburg cites her influence in a great deal of his work (though not “Honey Fist”). He recalled how the ensemble was “outraged” that “Sans Merci” had not been produced in New York before, noting that, despite the limitations of this particular play (there are not enough women

Photo by Isaiah Tanenbaum

In “Sans Merci,” Kelly mourns the death of her college girlfriend.

in the core ensemble to play the roles in this female-only work), Flux eventually chose to put it on. Speaking about the content of the plays themselves, Schulenberg observed how they have a very different sound to them. “Honey Fist” is “a very rowdy play. There is a lot of singing and fighting and drinking and potsmoking,” whereas “Sans Merci,” by contrast, “operates on a very tight bandwidth, almost a hush.” One ends on a more cathartic note, while the other lacks that sentimental sense of closure. “Sans Merci” has a “circular, almost claustrophobic feel,” while “Honey Fist” has an expansive, breaking-out feel.” Audiences will notice a very female flavor to “Sans Merci,” which does not have a single male actor on stage, and, by contrast, a very “stereotypically male”

charge to “Honey Fist.” Schulenburg asserts that the two plays are about “who owns the stories of the dead,” and admitted that “Honey Fist” was partly inspired by his own experiences. He had a friend named Justin who died in high school, and part of the writing of this play was an effort to give words to an experience for which there were none — to voice, as Schulenburg described it, “what I would have been able to say to Justin if I had been able to say something.” Instead, Schulenburg used his vision, and his own experiences, to “write a play reaching towards something I don’t understand, [something] I don’t have words for.” And that sense of wordless fulfillment is ultimately what the audience will walk away with as well.


22

April 25 - May 1, 2013

Publ ic Notice s Notice of Formation of foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Prevention Metrics Advisors LLC Application for Authority filed by the Department of State of New York on: 10/26/12 Jurisdiction: Delaware Organized on: 2/15/12 Office location: County of New York Principal office: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 137 Riverside Drive, #6D, New York, NY 10024 Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware 1209 Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801 Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building 401 Federal Street, Suite 4. Dover, DE 19901 Purpose: any and all lawful activities Vil: 04/25 - 05/30/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Delancy Diner, LLC d/b/a Retro Bar & Grill to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 148-150 Delancey Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that a Tavern Wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Immigrant Tap Room Inc. to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 341 E. 9th Street, West Store New York NY 10003. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by 88 Orchard Coffee LLC d/b/a Irving Farm Coffee Roasters to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 88 Orchard Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on premises license, #1270292 has been applied for by Astraea Management Inc. to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 163 Bleecker St. New York NY 10012. Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1269715 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a café under the alcoholic beverage control law at 243 East 14th Street, New York, NY 10003 for on-premises consumption. 243 E. 14th Café Inc. d/b/a The Winslow Vil: 04/25 - 05/02/2013

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A.C. LAWRENCE WEST, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/4/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leonard Franzblau, 729 Seventh Ave., NY, NY 10019. General Purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 D28 CAPITAL LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/16/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Douglas A. Lobel P.C., 28 W. 44th St., Ste. 1205, NY, NY 10036. General Purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Nelson, Robinson & El Ashmawy, PLLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 342 Broadway, #164 NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of formation of Gretchen & Waters LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York. SSNY on 03/12/2013, Office located in New York County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC at 1509 Broadway, Suite 1920, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of FBS Education, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/8/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Formation of Leslie Earl Robertson, Structural Engineer, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/5/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 100 Riverside Blvd., (18-D), NY, NY 10069. Purpose: practice the profession of engineering. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013

Notice of Formation of 22 BNDO LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Wachtel Masyr & Missry LLP, 885 Second Ave., 47th Fl., NY, NY 10017, Attn: Mitchell Fenton, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of Fluent Medical LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/2/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 377 Broadway, 11th Fl., NY, NY 10013. LLC formed in DE on 8/1/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/18 - 05/23/2013 Notice of Qualification of GOLF RIVERHEAD, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/28/13. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/20/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th Floor, NewYork, NY 10011. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 160 Greentree Drive, Ste. 101, Dover, Delaware 19904. Arts. Of Org. filed with DE Secy. Of State, Corporate Div., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, John G. Townsend Bldg., Dover, De 19901. Purpose: Acquisition, Development & Management of Real Estate and operation of a golf club. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Furious Flames Films, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 601 West 26th St., Ste. 1762, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Case Real Estate Funding, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Seyfarth Shaw LLP, 620 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10018, Attn: Lester Bliwise, Esq. Principal Office: c/o Case Real Estate Capital, LLC, 340 West Passaic St., 3rd Fl., Rochelle Park, NJ 07662. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Offshore) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/03/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 09/11/12. Princ. office of LP: 630 Fifth Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10111. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Limited Partnerships, Government Admininstration Bldg., Grand Cayman, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of ROTHSCHILD INNOVATORS GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/28/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/22/13. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: David D. Rothschild, 477 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of RA 70 PINE DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/01/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 200 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rose Associates, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of ROTHSCHILD CORNERSTONE GP, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/29/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/29/03. Princ. office of LLC: Attn: David D. Rothschild, 477 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

CERTIFICATE OF CONTINUED USE OF PARTNERSHIP NAME PURSUANT TO 81 OF THE PARTNERSHIP LAW OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK The undersigned, desiring to continue, after the close of business on January 24, 2013, the business previously transacted under the firm name of Cede & Co., a general partnership under the laws of the State of New York, with offices located at 55 Water Street1, New York, New York 10041, do hereby certify: 1. The name of the Partnership is Cede & Co. 2. The names and respective places of residence of each of the partners are set forth below: Name Residence Address Andrew Barnes 360 Furman Street Apt. 941 Brooklyn, NY 11201 Philip Braverman 505 East 79 St. New York, NY 10075 Joseph Brennan 457 Benito Street East Meadow, NY 11554 Debra Cook 4704 W. Neptune Street Tampa, FL 33629 John Faith 7425 Minnow Brook Way Land O Lakes, FL 34637 James Fernia 64-68 83rd Street Middle Village, NY 11379 Peter J. Gleeson 27 Greenwich Drive, Jackson, NJ 08527 Joseph Graziano 5 Claymore Rd., Fort Salonga, NY 11768 Robert T. Hensey 97 Harriman Woods Drive, Harriman, NY 10926 Kurt P. Holweger 64 Old Estate Road Manhasset, NY 11030 Ellen Fine Levine 13B Hillside Avenue Port Washington, NY 11050 Jeanne Mauro 14901 Heronglen Drive Lithia, Fl 33547 Donna Milrod 1 Leroy Street, Apartment 5A New York, NY 10014 Isaac Montal 19 Princeton Road Elizabeth, NJ 07208 Eric N. Miller 404 Apache Trail Brandon, FL 33511 Manuel Pires 331 Raccoon Hollow Mountainside, NJ 07092 Chad Richman 19 Beacon Crest Drive Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 Joseph C. Trentacoste 32 Pell Terrace Garden City, NY 11530 LoriAnn Trezza 191 Reid Avenue Breezy Point, NY 11697 Michael J. Tulaney 228 90th Street Brooklyn, NY 11209 Jeffrey T. Waddle 14 East 17th Street New York, NY 10003 1 Formerly at 7 Hanover Square, NewYork, N.Y. 10004 Related to file #M294/86 The foregoing Certificate duly signed and acknowledged by each of the Partners is on file at the office of the clerk of the County of New York, 60 Centre St., New York, NY. Vil: 04/11 - 05/02/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Yola Colon LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 200 E 64th St., #26AB, New York, NY 10065. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 RD LEGAL GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 03/21/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Irena Leigh Norton, Esq. C/O Law Office of Roni Dersovitz, 295 Madison Ave., 39th Fl, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013


April 25 - May 1, 2013

23

Publ ic Notice s NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Wall Street Cross Border Alternative Equity Index, LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 52nd Fl, The Trump Building, 40 Wall St, NY NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful act. 2062154 Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 340 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 500 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 504 East 12th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 435 East 12th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 338 East 11th LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Formation of Village JV 211 Avenue A LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Kushner Co., 666 Fifth Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

Notice of Qual. of Valinor Capital Partners SPV IX, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/8/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/7/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qual. of Valinor Capital Partners SPV X, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/8/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/7/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 V. STEWARD GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 201 E. 17th St., #11H, NY, NY 10003. General Purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of VHA Mid Atlantic, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 220 E. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 5/7/99. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013 Notice of Qualification of VHA MidAtlantic Purchasing Coalition, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/21/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 220 E. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 10/8/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/11 - 05/16/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Halo Direct, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/22/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Halo Direct, LLC, 832 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, New York 10003. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Lord Jane LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Lord Jane LLC, 200 West 16 Street, Apt 11K, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: 338 JEFFERSON LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 228 Park Ave S #42608, New York, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Offshore Feeder) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/21/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 09/11/12. Princ. office of LP: 630 Fifth Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10111. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Limited Partnerships, Government Administration Bldg., Grand Cayman, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KRAUS LAW PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New mi (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Kraus Law PLLC, 131 E. 81st St., No. 15, New York, NY 10028. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

Notice of Qualification of GEM Holdco, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/13/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/10/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Madison Ave., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office. Address to be maintained in DE: 1811 Silverside Rd., Wilmington, DE 19810. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of G and C Arts, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: G and C Arts, LLC 370 Lexington Avenue, Suite 509, NY NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/05/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC, 44 Wall Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Mundaca Artese LLP. Certificate filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLP may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against LLP is to: Business Filings Incorporated, 187 Wolf Rd, Ste 101, Albany, New York 11205. Purpose: To engage any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 AUTHOR LEVIN LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/16/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Charles Hopfl, 2211 Broadway, NY, NY 10024. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

GA REP LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/5/12. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dorf & Nelson LLP, 555 Theodore Fremd Ave., Rye, NY 10580. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 GENESIS CAPITAL LEGACY AND ESTATE, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 80 Maiden Ln., Ste. 303, NY, NY 10038. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 97 NOBLE LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Donna Jones Marfino, 401 2nd Ave., NY, NY 10010. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 MOKSH PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/11/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Meghana Giridhar, 347 W. 57th St., #28F, NY, NY 10019. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 DESTROYHIPSTERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 02/21/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kantor Davidoff Wolfe Mandelker Twomey & Gallanty, P.C., Attn Thomas E Kass, 51 East 42nd St. (17th Fl), NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of CA EAST HOUSTON LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 41st Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of twentybridge LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Sharon deMonsabert, 14030 Thunderbolt Place #900, Chantilly, VA 20151. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

Notice of Formation of Leslie Lane, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Qualification of Pliant, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/15/10. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/29/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 875 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001. Principal office: 200 East Main St., Macedon, NY 14502. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of YORK MANAGED HOLDINGS II, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 767 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10153. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest/ Michigan Investment Fund, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/29/11. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of P3 & G DONUT HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 135 W. 18th St., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10011. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Onshore) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/16/12. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of LHL HOLDINGS NY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/14/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 183 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Bennet L. Schonfeld at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of Kroesser + Strat Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/26/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 227 E. 87th St., NY, NY 10128, Attn: Amelia Setar, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Qualification of Secoya Partners, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/14/13. Fictitious name in NY State: Secoya Partners of Delaware LLC. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/8/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606. DE address of LLC: c/o Incorporating Services, Ltd., 3500 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Qualification of Napier Park Railcar Lease Fund LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/12/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/7/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Napier Park Global Capital LLC, 399 Park Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: THE FRENCH RESISTANCE, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/13/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 156 Fifth Avenue, Suite 200, NewYork, NewYork 10010. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 STUDIO CUBE LLC, a domestic LLC currently known as REID & TAYLOR STUDIO LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/7/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 328 W. 11th St., 1-C, NY, NY 10014. General Purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 AMB PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/27/13 using the fictitious name AMB 77 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1374 Whitehorse Hamilton Square Rd., Hamilton, NJ 08690. General Purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Run Away With Me Productions, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/18/13 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, c/o Alexes Lowe, 321 Edgecombe #20 NY NY 10031. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of HANNAH EAST END LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/06/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Davidson, Dawson & Clark LLP, 60 E. 42nd St., NY, NY 10165. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

letteRS to the editoR

p u b lic not i c eS Notice of QUaLificatioN of Qdg retaiL partNers, LLc Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/14/13. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, 20th Fl., NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of QUaLificatioN of ih2 property gp LLc Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/05/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/14/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with State of DE, Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013

Notice of formatioN of KLW advisors LLc Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/06/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 252 7th Ave., NY, NY 10001. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of formatioN of champioN parKiNg 230 LLc Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 655 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of formatioN of XeNia ghaLi LLc Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Arent Fox LLP, 1675 Broadway, NY, NY 10019, Attn: Ross Charap, Esq. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013

Notice of QUaLificatioN of Withers coNsULtiNg groUp LLc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/5/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 2/25/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: James R. Brockway, Esq., Withers Bergman LLP, 157 Church St., 19th Fl., New Haven, CT 06510, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of formatioN of Nv reaLty hoLdiNgs, LLc Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/18/2012. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt LLP, 900 Third Ave., NY, NY 10022. Term: until 11/1/2057. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013

pUbLic Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday May 8, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from COWGIRL, INC. to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 519 Hudson Street, in the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OFTHE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 04/18 - 04/25/2013

pUbLic Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday May 8, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from Two Bikes LLC to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 85 Orchard Street, in the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OFTHE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 04/18 - 04/25/2013

pUbLic Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, May 8th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from 31 Great Jones Restaurant Corp. to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 31 Great Jones Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 04/18 - 04/25/2013

Continued from page 10 community space to replace the CHARAS/ El Bohio Cultural and Community Center that he evicted from the building in 1999. I moved onto E. Ninth St. a few years ago and have followed this issue very closely, and have tried to help resolve it. Will the community end up with some semblance of a restoration of this space and these services? Losing them left a big wound that has yet to heal. There are still a lot of angry people. It would be a real shame if our community, spearheaded by our city councilwoman, failed in our effort to rectify the mistake that was made by Giuliani when he allowed this building to be sold to a private interest. The building sat unused for 12 years, with many demonstrations in between. I sincerely hope that we get something for all that effort. It reflects very poorly on our incumbent political leadership if we don’t. Steve Sinclair Sinclair is president, Progress Republican Club

I couldn’t agree more To The Editor: Re “Johnson and Rajkumar win V.I.D.’s

backing for Council” (news article, April 18): I agree with Tony Hoffmann. The vote for Jenifer Rajkumar was “about N.Y.U.” and the actions of the current councilwoman. Sylvia Rackow

Uncle Al’s loss leaves a void To The Editor: Re “Al D’Avanzo, 76, architect and a founder of BAMRA” (obituary, April 18): Thank you for posting this tribute to my Uncle Albert. I’m William D’Avanzo, Al’s godson and Victor’s (quoted in the obituary) much younger brother. As with the effect on BAMRA, the loss of our uncle leaves a very big void in our family. New York City is better for his efforts, and our hearts are fuller for his presence in our lives, though they ache now for our loss. William D’Avanzo E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


April 25 - May 1, 2013

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Councilmember Mendez vows to battle new dorm plan Continued from page 14 two floors for 15 years. “Cooper is paying the lease, and the students pay the school,” he explained. “If their students don’t want to take the beds, then [Cooper] has the option to sublease those spaces to another school. It’s no different from the kind of leases used by most big institutions,” Singer added.  But Cooper plays it differently. “We have reserved the right for students to have an option to rent there,” explained McCarthy. “We have a lease to reserve approximately 196 beds and have first rights for our students. It’s up to the students to decide if they want to rent there or elsewhere.” McCarthy said she believed Cooper students would pay rent directly to Singer or his manage-

ment firm. “We have nothing to do with running the building or the rates charged, which would be determined by the owner,” McCarthy explained. Both Cooper Union and Singer declined to provide The Villager with a copy of the lease, citing a confidentiality clause that Singer inserted. At press time, the Buildings Department did not respond to repeated queries as to whether the leasing agreement with Cooper Union would qualify this project as a legal dorm. “We’re still looking into it,” said D.O.B. spokesperson Gloria Chin. But Councilmember Rosie Mendez says she’s not buying it. “I’ve already placed a call to the Buildings Department, because it seems to me they don’t have a viable lease under the rules dictated by D.O.B.,” Mendez said.  

Leroy St. Dog Run is a bone of contention for an activist By T. Schoen New Yorkers who choose to own a dog don’t have the space in their homes or even on the street for their often rambunctious beasts to exercise and enjoy themselves. That is why places like the Leroy St. Dog Run, in Hudson River Park, are crucial to the well-being of the neighborhood. But this neighborhood nexus of dog activity, according to Lynn Pacifico, head of the Dog Owners Action Committee, is in an unsuitable condition. Overcrowding and unfinished surfaces, according to Pacifico, pose a danger to the health of the many dogs who use the space as a place to burn off their massive amounts of energy. “The run is crowded when there are 10 dogs and their owners in there,” Pacifico said, “but there are often between 30 and 40 dogs in there at one time! It’s insane!” Pacifico also mentioned that the park’s surface is too slippery, causing dogs to crash into the walls and fences if they’re carrying too much momentum.   The space, while big enough to accommodate a good number of dogs, does look a little too small for its purpose. The grayand-blue pavement appears cracked and unfinished, standing out noticeably from the well-kept landscape of the rest of Hudson River Park. But this didn’t keep a fairly large, diverse crowd of dog owners from using the run, even at a mellow, quiet hour for the park. And people interviewed seemed mostly content with the dog run’s condition. “The people here are very kind,” Ralph Perillo commented. Another of Pacifico’s concerns about the run was the danger posed to smaller dogs by larger dogs. Yet again, dog owners interviewed, one of whom owned a small dog, actually said this was not a problem. Dog owners who know their dogs have

aggressive tendencies will keep a watchful eye on them, they said. However, Pacifico does not attribute potentially violent behavior to any particular dog’s personality, but to what she called “instinctive drift,” an uncontrollable phenomenon that many dogs experience. “People see the cuddly baby side of their dogs,” she said. “But every dog is only alive because their ancestors were good at killing small animals. The quick movements of a small animal trigger a prey drive, buried in the animal’s DNA, and the little dog becomes a target.” With such unpredictable danger, space does become an issue — but not one, it seems, that grabs the attention of the people who use the run. In other words, other dog owners aren’t “getting her drift.” During a recent visit, there were minor complaints from some dog owners, concerning the run. Renee Yakemchuk, who takes her dog to the park for exercise, said she would like to see some upgrades to the static, featureless run. “I wish it had some obstacles like the ones they have in the run up on 34th St.,” she said. “I’d like to see the water running more.” However flawed it may be, the Leroy St. Dog Run provides an essential service in preserving the neighborhood’s well-being, giving Lower West Side dog owners a place to let their dogs be what they are. And some Villagers are happy to see the pooches off the pavement and in the run. “People start hassling you when you’re walking your dog,” Perillo said. “They want you to walk your dog in the street. People need this kind of place to go to.” But the Leroy St. Dog Run could certainly use some improvement, maybe even a little expansion.

“I will be filing a complaint based on what I’ve been told,” Mendez added. “Either someone here is not telling the truth, or these two parties have very different ideas of what they have contracted — all of which is problematic to me.” Beyond that, Mendez said, “having a lease for 200 out of 500 beds is not a majority share, so I don’t know how you can be the anchor tenant with less than 50 percent of the property. “Show us the lease, let’s see what Cooper actually signed on for,” Mendez challenged, adding, “I truly believe that [Cooper Union] President Jamshed Bharucha was not given a complete history of the building when he signed on to this. Cooper is now in an untenable situation with the community, because they were not given all the facts.” So far, L.P.C. has issued permits to replace the broken and cracked wooden windows with aluminum-frame windows, and is in the process of issuing a permit for Singer to perform necessary repointing and patching work. Singer said he also plans to replace terracotta facade work that he previously hacked off the building with new fiberglass versions. For his part, Singer insists the new dorm scheme will ultimately be welcomed by the community. “What I am giving them is a renovated building that adds vitality and life to the community,” he noted of the dorm plan, which is projected to cost $40 million. He pointed to his own petition, circulated in 2008, showing support for a “student dormi-

tory” from some 700 local business “owners,” including longtime East Village institutions like Guerra Paint & Pigment on E. 13th St. and Bella Tile. “Unused as an elementary school since 1977, the century-old structure sat empty for the past 11 years,” reads an April 18 press release on the University House dorm. “The building occupies much of the city block, where its vacancy has inhibited local development and the growth of small businesses in the neighborhood.” Conspicuously left out is any mention of CHARAS and the lingering resentment over the community space that was lost. Asked whether he could provide any space in the building for a community center, Singer said he has to be realistic and that he won’t get any loans approved unless it’s a financially viable project. Neighborhood agitator John Penley said both Singer and Cooper Union should brace for more protest. While he firmly disassociates himself from whoever torched three cars outside the school on Sat., April 6, following an aborted sidewalk campout to protest the new dorm plan, Penley said Cooper should consider that a warning. “It’s just a magnet for trouble,” he said. Mendez said she met with Cooper President Bharucha to voice her displeasure. “I told him I’m not happy with this dorm plan, the community is not happy,” she said. “There will be protests, and I will be joining in when that happens.”

Photo by Eric Faber

A tail of love: Millie and Zach PET SET Millie and Zach met at the Leroy Street Dog Run and never looked back. Zach is owned by Bob and Joan Matloff; Millie by Ron and Paula Faber. Zach and Millie love to wrestle when they’re in the Leroy

St. Dog Run. Zach grabs Millie’s leg while Millie grabs Zach’s ear. They’re very much a couple.  If you have a pet that you want to be profiled in the Pet Set, send a photo and a description to news@thevillager.com .


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April 25 - May 1, 2013

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

Xavier’s Jimmy Wolfer earning some hard yards while keeping the ball away from a tackling opponent.

Xavier rugby rumbles its way to the top but falls to Gonzaga SpoRtS By dAnieL JeAn-LuBin The clock wound down to zero. It had to happen eventually. The result, a 7-26 loss for Xavier High School against Gonzaga College Prep. With the loss, Xavier’s 10-game winning streak was snapped and their reign as the top-ranked rugby program in the nation came to an end. “It was an extremely testing match,” said Greg Norris, Xavier’s varsity rugby head coach. Although they lost in crushing fashion, Xavier’s run at the top deserves recognition. Xavier finished the 2012 season with a 10-6-1 record, coming in third in the national high school championship tournament. This year, Coach Norris was looking to eclipse that previous record with more consistent play from his squad, especially his veterans. Xavier began their 2012-13 season with a dominant 65-10 win on March 2 over St. Joe's Prep at Pier 40, at West Houston St. The following week, they picked up wins over an athletic Perry Street Prep, 31-19. Then, six days later, the club got their first shut-out victory of the season with an impressive 87-0 win over the Long Island Colts. Xavier won their next seven contests, including a record-setting 116-0 win over last year’s Rugby New York tourney champion, McQuaid Jesuit High School. During the streak, Xavier shut out their opponents three times and outscored the competition by a total of

554-94. Coach Norris’s team also never allowed an opponent to score more than 20 points during that 10-game span. “I would attribute the success to the sheer determination and grit of a number of the senior players,” said Norris on the team tying their last season’s win total with three games left in the season. “These players have all stood out well as the season progressed.” Led by captain Jimmy Wolfer, this Xavier club got off to one of the best starts in their program’s storied history. Speaking of Wolfer, Norris said, “He has truly been an excellent leader, and one who has definitely led by example.” Xavier, which is America’s oldest high school rugby program, founded in 1969, clearly has a bright future.

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April 25 - May 1, 2013

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The Villager, April 25, 2013