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April 4 - 10, 2013

Travelers trash C.B. 3 member’s ‘crusty proposal’ By lincoln anDerson They hadn’t yet read Chad Marlow’s controversial “A crusty proposal” talking point in last week’s Villager. But a group that the outspoken Community Board 3 member would deride as the “voluntary homeless” in Union Square Tuesday morning shrugged off his blistering critiques and defended their freewheeling lifestyle. About a half dozen youths

Kickin’ it for loving moms

Photo by Ali Smith

Lower East Side musician Alyson Palmer, with her daughter, above, is profiled in Ali Smith’s “Momma Love; How the Mother Half Lives.” Smith is doing a Kickstarter campaign to publish the photo book, which was 12 years in the making. See Page 3.

Charges over charters fly as Eva enters Wash. Irving By lincoln anDerson A new 500-seat charter school is planned to open this August in the Washington Irving High School building, and — as has frequently happened elsewhere when charter schools come in — a battle is brewing to block it. Arthur Schwartz, a Greenwich Village activist and attorney who has represented plaintiffs against other New York City charter schools, told The

Villager he expects to file a class-action lawsuit that will include the planned Success Academy Union Square and also possibly a charter school slated for Tilden High School, in Brooklyn. “This is Eva Moskowitz’s beachhead in Lower Manhattan,” Schwartz said of the K-to-4 school in the Union Square/ Gramercy area. The school is actually K-to-8; the students will continue on through the middle-school grades,

in their late teens and 20s, they were huddled together in the lee of the Union Square subway kiosk in the park’s southwestern corner. Some were slouched on the ground, partially covered by down sleeping bags in the unseasonably cold and windy weather. Others sat cross-legged on the pavement nearby. A hash pipe was passed and one of them

Continued on page 7

Outrage over infill scheme at seniors housing complex By PaUl BUFano Seniors living in one East Village apartment building rely on its park to get fresh air and to enjoy playing chess in the shade, but the green space may soon be replaced by a seven-story development with a 99-year ground lease. The New York City Housing Authority is moving forward with a plan to allow private “infill development” on eight of its

though at another, yet-to-be-determined location. Moskowitz, a former Upper East Side city councilmember, is the founder and C.E.O. of the Success Charter Network. Her first charter school, Success Academy Harlem 1, opened in 2006, and has since been recognized as a Blue Ribbon School, the federal

Continued on page 2

5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

Manhattan sites, including one at Meltzer Tower, a 20-story building exclusively for seniors at 94 E. First St. The buildings would be rentals, with a mix of 80 percent market-rate units and 20 percent affordable units. At Meltzer, an outdoor seating area with trees and benches now used by the complex’s

Continued on page 19

editoriAl, letters PAGE 8

rAVeN reAllY NAils it PAGE 16

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Charter slated for Wash. Irving, but lawsuit looms Continued from page 1 government’s highest honor. By next year, the network is on track to have 20 Success Academies serving 5,000 students in New York City. Success Academy Upper West, co-located in the Brandeis High School building, is in its second year. Success Academy Cobble Hill, co-located in a building with two high schools, is in its first year. Also slated to open this fall is Success Academy Hell’s Kitchen. A spokesperson for Success Charter Network said there has been an outpouring of interest by local parents in the planned Union Square school. “We’ve seen overwhelming demand from the community for another high-quality public school option,” she said. “We’ve had more than 1,000 applications for the coming school year for fewer than 200 seats. And I’d put that to Success Academy’s record of achievement as to why there’s such demand for such a school.” Success Academy Upper West, she noted, “is off the charts in terms of popularity.” The plan is for the Union Square charter to open with kindergarten and first grade and then add one new grade per year. It won’t, however, be a traditionally “zoned school” with its own restricted catchment area, like the Village’s two schools, P.S. 3 and P.S. 41. Rather, priority will be given to students throughout all of Community School District 2. The sprawling district stretches from Battery Park City to 59th St. on the West Side and to 97th St. on the East Side, taking in Tribeca, the West Village, Soho, Gramercy Park and the Upper East Side. There is no admission test. A lottery is being held soon, possibly this week, to fill the school’s first two classes. Throughout the Success Charter Network, 80 percent of the students are low-income, 15 percent are in special education and 10 percent are English language learners. “The hope is to create an integrated, highquality school that reflects the diversity of the surrounding neighborhoods,” the spokesperson said. According to Schwartz, on March 11, the Department of Education’s Panel for Education Policy voted to approve a Success Academy for the Washington Irving building, at 16th St. and Irving Place. Schwartz said the Success Charter Network’s strategy is to target school buildings that are “underutilized,” meaning there is some unused space in them. Despite the opposition of Councilmember Rosie Mendez, parents and teachers, Washington Irving High School is being phased out, which has opened up space in the massive Gramercy building. But the building still houses a number of smaller high schools, including Union Square Academy of Health Sciences, Gramercy Arts High School, High School for Language and Diplomacy, International High School at Union Square and the new Academy for Software Engineering, the latter which has the backing of local tech heavy hitters, like

Fred Wilson. Schwartz blasted the idea of co-locating an elementary school in a building with five other high schools, calling it “really weird.” “In the middle of that whole hodgepodge, they’re sticking an elementary school, which is projected ultimately to have 600 kids,” he said, citing a higher figure than the Success spokesperson. “All of the high schools’ students, 80 percent to 90 percent, get free lunch — they’re very poor. The kids come from all over the city,” Schwartz said, adding, “Would you want your 8-year-olds walking around in the middle of high school students who come from all over the city? I wouldn’t.” According to Schwartz, right now, there are about 1,900 high schoolers in the building. Once Success Academy is at capacity in a few years and the Academy of Software Engineering grows a bit, the building is expected to have close to 3,000 students, he said. Teachers and parents at the existing high schools are concerned there will be a space crunch, according to Schwartz. This will be felt most painfully by the schools’ specialeducation students and English language learners, who, Schwartz maintained, need smaller classroom sizes to learn effectively — which translates into more space. “The concerns that a lot of the leaders have — every classroom is currently being utilized now,” he noted. “The programs that are going on in the schools really need the space.” Schwartz said this negative impact on special ed and E.L.L. programs will be the

‘We are dead set against Eva due to her legacy of not playing fair with space.’ Gregg Lundahl lawsuit’s basis. In February, a similar suit he lodged defeated the city’s effort to start up a charter Brownsville Academy High School. However, he recently lost another suit, against Citizens of the World Charter School in Williamsburg, which is being started by Eric Grannis, Moskowitz’s husband. Gregg Lundahl, Washington Irving’s veteran union chapter leader, predicted that use of the building’s space will be an issue because Success Academy will be insular. “My basic concern is that, whereas the schools that currently are in the building share some of the facilities, there will be no sharing of the Success Academy provinces,” Lundahl said. “I anticipate that the charter school will be entirely barricaded from the other schools. The building is designed as a one-school building, so we use shared hall-

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Washington Irving High School is being phased out of the massive school building at 16th St. and Irving Place. A new K-to4 Success Academy charter school is set to occupy the building’s second floor and part of the third floor.

ways, gyms and the cafeteria.” Lundahl said word is that the Success Academy will get the whole second floor and some of the third floor. “The historic lobby ceiling and staircase extend to the second floor,” he noted, adding, “We believe that she will want to expand into the first floor.” Lundahl said he and other teachers and parents will be depending on the United Federation of Teachers union to assist them. “The U.F.T. has been very helpful in providing information on how we can battle Eva’s schools,” he said. “I look forward to continuing that battle in court.” They definitely won’t be rolling out the welcome mat for Moskowitz and Co., he added. “Eva will not find co-locating at Washington Irving comfortable,” Lundahl vowed. “We are dead set against her due to her legacy of not playing fair with space.” But the Success Charter Network spokesperson said the building can more than handle the new elementary school. There are, technically, currently 941 empty seats, according to the school’s official “educational impact plan,” she noted. “It’s an enormous building,” she assured, adding that Success Academy “went through the whole co-location process” required to site a new school in a building with other existing schools. “Two-thirds of all schools in the city are co-located,” she noted. The Success Academies that share space with Brandeis High School and with the two high schools in Cobble Hill are not having any associated problems, she added. As for Schwartz’s

concerns about elementary school students walking around amidst high schoolers “from all over the city,” she said she didn’t know exactly how to respond to that one, and would “put it back on him” to clarify what he meant. More to the point, she said, the Success Academies live up to their name — they’re successful. Last year, 88 percent of Success Academy students were at or above reading standards, while 96 percent were proficient in math — both far above the city average. Speaking to its integrated student body, the Union Square charter would also try to narrow the district’s “achievement gap,” she said. “The schools that are in the district are very segregated,” she noted. “The schools in the district that are predominantly white and Asian are high-performing, and the schools that are predominantly black and Latino are low-performing. The achievement gap in the district is huge.” Charter schools are publicly funded but have more leeway in certain areas than regular city public schools. Starting in kindergarten, the Success students have classes in science, chess, block play, arts, music and sports, among other things, and have regular field trips “to get them out in the city.” The school day is longer as well, stretching from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Students all wear blue-and-orange uniforms. “It’s very progressive but it’s very rigorous,” she said. “They call it ‘joyful rigor.’ The philosophy is, ‘We can’t dumb down what we think our kids are capable of,’ and we don’t.” Success Academy teachers aren’t unionized, though some teachers at other charters are union members. But normal city public school teachers generally decry charter schools as “union busters.” Schwartz said he suspects Moskowitz will next try to put a charter school in 75 Morton St., a former state-owned building that the city has purchased for a new District 2 school. But the Success spokesperson said she doesn’t know where he’s getting that from, and that the city decides where to cite charter schools. Keen Berger, who heads the Community Board 2 task force on 75 Morton St., said the community will soon make its recommendations on what it wants at the building, but that a charter school probably won’t be in the mix. “The community is very clear that we don’t need a charter school at 75 Morton,” Berger said. “We need a good public middle school. We have no middle schools, that’s the problem.” Plus, she added, “It’s not Eva’s victory — it’s our victory,” referring to the community’s finally winning the long-sought school space. The task force, which includes the Community Education Council for District 2, will meet Mon., April 22, at P.S. 41, at 116 W. 11th St., at 6:30 p.m. After the meeting, C.B. 2 and the C.E.C. will each draft separate resolutions on what kind of school uses they feel should be at 75 Morton St., which will then be reconciled sometime in May.

April 4 - 10, 2013

sCooPY’s

NotebooK action at last at olD P.s. 64? East Village journo Sarah Ferguson called Monday to tell us she had just walked by the former CHARAS/El Bohio (the old P.S. 64), at 605 E. Ninth St. near Avenue B and seen a woman posting assorted work permits on the plywood construction fence — such as for fixing up the building’s 10th St. terrace, adding an entry ramp on Ninth St., new firstfloor windows on 10th St., new railings, etc. We called developer Gregg Singer and asked him what’s up — is he finally going to put a dorm in the place, which has been a vacant eyesore for more than a decade? But he wasn’t divulging any details. “I’m not discussing that project with you,” he said. “There’s nothing to talk about.” But people are saying something’s obviously going on with the property, we told him. “They’ve got to find out on their own,” he replied. “I’m not the source to find out.” Sounds like Singer must have been muzzled by his business partners. Meanwhile, floor plans for the building submitted to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission for a “certificate of appropriateness” were, in fact, recently posted on Community Board 3’s Web site. The blueprints show the building chopped up into small rooms, with individual bathroom and kitchen facilities, just like in a dorm. Singer or his partners were planning to make a presentation before the C.B. 3 Landmarks Subcommittee on Wednesday night as we were going to press. PaPer PoWer! As you can read on Page 9 of this week’s issue, preservationist Andrew Berman is far from satisfied with the partial win by his Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and community allies in getting the city to pledge to consider landmarking half of the remaining proposed South Village Historic District. Nevertheless, Berman credited our editorial back in January for being a major assist in achieving what they did. “So many people came together and were such a huge help in pushing for getting a commitment on South Village landmarking,” Berman said. “But without a doubt The Villager editorial, ‘Landmark, Then Rezone,’ was an enormous boost for the effort. It helped make the argument clear and undeniable that the Hudson Square rezoning would accelerate the destruction of the South Village, and should not move ahead without the landmarking.” Also highlighting the cause, G.V.S.H.P., with a coalition of local community groups, sprung for two fullpage ads with us. Said Berman, “I think the full-page ads in The Villager also helped show how broad and deep the support was for this campaign. It definitely helps to have the local paper on your side!”

Get Better soon! Legendary zoning maven of Community Board 2, Doris Diether, fell on Wed., April 24, and broke her hip. She had surgery at Beth Israel the next day, and is doing O.K., according to Keen Berger, her fellow C.B. 2 member. Apparently Diether was walking through her building’s first-floor hallway when a neighbor opened her front door, causing Diether, 84, to swerve, lose her footing and go down. The grounded Diether gave the neighbor the number for the Board 2 office and District Manager Bob Gormley came right down to help take Diether to the hospital. Berger said Diether has been flooded with get-well cards and candy and her favorite, chocolate ice cream. Reverend Donna Schaper of Judson Church, where Diether goes, though she isn’t technically a member, is also giving updates. It sounds like Diether will be at B.I. for a bit longer. She might have to rehab locally somewhere, such as at VillageCare, on W. Houston St., but we didn’t have more information at press time. KicK it! The photo by Ali Smith on The Villager’s front page this week is of Alyson Palmer of the legendary band BETTY, with her daughter, who is shown holding a cool big rock. Palmer is one of several Lower East Side women featured in Smith’s new book, “Momma Love; How the Mother Half Lives.” For 12 years, the local lens woman has been lovingly working on the project, which features 40 women’s portraits and their stories about the highs and lows of the motherhood experience. The book is finally finished and has already gotten a rave review from Gloria Steinem, who said, “Ali Smith has given us a gift with ‘Momma Love:’ a fresh, eye-opening manifestation of motherhood’s contemporary realities.” Unfortunately, Smith had a nightmare experience six months ago with a publisher who, she said, suddenly closed up shop and stole the financial investment Smith had made toward the book’s production. “It left me stranded and hating life for a month,” she told us. “That had been my savings and a huge investment for me to make, but I believe in the project wholeheartedly.” So now Smith is self-publishing. To that end, she’s doing a Kickstarter fundraising campaign that runs until next Wed., April 10. (Go online to Kickstarter to contribute.) She lives on E. 23rd St. but, as she told us, “My life is lived on the Lower East Side — and has been for the last 30 years. I was in bands for years, and one, Speedball Baby, was a big deal on the L.E.S. music scene. CBGB’s was my stomping grounds, as was Ludlow St., when there was a Ludlow St. I bartended at Sophie’s and Mona’s. I was at the Tompkins Square riots, and now I take my son to preschool at Little Missionary Day School down the block from there — very strange.” As for the Kickstarter campaign, she said, “There has been a tremendous amount of support, but I have a long way to go to reach the goal that will fund the printing — which will be done with an ecofriendly green printer in the U.S.” Other Downtowners

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in the tome include Michele Quan, who founded Me and Ro jewelry and whose photo graces the book’s cover; Deb Parker, founder of Beauty Bar and Barmacy, who Smith called the “L.E.S. Queen;” and Erika “Giggles the Clown” Kirkland, who has raised her daughter while working as a clown for 20 years on the Lower East Side. anarchy in the l.e.s.! The Anarchist Book Fair and Anarchist Film Festival are coming to the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center, 107 Suffolk St., this Saturday and Sunday, April 6-7. The film festival is organized by Priya Warcry and is in honor of late activist Brad Will, who was slain in 2006 by paramilitaries while documenting a popular uprising in Oaxaca, Mexico. Fresh from his homeless campout outside N.Y.U., John Penley will be speaking at the film festival. Penley was also planning to do another campout over the weekend — this time outside the nearby office of Ben Shaoul’s Magnum Management — to protest Taylor Mead’s living situation on Ludlow St. in a building Shaoul used to own. Penley planned to demand that Shaoul use some of the money he got from flipping a portfolio of his East Village buildings to Jared Kushner, to provide a ground-floor apartment for Mead, free for the rest of his life. But word recently got out that Mead’s niece is helping him hopefully work a buyout, so the campout is off. But Penley said they’ll still protest briefly outside Magnum Management. For one, he’s angry that Shaoul is residentially redeveloping the former Cabrini Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation facility on E. Fifth St., charging that it was the developer who “kicked out the seniors.” anarchy in the Winery: Speaking of anarchy, we saw Glen Matlock, formerly of the Sex Pistols, and Sylvain Sylvain, formerly of the New York Dolls, at an “acoustic punk” show at City Winery in Hudson Square Tuesday night. Frankly, while we know Matlock played all of Sid Vicious’s bass parts for him, and while it was great to be in a room with a legendary Pistol, he needs a bit more “anarchy” in his voice, which, well, lacks range. We spotted Jesse Malin from Bowery Electric there, checking out the famed rockers before he dashed off in a cab.

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Lots to like at Leica store for camera connoisseurs By Bob Krasner Did you hear the one about the $8,000 digital camera that only shoots in black and white? Funny, right? Leica, the revered camera manufacturer, doesn’t think so. Their Monochrom is one of the more intriguing items in their new Soho location, which is filled with compelling items for both pro and amateur shutterbugs. The store recently opened at 460 West Broadway, between Houston and Prince Sts. It’s a collaboration between the 150-year-old manufacturer and Elliot Kurland, a Leica enthusiast and former proprietor of Kurland photo. While the Leica brand name instantly conjures up images of film cameras for photographers of a certain age, the company has jumped almost completely into the digital market. Although they still sell two models which use that archaic format, their focus on digital is both a leap into the modern age and a nod to the past, using classic designs to house a contemporary format. The store’s minimally designed space is filled with not just cameras, but books, magazines, accessories and a photo gallery. The place’s rear is designed to convert to a classroom as well. Customers are encouraged to test-drive the wide variety of models available, and the extremely knowledgeable staff is more than willing to educate the consumer. Even the guy who came in and asked, “How is a Leica different from

Photo by Bob Krasner

Holding their own: Soho Leica store staff with their favorite cameras, from left: manager Chris Durkin, with the ME; salesman Craig Williams, with the MP (film camera); salesman John Flanigan, with the Monochrom; and owner Elliot Kurland, with the M9-P Hermes Special Edition. The photo was taken with a $35,000 M9 Titanium.

my iPhone ?” got a straight answer. One possible answer to that query is that Hermes and Paul Smith don’t make limited-edition iPhones, as they do for cameras in collaboration with Leica. Of course, you might not be in the market for

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a $25,000 collector’s item, like the Hermes edition, but it’s still worth checking out the possibilities. One of the more popular items is the V-Lux 4, a midsize, point-andshoot that has a fixed f2.8 lens that zooms from 24 mm to 600 mm, with a surprising

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degree of sharpness at the long end. It sells for a more reasonable price of $800 (which includes Adobe’s Lightroom software). Smaller models designed for street shooting and medium format for studio work bookend the range of available equipment. One overwhelmed customer at the shop called his friend to inform him, “This is where I want to come to die.” (The management, for the record, discourages this). Unfortunately, according to Mr. Kurland, the supply does not always meet the demand and there is a waiting list for many of the more popular items. That is sometimes the case with the Monochrom, that high-end, black-and-white shooting machine. One of its more illustrious proponents is art photographer Ralph Gibson, a longtime favorite of ours who made his reputation creating beautiful, surreal images on black-and-white film. When asked for his opinion about the new camera, Gibson said: “I have been using the Leica rangefinder system exclusively for over 50 years and I can write with fullest confidence about the new Leica Monochrom. I have traveled extensively with the camera and my only complaint is that the user manual doesn’t explain how to set the camera down sometimes... .” After spending just a half hour with the Monochrom, we know just what he means. And if anyone is wondering, my birthday is in October.

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April 4 - 10, 2013

PoliCe blotter Vicious Meatpack attack A brutal three-man assault in the Meatpacking District early Sat., March 30, left one man unconscious and a second with multiple facial fractures. Witnesses told police that it started with a simple dispute around 4 a.m., when the two victims exchanged words with Adrian Capric, 21, Haljilj Kocic, 28, and Agim Zaneli, 26, as they crossed paths outside the Hotel Gansevoort, on Ninth Ave. between Little W. 12th and W. 13th Sts. It wasn’t clear exactly what set things off, but the fight suddenly exploded, the witnesses said, and the group of three reportedly became the aggressors in a near-deadly attack. Capric, Kocic and Zeneli allegedly punched and kicked one of the victims, 35, so many times that he lost consciousness on the sidewalk. And when his 38-yearold friend stepped in to aid him, the three brawlers socked him in the face as well, leaving him with a bloody nose and a bruised eye socket. After witnesses reported the attack, police arrived on the scene in time to catch Capric, Kocic and Zeneli in the act, as they continued to pummel the first victim even as he lay incapacitated. Once the three attackers had been subdued, paramedics arrived to take the unconscious man to Beth Israel Hospital, where doctors said that, along with painful cuts, he had to be treated for multiple broken bones in his face. Capric, Kocic and Zeneli were each charged with two felony counts of assault.

Cashier’s big-time con There’s a moral to this story — always keep an eye on your credit card when you’re making a purchase. Police arrested Janniah Jemison, 21, on March 28 after she allegedly used another woman’s Visa card number to purchase more than $3,200 worth of MasterCard and American Express gift cards. Jemison, an employee at the Gristedes supermarket at 246 Mercer St., at W. Third St., is believed to have copied the number while ringing up the victim’s purchase on Jan. 24, police said. According to results of a police investigation that began this past week, by the time the unwitting customer finally learned of the fraudulent charges upon seeing her bill, Jemison had reportedly bought 17 different gift cards between Jan. 24 and Feb. 17. The victim later told officers that she never suspected any foul play until seeing the evidence firsthand, since her physical card had never actually been stolen. After officers strolled into the Mercer St. Gristedes to slap the cuffs on Jemison, the sneaky thief finally got a first taste of

the world of trouble she’s brought upon herself. She’s now facing 17 charges of grand larceny — one for each fraudulent gift card purchase.

Beaten with a stick A thug who allegedly attacked another man near Union Square probably thought he was off the hook after initially escaping from cops — but the boys in blue corralled him two days later. The victim, 31, told police he got into an argument with Erick Rivera, 22, at the corner of E. 13th St. and University Place around 3 p.m. on March 26, and the dispute apparently escalated quickly. Rivera reportedly began hitting the other man on the head, arms and body with a wooden stick, police said, leaving him with cuts and bruises that required treatment at Beth Israel Hospital. Rivera fled the scene on foot before officers could arrive, according to the victim and witnesses, and a canvass later that day came up negative. But using information about the alleged attacker’s identity and description, police were able to track him down on March 28. Rivera was charged with assault.

Brained with a bottle Police arrested Eladio Lopez, 24, early on Fri., March 29, after witnesses said he smashed a glass bottle over another man’s head during a Greenwich Village bar fight. The altercation took place around 3:30 a.m. inside Wicked Willy’s, at 149 Bleecker St., and apparently stemmed from a drunken dispute, according to witnesses. The victim suffered a cut to his head, and was treated at the scene by paramedics, police said. Lopez was charged with assault.

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Travelers trash C.B. 3 member’s ‘crusty proposal’ Continued from page 1 sparked it with a lighter as his friend took a hit, and the smell of pot wafted into the brisk air. Told of Marlow’s premise, that there are voluntary homeless and involuntary homeless, namely the travelers — or crusties, as many call them — and that the latter should not be allowed to sleep on the city’s sidewalks or in its parks at night, they were dismissive, indignant. “Who is this guy?” asked Tre, 18, the most garrulous of the bunch, of Marlow, after exhaling the toke. From Baltimore originally, he sported dreadlocks with an array of colorful beer bottle caps interwoven into them. He said Marlow’s main point is fundamentally flawed, since, “Most of the time, you start out as a voluntary traveler — and you become an involuntary traveler.” Plus, one of them named Sid offered, “If you’re going to be homeless, why not use your homelessness and travel?” Actually, this group of travelers — none used the word “crusty” to describe themselves — didn’t seem to have done too much traveling lately. “I’m new,” said one woman from Atlanta, raising her hand, but she was the exception. Tre (pronounced “tray”) said he has been living in the city about a year. So had Julia, 20, though she said she was planning to hitchhike to California in two months. The two might possibly be off the hook under Marlow’s proposal — but only if they’ve lived in the city, including on the streets, without a break for 12 consecutive months. “We’ve been here all winter,” Tre said, noting they “moved around” to different spots. Other names they’re known by include “gutter punks” and “fauxbos,” as in “fake hobos,” as people call them in New Orleans. Marlow’s talking point also recommends that the travelers’ frequent companions, their dogs, if unlicensed, should be seized and taken to an animal shelter. But Tre argued the dogs are better off living out on the streets than cooped up alone and neglected indoors. “It’s better for the animals,” he asserted. “We spend all of our time with our animals. It’s better for their social interaction.” None of them had dogs, but one woman, who didn’t give her name, had a brown rat, which poked its head up out of the neck of her zipper hoodie for a moment and looked around, before scurrying back inside out of the wind. “It’s easier size-wise” than a dog, she noted of the rodent. “And it’s easier to walk.” How about another of the C.B. 3 member’s barbs: that panhandling crusties are competing with the very people who most need the handouts, the involuntary homeless. “We all have the same needs,” objected one man with a wispy brown beard. They simply like their lives, like being free, they said. Traveling is “an American tradition,” Tre added. “Woody Guthrie wrote about traveling and riding the trains,” he said. “It’s a music tradition. You ever heard that song about ‘Big Rock Candy Mountain’? It’s about traveling,” he said, singing a verse from the classic hobo ballad,

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

Two of the travelers, Tre, left, and Sid, agreed to pose for a photo, but only after pulling up their bandannas to cover their faces.

about “railroad bulls” and “cigarette trees.” “There’s a reason why alternative lifestyles exist — and will always exist,” he said. “People can’t just be like zombies.” What about Marlow’s main point, and the real impetus behind his column — that the travelers seem to have gotten more violent and destructive in recent years? Marlow said that The Villager’s coverage of several incidents last summer influenced his thinking, including crusties’ graffitiing profanities on St. Mark’s Church and a crusty menacing a senior in Washington Square Park and breaking the older man’s sunglasses after he complained about the traveler’s pit bull peeing in the fountain. “Everybody’s violent,” Tre observed. “Home bums are violent,” he said of travelers who don’t travel anymore but remain homeless. “Rich kids from New Jersey are violent. It sucks.” A homeless man named Smoke, 34, who knows them walked up to say hello. He’s not a traveler, but a native New Yorker — so, under Marlow’s proposal, could legally sleep on the street at night. Asked about the distinction between voluntary and involuntary homeless, Smoke wasn’t sold. “I feel personally that travelers are the same [as the native homeless],” he said. “It don’t matter where you’re from — it matters where you’re at. We go through the same things: It’s hard to get food; it’s hard to get money for carfare.” Julia became homeless at 15. Small and pretty with two silver lip piercings, shivering in a turquoise hoodie and flannel pajama bottoms, she said she left an abusive home in New Jersey. “I think traveling is something everyone should do,” she said. “You just try to meet and greet, and basically tell people your story.” She used to be very shy, but traveling has made her much more outgoing, she said. She’s even visited the famed favelas (shanty towns) in Rio de Janeiro. Jamie, 18, from the Upper East Side, and Julia met in Union Square. Asian, with tattooed forearms, he plans to go with her to California. Giving her a hug, he said, “I want to travel with her. When you’re at a young age, you want

to find who you are in life. I want to see how beautiful the world is, I want to understand it.” As for the homeless youths’ well-documented substance abuse problems, Julia said, “I know a lot of street kids who are under the influence due to depression, because it’s not always easy to live outside.” However, she added she keeps clean — both physically and in terms of substances. “It’s a myth that all travel-

ers are on drugs,” she maintained. Like her friends, she said, they have a right to defend themselves. She has to be on guard for “creepers” who might approach her when she’s sleeping outside. “I look young, younger than I am,” she noted. “People think I’m jailbait. I find that disrespectful. What am I supposed to do — get raped again? “A lot of stuff happens out here,” she said matter of factly. There’s one frequent criticism the travelers find especially irritating: Because some have cell phones, people don’t believe they’re really needy. But they noted it’s easy to get a free cell phone, and minutes can be paid for with food stamps. Also, their parents might want them to have one so they can stay in touch. “There’s a big difference between a cell phone and finding rent every month,” Tre explained. “I have a family I have to call. People all say, ‘Get a job.’ How can I get a job without a phone?” Although they’re proud of their lifestyle, most of them were uncomfortable posing for a photo. Tre and Sid eventually agreed, but only after pulling up their bandannas to hide their faces. During the hourlong interview, none of the travelers expressed any violence. However, at one point, Smoke, the homeless native New Yorker, came back around. He announced that a certain guy who really annoys him better not come by, or he would mess him up.

CITY OF NEW YORK 2012-2013 DISTRICTING COMMISSION NOTICE OF PRECLEARANCE SUBMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES ATTORNEY GENERAL PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT on March 22, 2013, in accordance with Section 5 of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, 42 U.S.C. 1973c, and 28 C.F.R. § 51.10(b), covering the counties of Bronx, Kings and New York, the City of New York 2012-2013 Districting Commission (the “Districting Commission”) submitted to the Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, the Districting Commission’s final plan for the boundaries of the fifty-one City Council districts in the City of New York (the “submission”). A complete duplicate copy of the submission is available for public inspection at the office of the Districting Commission at 253 Broadway, 7th Floor in the borough of Manhattan. A complete copy of the submission is also available on the Districting Commission’s website at http://www.nyc.gov/districting, where it can be automatically translated into over 50 languages. The Districting Commission invites members of the public to review the submission and to provide comments for the Attorney General’s consideration as this request for preclearance is being considered. Any such comments may be forwarded to: Mr. Chris Herren, Chief, Voting Section Civil Rights Division, Room 7254 – NWB Department of Justice 950 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. Washington, DC 20530. Please take further notice that, in order to permit timely implementation of the final districting plan in advance of the City Council’s upcoming primary and general elections, the Districting Commission has requested that a decision on preclearance be issued on an expedited basis pursuant to 28 C.F.R. § 51.34.

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editoriAl

Trust at the Seaport Another year, another big plan to “save” the South Street Seaport. Downtowners have coexisted with corporations running the Seaport mall for a few decades. There have been some good initiatives, and some great events, but the operators have never fully embraced the Lower Manhattan community. The companies over the years have tried to make the area more attractive to residents, but have not yet succeeded. There are malls all over the county, but what makes the Seaport special is its ties to early New York and the Fulton Fish Market, which did not leave all that long ago — and the South Street Seaport Museum with its historic ships decorating the harbor. “It’s not just another mall on the waterfront,” is the way Catherine McVay Hughes, Community Board 1’s chairperson, put it. Two weeks ago, the City Council voted to approve the Howard Hughes Corporation’s plan to redevelop the Pier 17 mall. There are clear, positive elements about the plan, but there is a lot to be concerned about too. “Pier 17 and trust,” was the headline of our editorial one year ago, and the need to restore trust is much more pressing now. The chief reason for that is the city Economic Development Corporation’s apparent decision to withhold important information from the public until after the Council vote. Specifically, the unredacted portions of the letter of intent between the city and Hughes included the company’s intention to build a large apartment and hotel building near the pier. The only defense we’ve heard for this contemptible decision to keep the public in the dark is essentially, “Big deal — everyone has known for years that there was a desire for big development.” If everyone knew, what would have been the harm in releasing the full document? General Growth Properties, Hughes’ predecessor, did make its development plans clear five years ago. Then it went bankrupt and reorganized as Howard Hughes Corp., so it was far from clear that anything had stayed the same. There’s no question that if the full information had been made public earlier, it would have affected the debate at the very least, and perhaps even the outcome. Clearly, the city and Hughes did not want to negotiate about anything other than Pier 17. We can’t help but wonder, though, if a tougher position would have won more. And this would not have been the first time the city negotiated two land-use applications, known as ULURPs, simultaneously. Councilmember Margaret Chin did win some concessions at Pier 17. One — like extending the leases of Pier 17 shops — was hard, but needlessly so. It’s just smart business to let the merchants sell through the busy summer season, before things close up for redevelopment. These stores were hard hit by Hurricane Sandy, which also should have made the decision easier to make. We are also pleased to see that the agreement includes more public access on the roof of the new Pier 17, more boat mooring for the museum and two large, locally sourced food markets, with one expected to open next year. The Council vote did put much more restrictive size limits on the New Market Building site, which is just outside the Seaport Historic District and which Hughes has an option on. But with so little discussion about the zoning limit, we suspect those in the know have reason to expect an attempt to get approval to build bigger. Hughes will have to go through the same review process regardless of whether it looks to build big or small. It’s never too late to begin building trust. You do it by sharing your plans early and working with a community.

letters to the editor Can’t lose our go-to market To The Editor: Re “Another supermarket will be checking out; Walgreens coming in” (news article, March 28): Right now, we are all reeling from the sudden news that our core neighborhood supermarket, Food Emporium, will close within the month. This is a terrible blow, since it will effectively eliminate the “go-to” market for those thousands living between Fifth and Seventh Aves. and 10th St. to 16th St. A significant part of the supermarket’s customers are the elderly, who aren’t able to travel far for their groceries. This doesn’t even address the loss of jobs for the very efficient, loyal employees, many of whom have been at this location for years. The market has kept abreast of the times, with offerings from the most basic to specialty foods now in demand by today’s customer base. Please tell us that it “ain’t over till it’s over.” We desperately hope something can be done, before another beauty salon, nail shop, bank or drugstore takes its place. This neighborhood is already overrun with these businesses. Vicki Margolis

Morton Williams to the rescue To The Editor: Re “Another supermarket will be checking out; Walgreens coming in” (news article, March 28): If anyone has an idea for a replacement location, please let me know. We’d consider opening a Morton Williams supermarket there. You can send me a note on our Web site: www.mortonwilliams.com . Avi Kaner Kaner is vice president and co-owner, Morton Williams Associated Supermarkets

Most park users are residents To The Editor: Re “NID critics poke holes in ‘unfair’ tax plan for park” (news article, March 28): As a resident who uses the Hudson River Park frequently — and whose property values are higher as a result of this wonderful amenity — I have little doubt that the majority of the park’s visitors are residents. Go there on any morning before work, or in the middle of the day, and you will see parents and caregivers with their children. Maintaining this amenity is critical and I see it as an invest-

ment in my front yard and in my property. I also like the fact that the median will be maintained. What an eyesore! It’s an embarrassment for our community and frankly our city. Aren’t business improvement districts the mechanism that has supported Union Square Park and medians elsewhere? I believe the Broadway medians are maintained by a BID. What they are suggesting doesn’t quite seem unprecedented to me. It just seems logical that neighbors would work and support such an incredible asset to their community. Griping and complaining will not solve the problem. All these people are complaining about paying a nominal fee — and not suggesting any solution to the real problem. Sandy Yeltser

Kavanagh on NYCHA infill plan To The Editor: I was disappointed and taken aback to read, in “Pols, public demand to be filled in on NYCHA infill plan” (news article, March 21), the highly misleading characterization of my position on the plan the New York City Housing Authority has been floating to build market-rate housing on 13 sites throughout Manhattan, including two in my district and others on the Lower East Side. The conversation I had with your reporter in his research for the article was, simply put, not accurately reported. During this conversation and during a public hearing days earlier, which your reporter attended, where I questioned NYCHA Chairperson John Rhea and other NYCHA officials at length on the record, I stressed some of the many concerns I have about the infill plan. My concerns include: (1) the crucial question of whether the specific sites proposed in NYCHA’s plan and discussed in the article are appropriate for the proposed development; (2) the potential negative impacts on local residents, including loss of existing recreational amenities and open space, and how they’d be addressed; (3) how we can be sure that NYCHA and any developers selected for these sites would follow through on promised improvements in security, utilities and basic maintenance; (4) whether the new buildings would include the appropriate level of affordability, and particularly how NYCHA would ensure that new apartments would be affordable to NYCHA residents, as promised; (5) why NYCHA officials hid crucial details about the proposal for so long, and when they will reveal important details, such as limits on the height of new buildings, setbacks from other buildings, etc.; and (6) why NYCHA’s efforts to reach out to public housing residents, community boards, elected officials and other community leaders and local residents have been so inadequate to date. Notwithstanding these concerns, I acknowledged to your reporter — and have said in public — that it is important for NYCHA to identify additional sources of revenue to cover

Continued on page 10

irA blutreiCh

Something to be happy about: Baseball season begins!

April 4 - 10, 2013

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Hudson Square rezoning not the win-win we hoped for tAlKiNG PoiNt By anDreW BerMan On March 20, the City Council voted to approve Trinity Real Estate’s Hudson Square rezoning. This was the third major rezoning in Community Board 2 within a year, following the N.Y.U. 2031 rezoning and the St. Vincent’s/Rudin rezoning. The other two rezonings were far more troubling in terms of their negative impacts and violating fundamental principles of good planning and fairness. The Hudson Square rezoning was nevertheless a mixed bag with some positive changes, but which also failed to address many community concerns and to keep many commitments made by city officials. The rezoning also shed light upon just how much the land-use approval process can be driven by real estate interests rather than the concerns of the most directly affected communities. The Hudson Square rezoning did have the opportunity to be a win-win. Developers wanted the previous zoning changed because it did not allow highly profitable residential construction, and felt property values would improve and rents would increase if the neighborhood had a larger residential base. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and many other groups wanted the allowable size and bulk of new development in Hudson Square to be reduced from the massive proportions that the old zoning allowed. There was a near-universal desire for change, and seemingly that change could have met the needs of all stakeholders. Unfortunately, that’s not quite what happened. The roots of the Hudson Square rezoning can be traced, in large part, back to the construction of the Trump Soho, the muchmaligned “condo-hotel” that threw into sharp relief the flaws in both Hudson Square’s zoning and the manner in which the city chose to interpret that zoning. In 2007, with the support of City Council Speaker Quinn and Borough President Stringer, the city approved permits for that project’s construction. G.V.S.H.P. and many others objected to the Trump Soho’s height and size, though unfortunately it was undeniable that this scale was allowable under the existing zoning. However, we also argued that as a “condo-hotel,” the Trump Soho violated

Hudson Square’s zoning prohibitions on residential and residential-hotel development, and thus should not be allowed to be built. In spite of this, city officials let the project proceed, claiming that ambiguities in the language of the existing zoning prevented them from stopping the development. They did, however, pledge to support changing the zoning to address the concerns raised regarding the Trump Soho development. For years after this, however, G.V.S.H.P. and other community groups pushed city officials to fulfill this pledge by putting forward zoning changes to appropriately shape development in Hudson Square and ensure that condo-hotels could not be used to circumvent intended zoning restrictions. But the city repeatedly refused to do so. Instead, years later, the city allowed Trinity Real Estate, a real estate developer that owns a great deal of property in Hudson Square, to put forward a privately initiated rezoning

plan. But this plan, as modified and approved by the City Planning Commission and the City Council, did not address many of the concerns community groups had originally raised. For instance, Hudson Square’s old zoning allowed new development of an extremely high density — the same density allowed in much of Midtown. But the just-approved Hudson Square rezoning still allows the exact same very high density of development. Hudson Square’s old zoning also had no explicit height limits. At 454 feet, the Trump Soho was far and away the tallest building ever constructed in the area under that zoning, giving a sense, practically speaking, of how tall one might build in Hudson Square under the old zoning. But rather than prohibiting development

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of these benefits reveals a more complicated picture. While the new zoning allows more development than the old zoning, it does place some new restrictions on what form that development may take. Under the old zoning, hotels were the most common type of new construction in Hudson Square. The new zoning makes hotel development more difficult (though not impossible), and makes residential development much more likely. Additionally, outside of the Duarte Square site, the rezoning does put new height limits in place — 290 feet on wide streets, and between 185 and 230 feet on side streets (depending upon the site, and whether or not affordable housing is included). While in this respect the rezoning may be better than the old zoning, it clearly did not go nearly far enough.

Continued on page 12

The roots of the Hudson Square rezoning can be traced, in large part, back to the construction of the Trump Soho.

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of such a scale in the future, the new Hudson Square zoning explicitly allows another development, at Duarte Square, in the southern end of Hudson Square, to rise to virtually the same height as the Trump Soho. And nothing has ever been done, in the Hudson Square rezoning or elsewhere, to address the supposed “loophole” that allows construction of condo-hotels where residences and residential hotels are prohibited. While failing to address some of Hudson Square’s problems, the rezoning actually exacerbates others. One of the area’s biggest problems is its overwhelming traffic, largely connected to the Holland Tunnel entrances and exits. Yet the Hudson Square rezoning will clearly increase the amount of development in the neighborhood, and thus inevitably increase the already crippling traffic as well. The new zoning is not without some arguable advantages. But a closer examination

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On Saturday, Time’s Up! held a “dance bike ride” to raise awareness of women’s, gay and transgender rights. In the season’s spirit, Easter eggs were passed out to participants before the ride. The eggs contained condoms and organizers called them “love bombs” after the seed bombs that garden activists throw into empty lots. Riders held up their Easter eggs at Union Square, above, before biking to the Astor Place Cube, Tompkins Square Park and then on to Brooklyn. They danced at each stop.

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letters to the editor Continued from page 8

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critical maintenance and capital repair needs. I explained that it may be “a good idea” for NYCHA to look at its property across the city to determine whether any of it might be used to generate additional revenue in a way that would be acceptable to local residents and to those of us responsible for overseeing and supporting public housing. However, I have also worked relentlessly over the past few months with a broad coalition of elected officials, community leaders and resident advocates, to make it clear to NYCHA, City Hall and our communities that we will oppose the proposed infill buildings unless and until our many concerns can be addressed in a process that includes proper community consultation. I have said this at every turn, including to another reporter for a previous news article you published (“City plans to lease NYCHA sites for luxury development,” Feb. 7). Of course, reporters sometimes mishear or misunderstand a source, but given the fact that your reporter had heard many of my concerns directly from me during the very conversation he cites, it is simply ridiculous to take the words “a good idea” grossly out of context and to print what would be quite a scoop: that “Kavanagh told The Villager that, in fact, he doesn’t oppose the infill plan and actually thinks it’s ‘a good idea’ for NYCHA to use its own property this way.” I strongly request a prompt correction or retraction. Brian Kavanagh Kavanagh is state assemblymember, 74th District Editor’s note: The Villager stands behind both its reporting and the article 100 percent. Toward the end of a phone interview, Kavanagh was asked by the reporter if he would oppose the NYCHA infill plan. On the contrary, Kavanagh — surprisingly, to the reporter — replied that, in fact, he thought the infill concept was “a good idea,” and then went on to qualify this, saying what must be done to make the infill approach acceptable to the community and to him. The article expresses all of this accurately. Kavanagh called us after the article was published, to take exception to his being quoted saying the infill plan was “a good idea.” He told us that — in his view — the article gave the impression that he supported NYCHA’s infill plan in its entirety, down to its very last detail, the exact same number of new apartments cited in the plan for each development, and so forth. However, the article does not assert this, and it was the reporter’s understanding that what Kavanagh meant was that he generally supports the idea of NYCHA using its property in a way like this to raise revenue — although that, obviously, as Kavanagh did say, the plan needs to address the community’s concerns before it goes forward. What Kavanagh stated previously at a public hearing or what he told another reporter for a previous article is one thing. However, people are not robots (fortunately) and they say different things at different times. Not saying something at a public hearing is not proof that a person didn’t say it in a private phone conversation later on. In short, the reporter did not mishear anything

— rather, it appears that the assemblymember misremembers what he actually said. The Villager will not print a correction or retraction. Again, The Villager completely stands behind its reporting and stands behind the article.

Traveling was only option To The Editor: Re “A crusty proposal: Crack down on ‘voluntary homeless’ ” (talking point, by Chad Marlow, March 28): I have a few problems with this column. First, if you’re going to do research on a group of people, then it’s best not to base your assumptions on a sensationalistic blog — especially if you’re attempting to craft legislation regarding those very folks. A blog is a collection of interviews collected, sorted and filtered by one person whose views don’t really reflect the reality of being a traveler. Have you ever spoken to a traveling kid? Can you spot the often not-so-subtle subcultural distinctions between each group? I’m going to assume you haven’t, and therefore you are not in a position to start cultural and especially legal actions. I’ve traveled on and off for the last six to seven years, and I would never ever say it was a choice. Many of us (especially us older travelers) started because there were no other viable options. With no jobs available, no parents’ house to be in, many of us began living this way in order just to keep going. Along the way, a lot of us develop skills and figure things out. A lot of the people I first met when I started traveling are now going to trade school, college or have a profession. Now, I’ve also met many people who’ve fallen by the wayside, and are stuck in that way of life. Condemning us because it appears to be a choice reflects a grave misunderstanding of where we come from. If it weren’t for traveling, I’d be dead. It provided a means for me to support myself, by dumpster diving, riding trains and playing various instruments for money. And now, I’m a professional musician living a wonderful, stable life in New Orleans. Your laws would certainly not have made it easier for me to approach where I am now. Also, you mentioned that violence from “crusties” is on the rise. I will agree with you on that. But so is the legal and cultural suppression of travelers. Might there be a connection? Quite possibly. When you alienate people and treat them with impunity and disrespect, then they’re going to respond in kind. And that violence bleeds on to everybody, including other travelers. Providing positive options is a much more humane and reasonable response. My point overall is that being a “crusty” (which is a word that I hate because I and other folks I know stay as clean as possible on the road) does not mean that you have picked that lifestyle voluntarily. Drawing a distinction based on residency really doesn’t work — especially because many homeless people lack ID — it only fosters hatred and classism toward the poor. Lyle Werner

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letters to the editor Bikes rock, but not bike locks

Continued from page 10

‘Like Jim Crow for the E.V.’ To The Editor: Re “A crusty proposal: Crack down on ‘voluntary homeless’ ” (talking point, by Chad Marlow, March 28): Why not just enforce the laws on the books against violence like assault? Why craft a “designer” law targeting a specific group of people that you’ve previously identified by their dress, their habits and their origins? Sounds like Jim Crow for the East Village. Rob Hollander

Don’t mess with Texas! To The Editor: Re “A crusty proposal: Crack down on ‘voluntary homeless’ ” (talking point, by Chad Marlow, March 28): Trash Can speaks the truth. You’re darned right that Texas wouldn’t tolerate this! I love New York City and I chose to live here when I moved from Dallas in 1985, but there are just some things decent people shouldn’t have to put up with. Quality of life can make or break a community and it’s what separates the civilized from the savages.

To The Editor: Re “Theft and the City — bike bummer” (photo, March 21) and “Bikes rule! Or bike rules? One cyclist sounds off” (talking point, by Scott Oglesby, March 21): Many years ago, I bought a Kryptonite U-lock. I was told Kryptonite would pay the value of my new bike, if stolen anywhere in the U.S. should I use this lock. Anywhere, that is, but New York City. Apparently, New York City thieves are among the best. While it was a bummer, it also made me feel oddly proud of my city. Excellent piece by Scott Oglesby! As a longtime bike rider, I especially appreciate Scott’s riff differentiating riding through red lights like a jaywalker versus barreling

through them like a speeding car, and his point that going against traffic on a one-way street for a block minimizes chances of being doored. My hope is that, as bike riding becomes more prevalent, people exiting cars, etc. will, so to speak, actually look before they leap. Joseph Hanania E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

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Trash Can: It’s a little much To The Editor: Re “A crusty proposal: Crack down on ‘voluntary homeless’ ” (talking point, by Chad Marlow, March 28): So hey, I’m David, the one in the picture. The full story, what I told the man, Steven Hirsch, was that what happened was these other traveling kids I met, they got caught shooting heroin in the park and the cops just ran them out of the park. Just because I choose to travel doesn’t mean I’m a bad person or taking from anyone else that’s out there trying to make a buck. But I’m definitely one of the few who are respectable. I only panhandled when I had too. But to put a law on only the travelers that are out there seems a little much. David, a.k.a. Trash Can

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Hudson Square rezoning not the win-win we hoped for Continued from page 9 Most Hudson Square buildings currently rise no more than 200 feet, and thus the rezoning encourages more out-of-scale construction. Worse, while Trinity’s original rezoning proposal actually called for lower height limits (in some areas — known as “Subdistrict B” — no more than 125 feet, and no more than 185 feet on side streets), through the approval process, the 125-foot limit was entirely eliminated, and the 185-foot limit was raised on several sites. Trinity’s original proposed height limit for wider streets was lowered from 320 to 290 feet through the approval process, but this decrease is not nearly as great as the aforementioned increases in allowable height that were made through the same process. The rezoning’s proponents argue that one of its benefits will be to turn Hudson Square into a 24-hour neighborhood, with full-time residents, more foot traffic and a livelier retail mix. Clearly, many local businesses, and some cultural institutions and residents, wanted such a change. But many others did not. The opponents argued that next-door Soho has more than its

In the end, developers drove this train, emerging from the rezoning much better off than before. share of round-the-clock activity and street life, and that keeping Hudson Square low key and relatively quiet was a good thing. This perspective, while raised frequently at the public hearings, was ignored in the rezoning process, and not reflected in the final results. The rezoning’s proponents also point to the inclusion of a new school, funding for recreational space, and provisions for the construction of affordable housing as public benefits. But here too a closer examination of these benefits reveals a much more complicated picture. The Hudson Square rezoning will result in the construction of thousands of units of housing. It will therefore significantly burden the area’s already overcrowded schools and very limited recreation spaces. Thus, the new school and funding for recreation spaces that accompany the rezoning, rather than being a pure benefit to the community, are actually necessary just to offset the significant additional strain upon local infrastructure and decrease in quality of life the rezoning would bring. The affordable housing benefit is more complicated as well. There are no guarantees about the amount or percentage of affordable housing that the rezoning will create, since none of the affordable housing is mandatory. Rather, the plan provides incentives to private developers to build affordable housing by allowing them to build more luxury housing than they would otherwise be permitted, in exchange for building a small amount of affordable housing.

Map courtesy Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

The Landmarks Preservation Commission has pledged, by the end of the year, to consider designating half of the remaining unlandmarked section of the proposed South Village Historic District — specifically, the yellow area north of Houston St.

But let’s assume for the sake of argument that every developer builds the maximum amount of affordable housing incentivized under the rezoning. This will still, at best, result in the construction of at least four units of luxury housing for every one unit of affordable housing. This raises questions as to whether the rezoning actually makes for a community which is more diverse and egalitarian, or less so. Finally, the Council’s deal to rezone Hudson Square did include a commitment by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to “hear and vote upon” a little more than half of the remaining proposed South Village Historic District — the section north of Houston St. — before this year’s end. This commitment is very important to G.V.S.H.P., and one we and many others fought very hard for. We argued strongly that the rezoning would put greatly increased development pressure on the neighboring, proposed South Village Historic District, and therefore that the rezoning should not be approved unless the city also landmarked the remainder of the South Village, as it promised to consider doing more than four years ago. This commitment, secured as part of the rezoning deal, is certainly a very significant step forward from where we were, given that

the commission was not moving at all on the remainder of the proposed South Village Historic District. And any landmark designation that results from this deal will have important, permanent benefits, helping to protect this area from threats well beyond any increased development pressure from the Hudson Square rezoning. But it is also important to understand that this landmarking commitment falls well short of what we called for, and still leaves a significant portion of the South Village unprotected, especially from the enormous development pressure the Hudson Square rezoning will bring to bear upon it. Not included in the deal is any commitment to landmark or even consider the section of the proposed South Village Historic District south of Houston St. Consisting of nearly half the remaining proposed district, this area is exceedingly vulnerable, and has already seen the largest surge in development activity in anticipation of the Hudson Square rezoning. With the failure to include this area in the rezoning deal, we will have to redouble our efforts to find ways to protect and preserve this historic neighborhood before it is irreversibly altered. But even north of Houston St., the deal is not unqualified good news either. The agree-

ment reached with the Landmarks Preservation Commission does not require landmark designation of this area until the end of the year — nine months after the rezoning has gone into effect. This means developers have nine months to get demolition, alteration or new construction permits from the city — permits which, if not used right away, still remain in effect and can be used after landmark designation is approved. Thus the deal allows plenty of time for continued and future destruction of this area. G.V.S.H.P. anticipated this situation exactly. We and our allies began calling upon Speaker Quinn to seek landmark designation for the South Village as a condition for approving the Hudson Square rezoning in 2011, as soon as Trinity’s draft rezoning plan was introduced. We hoped that landmark designation would be secured in advance of, or at least concurrently with, the rezoning. Additionally, while the landmarking deal calls for the South Village’s northern section to be “heard and voted upon” by the end of the year, this does not mean that the entire area will ultimately be landmarked. Though very unlikely, the commission could vote No on the landmark designation. More realistically, however, the commission could decide to landmark only part of the district that we have proposed for designation. The commission chose to landmark only about 80 percent of the first section of our proposed South Village Historic District in 2010; it landmarked less than 70 percent of our proposed Gansevoort Market Historic District in the Meatpacking District in 2003; and it landmarked only about half the area in the Far West Village we proposed for landmark designation in 2006. So the ultimate breadth and impact of this landmarking commitment is still to be determined. Things could have been different: A rezoning deal that met all sides’ needs could have been achieved in Hudson Square. This would have included lower height and bulk limits in Hudson Square — to keep new development in context, fulfill promises made after the Trump Soho, and reduce the impact upon traffic and infrastructure. And it would have also included landmark designation of the entire proposed South Village Historic District, in time to protect it from the increased and overwhelming development pressure the Hudson Square rezoning would create. This would have still allowed the creation of the residential community in Hudson Square sought by the rezoning’s proponents, and still allowed developers to profit handsomely from new, highly lucrative development. But in the end, it was in fact developers who drove this train, and who emerged from the rezoning much better off than they were under the old zoning. What had been discussed six years ago as a publicly initiated rezoning to address community concerns became a private developer’s rezoning that many people fought long and hard to improve. What could have been a win-win ended up as a great deal for real estate interests, with mixed results for everyone else. Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

April 4 - 10, 2013

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Photos by Jefferson Siegel

Hats on parade…and look what ‘Auntie Pasta’ cooked up Plenty of Downtown creativity was on display at Sunday’s Easter Parade on Fifth Ave. in Midtown. From left, Chelsea resident Paul Nagle, who was arts liaison to former City Councilmember Alan Gerson, tipped his cap to “Les Miserables;” East Villager Rolando Vega transformed himself into “Auntie Pasta;” and Carmen Garcia, also from Chelsea, wore her tribute to the new pope, Francis.

Trust must improve its communication and transparency TALKING POINT By Deborah J. Glick I read “The Hudson River Park must generate more revenue” (talking point, by Diana Taylor et al., March 28) with interest, and am pleased that the Hudson River Park Trust board of directors seems to be willing to move beyond the proposal for residential development at Pier 40. And while it’s true that the task force created by the Trust was attended by local elected officials and community board chairpersons, as well as others with direct interest in the park, the agendas were developed by the Trust and reflected the Trust’s desired changes to the Hudson River Park Act, most notably the desire to allow residential development within the park, which they pressed for vigorously against strong objections.   Whether or not we agree that the best way for parks to be funded is to require them to generate funds for their own upkeep, regrettably that is the structure that was set in the legislation creating the Hudson River Park. Unfortunately, the Trust has curiously undermined aspects of the law that would have provided the park with more funding. For example, recognizing a need for ongo-

ing income, the park’s founding legislation includes a requirement that the passenger ship terminal, at W. 52nd St., share revenue with the park on an ongoing basis. The revenue share was to be 15 percent for the first five years, and then increased to 20 percent. In view of the focus on the park’s finances it was an unpleasant surprise that the Trust agreed in 2006 to waive those revenues for 20 years, without any public hearing as required by the legislation. It’s not clear how much money has been lost, but it is a well-documented fact that there has been a dramatic increase in commercial activity at the passenger ship terminal. Another opportunity to create a funding stream for the park was lost when the Trust did not heavily lobby Trinity Real Estate during the recent Hudson Square rezoning process. There is no doubt that the Hudson Square community will view the Hudson River Park as a neighborhood amenity, and it is likely that real estate interests will sell apartments on that basis. While I, and others, pushed for ongoing contributions to the park to be a cornerstone of the rezoning agreement, the Trust and the city administration showed an unwillingness to link the two projects. It should be noted that the paid facilitator for the Hudson River Park Task Force

was also associated with the Trinity application for the rezoning of Hudson Square, but resigned when it became apparent that there was a glaring conflict of interest. Fortunately, when the rezoning came before the City Council, Speaker Quinn did get a one-time contribution for Pier 40 to help pay for the repair of the roof but I found the Trust’s lack of support on this issue to be surprising. Now the Trust is actively pursuing a neigh-

The task force route has been an inside game with agendas developed by the Hudson River Park Trust. borhood improvement district (NID) that would provide a new revenue stream by taxing those living close to the park. While I am glad that the Trust is pursuing a revenue stream that is not reliant on inappropriate development, I worry that it is undercutting

its own efforts by excluding two neighborhoods on the horizon, Hudson Square and Hudson Yards. These neighborhoods will bring thousands of new residents, many of whom are likely to be children, to the neighborhood and yet they would not be party to the NID or required to make any other sort of financial contribution to the ongoing operations of the park. While the Trust’s talking point in The Villager continues to focus on the benefits of residential development, even as they recognize that the focus on residential has proven to be a regrettable distraction, I remain hopeful that we can turn the page and move forward. In order to do so, the Trust needs to commit to a more communicative process that includes the general public, if we are to see an appropriate collaboration between the Trust and the West Side neighborhoods that use the park. Thus far, the task force route has proven to be an inside game that lacks transparency and does not allow for stakeholders to vet any ideas before the public; it is my hope that we can now work together with the public to come up with viable and appropriate solutions to help sustain our park.  Glick is assemblymember, 66th District

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Things change: If not Soho House, what will we get? C L AYTO N By Clayton Patterson In 1998 when Captain Cooper of the Seventh Precinct was asked about the explosion of quality-of-life types of crime in my area of the Lower East Side, Houston to Delancey St., he stated we were now living in an Entertainment Zone. Who thought up the Entertainment Zone idea? Who was behind this plan with a name? Surely it was not Captain Cooper. Was this a BID secret plan? Which politicians were in on this? I do not know, and was never able to find out the answer. I’m still asking the question. We soon learned the meaning of Entertainment Zone. Translation: The focus will be on clearing out the old businesses and bringing in bars and restaurants. It worked. Now every weekend is like spring break, hordes of young people, mostly in their 20s, come to the L.E.S. to get washed in alcohol. The late Marcia Lemmon called it an Alcohol Theme Park. At first we assumed that there were rules and regulations governing how many liquor licenses an area could have. This turned out not to be true. There were many ways around the law. Tell the community board you were opening a restaurant, which soon turned into a bar. The club on the end of my block is directly across the street from a school. It’s not a problem because the main entrance to the club is on Houston St., and the school’s entrance is on Essex St. The amount of rent a landlord could charge a bar or restaurant was way beyond what a traditional neighborhood business could pay. Meanwhile, landlords used dirty tricks used to force out long-term, lower-rent residents. I either had to adapt, go crazy and become a hater, or move. So before automatically being against I decided to check out the new. Here are some of my experiences: At night walking down Orchard St. I spotted four young people working on opening a new store. I went in talked to the people to see what was up and it turned out to be Alife, a new-concept art and sneaker store. Soon I had a group of new friends. The hotel project at 180 Orchard St. wiped out that Alife location. Then there was the Christodora, at Ninth St. and Avenue B. After the 1988 police riot, the Christodora and Red Square, at E. Houston St. and Avenue A, became two of the main symbols of the antigentrification movement. For a number of years, protests started or ended at the Christodora. The Christodra had had a long history public service as a former settlement house. Now it was expensive private property. Just east of Christodora is 605 E Ninth St., the old P.S. 64. By the late 1970s,

CHARAS, a socially minded Lower East Side Puerto Rican group, took over the old P.S. 64 and renamed it CHARAS/El Bohio (“The Hut”). CHARAS/El Bohio was led by Chino Garcia, Bimbo Rivas and Armando Perez. It was an active, multiethnic, age-diverse, community cultural center, filled with artists working in studios, poets giving readings, playwrights, actors, putting on plays, filmmakers screening movies, curators mounting art shows. In 1998, the Giuliani administration put the building — which was still cityowned — up for auction. Scores of Lower East Siders, including me, turned out at 1 Police Plaza to try to disrupt the auction.

I’ve been offered a free Soho House membership. I haven’t decided if I’ll join. Despite the release of live crickets during the bidding, Gregg Singer was able to buy the building and took ownership of it in 1999. Because of community resistance against his development plans, though, the building stayed empty. He started pushing the idea of building a 27-story student dorm, first reported by The Villager. Community activists were looking for ways to stop Singer’s skyscraper. Word got out that people in Christodora were now also fighting to stop Singer’s project. And then I did something I never expected to do. I entered the Christodora. Went up to the penthouse. A man named Michael Rosen was leading this charge. In the end, Rosen and friends — working with former City Councilmember Margarita Lopez — were able to landmark the old P.S. 64, meaning it couldn’t be demolished, or even partially demolished, for Singer’s tower. I later learned that Rosen and his wife had adopted two neighborhood boys from the projects who they met at a chance pickup baseball game in Tompkins Square Park. As time went on I came to respect Rosen and we became good friends. The Singer building is still empty, a dangerous, abandoned eyesore in the community. CBGB, the infamous L.E.S. music venue, started in 1973 and lost its lease in 2006. In 2007, Hilly Kristal the visionary whose name was on the lease, died. I went to a few meetings to see if anything could be done to save the historic space. It became obvious that the family was split into different factions working against each other. Next question: What business was going to take over this landmark space? The next tenant was John Varvatos, the elitist fashion designer, selling expensive Varvatos product. At first glance, it was a tragic spit in the eye to everything

Clayton Patterson.

CBGB stood for. People protested. My take on it was before I got too involved in being against the man — and Varvatos is a real person — I thought I should meet the guy. He was hard to reach. We exchanged e-mails. It became tense. He finally came down with his right-hand person. We talked and found common ground. Yes, he was a high-end clothing designer, but his other main love is music. Once a month he cleared the space and put on a free rock concert. To get on the guest list all you had to do was send an RSVP to the Web site. Some shows featured famous musicians; at others up-and-coming bands were competing for a recording contract. CBGB was over. Better Varvatos with a sensitivity to the history than a Prada or some other expensive store, bar or restaurant with no connection to the community. Now comes Soho House wanting to take over the old Nieberg Funeral Home, at 137-139 Ludlow St. I check around and find out the are a number of Soho Houses around the world. In New York City, there is a Soho House in the Meatpacking District. I visited this Soho House. It is a private, expensive-to-join art club. My first reaction was, Ughh. I have never fit comfortably into the mainstream art world. The debate over Soho House coming to Ludlow is centered on its getting a liquor license. If they don’t get a liquor license they won’t take the space. LES Dwellers, a local advocacy group, formed to stop more liquor licenses in the area where Soho House wants to develop. The law is on LES Dwellers’ side because the block has maxed out on the number of licenses

allowed. At this point, my position is different from LES Dwellers. I appreciate not wanting anymore licenses because we are beyond saturated with alcohol drinking holes. But I’ve also come to realize that we are now an Entertainment Zone and that there are enough laws on the books to bring the nightlife under control. Using noise meters, the police now control how loud and long the bands can play in Tompkins Square Park: No conga playing after 10 p.m. Basically, there is no reason why our streets should be this noisy and with this many drunks. Greenwich Village and Times Square have their share of liquor licenses and they don’t have the drunken stupidity we are faced with. I reached out to Rachel Smith, Soho House’s membership manager. She convinced me that, yes, Soho House is private and pricey, but if a creative person wants to join, he or she can trade work for a membership. There have always been members-only clubs in New York City. The YMCA is one. Private is not my problem. I see many of the L.E.S. commercial and residential establishments as private because of the cost of buying, eating, drinking or living there. If Soho House is going to bring some kind of interactive creative space to the community, I’m for this. If the neighbors fear the noise from its rooftop space will be similar to the hell the Allen St. Thompson rooftop creates, then bring that point up with Soho House. This new space will become something. If not Soho House, then what? Tear down the building and give us a new glass building? Another expensive clothing boutique? Luxury apartments? I have been offered an exhibit of my photos at the Soho House on the West Side, which would come with a free membership. I have not decided if I will join or not. At this moment, I do not see Soho House as a place for me to hang my cap. But, if creative people I know want to join and do not have the money, then I’ll help to see if I can negotiate something. The people at Soho House, including the company’s C.E.O., have said they will meet with people. There is no problem with meeting someone. I did go to the meeting with the Barclays Capital representatives about the 180 Orchard St. hotel. All wore expensive clothing. There were at least five distinct foreign accents. I found them arrogant and completely out of touch with local residents. I don’t see ever setting foot in the place. And they will pull the old door trick, use the Orchard St. entrance instead of Ludlow, and they will get a liquor license. This license business has always been an insider’s game. Not much different from the wink-and-nod days when our area was an illegal drug supermarket.

April 4 - 10, 2013

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villager arts & entertainment

We all love to watch

Director Antonio Campos relies on the eye to get into the brain of his title character FILM SIMON KILLER Directed by Antonio Campos Opens April 5 At IFC Center 323 Sixth Ave., at W. Third St. Visit ifccenter.com

BY GARY M. KRAMER Simon Killer” is a fascinating, slow-burn character study. Simon (Brady Corbet), an American student who studies the connections between the eye and the brain, heads to Paris after breaking up with his girlfriend. He is lonely, horny, and lost, and director Antonio Campos follows him closely — often tracking him from behind — as he wanders around the city. When Simon meets Victoria (Mati Diop), a prostitute, he gets off with her, and they connect again for increasingly more intimate sex. The couple eventually hatches a plan to film and blackmail her married clients. But things do not necessarily go as planned. In a recent Skype interview, Campos spoke about his film, explaining the appeal of Simon, a young man whose behavior is at times inscrutable. “I find him interesting for all the reasons he seems normal and all the reasons he seems dangerous — how his pathetic and babyish aspects become kind of diabolical,” the filmmaker said. “I like that there is a shift in your perspective of his character. He is a young guy in his 20s, and you immediately connect with that. It was a slow process of getting to something scary, so you had to have a connection with him before that realization happened.” The film’s fly-on-the-wall approach — what Campos described as “the cognitive camera” — is effective, particularly because viewers become part of the action by following Simon, as well as Victoria, closely and intimately. Simon often seems desensitized, as if in a bubble, as he moves through his life with a mix of purpose and hesitation. “That was exactly it!,” Campos agreed. “You have this wide range of emotion looking at him. We were very aware of when you would like him or wouldn’t like him. We were conscious of not going overboard, and yet it was important to humanize him. He’s complicated. He isn’t a sociopath. It

Photo courtesy of IFC Films

Brady Corbet in the title role of Antonio Campos’ “Simon Killer.”

seems like he’s gone down the wrong path, but there is something inside him he’s trying to satisfy or connect to — or a barrier he tries to break — and we wanted pick away at that.” As the film reveals Simon’s true nature, Campos provides a sensory experience for audiences. Viewers hear the music in Simon’s iPod and can even feel the texture of his skin. The film is full of references to eyes — from the iris of a ceiling window at the Louvre to the eye of the camera recording Victoria’s tricks to a strobe-like flashing visual effect

ters in the film to filmmaking.” Campos also agreed that the sense of smell — two characters mention the smell of sex — is a palpable factor in drawing his characters. “Yes! Something about Simon was very primal, and communicating these senses through cinema was important,” he said. “I wanted to explore this male character almost as if I was studying an animal. At the end of the day, we’re all animals getting to the broadest experiences.” The filmmaker is clearly interested in

‘People get upset the film is graphic, but there are others who think it’s not graphic enough. There’s more sex than violence on purpose. It’s not a film made to satisfy all audience members, but if you give yourself into the experience, you will be satisfied. But if you’re not patient with it, you’re not giving into it.’

the director periodically employs to evoke “blinking.” Campos explained he chose this visual motif to find “a way into Simon” as he uses his eyes and brain as a way to see the world. “The thematic connection made sense to me,” the director said. “I guess there is always something that connects the charac-

Simon as a sexual animal. In one encounter, he has sex doggie-style with Victoria, and in another scene she excites him by pushing him up against a wall and dry humping him before forcing him onto the bed and anally penetrating him with her wet thumb. Asked whether Simon is a latent homosexual, Campos sounded intrigued.

“I think Simon is confused, and that’s part of it,” the director said. “When we talked about that sex scene, we said that it’s when both characters are getting fucked in that scene that they both enjoy sex the most. With Simon, we were exploring this character who is trying to figure himself out, and that’s there. We were also thinking about ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ too. There’s something sexually charged in Paris, it’s in the air.” Campos’ frank approach to depicting sexuality is a key strength of “Simon Killer.” “It is raw and awkward and exciting,” he said. “People get upset the film is graphic, but there are others who think it’s not graphic enough. There’s more sex than violence on purpose. It’s not a film made to satisfy all audience members, but if you give yourself into the experience, you will be satisfied. But if you’re not patient with it, you’re not giving into it.” Whether Simon’s sexual confusion prompts his behavior at the end of the film is best left for audiences to decide. “It’s up to you,” Campos said. “I think flawed characters are easier to relate to. They seem more human. I feel the nature of the story is that you allow yourself to relate or connect to them or you fight that. I allowed myself to connect to them in whatever way happens naturally. I go with as open mind as possible. If a film makes me feel upset or uncomfortable, that’s a successful film. I want an experience. Doesn’t have to be negative. Makes me see the world in a way I haven’t seen.” At its best, “Simon Killer” stimulates precisely that sort of broader perspective on the world.

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THE MANNAHATTA PROJECT

In this free lecture, landscape ecologist Eric Sanderson will discuss his work at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) as well as how recent storms have impacted the Manhattan landscape. Sanderson will also talk about Manhattan’s early history — harkening back to when Henry Hudson sailed his ship, the Half Moon, up the river that now bears his name. For the past decade, Sanderson has directed The Mannahatta Project, a recreation of the ecology of Manhattan Island at the time of its European discovery in 1609. Part of the WCS’s Human Footprint initiative (which maps the human race’s impact on the surface of the earth), The Mannahatta Project has recreated a rich and diverse landscape in digital form — using new methods in geographic analysis (and a remarkable 18th-century map prepared by British Headquarters in 1782 charting Manhattan with over 70 miles of streams and at least 21 ponds). Free. Thurs., April 18 at 1pm. At 6 River Terrace, Battery Park City (South end of River Terrace, north of the Irish Hunger Memorial). For info, visit bpcparks.org.

Image courtesy of Eric Sanderson and WCS.

What is, what was, what will be: Landscape ecologist Eric Sanderson lectures on his Mannahatta Project, on April 18.

WOMBAT THEATRE COMPANY: “NO EXIT”

WILL RYMAN’S “BIRD”

Image courtesy of ArtQuilt Gallery and the artist Quoth the raven, “Nevermore” — after April 21, that is. That’s the date through Beth Carney’s work draws on her backwhich artist Will Ryman’s 12-foot high, ground as a dancer. See “CHAOS.” 12-foot wide, 14-foot long sculpture will roost on the Flatiron’s Public Plaza, near it “CHAOS & CHASMS: A Rhythmic 23rd St. and Broadway. Made of 5,500 Journey,” the artist displays selections actual and fabricated nails (and inspired informed by her background as a dancer. by Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”), “I work in an improvisational manner,” Ryman says the work “is about changing says Carney, “exploring line, shape, color the meaning of an object. A nail is cold. and motion to create compositions that It’s hard. It is used to connect objects. But dance.” when it’s multiplied, and the scale altered, At The ArtQuilt Gallery (133 W. 25th it goes from hard to soft, from menacing St., btw. Sixth & Seventh Aves.). Open to approachable.” Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm and Sun./Mon. by appointment. “CHAOS” is on view CHAOS & CHASMS: through Sat., April 13. It’s followed by A RHYTHMIC JOURNEY Deb Hyde’s “Sunshine and Shadow,” The ArtQuilt Gallery — New York from April 30 through June 8. For info, City’s only gallery focused on contem- call 212-807-945, visit artquiltgallerynyc. porary art quilts — is putting its cur- com or send an email to info@artquiltgalrent focus on Beth Carney. In the exhib- lerynyc.com.

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

ANOTHER LIFE Written & Directed by KAREN MALPEDE starring George Bartenieff with Abbas Noori Abbood, Christen Gifford, Abraham Makany, Alex Tavis & Di Zhu.

Thursday - Sunday, April 4 - 21

Thu-Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm All Seats $18/tdf

CZECHOSLOVAKAMERICAN MARIONETTE THEATER in

KING EXECUTIONER Written & Directed by VIT HOREJS Thursday - Sunday April 4 - 7 Thu-Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm All Seats $10/tdf

Photo by Scott Stiffler

“Bird” is on display through April 21.

WENDY OSSERMAN DANCE COMPANY in

APPETITE

Performers: Lauren Ferguson, Emily Vetsch & Wendy Osserman with Briana Bartenieff, Laurie Bennett, Hallie Hayne & Liliana Kelson.

Thursday - Sunday April 4 - 7

Thu - Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm

All Seats $15 Children under 12 $10

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

Jean Paul Sartre’s “No Exit” has been a touchstone of the philosopher’s existentialist thought ever since it was first performed in Nazi-occupied Paris in 1944, spawning one of Sartre’s most famous (and perhaps misinterpreted) quotes: “Hell is other people.” Now, Wombat Theatre is staging the play — which centers on three dead people who are spending an eternal afterlife together in a single room — by taking it out of Sartre’s original mid-century context, forcing audience members to consider his themes of soul searching, soul baring and a brutal human condition amid present-day societal struggles. The new production takes place on a stage shrouded in a circular curtain. There is no beginning and no end to the room. There are no walls. There is no time period — the sound design evokes the empty, glaring presence of a diver in a shark cage. The question is…what does forever feel like? April 18 & 19 at 8pm, April 20 at 3pm & 8pm and April 21 at 3pm. At Roy

Photo courtesy of Wombat Theatre Co.

Rita Thompson, playing Estelle, and Matthew Thompson, playing Garcin, in rehearsal for “No Exit.”

Arias Studios, Stage 2 (Fourth Floor, 300 W. 43rd St., just west of Eighth Ave.). For tickets ($18 for evening shows, $13 for matinees), visit ovationtix.com.

—Sam Spokony

April 4 - 10, 2013

The Power of Silence

Trav S.D. makes the case for wordless mirth, then and now BOOKS CHAIN OF FOOLS: SILENT COMEDY AND ITS LEGACIES FROM NICKELODEONS TO YOUTUBE

By Trav S.D. Price: $21.95 Published by Bear Manor Media Visit bearmanormedia.com Also visit travsd.wordpress.com

TRAV S.D.’s “CHAIN OF FOOLS” BOOK LAUNCH Free Wed., April 10 at 7:30pm At Dixon Place 161 Chrystie St., btw. Rivington & Delancey Sts. For info, call 212-219-0736 Visit dixonplace.org

By scott stiFFler Performer, playwright, producer, author and all-around troublemaker Trav S.D. — who until recently served as this publication’s beloved Downtown theater columnist — is one of the best friends comedians, musicians and uncategorizable stage performers ever had. He proved that with the publication of 2005’s “No Applause, Just Throw Money, The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous” — a sprawling tome which, like much of the author’s prolific blog work, was written with a scholar’s sense of dutiful reporting leavened by an incredibly sharp sense of humor and cut with a generous amount of cultural observations and criticisms that put today’s “New Vaudeville” and burlesque circuit into its appropriate context. The good Mr. S.D. is at it again, with a new work destined to function as, if not a sequel, then most certainly the other half of a pair of damn fine bookends. The space in-between might well be filled with DVDs of everything from

Image courtesy of Bean Manor Media

Trav S.D. lanches his latest book, at Dixon Place, on April 10.

Chaplin films to “Our Gang” shorts to “Cannonball Run” and the complete library of Jerry Lewis films. All of these, and dozens of deserved but forgotten also-rans, get the detailed examination they so richly deserve — in “Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to YouTube.” Dense and detailed but always written with an infectious fan’s love of the game, “Chain” — as its title implies — is a chronological examination of laughinducing wordless expression that the author actually manages to trace all the way back to 27 centuries ago…right up to the sort of physical comedy that’s being posted on YouTube as you read this. That means you’ll come to enjoy (or at least aesthetically appreciate) the relevance, and relative merits, of The Keystone Cops as well as Adam Sandler. The author even manages to explain why all of France seems to be in love with Jerry Lewis. Curious? Ask Trav S.D. about that (as well as why he’s so hard on Tim Conway), at the book launch party (April 10, 7:30pm, at Dixon Place). Before the book signing and celebration, there will be a screening of new, original silent comedies made by the author himself (with Hilary Chaplain), Piper McKenzie Productions (Hope Cartelli & Jeff Lewonzyk), Jeff Seal, Jim Moore and Christopher Michael.

OCCUPY Community News

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April 4 - 10, 2013

BY SEAN EGAN & SCOTT STIFFLER T H E C H I L D R E N ’ S R O O M AT P O E T S H O U S E T h e C h i l d r e n ’s R o o m a t P o e t s H o u s e i n B P C i s a bright and vibrant space that encourages literacy and creativity. In addition to housing many poetry books by classic and contemporary authors, the Children’s Room is designed to stimulate the imaginations of young ones and drive them to create poems and art of their own. From Thurs.-Sat., child r e n a r e f r e e t o d r a w i n s p i r a t i o n f r o m t h e r o o m ’s card catalogue full of quirky objects, and type up their own masterpieces on the vintage typewriters p r o v i d e d . E v e r y T h u r s . a t 1 0 a m , “ Ti n y P o e t Ti m e ” offers poetry readings and music for toddlers. On A p r i l 6 a t 1 1 a m , t h e C h i l d r e n ’s R o o m w i l l h o s t a performance of “Blown Away by Poetry” — a puppet show that teaches kids about poetic devices like simile and alliteration. On April 18 at 4pm, Poets House will present an all-ages Poem in Your Pocket Day celebration, featuring poetry readings from local school children and music by the Knickerbocker Chamber Orchestra . A t 1 0 R i v e r Te rr a c e ( a t M u r r a y S t . ) . H o u r s : C h i l d r e n ’s R o o m o p e n Thurs.-Sat., 11am-5pm. Admission: Free. For info, call 212-431-7920 or visit poetshouse.org THE SCHOLASTIC STORE Held every Saturday at 3 p m , S c h o l a s t i c ’s i n - s t o r e a c t i v i t i e s a r e d e s i g n e d to get kids reading, thinking, talking, creating and moving. On April 6, the “Science Spectacular” (ages 5 and up) gives kids a chance to take chances, make mistakes and get messy! Ms. Frizzle is back again with demonstrations of some cool science kits. Hop into the Magic School Bus for a picture with the Frizz! On April 13, “Emergency Vehicles” (the latest book from the Discover More series) comes to life, with a visit from SoHo’s own Ladder 20. Learn fire safety facts from real live firefighters, and make your own fire fighter hat (appropriate for ages 4 and up). At 11am every Tu e s . , We d . a n d T h u r s . , t h e S c h o l a s t i c S t o r y t e l l er brings tales to life at Daily Storytime. At 557 Broadway (btw. Prince & Spring Sts.). Store hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-7pm and Sun., 11am-6pm. For info, call 212-343-6166 or visit scholastic.com/ sohostore. S AT U R D AY F A M I LY P R O G R A M S AT T H E SKYSCRAPER MUSEUM Explore tall buildings as objects of design, products of technolo g y, s i t e s o f c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d p l a c e s o f w o r k and residence at The Skyscraper Museum. Their spring “Saturday Family Program” series (taking place from 10:30-11:45am) features workshops designed to introduce children and their families

t o t h e p r i n c i p l e s o f a r c h i t e c t u r e a n d e n g i n e e ring through hands-on activities. On April 6, also designed for ages 7-14, “Cathedral of Commerce” explores how the Woolworth tower used the architectural vocabulary of medieval cathedrals. On April 27, “Woolworth’s Gargoyles” takes kids ages 3-10 on a quick tour of the exhibition “Woolworth Building @ 100,” then reveals why its design i n c l u d e s s c u l p t u r e s c a r v e d t o r e s e m b l e a m o n k e y, dragon or lion (hint: it has something to do with r a i n w a t e r a n d t h e r o o f ! ) . A f t e r t h e t o u r, p a r t i c i pants will design skyscrapers with visual stories of their own. On May 11, kids of all ages are i n v i t e d t o a M o t h e r ’s D a y C a r d Wo r k s h o p t o c o n struct architecturally-themed cards for mom. All workshops ($5 per family) take place at 10:30am. Registration is required. Call 212-945-6324 or e m a i l e d u c a t i o n @ s k y s c r a p e r. o r g . A t 3 9 B a t t e r y P l a c e ( b t w. F i r s t P l a c e & L i t t l e We s t S t . ) . R e g u l a r m u s e u m h o u r s a r e We d . - S u n . , 1 2 - 6 p m . A d m i s s i o n is $5 ($2.50 for students/seniors). F A C E T O F A C E : A N E X H I B I T AT T H E C H I L DREN’S MUSEUM OF THE ARTS The Museum celebrates its quarter century of promoting selfexpression and esteem — by presenting a new exhibit that offers a fascinating exploration of self-identity through still, moving and living portraits, as portrayed by children using traditional methods of painting and drawing, as well a s t e c h n o l o g y. O n v i e w t h r o u g h J u n e 9 , “ F a c e t o F a c e ” f e a t u r e s 4 0 p o r t r a i t s s e l e c t e d f r o m C M A’s P e r m a n e n t C o l l e c t i o n o f c h i l d r e n ’s a r t f r o m o v e r 50 countries, dating back to the 1930s. “When viewed together,” says CMA Deputy Director Lucy Ofiesh, “the exhibit represents the diversity of self-expression and identity across the world and through the years.” To incorporate CMA’s philosophy of hands-on-art-making, the exhibit will be accompanied by a variety of interactive installations that examine the texture, shape and sound of portraits. Hands-on stations encourage visitors to become part of the exhibit, including reimagined versions of a typical self-portrait station. At the CM A M edia Lab, visit ors can take phot os that will be projected on the wall. These photos will stream into a montage that will be accessioned into the collection and will also serve as a fascinating time-lapse of the exhibit as a whole. At t h e C h i l d r e n ’s M u s e u m o f t h e A r t s , i n t h e C M A G a l l e r y ( 1 0 3 C h a r l t o n S t . ) . H o u r s : M o n . & We d . , 12-5pm; Thurs. & Fri., 12-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 10am5pm. Admission: $11 (Seniors and 0-12 months, free, from 4-6pm). Thursdays are pay-as-you-wish. For info, call 212-274-0986 or visit cmany.org. For Twitter: twitter.com/cmainnyc.

14th STREET Y FREE SUMMER THEATER CAMP PREVIEW WORKSHOPS

Created in partnership with Amas Musical Theatre, MCC Theater and the Red Fern Theatre Company, the 14th Street Y’s Teen Theater Summer Institute offers students entering sixth to ninth grades the opportunity to study with theater experts from a variety of fields and perspectives. Through programs such as master classes, physical theater and script analysis, students will receive discipline-specific instruction in the areas of musical theater, acting and theater for social justice. At the conclusion of the July 8-19 Institute, graduates will present their work for an audience of family and friends (in the Y’s newly renovated, state-of-the-art black box theater). Two free workshops, hosted by the 14th Street Y, will provide an opportunity to meet some of the teaching artists and learn more about the Institute. Bring your questions about blocking and script analysis to the Actor Skills workshop (Wed., April 10 from 5-6:30pm). Then, at the D.I.Y. Theater workshop (1-2:30pm on Sun., May 12), learn how to create theater about what matters most to you. Both free workshops take place at The Theater at the 14th Street Y (344 E. 14th St., btw. 1st & 2nd Aves.). To register for a workshop or learn more about the summer program, call 646-395-4322, or visit 14streety.org/teens. The cost of the Teen Theater Summer Institute is $900.

Photo by Whitney Browne

TRINITY CHURCH PRESENTS FAMILY FRIDAY PIZZA & MOVIE NIGHT

Every so often, every family should get together for pizza and a movie. To help make that noble goal a regular thing, Trinity Wall Street hosts this third-Friday-of-the-month event for kids who are hungry (for food and entertainment) and adults who are too tired to cook (or even dial for delivery!). The April 19 edition features “Kung Fu Panda.” Then, in May, it’s Dr. Seuss’ “The Lorax.” Free. From 6-7:30pm. At Charlotte’s Place (107 Greenwich St., rear of 74 Trinity Place, btw. Rector & Carlisle Sts.). For more info, call 212-602-0800 or visit trinitywallstreet.org/calendar. For Twitter: @CharlottesPlc. For Facebook, facebook.com/ CharlottesPlaceNYC.

La MaMa KIDS PRESENTS “THE MAGIC POT”

Shadow puppets, dance, music, storytelling and mask-making for youngsters and their families all figure into the schedule of events that are part of “La MaMa Kids.” This new series of creative workshops, La MaMa’s first such regular series of programming for family audiences, is sure to inspire a love of theater — and likely help launch a whole new generation of theatrical performers! The next installment in the series (which runs through June) is “The Magic Pot.” Julia Martin’s re-telling of an ancient magical, mathematical Chinese tale concerns a very special pot that doubles everything! A workshop after the performance (which features music and puppets) will include craft-making. Sat., April 13 at 11am. At La MaMa’s Ellen Stewart Theatre (66 E. 4th St., 2nd floor). Admission is $10 per family. For a full schedule of events and more info, call 212-4757710 or visit lamama.org.

April 4 - 10, 2013

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Outrage over infill scheme at senior housing complex Continued from page 1 senior residents would be replaced by a 121,500-square-foot, 97-unit building with additional space for retail stores on the ground floor. NYCHA is set to release a request for proposals (R.F.P.) for interested developers near the end of this month, but many local residents and politicians are calling for a slowdown in the process and for greater transparency. Issac Quinerly, 71, a Meltzer tenant and Manhattan resident since 1984, said he feels NYCHA has misled him about the details of the development. “I went to the meetings and wasn’t impressed by what I seen,” Quinerly said. “They were talking about how they were going to save our building, so I guess that just means no more outside time for us. They’re leasing the land to a private developer for 99 years? What kind of lease is that? By the time it’s up we will all be dead!” Karen Brown has lived in a privately owned apartment building behind the park at 105 E. Second St. for 33 years. She is a member of Friends of Meltzer, a group of local residents fighting to preserve the park for the seniors and the neighborhood. “We are very uncomfortable with the way NYCHA is handling the project,” Brown said. “We understand that there is a deficit, and that the development will bring in money, but does it really require taking away a park for senior citizens? Meltzer has a parking lot that could be made into a profitable one. There just doesn’t seem to be any digging down for creative ideas to create revenue.” Fred Harris, executive vice president for Development at NYCHA, said that he wants every resident to understand what’s going on, and why it’s happening. “We have set up multiple meetings because we want to get feedback from residents, and then get back to them with helpful answers and actions,” Harris said. Referring to the meeting for the Meltzer residents, he said, “We know that not everyone speaks English, so at the meeting we had a simultaneous translation through headsets in Russian, Chinese and Spanish

Photo by Paul Bufano

Meltzer Tower residents Issac Quinerly, left, and Shirley Jackson talking to each other in the outdoor seating area where the new “80/20” development would go. 

to ensure that everyone could follow along.” Harris said that his primary concern is addressing the impact of the development on Meltzer residents and on the community. “We have been looking into alternatives to taking away the park, but so far we haven’t found any,” Harris said. “It’s certainly very possible to leave a portion of the seating area, and we can do some reconfiguring, but it wouldn’t be too much smaller at this point. We understand residents enjoy it, so the plan isn’t to have the buildings right up against each other.” Councilmember Rosie Mendez chairs the City Council’s Committee on Public Housing, which will hold a hearing on the plan at City Hall on Fri., April 5, at 10 a.m. She said she is asking NYCHA for additional meetings with meaningful input from the community to ensure that everyone’s voice is heard. “The development has disadvantages

Scoopy’s

notebook Continued from page 3 TO SLURPEE — OR NOT TO SLURPEE? The No 7-Eleven Players are excited to announce that Reverend Billy and his Choir will be joining them for a dramatic protest this Saturday in Tompkins Square Park at 1 p.m. Bob Holman of the Bowery Poetry Club called to tell us they’re planning some rockin’ anti-chain store skits.

just as it has benefits, so you really have to take everything into account,” Mendez said. “While Meltzer wasn’t flooded by Hurricane Sandy, it lost power for five days. With these buildings, developers will include generators so that in the event of a blackout, [the whole complex] can stay powered up, which is crucial for a senior population.” A significant portion of the money generated from the new buildings will go toward repairs and maintenance, including fixing roofs, elevators and lobbies and upgrading security systems in the existing complexes where the new projects are sited. NYCHA reports that Meltzer Tower needs $10.5 million in capital building improvements over the next five years. Harris said the new tower would help pay for the necessary work. He estimated it would generate around $970,000 annu-

MARLOW NOT BACKING DOWN: Following his savaging of the crusties and their lifestyle in his incendiary talking point in The Villager last week, we asked Chad Marlow if he wanted to comment for our article this week, in which the travelers talk back (even though they hadn’t actually read his piece yet). Marlow’s reply: “I am not going to respond to comments by people who didn’t bother to even read my op-ed, except to say I was not anticipating a positive or constructive response from the crusties. The only opinions that matter to me are those of East Village residents. While online debate about the op-ed has been vigorous, which is great, the overall response has been overwhelmingly positive. I feel comfortable saying, based on the feedback I received, that a vast majority of East Village residents either want

ally — based on the projected 97 apartments providing an average of about $10,000 per year. “Aside from rent revenue, the new development would also create many temporary construction jobs, and then permanent employment opportunities in the retail stores on the ground floor,” he added. “There’s no doubt that it will stimulate the economy in the area." Quinerly said that despite the project’s alleged benefits for Meltzer, he was still skeptical any good will come from it. “I love the area and don’t ever want to leave, but if a community is going to be ignored and overlooked, what other choice do I have?” Quinerly asked. “The sad thing is not many other people here have that option to leave like me. I really hope these officials don’t take my words lightly because a lot of lives could be impacted, and not necessarily in the best of ways.”

my proposal adopted as is or with a few minor amendments. The ball is now out of my court.” Once his talking point was published, Marlow promptly e-mailed it to Councilmember Rosie Mendez, asking her if she would adopt all or part of his multipronged, crusty-control proposal. As was reported in The Villager, it was Mendez who, last year, first said something needed to be done about crusties sleeping and acting out on the sidewalks. The councilmember has recently been in Puerto Rico on a family matter. We called her Friday for her response to Marlow’s piece, but she hadn’t read it yet, though said she planned to do so. But we couldn’t reach her this week in a follow-up call. Her office said she had traveled to “the other side of the island,” so perhaps cell phone service may have been an issue.

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April 4 - 10, 2013

Publ ic Notice s Notice is hereby given that license #1269825 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 174 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012 for on-premises consumption. SLIDE GROUP LLC d/b/a SLIDE Vil: 04/04 - 04/11/2013 Notice is hereby given that a Hotel Liquor License for beer, wine and liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to permit the sale of beer, wine and liquor at retail rates for on-premises consumption at the Courtyard New York ManhattanTimes Square West located at 307 West 37th Street, New York, NY 10018 under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law. SBCO-NYC, LLC and 365 Management Company, LLC. Vil: 04/04 - 04/11/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Ivrose B LLC d/b/a Opal to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 135-137 1st Avenue NewYork NY 10003. Vil: 04/04 - 04/11/2013 Notice is hereby given that a tavern wine license, #TBA has been applied for by The Immigrant Wine Bar LLC d/b/aThe Immigrant NYC to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 341 E. 9th Street, West Store New York NY 10003. Vil: 04/04 - 04/11/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Halo Direct, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/22/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Halo Direct, LLC, 832 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, New York 10003. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Lord Jane LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Lord Jane LLC, 200 West 16 Street, Apt 11K, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: 338 JEFFERSON LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 228 Park Ave S #42608, New York, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Offshore Feeder) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/21/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 09/11/12. Princ. office of LP: 630 Fifth Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10111. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Arts. of Org. filed with Registrar of Limited Partnerships, Government Administration Bldg., Grand Cayman, CI KY1-9000. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KRAUS LAW PLLC a professional service limited liability company (PLLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New mi (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the PLLC is to: Kraus Law PLLC, 131 E. 81st St., No. 15, New York, NY 10028. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Qualification of GEM Holdco, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/13/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/10/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Madison Ave., 27th Fl., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office. Address to be maintained in DE: 1811 Silverside Rd., Wilmington, DE 19810. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of G and C Arts, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: G and C Arts, LLC 370 Lexington Avenue, Suite 509, NY NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/05/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Law and Mediation Office of Justine Borer, Esq., PLLC, 44 Wall Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Mundaca Artese LLP. Certificate filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLP may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against LLP is to: Business Filings Incorporated, 187 Wolf Rd, Ste 101, Albany, New York 11205. Purpose: To engage any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 AUTHOR LEVIN LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/16/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Charles Hopfl, 2211 Broadway, NY, NY 10024. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 GA REP LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/5/12. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dorf & Nelson LLP, 555 Theodore Fremd Ave., Rye, NY 10580. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 GENESIS CAPITAL LEGACY AND ESTATE, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 80 Maiden Ln., Ste. 303, NY, NY 10038. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

97 NOBLE LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Donna Jones Marfino, 401 2nd Ave., NY, NY 10010. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 MOKSH PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/11/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Meghana Giridhar, 347 W. 57th St., #28F, NY, NY 10019. General Purposes. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 DESTROYHIPSTERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 02/21/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kantor Davidoff Wolfe Mandelker Twomey & Gallanty, P.C., Attn Thomas E Kass, 51 East 42nd St. (17th Fl), NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of CA EAST HOUSTON LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 41st Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of 145 Hudson Street Suite 5A LLC amended to 145 Hudson Street Suite 5C LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/3/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 145 Hudson St., Ste. 5C, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of twentybridge LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Sharon deMonsabert, 14030 Thunderbolt Place #900, Chantilly, VA 20151. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013 Notice of Formation of Leslie Lane, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/27/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/04 - 05/09/2013

Notice of Qualification of Pliant, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/15/10. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/29/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 875 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001. Principal office: 200 East Main St., Macedon, NY 14502. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by Clinton Street Pizza Inc. d/b/a Rizzo’s Fine Pizza Co to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 17 Clinton Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 03/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on-premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Brannons Sandwich Shop LLC d/b/a Brannons sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 119 Essex Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 03/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1268796 for liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 5 King Street, 1FE, New York, NY 10012 for on premises consumption. Kennedy Organics LLC Vil: 03/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest/ Michigan Investment Fund, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/29/11. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Notice of Qualification of AlpInvest Secondaries Fund (Onshore) V, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/16/12. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of YORK MANAGED HOLDINGS II, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 767 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10153. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of P3 & G DONUT HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 135 W. 18th St., 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10011. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of LHL HOLDINGS NY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/14/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 183 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Bennet L. Schonfeld at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Formation of Kroesser + Strat Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/26/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 227 E. 87th St., NY, NY 10128, Attn: Amelia Setar, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013

Notice of Qualification of Secoya Partners, LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/14/13. Fictitious name in NY State: Secoya Partners of Delaware LLC. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/8/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606. DE address of LLC: c/o Incorporating Services, Ltd., 3500 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 Notice of Qualification of Napier Park Railcar Lease Fund LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/12/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/7/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Napier Park Global Capital LLC, 399 Park Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10022, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/28 - 05/02/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: THE FRENCH RESISTANCE, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/13/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 156 Fifth Avenue, Suite 200, NewYork, NewYork 10010. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 STUDIO CUBE LLC, a domestic LLC currently known as REID & TAYLOR STUDIO LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/7/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 328 W. 11th St., 1-C, NY, NY 10014. General Purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 AMB PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/27/13 using the fictitious name AMB 77 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1374 Whitehorse Hamilton Square Rd., Hamilton, NJ 08690. General Purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Run Away With Me Productions, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/18/13 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, c/o Alexes Lowe, 321 Edgecombe #20 NY NY 10031. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of HANNAH EAST END LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/06/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Davidson, Dawson & Clark LLP, 60 E. 42nd St., NY, NY 10165. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Qualification of QDG RETAIL PARTNERS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/14/13. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, 20th Fl., NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Qualification of IH2 PROPERTY GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/05/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/14/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with State of DE, Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of KLW ADVISORS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/06/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 252 7th Ave., NY, NY 10001. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013

April 4 - 10, 2013

21

Publ ic Notice s Notice of Formation of Champion Parking 230 LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 655 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of XENIA GHALI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Arent Fox LLP, 1675 Broadway, NY, NY 10019, Attn: Ross Charap, Esq. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Qualification of Withers Consulting Group LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/5/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 2/25/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: James R. Brockway, Esq., Withers Bergman LLP, 157 Church St., 19th Fl., New Haven, CT 06510, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of NV Realty Holdings, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/18/2012. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt LLP, 900 Third Ave., NY, NY 10022. Term: until 11/1/2057. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/21 - 04/25/2013 Notice of Formation of OPP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Salvatore D’Avola, c/o Restored Homes, 150 Broadway, Ste. 2101, NY, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: THE MAK ORGANIZATION LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 37A Orchard Street, New York, New York 10002. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: PUSHPOINT, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/04/13. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2113. Office location: New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 400 Townline Road, Suite 150, Hauppauge, New York 11788. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of MOMIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/5/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013\\ Notice of Formation of Caldera Brand Development LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/6/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 171 E. 84th St., Apt. 31E, NY, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of Anat Nev, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Ellyn Roth Mittman, Esq., 110 E. 59th St., 23rd Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of Travis Quinn Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 445 W. 23rd St., #15A, NY, NY 10011, Attn: Travis Quinn. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of Ladder Capital Realty Finance III LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 345 Park Ave., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10154. LLC formed in DE on 5/16/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013

Notice of Qualification of THL Credit Advisors LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 570 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 6/26/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of Rose Moss Associates, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/14/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/22/00. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Toback, Bernstein & Reiss, LLP, Att: Leonard Reiss, Esq., 15 W. 44th St., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10036. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Duke & York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of SPRINGS 6 LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/20/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 11/1/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o John Silberman Associates, 145 E. 57th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: c/o National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of TARGET SOURCING SERVICES LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/25/13. Princ. office of LLC: 500 Seventh Ave., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, DE Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013

Notice of Formation of SHAP ENTERTAINMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 415 Madison Ave., 20 Fl., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of AIG PORTFOLIO SOLUTIONS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/15/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/19/12. Princ. office of LLC: 80 Pine St., NY, NY 10005. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy of State, DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Formation of DRS Productions LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 601 West 26th St., Ste. 1762, NY, NY 10001, also the principal office. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of AMERICAN DIAMONDS UNLIMITED, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 579 5th Avenue Suite #888, NewYork NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF STRIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: VIJAY BACHANI 330 E 33RD ST, APT #5C, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful act. 2038871 Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 FORMATION NOTICE OF THE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: APPLE RESIDENTIAL VENTURES LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Secretary of State (SSNY): February 13, 2013. The LLC was originally filed with Secretary of State of Delaware: April 15, 2011. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 230 West 41st Street, Suite 1102, New York, New York 10036. Purpose: All lawful purposes. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013

Notice of Registration of Rich Michaelson Magaliff Moser, LLP. Certificate filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/20/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLP, 340 Madison Ave., 19th Fl., NY, NY 10173. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Formation of 528-534 West 39 L.L.C Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/10/12. Office location: NY County. Principal business location: 666 Fifth Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10103. SNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Rockrose Development Corp., 666 Fifth Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10103, Attn: General Counsel. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of Long John Silver’s LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/6/69. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013

Notice of Qualification of Premier Research International LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/19/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/16/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of Redwood Income Fund LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/13. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Steven Katz, 227 E. 56th St., Ste. 401, NY, NY 10022. DE address of LLC: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 874 Walker Road, Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of 150 NYC LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/15/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Isaacs & Associates, PLLC, 260 Madison Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

LUXURY CHAUFFEURED SERVICE LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/9/11. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Nissim Holand, 270 11th Ave., NY, NY 10001. General Purposes Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of DURST WARREN STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/14/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rosenberg & Estis, P.C., Attn: Gary M. Rosenberg, Esq., 733 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of ECHO INVESTORS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to M. Nader Ahari, 524 Broadway, Ste. 405, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Notice of Formation of HANG WU REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/19/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o 349 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10016. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 12/31/2035. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Qualification of 205E45 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: William R. Hagner, 135 E. 57th St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Address to be maintained in DE: The LLC, 3500 S. Dupont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. MF ROSE COMMUNICATIONS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 82-30 98th Street, Woodhaven, New York 11421. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from 31 Great Jones Restaurant Corp. to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 31 Great Jones Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 04/04 - 04/11/2013

Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday April 10, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from HPA Restaurant, LLC to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 255 Fifth Avenue, in the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/28 - 04/04/2013

Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from Barnorth Group LLC to establish, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 77 Delancey Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/28 - 04/04/2013

22

April 4 - 10, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

sea Chelnow

www.thevillager.com

www.chelseanow.com

DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00 PM MAIL 515 CANAL STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212-229-2790 REAL ESTATE PALM SPRINGS, CA. TOWNHOUSE CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Please visit this link: www.alwaysonvacation.com and type in 809752 in the "where are you going" search bar for details about the property, include pictures IF INTERESTED, CALL 323-493-3114.

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BROWNSTONE WANTED BROOKLYN/HARLEM please email details/photos to: mykonos55@yahoo.com

‘Trials of Muhammad Ali’

SoHo SPACE 4 LEASE

Ground Floor aprox 1,550 sqft $120k per Anum. Call 212-226-3100

Join your neighborhood newspaper in a salute to the 2013 TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL A SPECIAL ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITY

West Village Commercial Space Avail. Considering Non Food Business at present. Approx.550 sq FT w Bsmt. Call Owner 718-344-6468

ISSUE DATE: APRIL 18

RESERVE BY:

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APRIL 10

Backyard,Walk to Subways,

CONTACT FRANCESCO REGINI Francesco@TheVillager.com 646 452 2496 • 212 229 2790 (fax)

Publ iC Not iCe s

Shopping, Etc. Avail. August 1, $2195 per mo.

Notice oF ForMAtioN

Notice oF ForMAtioN

MR M 718-426-2800 BTW 10 AM-4PM

oF PoiNte tibet retAil

oF tessANNieK, llc

llc

Arts. of Org. filed with NY

Arts of Org filed with Secy

Dept. of State on 2/7/13.

of State of NY (SSNY) on

Office location: NY County.

TRIBECA... Basement storage with elevator street access. Space can be divided to accommodate requirement. Secure space beneath neighorhood bar. Send email to schedule visit. Info@m1-5.com

1/14/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process

Princ. bus. addr.: 30 Crosby St., NY, NY 10013. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Mihir

against LLC to principal

Patel, Morgan Stanley Smith

address: 1 Little West 12th

Barney, 55 E. 52nd St., 28th

St New York, NY 10014. Pur-

Fl., NY, NY 10055. Purpose:

pose: any lawful act.

all lawful purposes.

Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Notice oF QuAliFicAtioN oF NAtioNAl WoMeN’s soccer leAgue, llc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/8/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1801 S. Prairie Ave., Chicago, IL 60616. LLC formed in DE on 12/12/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Notice oF QuAliFicAtioN oF vtr hertliN house, llc Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/3/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10350 Ormsby Park Pl., Ste. 300, Louisville, KY 40223. LLC formed in DE on 11/27/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

April 4 - 10, 2013

23

Free Electronics Recycling Events The ASA Avengers lacrosse squad practices at Pier 40, at West Houston St., in Hudson River Park.

In second season, ASA lax team netting lots more wins sPorts By Daniel Jean-lUBin A thrilling 12-11 win over the County College of Morris Titans (4-6) on March 27 boosted the ASA Avengers men’s lacrosse team’s record to 6-3. The victory was monumental for two reasons. Freshman and Rookie of the Year candidate Joe Granata scored a career- and game-high seven goals — including the game winner — for the Avengers. This latest offensive explosion puts Granata’s season total at 25 goals, and moves him to seventh place over all in goals scored in the nation. That wasn’t the reason for all of the team’s celebration, however, because with the victory, the Avengers have already matched their win total from their inaugural 2012 season. In addition, for the first time in the young program’s history, the Avengers lacrosse team is three games over .500 (including 1-0 in conference play) in what is considered the toughest region in junior college lacrosse. Progress is what this season is all about. The ASA Avengers began their second season on March 2 with a 19-9 loss to Harford Community College, extending their losing streak dating back to last season to five. The team’s first victory came the next day at Northern Virginia Community College in a 25-8 rout. Sophomore Casey Jackson, ASA’s leading scorer last season, provided most of the offense with 10 points (8 goals and 2 assists). This win gave the Avengers all the confidence they needed and sparked a five-game winning streak, with victories over Union County College, Dean College, Delaware Technical Community College and conference rival, nationally ranked Suffolk Community College. During the streak, ASA outscored their

opponents by a combined 92-56, breaking a school record for goals scored over a five-game span as well. The Avengers would go on to drop back-to-back games at Howard Community College and Community College of Baltimore, only scoring 15 goals during that stretch. The lack of offense can be linked to the loss of Jackson, the second-leading scorer in the National Junior College Athletic Association. A native of British Columbia, Jackson was netting goals at a torrid pace. During the team’s winning streak, he scored a whopping 32 goals, with 12 assists to boot. ASA’s journey to eclipse their previous win total will begin on April 4 when they travel to Hoboken to take on the Stevens Institute of Technology junior varsity (7-2). After that, the Avengers will play the next five on the road before hosting Delaware Technical and Community College on April 20 in their regular season finale.

Events Are 10am to 4pm • Rain or Shine Apr 6

Tekserve, Chelsea

Apr 7

Delancey Street, LES

Apr 7

Emerson Hill, Staten Island

Apr 13

Bushwick, Brooklyn

Apr 13

Fort Greene, Brooklyn

Apr 14

Melrose, Bronx

Apr 14

Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx

For details, visit tekserve.com/recycling

Recycle with us for a chance to WIN a MacBook Air® For questions about recycling, contact:

Catch you on the FLY! Sports, every week in The Villager

212.477.4022 • lesecologycenter.org

A Lower East Side Ecology Center program sponsored by

119 W 23rd St | 212.929.3645 | tekserve.com Apple, the Apple logo, and MacBook Air are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

David April 4 - 10, 2013

APR 17—21

William Christie Les Arts Florissants

Photo: Ana Quintans and Pascal Charbonneau, by Artcomart/P. Victor

24

et

Jonathas By Marc-Antoine Charpentier / Les Arts Florissants / An Aix-en-Provence Festival production Conducted by William Christie / Directed by Andreas Homoki

BAM.org BAM 2013 Winter/Spring Season sponsor:

Brooklyn, NY / 718.636.4100 / Tickets start at $30

Adventurous artists, audiences, and ideas

Leadership support provided by Ronald P. Stanton and The Delancey Foundation, and

Major support provided by:


The Villager, April 4, 2013