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Volume 82, Number 42 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

March 21 - 27, 2013

Faculty demand that Sexton resign after adverse vote By LincoLn anDerSon Concluding a highly anticipated five-day electronic vote, faculty at New York University’s largest school voted no confidence in President John Sexton last week — and summarily urged him to resign. The final tally was revealed early Friday evening, with the results that the faculty of Arts and Science voted 52 percent for and 39 percent against a

Theft and the City — bike bummer

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Stefania Owen, who plays Dorrit, Carrie Bradshaw’s kid sister, in “The Carrie Diaries,” the “Sex and the City” prequel, had her bike stolen on Prince St. sometime around 1 p.m. on Wed., March 13. She and her dad, left, cablelocked their four-month-old six-speeds to a tree near MacDougal St., then went to help someone move in to their place. When they returned an hour and a half later, the bikes were gone and only 2 feet of cable was left. “The store insisted we buy this cable, that you couldn’t cut it,” her dad said. “We rode everywhere, even in the winter. It’s a great way to see the city,” Stefania said wistfully, before they headed to the First Precinct to report the theft.

Pols, public demand to be filled in on NYCHA infill plan By LincoLn anDerSon Although local politicians, Community Board 3 and public housing residents are all calling for a slowdown in the process, the New York City Housing Authority is moving full-speed ahead with a plan to allow private “infill development” on eight of its Manhattan sites, including at five complexes in the East Village and Lower East Side. The new buildings would be rental, with a mix of 80 percent market-rate units and 20 percent afford-

able units. NYCHA is set to release a request for proposals (R.F.P.) for interested developers late next month. According to a timeline being given out by the city, developers would be selected between August and November. Ninety-nine-year ground leases would then be signed for the parcels. The infill buildings “could come online in four to five years,” according to Fred Harris, formerly of AvalonBay develop-

ers, who is overseeing this NYCHA development project. Department officials say the scheme could generate $30 million to $50 million annually for the cash-strapped agency. Complexes where the new buildings are constructed would benefit by getting a share of the revenue to use for repairs and maintenance, plus would get emergency backup power in the case of black-

verdict of no confidence. Of 682 eligible faculty, 83 percent weighed in on the question, which was mainly spurred by N.Y.U.’s 2031 development plan on its two South Village superblocks, where about 40 percent’s of the school’s faculty live. N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan — which is a plaintiff in what’s called an

Continued on page 8

Rajkumar readies to announce her challenge to Chin By JoSh rogerS Saying Lower Manhattan needs “a stronger, more active voice on the City Council,” Jenifer Rajkumar is about to formally announce her bid to unseat Margaret Chin in this year’s Democratic primary. “When major developers come to the South Street Seaport, or to Greenwich Village, or to the Lower East Side, and we are deciding how the land will be used, I will always represent one

Continued on page 20

5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

thing and one thing only — the people that elected me, not any outside interests,” Rajkumar, a Democratic district leader and Battery Park City resident, said in a statement. In two short phone interviews on Mon., March 18, she said she had not decided on an announcement date, but she left little doubt it would be coming soon. She

Continued on page 5

editoRiAl, letteRS PAGE 12

SeXy FUn At tHe boX PAGE 23


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Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Late last Thursday night, a bicycle activist stenciled at Third Ave. and 27th St. where, on Feb. 24, a still-unidentified pedestrian was killed after a car and cab collided, sending the car jumping the curb onto the sidewalk.

Cyclists draw a line; Demand accountability in car accidents By JeFFerSon SiegeL All too often, the news is filled with stories of pedestrians and bicyclists killed in accidents with cars. The stories usually conclude with the drivers not being charged followed by the police statement: “No criminality suspected.” In certain circles, there is even a saying: If you want to kill someone in New York and get away with it, use a car. Last week a group of volunteers from Time’s Up!, the environmental advocacy organization, set out to question the lack of accountability involving drivers who kill pedestrians and cyclists yet are not held responsible for their actions. A winter’s night isn’t usually prime time for a group bike ride. But late last Thursday night, several cyclists set out from the Lower East Side, making eight stops throughout the city. At the stops — each where a pedestrian or cyclist was killed over the past year — they stenciled the outline of a body on the street, along with the victim’s name, date of death and the phrase, “No Criminality Suspected.” Below that phrase was a question to the police commissioner: “Why, Ray, Why?” “The N.Y.P.D. is charged with investigating serious crashes and enforcing traffic laws, including the requirement that motor vehicles be driven with due care. Yet in each of these cases, and in the vast majority of cases in which pedestrians and cyclists are killed by automobile, the N.Y.P.D. declared ‘No criminality suspected’ within hours of the crash,” said traffic analyst Charles Komanoff. He added that accident investigation reports in recent crashes have not been released to the public or to the victims’ families. The New York City Department of Transportation reports that deaths resulting from traffic accidents increased 23 percent from 2011 to 2012. In 2012 there were almost 300 fatalities; more than 150 of those involved the deaths of bicyclists and pedestrians. “The N.Y.P.D. is whitewashing traffic violence

to the public, withholding potentially emotionally healing information from grieving families, and robbing safer-streets activists of the information they need to best advocate for a livable city,” said Keegan Stephan, the Time's Up! ride organizer. By 2 a.m. last Friday the cyclists had finished stenciling body images and messages at the locations of the most recent crash scenes. Hours later on Friday morning, the group set out once again on their “Criminality Suspected Ride” — visiting the stenciled sites — to remember the victims and call for tougher enforcement of traffic laws. Stephan also noted that, in two of the recent cases, police have still not identified the victims. They include a female cyclist killed by a truck on E. 23rd St. in January and a female pedestrian killed by a car that had collided with another car and jumped the curb at Third Ave. and 27th St. in February. Following a City Council hearing last year, Police Commissioner Ray Kelly announced the department would increase its Accident Investigation Squad from 23 to 33 members. The squad is responsible for investigating all fatal traffic accidents in the city. In a letter to the City Council earlier this month, Kelly said the squad’s investigators will now be sent to crash scenes that also involve serious injuries, rather than just to the scenes of fatalities. Also the police will now categorize such scenes as “collisions” instead of “accidents.” Yet on March 11, just one week after Kelly’s letter, Tenzin Drudak, a 16-year-old student, was killed near his Queens school when a van crossed several lanes of traffic and jumped the curb, hitting him on the sidewalk. The driver admitted he lost control of his van while reaching for a milk carton he had dropped. No charges were filed against the driver, despite city laws requiring drivers to exercise extra caution when driving by a school. The police concluded: No criminality suspected.


March 21 - 27, 2013

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Carolyn Maloney, right, endorsed Christine Quinn for mayor on Monday.

Maloney for ‘Ms. Mayor’: Saying Christine Quinn will be “the first woman mayor of the greatest city in the world,” Congressmember Carolyn Maloney proudly endorsed the City Council speaker Monday at the site of a major Downtown voting bloc, Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village. “Anyone with brains and hard work can get the job done,” Maloney scoffed, “but we need someone who can do the impossible. She’s been the second most powerful person in New York City for seven years,” the veteran lawmaker said, “passed seven on-time budgets.” She praised Quinn’s “smarts, her dedication, her ability to work in a collaborative way. … Public safety and homeland security are the number one responsibility of the mayor, and she understands that,” Maloney said, adding, “She has promised to reappoint Ray Kelly as Police commissioner.” Quinn interjected a “Yay!” for Kelly. “She can lead on the tough issues, she can bring all the stakeholders together, she can listen to all points of view and find a solution,” Maloney continued. “She’s tough; she’s not afraid of anything or anybody.” She will be, Maloney said, “the first woman to be called Ms. Mayor of New York City.” Quinn, in turn, praised Maloney for working hard to keep Stuy Town affordable and for “making New York City a better community for women and girls and the L.G.B.T. community.” The two pols then joined a contingent of ST/PC supporters for a stroll up the First Ave. retail strip from 16th St. to 20th St. Quinn popped into Bruno Ravioli to chat up a tableful of tradesmen having a bite and sound them out on their views on the economic situation, then re-emerged onto

the sidewalk to compliment a mom and her two young kids on their matching Nepal-style earflap hats. She doled out a slew of kisses and hugs and petted Callie, J.C. Myska’s dog. Myska said he’s voting for Quinn because he’s going to enroll in the Police Academy and he supports keeping on Kelly as top cop. Along the route, we asked Quinn if she backs the mayor’s “portion ban” idea, under which fountain sodas at restaurants, movie theaters, delis, etc. could not be served in cups more than 16 ounces in size, and if she’d continue to push for the regulation and implement it, if elected. “I am not a supporter of the ‘soda ban,’ ” she told us. While Quinn said she thinks “the mayor’s done a lot on health,” she feels the portion ban for soft drinks is different than the smoking ban, for example, since drinking a sugar-saturated soda doesn’t impact other people. Maloney interjected, “I would say that people don’t care about the size of their drinks. They care about jobs — and that’s what she’ll focus on.” Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, another mayoral candidate, however, does strongly support the portion ban. He appeared with Mayor Bloomberg the week before at Lucky’s Cafe, at 34th St. and First Ave., the day after Judge Milton Tingling struck down the implementation of the new soda-size limits, which Tingling trashed as “arbitrary and capricious.” “I hope the city wins the appeal, for the good of our children,” de Blasio said. Borough President Scott Stringer, who is running for city comptroller, also stood with the mayor at Lucky’s in support of the portion cap. “To ignore this is giving in to the soda cartel,” he declared.

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Declaring for district leader: Jonathan Geballe and Keen Berger last Thursday announced the start of their campaign for male and female Democratic district leader for the 66th Assembly District, Part A. Geballe is running for his first full term after having been recently elected to fill the seat left by Brad Hoylman upon Hoylman’s being elected state Senator to fill the seat of Tom Duane, who retired from the Senate. “Jonathan has been at the forefront of the battle for election protection and voters’ rights,” said Berger, who has been D.L. nine years. “He has stood with the Village on landmark preservation and our battle to stop hydrofracking and protect our city and state’s water supply. I am thrilled to have a partner who will fight for the concerns of our community.” Said Geballe, “It has always been my wish to preserve the Village's storied past while growing its vitality for the future. The streets of the Village, East and West, tell us its history, but the Village is always foremost about its people, from the youngest infants to our seniors. Filling Brad’s shoes is a challenge I’m ready for. I’m eager to advance the causes he has championed in areas like securing a new middle school at 75 Morton St. and designating the remainder of the South Village as a historic district.” Now we’re waiting for State Committeeman Arthur Schwartz’s announcement that’s he’s running to reclaim the district leader seat he grudgingly gave up six years ago after local pols pushed him out of the way so Hoylman could start his political rise. Tony Hoffman, president of Village Independent Democrats, Geballe and Berger’s home club, admitted to us that, “It’s going to be a tough race.”

Mayor Bloomberg made a point at Lucky’s Cafe after his portion ban was put on hold by a judge.

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March 21 - 27, 2013

A tree house grows in Brooklyn, with Sandy wood By Sarah Ferguson Hurricane Sandy laid waste to more than 10,000 trees across New York City — “like a chainsaw on methamphetamines” was how The New York Times put it. But one East Village artist is putting a lyrical twist on Mother Nature’s wanton destruction. Renowned tree house architect Roderick Romero is using wood from trees felled at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden to create a whimsical, nest-like platform that kids and adults can “inhabit.” “It’s like a bird’s nest observatory onto the Botanic,” says Romero of the 200-square-foot structure, which he’s dubbed “Sandy Remix” “It’s a collage really,” explains Romero, who has lived on Avenue C since 2001. “I’m using wood from 14 different tree species” — including pin oak, elm, cedar, maple, walnut, ironwood, Caucasian wingnut (yes, that’s an actual species) and 200-year-old persimmon, from a stand of persimmon trees that came down in Hurricane Irene. “So it’s like a song I’m remixing, a song about trees and wood,” explains Romero, who moonlights as lead singer and lyricist of the Seattle-based band Sky Cries Mary. The wooden planks and stumps used in the frame and stairs were milled on site by John Duvall, a sawyer from Upstate New York who reached out to the Botanic Garden after Sandy. “He just did it out of passion for wood,” says Romero. “He understands that all this

Photo by Sarah Ferguson

East Villager Roderick Romero on the deck of the tree house he’s building at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

really amazing wood usually goes to mulch. So he just jumped on it, thank God.”

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Around the structure’s frame, Romero is weaving the nest with saplings of persimmon and wingnut, along with willow branches “repurposed” from a nearby environmental installation by sculptor Patrick Dougherty, which the museum is taking down. Assisting Romero in the construction are Ian Weedman, another tree house builder from Portland, Oregon, and East Village carpenter John Wagner. (Full disclosure: John is my partner and the father of my son.) “This is by far the greatest work I’ve ever done,” says Romero. “It’s my quintessential piece.” That’s saying a lot, considering that Romero has built 53 other tree houses and sculptures around the world, including commissions for Sting, Laurie Anderson, Val Kilmer, Julianne Moore and Hollywood film director Darren Aronofsky. He built his first tree house in 1997 “as a whim” for a “Mexican surrealist, Gnostic artist” in Olympia, Washington. “Then my brother in Seattle saw pictures and said, Hey, I need one of those,” Romero explains. Then Sharon Gannon, the founder of Jivamukti yoga studio and a close friend from Seattle, introduced Romero to Sting and his wife, who hired him to create a tree house on their estate in Tuscany, Italy. Romero also built a tree house with street kids in Tangiers, financed with donations from Sting, Donna Karan and Russell Simmons. “You gotta go with the flow,” shrugs Romero, when asked about the fairy tale trajectory of his career. When his wife got into graduate school in New York, he took leave from his band and moved to the Lower East Side in September 2001 — arriving seven days before 9/11.

“I had all these commissions for museum installations, and then 9/11 happened and that all dried up, and so I was like, What the hell am I doing here?” Now an East Village father (his daughter was born here in 2005) and active community gardener, he built a tree nest at the base of a big willow tree at El Jardin del Paraíso on E. Fourth St. That piece drew the attention of Kathryn Glass, vice president of marketing and public engagement at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, who also used to live in the East Village. “When we lost all these trees in Hurricane Sandy, I was thinking about ways we could reuse the wood, and immediately thought of Roderick and the work he did on Fourth St.,” explains Glass. To get the gig, Romero beat out more than 30 other artists submitting proposals for the museum’s next environmental installation. “I’m the only one who pitched using only wood from Sandy.” Sited next to a sprawling Caucasian wingnut tree and overlooking “Bluebell Wood,” the tree deck sits 5 feet aboveground, allowing visitors a “fresh perspective” on the Botanic Garden, says Glass. Although the grand opening isn’t until April 6, the tree deck has already drawn much notice from visitors, especially children, who seem magically drawn to the work. In fact, from March 26 to April 2, the Botanic Garden is planning a series of free drop-in workshops for families, where kids can watch Romero at work and try their hand at weaving a nest, while learning about the different structures that animals build. “My hope is that it will give people a new perspective on nature,” says Romero, “and on the art of wood.”


March 21 - 27, 2013

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Personally Selected: File photo by Terese Loeb Kreuzer

Jenifer Rajkumar singing last September for her neighbors at the annual Battery Park City block party.

Rajkumar readies to announce that she’s running against Chin Continued from page 1 now has a few paid consultants, and according to a campaign press release, a final decision was “days away.” She declined to say much more before her announcement. Rajkumar, 30, is an attorney with Sanford Heisler L.L.P. She surprised, if not shocked, Lower Manhattan political observers in 2011 when she defeated the area’s longtime incumbent district leader, Linda Belfer. Since then, Rajkumar has been an active presence Downtown, attending community board meetings and neighborhood events, and she’s a regular at her home political club, Downtown Independent Democrats. She did not directly criticize Chin but did say she favored “bottom-up democracy.” Chin’s opponents have criticized her for not consulting enough with community members on issues like New York University’s 2031 development plans or on the creation of a business improvement district in Soho. It’s a charge Chin and her supporters dismiss as baseless. Before the issue was even raised in a short

phone interview on Tuesday, Chin, 58, said one of her proudest accomplishments was getting a plan approved for the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area after it was stalled for decades. “The whole community was able to come together to find a solution,” she said, adding that 50 percent of the apartments, or 500 total, would be for low- and middle-income tenants. “I am proud of my record in the City Council and I am very confident the people in the district will vote for me overwhelmingly,” she said. She scoffed at Rajkumar’s veiled criticisms, saying, “What have you done?” Both candidates say they have just about raised the $168,000 spending limit they will have this year, once the expected matching funds are factored in. Rajkumar, who has only been raising money for about two months, reported hauling in nearly $30,000 in the latest filing (including a karaoke fundraiser), bringing her total to just under $67,000. Chin took in $12,695 in her latest numbers bringing her up to $109,585.

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Police BLOTTER Soho rapist gets 25 to life Subway thief thwarted The man found guilty of raping and assaulting a 19-year-old woman behind her Soho apartment building in 2008 has been sentenced to 25 years to life, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced Tuesday. A State Supreme Court jury in November found Andres Suarez, 30 (opposite page, top), guilty of predatory sexual assault, first-degree rape, firstdegree burglary, first-degree attempted rape and first-degree sexual abuse. Early on the morning of May 28, 2008, Suarez followed his victim onto a subway train at 14th St., and then continued trailing her after she got off the train at Spring St. and walked home to her apartment on Prince St., the D.A. said. When the young woman opened the door to her building, Suarez rushed in behind her and followed her up the stairs to her apartment. He dragged her into the building’s courtyard, where he raped her while threatening her with a box cutter, according to court testimony. DNA was collected from the crime scene soon after the incident, but the case remained unsolved until 2011, when Suarez’s DNA was entered into the state’s databank following his conviction for an unrelated crime. In addition to the 25-to-life prison term, Suarez was sentenced to 20 years of post-release supervision.

Hey, that’s my debit card! This guy’s excuse for buying drinks with someone else’s debit card certainly wasn’t getting him any sympathy. Benjamin Touze, 23, reportedly told police, “The card was just on the bar, so I decided to use it.” But the card’s rightful owner, a 27-year-old woman, said that she’d lost her wallet in a cab on the evening of Sun., March 17, and only realized the whole situation when she got home later that night, checked her account online and noticed multiple charges at The Village Underground bar, at 130 W. Third St. The woman said she called the bar around 10 p.m. to tell them to stop accepting the card, and when the bar’s manager confronted Touze to explain he was using a card that didn’t have his name on it, the alleged crook could only come up with his aforementioned sorry excuse. Shortly after that, the manager reported the crime to police, who then showed up to apprehend the opportunistic drinker. Touze was charged with grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property.

Sometimes it’s just too hard to keep your hands to yourself. While a plainclothes police officer was checking on an L train at the 14th St. subway station around 4:15 a.m. on Sun., March 17, he spotted Joe Outley, 19, sitting next to another male passenger who was asleep. The officer said Outley then placed his hand into the sleeping man’s right pocket and began rummaging for property to steal. But the handsy thief didn’t get too far, as the officer revealed himself and apprehended Outley while he was in the act. Outley was charged with attempted grand larceny.

Stolen bike bust Note to self: If you want to get away with stealing a shiny new bike, don’t ride it down the middle of a crowded sidewalk. Jeremy Rodriguez, 27, apparently wasn’t thinking that far ahead while taking a sidewalk joyride past the corner of W. 12th St. and Seventh Ave. on Thurs., Mar. 14, around 6:30 p.m. Rodriguez, who was riding a red bicycle, was creating a serious hazard to the pedestrians he passed, according to the cops who stopped him. And shortly after they’d apprehended him, the officers realized that Rodriguez’s bike was in fact stolen. The thwarted thief quickly confessed to using a wooden ax handle to break the bike out of its lock on a nearby street. So, in addition to being charged with reckless endangerment for his sidewalk riding antics, Rodriguez was slapped with a petty-larceny charge for jacking the bike.

Kung-fu cab kick Patience is a virtue — especially when a lack of it leads to a busted taxi window and a seat in the back of a police cruiser. An off-duty cab driver told officers that, while he was stopped at a red light at 14thSt. and Fifth Ave. just after midnight on Thurs., Mar. 14, a man approached his taxi to ask for a ride. When the cabbie told him he wasn’t available, the man — later identified as Youba Haidara, 23 — apparently became so angry that he kicked the car’s driver’s-side, rearview mirror, nearly knocking it off. The hack said Haidara then fled west down W. 14th St. But the cab kicker was quickly stopped by police who had heard the previous commotion. The officers held him until the flustered driver could pull up and identify the impatient kick-and-run perp. Haidara was charged with criminal mischief.

Sam Spokony


March 21 - 27, 2013

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Andres Suarez was sentenced on Tuesday to 25 years to life for a rape he committed on Prince St. in 2008. This photo was taken at his last court appearance, on Feb. 25.

Photo by Jefferson Siegel

Cab jacker slows sentencing

Michael Findley, in Manhattan Supreme Court on March 4, above, was arrested in 2011 after hijacking a cab and crashing it in Union Square. At trial he represented himself, often interrupting the judge as Findley made various claims, including that the taxi driver sexually assaulted him. Findley hailed the taxi on Delancey St. early one morning in February 2011, and asked to be taken to the West Village. Driver Mohammed Latif told him not to eat in the cab. Findley, drunk at the time, ignored him, spilling a plate of rice. The two argued before Findley got in the driver’s seat and took off with the vehicle. After roaring across Houston St. at speeds of more than 80 miles per hour, Findley crashed the car into a lamppost on Union Square West. A jury subsequently found him guilty. On March 4 he was due to be sentenced but, after entering the courtroom, told Judge Daniel Conviser that he wanted copies of transcripts to bolster his defense. Findley’s sentencing is now scheduled for mid-April.

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No-confidence vote for Sexton; No-go for one lawsuit Continued from page 1 Article 78 lawsuit against the city’s approval of the university’s “N.Y.U. 2031” scheme — issued the following statement: “N.Y.U.’s faculty of Arts and Science has now voted, by 298 to 224 with 47 abstentions, for a motion of no confidence in the leadership of President John Sexton. We call on him to honor that consensus by resigning, and ask that the trustees accept his resignation. “As the trustees comprise the third tier of shared governance, we hope they will act quickly to restore faculty morale, by working with us to turn N.Y.U. into a more open university,” FASP members said, “one that is transparent in its financial dealings, and more democratic in its management of academic affairs.” Sexton, giving no sign he would step down, released a statement of his own, praising the university’s ongoing “academic trajectory” “I have spent the majority of my professional life at N.Y.U.,” he said. “In those three decades, I have been animated by a single purpose — to serve my institution well, and to try to improve it. Through a collective effort involving trustees, alumni, university leadership and faculty, we have during the past 30 years transformed N.Y.U. from a decent regional university into an international research university that stands among the top institutions in the world. “Now we are in a time of tremendous pressure on higher education,” Sexton continued, “and my goal is to sustain that academic momentum while adapting N.Y.U. to a dramatically changing environment. Over the past several months, there has been vigorous debate about N.Y.U.’s direction, resulting in both expressions of support — from the Medical School, from the Nursing School, from the Dental School, from the deans of

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Members of N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan celebrated at La Lanterna di Vittorio on MacDougal St. Friday evening after the no-confidence vote results were announced.

all the schools, as well today’s e-mail to the N.Y.U. community from the trustees — and now this expression of dissatisfaction from FAS [faculty of Arts and Science]. “In the university setting, we believe in debate and criticism; it helps us improve,” Sexton said. “That will be particularly important in the months and years ahead, because we are at a moment that compels meaningful change in higher education. “It is also the case that faculty must be at the center of the academic endeavor and involved in the decision-making,” he added. “We have taken some important steps in that direction and, particularly with this vote in mind, that effort will continue.

I look forward to working with the faculty to maintain N.Y.U.’s academic trajectory and prepare for the challenges ahead.” In a statement, Martin Lipton, chairperson of the university’s board of trustees, said they stand firmly behind Sexton: “The board of trustees unanimously and strongly supports President John Sexton, and believes in his strategic direction for the university,” Lipton said. “We have seen a strong, thriving, advancing university during his tenure as president,” Lipton said. “We note a 12 percent increase in applications for freshman admission in this year, the sixth straight year of record applications. We see the improvement in the academic qualifications of entering freshmen during John’s presidency, the increase in retention and graduation rates, and the expansion of financial aid. … We see a very successful record of fundraising — essentially $1 million per day, day in and day out since John Sexton became president. We note improvements in the finances, in the budgeting, and in the physical facilities of the University over the last 10 years, as well as the successful handling of the demerging of Mt. Sinai’s and N.Y.U.’s medical centers, and the dramatic turnaround at the N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center. We see the increase in tenured and tenure-track faculty, particularly in the arts and sciences, and a marked improvement of our ability to attract top scholars. “We believe that the global network created during his presidency has offered new academic opportunities to faculty and students (twice as many of whom study abroad as did 10 years ago), distinguished N.Y.U. among U.S. universities, and attracted the commitment and support of sophisticated partners.” In related news, a community lawsuit filed by longtime Washington Square Village non-N.Y.U. tenants and others

Continued on page 19

Saint Brigid - Saint Emeric Parish Parroquia de Santa Brigida - San Emérico Holy Week – Semana Santa Holy Thursday // Jueves Santo March 28 – Marzo 28 Mass 7:00 pm (Bilingual/Bilingüe)

Good Friday // Viernes Santo March 29 – Marzo 29

The Lord’s Passion // La Pasión Del Señor 12 noon Liturgy of the Passion of Christ (English) // Liturgia de la Pasión de Cristo (Inglés) 2:00 pm Celebracion de la pasión de Cristo (Español) 3:00 pm Procession through the streets // Procesión por las calles 7:00 pm: Solitude of Mary // Our Lady of Sorrows Procession Procesión de la Soledad de María // Procesión de la Dolorosa

Holy Saturday // Sábado Santo March 30 – Marzo 30 Mass 8:00 pm (Bilingual/Bilingüe)

Easter Vigil // Vigilia Pascual March 30 – Marzo 30 Mass 7:00 pm (Bilingual/Bilingüe)

Easter Sunday // La Resurrección del Señor March 31 – Marzo 31 Mass 10:00 am English Misa 11:30 am Español

119 E Ave B (Between 7th & 8th Streets), New York, NY 10009 Tel. 646-476-5617 // Fax. 212-375-1163 www.saintemericchurch.com // info@saintemericchurch.com


March 21 - 27, 2013

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a elebr

Life

e Grace v o L

y r ion t o c t e r r Vic Resu Holy Week - March 24 - 30

Palm Sunday:

11 AM Mass w/ Palms 6 PM Jazz Mass w/ Palms

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday: Evening Prayer at 6 PM

Maundy Thursday:

Good Friday Open Mic at the Foot of the Cross 12 - 3 PM Solemn Liturgy Passion Reading 6 PM

Holy Saturday Easter Vigil Fire, Food, Fellowship, & First Eucharist of Easter 6 PM

(great event for families, reservations requested)

Eucharist with guest choir 6 PM

Easter Sunday - March 31

11 AM - Traditional Mass

6 PM - Jazz Mass

St. John’s Lutheran Church Photo by Lincoln Anderson

John Penley led a large speak-out at N.Y.U. last Friday night, capping off his two-week campout on Washington Square South.

81 Christopher Street In the heart of the village, with the village in our hearts stjohnsnyc.org The Rev. Mark Erson, Pastor 212-242-5737 pastor@stjohnsnyc.org ALL ARE WELCOME!

Activist concludes his N.Y.U. homeless campout on a high By Lincoln Anderson John Penley’s campout in front of New York University’s Bobst Library may have started slowly after he launched it on March 1, but by the end of two weeks he had definitely built momentum. A crowd of about 50 gathered at the corner of LaGuardia Place and Washington Square South last Friday evening for a speakout on topics ranging from gentrification to the Kimani Gray shooting in Brooklyn. Penley’s main message during the campout was to call for N.Y.U. to build housing for the homeless since it has been such a major gentrifier of the Downtown area. At one point during Friday night’s speakout, N.Y.U. President John Sexton exited from Bobst and walked past the group. Penley shouted at him after Sexton had passed by that he “should be ashamed” that the university “kicked the seniors out” of the former Cabrini Residence on E. Fifth St. so that it could be an N.Y.U. dorm. (An N.Y.U. spokesperson later said that the school did look at the building two years ago, but that it didn’t meet the university’s needs.) The protesters also chanted “No con-fi-dence!” at Sexton, though by that time he was about a half a block away. About a dozen people camped out on the sidewalk in sleeping bags with Penley last

Friday night. Some were Occupy Wall Street veterans, and Penley called it “an Occupy Wall Street reunion.” Paul Funkhouser, an N.Y.U. student and Occupy activist, said they might keep gathering there, though not on a full-time, but on a once-a-week basis. “If we keep doing this, getting numbers of students, people start seeing the commonality,” he said. During the days, Penley worked at archiving his photos, which he previously gave to N.Y.U.’s Tamiment Museum, inside Bobst. The former East Village activist endured freezing weather and, one night during a snowfall suffered minor frostbite. When he just couldn’t face another night on the cold street, he crashed at C-Squat, on Avenue C, a couple of times. “C-Squat were really the only ones that helped me — Shane and Bill Cashman and Jerry [The Peddler],” he said. On Saturday, Penley ended the campout and headed to Pennsylvania where he had pledged to stay with a dying friend. The friend has a lawsuit against the government, and if he wins, Penley said he and others will use the funds to go into the medical marijuana business in Colorado, where it was recently legalized.

Our Lady of Pompeii Rev. John C. Massari, C.S., Pastor 25 CARMINE & BLEECKER STS., GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY 212-989-6805

HOLY WEEK SERVICES 2013 Wednesday, Thursday and Friday Private Confessions: 4-6pm Holy Thursday 7:00pm Mass of the Lord’s Last Supper Adoration until 11:00pm

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Good Friday 3pm Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion 7pm Solemn Stations of the Cross with the participation of the Choir

Holy Saturday Confessions: 9:00am to 12 Noon and 3-5pm 8pm Solemn Celebration of the Easter Vigil Easter Sunday Mass 9am, 11am (Italian), 12:15pm, 1:30 (Brazilian), 3:00 (Filipino) * NO EVENING MASS *


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March 21 - 27, 2013

Is this goodbye for Shalom Chai Pizza on Grand St.? By rey MaShayekhi A popular Lower East Side kosher restaurant was forced to close its doors earlier this month after racking up numerous violations from the city’s Department of Health — including evidence of mice on the premises and inadequate hand-washing facilities. The city shuttered Shalom Chai Pizza, at 357 Grand St., on March 8 after an inspection that same day recorded 61 points worth of violations at the restaurant. The infractions ranged from “evidence of mice or live mice present in the facility” to lack of a hand-washing facility “provided in or near food preparation area,” to the fact that the restaurant’s food was “not protected from potential sources of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service,” according to D.O.H.’s report. This is the second time in less than a year that Shalom Chai has closed because of a failed health inspection; last May, the city ordered the restaurant temporarily shuttered after the place garnered 73 points worth of violations. Frank Durant, general manager of the Seward Park Co-operative, which owns the strip of retail locations on Grand St. that houses Shalom Chai, told The Villager he was unsure whether the restaurant would reopen after its repeat violations. Shalom Chai is one of the only kosher pizza restaurants located in the Lower East Side, long an enclave for Manhattan’s Jewish

Photo by Rey Mashayekhi

Shalom Chai Pizza was closed earlier this month due to violations for mice, among other things.

community, though the Grand St. co-ops have become more diverse over the years. William Soo, an employee at The Pickle Guys, a pickle shop next door to Shalom Chai on Essex St., said he was sad to hear

Shrine  Church  of  Saint  Anthony  of  Padua adua  

Franciscan  Friars  

Founded  in  1866   154  Sullivan  Street  ˜  New  York  NY  10012   212-­‐777-­‐2755  ˜  212-­‐673-­‐6684  (FAX)     stanthonychurch@aol.com  ˜  www.stanthonynyc.org

       

  HOLY  WEEK  AND  EASTER  2013  

March  25-­‐  Reconciliation  Day   Sacrament  of  Penance  will  be  celebrated  at   our  church  from  3  PM  to  9  PM    

                   March  28-­‐  Holy  Thursday   9:00  AM  Morning  Prayer  (Chapel)   7:00  PM    Solemn  Liturgy   10:00  PM  Closing  of  Adoration    

                 March  29-­‐  Good  Friday   9:00  AM  Morning  Prayer  (Chapel)   3:00  PM  Stations  of  the  Cross   7:00  PM    Liturgy  of  the  Passion    

                 March  30-­‐  Holy  Saturday   9:00  AM  Morning  Prayer  (Chapel)   8:00  PM  Solemn  Easter  Vigil    

   

 

March  31-­‐  Easter  Sunday   Masses  at  9:00  AM  and  11:00  AM

of the potential demise of “one of the last kosher pizza places” in the Lower East Side. “It’s a shame,” Soo said, “because if you want some pizza that’s kosher, where are you going to go now?”

Victor Mendez, owner of nearby Vic’s Pizza, located on Essex St., said he was not surprised at how seriously city inspectors took the violations cited at Shalom Chai. “They’re very strict,” Mendez said of the city’s inspection guidelines. “If it is what I heard it is, they don’t fool around with mice.” Veronica Foley, an employee at Flowers Cafe on Grand St., said that while she had personal reservations about the restaurant’s cleanliness, it was always popular with locals. “The windows never looked very clean, and I judge a place by its windows,” she said. “But there were always people in there, and it was never empty.” Several employees of neighboring businesses located in the Seward Park-owned retail space — which also houses Kossar’s Bialys and the Doughnut Plant — said that their establishments share a common storage space with Shalom Chai in the building’s basement. All, however, described the shared basement as well-lit, clean and vermin-free, a sentiment echoed by Seward Park general manager Durant. “[Seward Park] maintains the common basement area; we’ve painted it, it’s lit up, everything is immaculate down there,” Durant told The Villager. “So I don’t know what the issue is with [Shalom Chai], but I don’t think the basement played any role in it.”


March 21 - 27, 2013

Gerald Barry, 90, writer/editor The Church of the Ascension for Newsweek, wires and Peat Fifth Avenue at Tenth Street

www.ascensionnyc.org 212-254-8620

OBITUARY By Albert Amateau Gerald J. Barry, a journalist and editor who made his home in Greenwich Village with his family for the past 50 years, died Wed., March 13, after a brief illness. He was 90. At a funeral Mass at St. Joseph’s Church, at Sixth Ave. and Washington Place, attended by scores of friends, neighbors and relatives on Sat., March 16, Jerry Barry was recalled as a calm tower of strength. Greg Barry, a nephew, said that in the Depression year of 1935 when his uncle was 12 and the oldest of five children in an Irish immigrant family in Detroit, Jerry’s father died and social workers came to the house to determine what would become of them. “Uncle Jerry said that he would take on an expanded newspaper delivery route and some additional odd jobs and keep the family together. Surprisingly, the social workers agreed,” Greg Barry said. “He was passionate about books and taught his young relatives to love books,” recalled Linda Carlsen, Gerald Barry’s sister-in-law. In Depression-era Detroit, Gerald worked at various jobs to support the family, according to his wife, Thelma — known to family and friends as Sugar. “He ran a lunch counter while he was in high school and later worked in the auto industry,” Sugar said. In 1944 toward the end of World War II, Gerald was drafted into the Army and served in France. He returned to Detroit after the war and attended the University of Detroit under the G.I. Bill, which provided veterans with college tuition. Gerald became editor in chief of the university newspaper, and a full-time journalist after graduation. He wrote auto industry news and then landed a job with the Detroit Times. In the 1950s, he worked for International News Service, a Hearst wire service, in Hartford, Conn., and when I.N.S. merged with United Press as U.P.I. he worked as a wire editor in London until 1960. Clem Morgello, retired business editor of Newsweek, the news magazine where Gerald Barry wrote business news articles from 1960 to 1970, recalled Barry’s abilities in the high-pressure environment.

Please join us for Services in Holy Week. March 24 – Palm Sunday 11 a.m. • The Sunday of the Passion The Liturgy of the Palms

Gerald Barry.

March 27 – Tenebrae 6 p.m. • Prayers, Psalms, and readings in the Shadows

“Jerry knew how to dig deep for a story and get it,” Morgello said. “In an atmosphere of super egos Jerry was a listener but he would put up a feisty argument to prove a point,” Morgello added. In 1970, Gerald Barry took a job as director of publications for the international accountancy firm of Peat Marwick Mitchell. “It was a wonderful opportunity,” said Sugar. “He helped organize a company magazine, World, which became quite well-known and he travelled all over — Europe, Japan, the Caribbean," Sugar said. He retired after 18 years at Peat Marwick. For the past two years, Gerald had resided at the Kateri Nursing Home on Riverside Drive. “He loved newspapers and always marveled at having been able to work at what he loved,” said Sugar, a longtime member of the Washington Square Association and the Washington Square Music Festival. Elizabeth Butson, former publisher of The Villager, recalled that Gerald and Sugar welcomed her and her husband, Tom Butson, when they revived The Villager in the late 1980s. “They were both devoted to their local paper,” Butson said. In addition to his wife, Sugar, their son, James, survives. A daughter, Susan, died last September.

OCCUPY Community News

March 28 – Maundy Thursday 6 p.m. • The Maundy Thursday Liturgy, with the Washing of Feet, Stripping of the Altar, and Setting of the Altar of Repose (with full choir). After the evening service, an all-night Vigil before the Reserved Sacrament will be kept in All Saints’ Chapel

March 29 – Good Friday 12 noon • The Three-Hour Liturgy for Good Friday with reading of the Passion Gospel according to St. John, the Solemn Collects, Veneration of the Cross, and Meditations (with full choir).

March 30 – Holy Saturday 8 p.m. • The Great Vigil of Easter with the Lighting of New Fire, Renewal of Baptismal Vows. This is the culmination of Holy Week, including the celebration of the first Eucharist of the Resurrection.

March 31 – Easter Day: The Day of Resurrection 9 a.m. • The Second Eucharist of Easter 11 a.m. • Festival Eucharist for Easter Day (with full choir) Child care at 11 a.m.

Parish Office at 12 W. 11 St. Office Hours: Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ALL ARE WELCOME!

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March 21 - 27, 2013

editorial

Claps for the cap

This might not go down well with all our readers (no pun intended), but, yes, we do support Mayor Bloomberg’s portion cap on sodas and sugary drinks. Polls show that slightly more than half of New Yorkers oppose restricting the serving size of fountain soft drinks to no more than 16 ounces. Yet, we feel that the mayor is on the right track on this issue, and that, in general, his initiative is a positive step in raising awareness about one of our top health scourges — obesity, particularly childhood obesity. The portion cap wouldn’t make it illegal for anyone to buy or ingest sugar, but would essentially force consumers to “slow down” their sugar suctioning. The law would basically create an inconvenience: Instead of buying one supersize cup of soda, one would have to buy two — or possibly even more, depending on the severity of one’s sugar addiction — 16-ounce cups; or would have to elevate oneself from one’s seat and walk back to the counter and get a refill (expending energy, burning empty calories that one has just put on by slurping down the admittedly already oversaturated 16-ounce soda). Seriously, how arduous and horrible is that? Not very. As the mayor, health experts and youth advocates all point out, economically challenged, minority neighborhoods, like much of the Bronx, for example, are ground zero for obesity in New York City — the highest children’s obesity rates are there, topping 30 percent, which is, frankly, horrifying. On the other hand, many accuse Bloomberg of creating a “nanny state” — injecting government inappropriately into people’s personal lives and freedoms. But most of us, except for possibly hardcore libertarians, will agree that government does have a public responsibility to protect people’s health. That’s why we have warnings on cigarette packs, why youngsters can’t by alcohol or alcohol-infused “energy drinks,” and so forth. Bottom line, obesity is no laughing matter. Over time, being overweight severely taxes joints and the back, but more seriously, it’s a leading cause of heart attacks, diabetes and early death. And of course, sugar water, particularly when in acidy soda, simply rots the teeth. We’re glad to hear Bloomberg, after his third (and, yes, final) term ends, will continue to campaign against the serving of supersize sugary drinks. Asked if he would do so last week at a press conference at Lucky’s Cafe — a business that is voluntarily instituting portion caps — the mayor assured he would stay active on the sugary drinks issue. “You can take that to the bank,” he stated. The problem, as he and others note, is that sugarpacked pop and other highly sweetened drinks simply aren’t filling, so kids gulp them right down — 64 ounces at a time, for a KFC jumbo cup, for example — ingesting a huge amount of calories, and yet remain just as hungry as before, ready to vacuum in still more syrupy goo. Again, people will respond that it’s their right to decide what to put into their bodies, and how much. But again, no one is banning sugar- or fructose-filled beverages — just making it a bit more of a hassle to chug humongous amounts of them in one fell swoop. And is it right that a person currently can’t even get a 16-ounce cup at a movie theater? Why do all their cups have to be jumbo-sized? The answer is clear: Huge profits are being made on what is essentially cheap sugar water. We hope the administration wins its appeal of the soda industry’s lawsuit against the portion ban, which was dismissed by Judge Tingling last week. As Mayor Bloomberg said, following New York’s no-smoking law, much of the world now also has similar laws — including most of Europe and Latin America, with no-smoking laws now gaining steam in Asia, too. As goes New York, so goes the world. And that’s precisely what the soda industry and Big Sugar are so afraid of.

letters to the editor Case is clear: No housing on pier To The Editor:  As one of the attorneys who brought the case establishing the Pier 40 ball fields (along with Arthur Z. Schwartz), I have been following the debate about whether housing should be permitted on Pier 40. I have lived and worked in Tribeca for about 30-plus years. My kids played ball in the Greenwich Village and Downtown Little Leagues and used the batting cages and the fields at Pier 40. It is no secret that Downtown Manhattan is one of the most park-deprived places in the city, but I don’t think housing is a viable long-term solution. I strongly support the plan advocated by Deborah Glick, Brad Holyman and Douglas Durst, among others. While I hope that the Hudson Rive Park will be selfsupporting and finished soon, I don’t believe housing on Pier 40 is the answer in either the short- or long-term. Please put my name on the list of people saying “No” to housing in the Hudson River Park, and let a permanent solution be found to finish the park and make it self-supporting.   Daniel L. Alterman

Real estate rears its head To The Editor: New York’s real estate and investment communities that pull the strings in Albany and City Hall never intended that a Hudson River park should succeed. The initial proposal in 1987 by a politically appointed citizens’ committee was for an esplanade connecting nodes of development. These nodes would act like anchor stores in a shopping mall to attract smaller commercial activities, which would eventually create uninterrupted commerce in and along the Hudson River. Citizen outcry for muchneeded parkland led the committee to change the name of the project, but not, it seems, the plan. To accomplish its aims an authority, also known as a public benefit corporation, was created by the 1998 legislation: the Hudson River Park Trust. The Trust now appears to be implementing the original plan in stages as funds for the park disappear. A failing park does indeed supply a rationale for introducing commercial and residential development. But why is it failing? Should an independent audit be undertaken? Community and environmental groups fought to prevent authority control of the river and the park. They argued that the state and city wanted authority control so that future land use decisions could be made without citizen

input. Because of the dedicated work of Assemblymember Deborah Glick, who singularly stood in opposition to the authority scheme, language was inserted into the Hudson River Park Act that prevented residential development within the park, and guaranteed citizen notice and input before decisions were made regarding Pier 40. This is the law the authority now lobbies to change. The latest debate involving Pier 40 has ramifications for the future of the entire Hudson River Park. If the authority succeeds in changing the law to allow residential development within the park, it would not only open the door for building at Pier 40 but also on the piers and on floating structures in the Hudson River. Authority control extends from the park’s northern boundary at 59th St. to its southern boundary at Battery Park City, including the piers and the water between the piers. Imagine the West Side drive encased by high-rises and commercial activity on both sides. That was the vision introduced in 1987. It is obviously still the plan. However, Mother Nature may have other plans. Green was director of community relations for former speaker pro temp of the New York State Assembly, William F. Passannante, and a founding member of the Federation to Preserve the Greenwich Village Waterfront and Great Port.

Nice editorial on Pier 40 To The Editor: Re “Pier 40 reality” (editorial, March 7): I’m writing to express my support for your recent editorial about the Hudson River Park and Pier 40. As a resident and homeowner in the West Village, I make regular use of the park. To see high-rise residential towers go up there arguably would benefit those living in them, but represent a huge loss to the public at large. Laurie Krasny Brown

Don’t study — landmark A.S.A.P.! To The Editor: Re “Hud. Sq. rezoning O.K.’d; S. Village landmark pledged” (news article, March 14): The City Council’s vote in committee this past week to

IRA BLUTREICH

Someone finally reads the Obamacare plan.

Continued on page 29


March 21 - 27, 2013

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Bikes rule! Or bike rules? One cyclist sounds off tAlkinG point By Scott ogLeSBy I’ve been riding bikes in Manhattan for 27 years, so retro that I call myself a “biker,” not a cyclist. Before moving here in the ’80s, I was an avid biker in San Francisco for 15 years. My first ride was in 1956, on a single-speed Schwinn American Flyer. Made of steel, it was indestructible, a far cry from my current lightweight wheels — a road bike, and a mountain bike. This long history (plus my age) has given me a seasoned take on the bike-friendly changes taking place in the city’s road grid. Not to mention serious street cred: Accidents? You bet, at least a dozen. Injuries? Sure — a broken collarbone (nine pins), two broken wrists, one hand. Brushes with death, lost count. Centuries (100-mile bike rallies) — three, minus senior discount miles. Thefts — five stolen bikes, one pedal set, one front wheel. Written about it all — once: a novel, “Riding High.” Advocacy — member of Transportation Alternatives. Bikes are still my primary New York City transport, but I also walk and drive here, therefore I empathize with all sides in the ongoing hot debate dubbed the “bike wars.”

Dogs, pythons, parrots and other pets are not mobile fashion accessories. The front line in this conflict is the proliferation of bike lanes. For most of my life, a “bike lane” was simply the everchanging space between cars that I could squeeze through; so it’s been heartening to see the proliferation of “real” bike lanes, some of them “dedicated” (protected by an island or parked cars). Many lanes have specified traffic lights (a lit-up biker icon), just for me and my two-wheeled friends. The hope is that everyone will learn to share the road and accept progress as something more than increased speed. This new landscape of bike lanes and rules is sure to dampen “outlaw” riding styles. I’ve never been a messenger, but I have ridden like one — wrong way up one-way streets, running red lights, brief stints on sidewalks. I’ve scattered jaywalkers like so many chickens. So, it is true, some riders can be impervious, rude and reckless. I’ve been bumped and near-missed countless times by bike-delivery people, most of whom have zilch rider-training. And naturally, career messengers see the streets as their workplace, and like cabbies, they see you as just another obstacle to their need for speed. When money’s involved, civility is always the first casualty. Think Ratso Rizzo in “Midnight Cowboy” — “I’m walking here!” Remember that many bikers are literally riding scared,

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Published by NYC COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, NY, NY 10013 Phone: (212) 229-1890 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2012 NYC Community Media, LLC

Scott Oglesby ready to do some winter cycling — or bike riding, as they used to call it — with his 1986 Miyata road bike.

because most bike lanes are not protected. Many become magnets for cabs and double-parkers, forcing riders to swerve into traffic, a harrowing, sometimes lethal move. At times, riders feel safer sharing a regular lane with cars — perfectly legal when your speed is comparable (and there’s no bike lane). Unfortunately, aggressive riding is sometimes the best protection from autos and unpredictable pedestrians. In the end, it becomes a question of balance — fear pitted against courtesy. New York City pedestrians are also known for “taking their lane,” braving large vehicles daily just to cross the street. Erroneously, many see bikes as relatively harmless, or worse, invisible. They seem to think that a collision would be a minor bump. Not true, as many have discovered. All this contentiousness has led to hardcore “atti-rudes.” Like tabloid bluster from the Murdoch blowhards — one senior clobbered by a messenger gets equal space to the droves of walkers and cyclists mowed down by vehicles. Pushing back from rad sections of the bike community are Eco fanatics. All greened-up, they’ve married biking to public

transit, recycling, hybrid-driving, etc. As if living right entitles special privileges on the street. When bikers meet traffic lights, opinions really polarize, so let’s fine tune it. There’s running red lights, and then there’s running red lights! There’s a huge difference between coasting through a light, and “crashing” one — hitting an intersection at high speed, threading gaps between moving cars and people. Pedestrians habitually cross against lights, so no surprise that bikers feel unfairly targeted when ticketed. Fair enough, but on a bike, don’t expect to be treated like a pedestrian unless your velocity and lethality are similar. Best safety enforcement? Forget the light, ticket reckless behavior. I confess, occasionally I still ride the wrong way up oneway streets. Only one block at a time, and for a zillion different reasons, but I do it. But, with extreme diligence and at a much slower speed, aware that pedestrians especially, are not expecting me coming from the wrong direction. Ironically, bikers stand a greater chance of being “doored” by exiting passengers when riding the correct direction (my biggest fear). How do you tell a seasoned New Yorker? They compulsively look both directions when crossing any street. Helmets are a no-brainer. Imagine sucking a mojito through the straw stuck in your wired-up jaw. Wear the thing! Chances of a fatal accident are much less. Pet peeves: Dogs, pythons, parrots and other pets are not mobile fashion accessories. Please don’t stuff them in your backpack or bike basket, or wrap them around your neck. It endangers them, yourself and me! Rule of dumb — if they can’t strap on a helmet without help, don’t ride with them. (Applies to children.) Fools with phones: If you believe that crossing a city street is not the place for phone calls or texting, then you’re most likely over 40. I have saved countless young lives by simply hitting the brakes (sometimes reluctantly). My bumper sticker reads: “I brake for fools.” Bigger fools are the bikers riding with a device in one hand, the other supposedly in control of their bike. These folks have surely never had an accident. Yet! Others grip the bars with both hands and clamp their phone between their head and shoulder. Wake up, kiddos! Please don’t chat with your mom, check e-mail, tweet or surf, or peruse your stocks while riding. You can replace your device with a smarter model, your dumbo head’s a different story. I’m reluctant to discuss bells but New York City law requires one on all bikes. Really? In the din of cab horns and jackhammers, who’s gonna hear bells? Especially when most ped ears are clogged with earbuds, Bluetooth and indie rock. An air horn is what bikers need, or maybe one of those South African soccer horns. A vuvuzela mounted on the handlebars! Now that would create some rolling room in the crosswalks. Last-ditch advisory: Bikers and drivers — slow down; adapt to the new streetscape; always give pedestrians the right of way (optional for phoners and texters). Smile.

Member of the New York Press Association

PUBLISHER Jennifer Goodstein

SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING Francesco Regini

ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Troy Masters

CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.

Member of the National Newspaper Association

EDITOR IN CHIEF Lincoln Anderson

RETAIL ADVERTISING MANAGER Colin Gregory

SENIOR DESIGNER Michael Shirey

CONTRIBUTORS

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Arnold Rozon PHOTOGRAPHERS Tequila Minsky Jefferson Siegel Clayton Patterson

Terese Loeb Kreuzer

The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 0042-6202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, 515 Canal Street, Unit 1C, New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2011 NYC Community Media LLC.

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The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue.

ARTS EDITOR Scott Stiffler BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Allison Greaker

Ross Garnick

Julius Harrison

PUBLISHER EMERITUS John W. Sutter

Alex Morris Julio Tumbaco

Marvin Rock Ira Blutreich Patricia Fieldsteel Bonnie Rosenstock Jefferson Siegel Jerry Tallmer


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March 21 - 27, 2013

Buying a bed to attract love, and being O.K. with it notebook By kate WaLter I could hardly sleep the night before the delivery. I woke up that morning in a panic. I’d cleared the bedroom area, creating messes in other corners. I was freaking out over which way to angle my beautiful new mahogany platform bed. I always envisioned it perpendicular to the wall, but now I thought it should go parallel. I kept pulling out my tape measure and making calculations. As soon as it was nine o’clock, I called my designer friend Beth, who was coming over later to help hang art. I still had paintings and posters strewn about my place, lined against the walls, waiting to be hung once my loft came together. “I think you should have the bed facing the room,” she said confirming my new idea. Now I worried it would be sticking out too far. In my first session of 2013, I’d told my shrink my big news, “I finally bought a bed.” “Mazel tov,” she said. “That’s wonderful. Why are you focusing on the delivery?” I was obsessing over my fears that the front desk would send the delivery men to the freight elevator and they would be unable to find my apartment in my confusing building complex. “I feel unworthy, undeserving of having nice things,” I ventured. During 20 years of therapy, we’d discussed my intense Catholic education and how I viewed austerity as holiness. “You have this conflict inside you that if you get something nice, you’ll be punished,” said Dr. R. “So you segue into worrying because it’s safer. Getting what you want terrifies you.” At 63, I was much too old to be using a pull-out sofa. Since my gay divorce from the love of my life, I spent years sleeping on a convertible couch in a tiny studio in the West Village. I’d been single too long after the breakup of my 26-year relationship and realized I had to make one big change to bring love and sex back into my life. It was time to buy a real bed. In the beginning, I used space as my excuse for not having one. But a year ago, I upgraded into a small (570-square-foot ) one-bedroom loft in my rent-stabilized complex. After shelling out money for the move, I was broke — my new excuse. When I caught up financially last summer, I decided I’d rather go to the beach. This past fall my building (Westbeth) got badly flooded by Sandy and I needed to focus on surviving in an altered environment. I also wondered if my procrastination was fear of romance, of bringing a new woman into my life after my partner abandoned me. Not having a cozy place for two to

sleep was a foil to romance. I’d been dating off and on but nothing materialized. Friends kept telling me I was sending the wrong message to the universe by not having a bed. I agreed. My astrologer said that 2013 looked promising for love, so I needed to be ready. Then my mother gave me Christmas money and told me it was for a bed. Now I would feel guilty if I kept holding off. I had to laugh when my mother wondered if I’d get a twin because my place is not that big. I made it clear I needed room for another person. It had taken years for my parents to accept my being gay, and my mother had become way more open-minded after my father died, so I dismissed her slip.

‘Why can’t you just enjoy this? You need to chill out and be with having a great space.’ Dr. R Everything was on sale in January, and on New Year’s Day, I bought a full-sized platform bed and mattress from a Charles P. Rogers, a classy store in Chelsea. I had so much anxiety over this big purchase that I needed permission and had to act fast. After looking online, I dashed to the showroom, picked out a frame, tried two mattresses, set up a delivery date. My doorman buzzed to tell me the men from the store were on their way upstairs. They brought everything in one trip on the main elevator next to my apartment. It took just five minutes for them to set everything up. Wow! My bed looked fantastic and was definitely facing the right way. I gave a generous tip and they were gone. My friend Beth came over and admired my choice. We hung artwork and picked spots for the big paintings that would require me to borrow a taller ladder. Then she took me out to lunch to celebrate. That night, I was too wound up to sleep well on my comfortable new mattress with its fresh blue sheets. The next morning I spent my entire therapy session discussing my anxiety over my fabulous new addition and obsessing over my process of designing a put-together New York City loft. Now I worried about where I’d put the items displaced from my bedroom — my bike, stereo system and four boxes of yoga and New Age books, still unpacked. “Why can’t you just enjoy this?” Dr. R. asked. She

suggested this was related to my father, a lovely man but anxious devout Catholic who disliked change and prayed compulsively every day. “Having a nice space puts you outside your comfort zone.” I agreed my nervousness was related to my father as well as growing up in a frugal household (teacher father and stay-at-home mother), where we lived on a tight budget and only went out to dinner twice a year. I’d been deeply affected by parents’ concern about expenses. My shrink complimented me on venturing beyond my upbringing and reminded me that my mother, who had loosened up in her old age, gave me money for this purchase. “It is so cool that I can see the Empire State Building while relaxing in bed,” I said, allowing myself to bask for a moment. I told her I’d ditched my original plan to put up a bookcase as room divider. “I love the open and airy feeling — and the view.” “You have the kind of loft everyone wants,” said my shrink. “You need to chill out and be with having a great space.” “Well it’s not that big,” I replied, immediately realizing I was negating my happiness. We ended the session with my therapist noting, “Hold it in your head that you are afraid of change and worrying too much.” The next day I began to relax and started to enjoy fixing up my place. The bed transformed my entire loft — it now looked bigger — and I felt like I had a real home. I went to ABC Carpet and used a gift certificate to buy a gorgeous fabric-art bedspread from Tibet. I picked out two new down pillows at a Macy’s bedding sale. I moved a small table into my sleeping area to create a nightstand and this opened a space for my stereo cart. I started measuring corners and looking for bookcases. My super installed a pulley device to hang my bike from the kitchen ceiling. Then he helped me secure the big abstract painting high over my bed. That area looks fabulous. I could see myself with a date here. So I started obsessing again to take in all this good stuff. As I lay in bed gazing at the Empire State Building, I began to worry the art would fall on my head when I’m asleep. It’s now the end of February. I’ve been sleeping peacefully in my bed for a month. The gay couple next door gave me a vintage dresser (circa 1940s) in mint condition, with six drawers. I put my art deco lamp and old typewriter on top. My books are still piled on the living room floor, but my bedroom has art and antiques and extra dresser drawers for that special someone.

It takes a

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March 21 - 27, 2013

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Year of the Snake ssssizzles at spruced-up center

2013

Offering an impromptu tour, he asked a visitor, “Have you seen the theater posters in the large dining room?” Katz personally sourced these from archives and members’ collections, creating a theater theme in the largest of the center’s spaces.” It’s a theme that certainly resonates, since, as he noted, “So many of our members are artists, actors, dancers and painters, living here in the Village.” “We’re known as ‘the theater senior center,’ ” Katz boasted. “For two or three dollars, members get tickets to Broadway, Off Broadway shows — also, concerts, dance performances and even sports events.” Giving Katz kudos, Shub said, “Phil has managed to achieve a totally different feeling in the center.” She should know after volunteering at Greenwich House for 10 years — and being known for organizing far-flung “trips for active seniors.” “The rejuvenation uplifts our spirits when we’re in these

Take part in the dialogue on timely & critical issues that shape our lives.

CONFERENCES

Photo by Tequila Minsky

Solo in the City: Jewish Women, Jewish Stars featuring Sandra Bernhard, Jackie Hoffman, Tovah Feldshuh, Sheba Mason, Rachael Sage, Inna Faliks and Judy Gold. march 14 • 8:30 am

march 21 • 1:15 pm

The 8th Annual Burton Kossoff Business Leadership Lecture featuring Jay S. Fishman Mr. Fishman is chairman and chief executive officer of The Travelers Companies, Inc.

For a compleTe calendar oF THe BarucH conFerences go To

www.baruch.cuny.edu

april 5 • 12 NooN

What is the Reputational Risk of Being Politically Active? A panel of experts addresses this question at Corporate Communication International at Baruch College’s 11th Annual Symposium on Reputation, held at and hosted by Pfizer Inc. april 19 • 8:30 am

Living and Working in a Connected Community, Accessible Technology for All This Annual Conference from Computer Center for Visually Impaired People (CCVIP) features interactive workshops, app recommendations and a “Breaking Barriers” award ceremony. Featuring Dr. Judy M. Dixon, Library of Congress.

Photo: The Rubin Museum of Art

Futureproofing Our Cities: Urban Resilience, At What Cost? Problems, Solutions and Pathways to Implementation; a half-day conference featuring key NY City leaders presented by The Steven L. Newman Real Estate Institute. Photo: The Travelers Companies

By Tequila Minsky Greenwich House Senior Center has been transformed since volunteer Phil Katz undertook the project to improve it almost two years ago. Tired wall décor has come down. The smaller dining room shines with a fresh coat of radiant yellow paint and members’ paintings — mostly created in the Friday afternoon art classes — hang on the walls. In early February, the center, on the fourth floor of 27 Barrow St., celebrated the spiffed-up senior digs by hosting an expo with a reception of the seniors’ art. The former, overstuffed storage room is now a comfy reading room and a micro-museum. Historical photographs — many of them public-domain images from the Greenwich Village Historical Society — hang alongside several paintings. The space doubles, as needed, as a multipurpose room for other activities. Almost rhetorically, Katz asked, gesturing to the photo exhibit, “Did you know that Greenwich House is one of the oldest settlement houses in New York?” Pointing out specific photos, he noted, “Eleanor Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart and Betty Davis were volunteers here.” Sami Shub, a longtime volunteer at the center, gestured to paintings hanging beside the photos. “These are some of the best artworks on exhibit,” she offered, referring to two Greenwich Village streetscapes painted by local artist Stu Gottfried, who is also a board member. Katz reflected, “My involvement here has given me a focus — almost a calling.” A former advertising copywriter, he happily discovered volunteerism following a bit of floundering after retirement. He’s been coming to Greenwich House for eight years.

Photo: ©WireImage.com

Now through march 31

Longtime volunteer Sami Shub displayed a hat/paper sculpture entitled, “Disguise by Margo Mead.”

rooms,” Shub added. At the Greenwich House center’s reception, unique hat/ paper sculptures were also on exhibit, created under the direction of Whitney Museum docent Melanie Adsit. The snake-themed creations burst with color, form and creative energy. “We worked out a theme in conjunction with this Chinese New Year’s Year of the Snake,” said Shub, who also organizes a banquet dinner for the center in Chinatown every new year. The whimsical headdress/artworks were shown at the Whitney last November in a one-day exhibit. Following the exhibition, more seniors made even more snake-themed paper headdresses to bring them to the 10-course Lunar New Year banquet. Without a little less hoopla, a new senior art expo went up at Greenwich House on Tues., March 19.

april 24-25 • 4:30 pm

Museums and Higher Education in the 21st Century: Collaborative Methods and Models for Innovation Co-hosted by the School of Public Affairs and The Rubin Museum of Art.


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March 21 - 27, 2013

Our artists are our cultural treasures; They need help! CLAYTON By Clayton Patterson On March 7 a representative each from Councilmember Margaret Chin’s office and the Cooper Square Committee visited Taylor Mead. They arrived around noon and stayed for about 15 minutes. Taylor lives on the top floor at 163 Ludlow St. I am not sure if they checked the door to the roof. The roof door is never locked or fully closed, which allows in the elements and the cold air. Imagine what it must have been like during Hurricane Sandy. Then add in that Taylor is 88, with no electricity, and is one of the only tenants left in the tenement, which is a construction site. And if they went to the roof they would have observed that there is fresh graffiti, which means the roof is somewhat active and certainly accessible. People have been mugged in his building. I, as well as others from The Villager and other concerned people, have tried to reach the people who made the visit, or at least get a verbal response about the visit. Taylor has a niece on vacation, who will come by in a week. I think something needs to be done now. On March 13 Taylor was having problems with his heart and was taken to Beth Israel Hospital. He was released and allowed to go home Sun., March 17. He

Photos by Clayton Patterson

Taylor Mead has returned to his Ludlow St. top-floor apartment after a hospital visit, but he has difficulty going up and down the stairs.

did say he has to now basically stay at home, since going up and down the stairs is extremely difficult. Taylor, until now, has endured and survived the wrath and all the brutality

his new landlord has inflicted on him. But isn’t there any agency, politician or a group that can do anything to help? Is there an elderly abuse council? How about calling 311? Something? Where are our councilmembers on this — not only Chin, but also Christine Quinn and Rosie Mendez, who are both openly gay, and share that bond. Taylor is gay. He needs help!

Quinn makes so much of her Irish immigrant grandparents — but they couldn’t survive in Bloomberg’s New York. Our politicians are just letting all of this happen, as Manhattan increasingly becomes a place only for the rich, with no room for artistic types like Taylor. I got a note from Shell Sheddy, one of our important Lower East Side documentary photographers. She, like so many others, is facing landlord hell. It’s a serious situation. Shelly is fighting to stave off homelessness and also trying to save her L.E.S. photo archive, a jewel of immense importance. Look her up on Facebook. She had one benefit but it did not raise enough for the fee for her storage locker. N.Y.U, a nonprofit institution, is investing in billions of dollars of real estate, yet they have no interest in Downtown history. Shell has created a historically important visual history, saving for future generations a slice of the culture she found worth memorializing. Shell Sheddy is not the first artist to lose so much because of lack of funds to pay storage. Anthony Haden Guest lost his retirement collection. John Penely, who has been protesting for N.Y.U. to provide some shelter for the homeless, had the university’s Tamiment Library purchase his archive for so little it was a steal. And then I saw some of his images online and the copyright credit went to Tamiment Library, when in fact it still belonged to John. We have to protect our cultural treasures — and we need the help of everyone, including our politicians.

Shell Sheddy, right, with East Village activist Rob Hollander, is battling to keep her apartment and to raise the fee to store her photo archives.


March 21 - 27, 2013

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March 21 - 27, 2013

Fallen heroes honored six years after tragic night

Photos by Jefferson Siegel

At last Thursday’s memorial ceremony, from left: Iola Latman, mother of Auxiliary Officer Nicholas Pekearo; Boris and Maya Marshalik, parents of Auxiliary Officer Eugene Marshalik; and Deputy Inspector Brandon del Pozo, Sixth Precinct commanding officer.

Auxiliary officers salute their fallen comrades.

By Jefferson Siegel Marking the sixth anniversary of the killing of two heroic Sixth Precinct auxiliary officers in the line of duty, police and auxiliary officers, family members and community members gathered at the corner of Bleecker and Sullivan Sts. for a brief memorial last Thursday evening. On the evening of March 14, 2007, disgruntled filmmaker David Garvin walked into DeMarco’s Italian restaurant at West Houston and MacDougal Sts. and, after asking for a menu, fired 15 shots into restaurant employee Alfredo Morales’s back. Two Sixth Precinct auxiliary police officers, Nicholas Pekearo, 28 and Eugene Marshalik, 19, were on patrol and heard news of the shooting on their radio. The unarmed auxiliaries spotted Garvin approaching on Bleecker St. and ordered him to drop his backpack. At first Garvin complied but then punched Pekearo in the face and proceeded to run up Sullivan St. It was later revealed that the backpack held a second gun and 100 bullets. The young officers followed Garvin at a distance. Suddenly, Garvin turned and fired a half-dozen times at Pekearo. He then turned his weapon on Marshalik, killing him with one bullet to the back of the head.

Police flooded the area. After exchanging fire with pursuing officers, Garvin ducked into a leather-goods store, the Village Tannery, where he likely reloaded. Upon emerging, he was ordered to drop his weapon before officers ended his rampage in a hail of gunfire. Marshalik was a student in N.Y.U.’s College of Arts and Science, working toward a degree in politics and economics. Pekearo, who grew up in the Village, was a writer and had just completed a fantasy novel about werewolves. Two street signs bearing the heroes’ names now hang on the northeast and southwest corners of Sullivan and Bleecker Sts. Attending last Thursday’s ceremony were Deputy Inspector Brandon del Pozo, the Sixth Precinct’s commanding officer; Deputy Inspector Phylis Byrne of the auxiliary police; and former state Senator Tom Duane. Speaking afterward, the two mothers expressed their gratitude for the memorial event. “I am very grateful to the people who remember my son,” said Maya Marshalik. Said Iola Latman, mother of Pekearo, “It’s wonderful that the neighborhood, the community and the police are honoring them both. The ceremony was very nice.”

Flowers were left on two lampposts at Bleecker and Sullivan Sts. bearing honorary street signs for the officers.


March 21 - 27, 2013

The impossible interview: The pope and the journalist TALKING POINT By Jerry Tallmer JACOBO TIMERMAN, journalist, publisher, author, born Bar, Ukraine, January 15, 1923 — died Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 11, 1999. JORGE MARIO BERGOGLIO, born Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 17, 1936. Former priest, bishop, archbishop, cardinal, now Pope Francis I. THE JOURNALIST: Father — is that how I should address you? — Your grace? — Good sir? Please accept this rather musty copy of my book “Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number.” When it came out in the United States in 2001, it caused quite a stir. The chapters on electronic torture...that was the year of America’s 9/11. It was also the year, I believe, that you became cardinal of Argentina. I was wondering whether — THE PONTIFF: My son, I thank you — but we in the Vatican are not allowed to accept gifts of any kind, no matter how wellintentioned. THE JOURNALIST: Oh, your worship, my passing along this book wasn’t meant as a gift — or well-intentioned either. The intention was educational. I don’t know how much you know, sir, about electronic torture — or any torture, for that matter — since vocal opposition to torture seems not to have been among the many good works you have done — and I know how you’ve always warmly embraced Argentina’s Jews — through all the years of the Juntas and their “Dirty War.” I mean, when at least 30,000 men and women of all ages were kidnaped off the streets, raped, beaten, tortured, thrown from aircraft into the ocean, the women’s newborn infants handed over to Fascist households... . THE PONTIFF (in Spanish): Stop! Stop,

my son! How old are you, anyway, that you should know such evil? THE JOURNALIST: Well, I was 76 when I departed this earth, not that that means anything. I was 54 when they put me in that cell, in solitary, and then on the torture table. The point is, I know such evil because I learned the hard way — from the electrodes. But they made a mistake — they didn’t kill me. So I went to Israel for a while, and I wrote “Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number” to teach people what torture is all about... . Would you like to know, sir, what they can do with those electrodes... . THE PONTIFF: (his hands over his ears): No, no, in the name of Jesus Christ, Our Lord, please no! THE JOURNALIST: I looked you up on Google, you know, and in The New York Times. There’s a lot about how you’ve fought for the poor and the humble and the needy all your life — stood up to the bosses and the big corporations, the exploiters of the salt of the earth — but very little about your standing up to the bemedaled bastards of Juntas 1, 2, 3 and 4. Oh, maybe a discrete phone call or two when the Peronistas had snatched up a couple of ultra-radical Catholic priests, but anything more than that — silence. Indeed, Google puts it discreetly this way: “His relationship with the military Junta during the National Reorganization Process remains controversial.” National Reorganization Process! The Nazis did some reorganizing, too, in the years when the pope was Pius XII. He kept his mouth shut while 10 times 6 million died. I hope, your reverence, that the world will remember you for something other than that. THE PONTIFF: My son, what will be will be. Rest in peace. Amen. With apologies to Miguel Covarrubias and Vanity Fair, the originators of “Impossible Interviews.”

No-confidence vote for Sexton Continued from page 8 against the university’s development plans was dismissed this week by Supreme Court Justice Elizabeth Coin. Coin ruled that the suit’s contention that the residents were being “deprived of essential services” should go before the state’s Division of Housing and Community Renewal, rather than be heard in court. The suit argued that N.Y.U.’s plan to add two large new infill buildings in the complex’s courtyard would deprive the residents of use of the backyard Sasaki Garden, which they have had consistent use of ever since moving

in decades ago. The plaintiffs’ attorney, Lawrence B. Goldberg, a resident of the complex, said he was “extremely disappointed” at Coin’s ruling, charging that she “took five months to do nothing.” He told The Villager he filed the necessary papers to appeal the ruling and that the decision to appeal must be made within several months, but that the plaintiffs will know well before then how they’ll proceed. Lynne Brown, N.Y.U. senior vice president for university relations and public affairs, said of Coin’s verdict, “We are very pleased with today’s ruling and also look forward to prevailing in the Article 78 case that has been filed with regards to N.Y.U.’s expansion plans.”

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Politicians want to be filled in more on infill plan Continued from page 1 outs — which would provide hot water, limited elevator use, security and hallway lighting. The new affordable units would be permanently affordable. The city’s plan is to lease sites for development within existing public housing complexes, including Baruch Houses, at East Houston St.; Campos Plaza, at E. 12th St.; LaGuardia Houses, at Madison and Rutgers Sts.; Smith Houses, at South St. and Robert Wagner Place; and Meltzer Tower, at E. First St.

‘This represents the single, best way to raise the money — and the time to act is now.’ John Rhea

The Baruch site — now a parking lot on Baruch Drive — would allow one new building of 375,000 square feet with 405 apartments. The Campos property — currently a parking lot and a basketball and handball courts — would allow a 90,000-square-foot building with 97 apartments. The LaGuardia Houses parcels — which is right now two parking lots — is earmarked to become two new buildings with a total of 255,000 square foot and 276 new apartments. At Meltzer Tower, an outdoor seating area now used by the complex’s senior residents would be replaced by a 90,000-square-foot, 97-unit building. At the Smith Houses, there would be two new developments — to be located on the current sites of a paved baseball field and basketball court, parking lot and garbage-compactor lot — comprising more than 1 million square feet

Photo by Peter Mikoleski/NYCHA

NYCHA General Manager Cecil House, at podium, and Fred Harris, right, outlined the infill plan and fielded questions at an informational meeting for Baruch Houses residents Monday night, as a woman translated their remarks into sign language.

and 1,150 new units. At an Assembly hearing on the plan last Friday, assemblymembers pushed John Rhea, the Housing Authority’s chairperson, and Harris for more information about the plan. Brian Kavanagh, whose East Side district includes two of the affected housing complexes, accused the authority of “hiding the ball” on details about the infill plan. Rhea said the idea is simply for NYCHA to “leverage one of our most valuable assets — our land.” Based on current zoning law, many NYCHA developments, he said, “have the ability to grow, and the ability to enhance their neighborhoods.” Added Harris, “These areas are all located in areas that are dense, but we think could be a little denser.” “Why are we rushing this?” asked Keith Wright, chairperson of the Assembly’s Standing Committee on Housing. The authority is struggling financially, Rhea explained, having lost $2.3 billion in government funding since 2001, and is

carrying an operating debt of $60 million. A substantial part of the money from the new infill buildings will go toward fixing roofs, elevators, lobbies and boilers and upgrading security in the complexes where the new projects are sited. “Every penny will go to the capital needs of NYCHA,” Rhea stated. “This represents the single, best way to raise the money — and the time to act is now.” These capital repairs are separate from the agency’s backlog of apartment repairs, though this number is dropping, Rhea assured. “This plan is specific to meet these [capital] needs — not the backlog,” he clarified. The Housing chairperson said NYCHA has been talking about the idea of capitalizing on its land for more than a decade. He added that the new construction projects “will bring $3 billion in economic activity and money to neighborhoods in need.” Rhea said NYCHA residents would be given jobs in connection with the conFINANCIAL

struction of the new buildings and then permanently, staffing them. Rhea said it’s incorrect to dub the infill buildings “luxury housing,” rather, that they would be “mixed-income, 80 percent market rate.” But Carmen Quinones, a Douglass Houses tenant activist who is running for City Council, who was in the audience at the hearing, didn’t agree. “Eighty percent luxury housing!” she shouted out. Douglass Houses, on the Upper West Side, is also slated for the infill scheme. In response to questioning about why the new infill buildings couldn’t have more affordable units, Harris said, NYCHA would “receive significantly less” if it went up from the 20 percent affordable figure. As for eligibility for the affordable units, Rhea said NYCHA residents would receive priority and that applicants would have to earn less than 60 percent of area median income — $36,000 for a single person and $54,000 for a family of four. NYCHA does have middle-income residents, but they won’t be eligible for these new affordable units. In response to accusations that NYCHA hasn’t done an adequate job informing its residents, politicians and the wider community about the plan, Rhea said the authority has been doing outreach, and is currently completing a round of tenantoutreach meetings, and that the plan will also go to local community boards for review. There will also be a second round of community outreach later on, he said. A Web site on the infill plan is now live at http://on.nyc.gov/landlease , and will eventually let people post comments, though they can’t now. However, Wright asked, “Will the horse be out of the barn [once the R.F.P is released]?” “Absolutely not,” Rhea countered, saying, “What we’re trying to do is put down a track [for the horse].” The Assembly panel — which also included Linda Rosenthal from the Upper

Continued on page 28


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villager arts & entertainment For Village Folkies of the 60s, Turning 70 is a Good Gig Times change, but the song remembers when

Photo by Michael Lydon

The entrance to the shuttered Gaslight, on MacDougal Street.

BY MICHAEL LYDON “I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now,” Bob Dylan sang in 1964. Back then, the 23-year-old was a two-year veteran of the rough-and-tumble folk music scene that flourished in dozens of little clubs dotted along Bleecker, MacDougal and Fourth Streets in Greenwich Village. Almost 50 years later, Dylan is a vigorous senior. The scene that nurtured and sharpened his talent has changed and aged — but, more important, it has survived along with him. Most of the old clubs, however, haven’t survived. The Kettle of Fish on MacDougal, where Tim Hardin and Richie Havens hung out between sets at other clubs, is now a Vietnamese restaurant. Next door, The Gaslight, a basement bistro that once booked Doc Watson and Jose Feliciano, is shut tight. Above the steps, a faded sign boasts of the day “when poets and other arty types were known as bohemians not beatniks.” Across the street, the Players Theatre — where The Fugs chanted their X-rated ditties — is still there. But Speakeasy, the top folk club of the early 80s, has vanished without a trace. MacDougal Street has changed so much that when the Coen brothers recently shot exteriors for a movie about the Village folk scene, they set dressed a block of East Ninth Street rather than trying to reconstruct the original. Gerde’s Folk City, at Mercer and West Fourth in Dylan’s day, moved in the late 60s to the former Tony Pastore’s restaurant

Photo courtesy of Erik Frandsen

Left to Right: Erk Frandsen, David Massingiull and Dave Van Ronk in a Village bar, in the 1980s.

Photo by Michael Lydon

Erik Frandsen in his MacDougal Street apartment.

on West Third near Sixth Avenue. Run for years by the legendary Mike Porco, Folk City hung on as a music club until 1987. Bleecker Street’s The Bitter End became The Other End and then, again, The Bitter End — and now features more rock than folk performers (Lady Gaga is the latest star to win a first following at the 52-yearold venue). “But what are you going to do?” asks Erik Frandsen, a fine finger-picking guitar-

ist and Folk City regular through the 70s, “Give up because a club closes? Never!” Frandsen, who still lives above the old Gaslight in a tiny apartment crammed with songbooks, CDs and old VHS tapes, often drops into Caffé Vivaldi on Jones Street to play a few late-night tunes. Living through lean times by selling guitars at Matt Umanov’s on Bleecker, he slowly built an acting career. “By now I’ve done dozens of ‘Law and Order’ episodes, and on ‘The

Colbert Report’ I play Heinz Beinholtz, the stern German ambassador who comes on to explain why Europe is going to hell.” Frandsen also acted, sang and played guitar in long runs of “Pump Boys and Dinettes” and, with banjoist Charlie Chin (another MacDougal Street veteran), put together a Hawaiian swing band whose syrupy repertoire grew into “The Song of Singapore” — a musical that ran for a year and a half at the Irving Plaza. “Now I’m 66, on Social Security, so you could say I’m semi-retired. But hell, with a few pals, I’m trying to launch a new musical comedy about the CIA, ‘John Goldfarb, Please Come Home.’ To any senior who wonders, can I still play music, I say, sure, dust off the old songs you used to play. You never know what might happen, and you gotta be in it to win it!” Rod McDonald, a mellow-voiced singersongwriter, had to give up his Folk City and Cornelia Street Café gigs in the mid-1990s to move to Florida and care for his elderly parents. “I thought my career was over,’ McDonald recently recalled. “But I looked around, and found that a lot of little clubs in Florida had open mikes. So I started dropping in, and the bookers began asking me, ‘Hey, could you play Wednesday night, maybe Thursday?’ Soon I was doing as well down there as I’d been doing in New York City.” Florida is still home for McDonald, his wife and kids — but he books tours

Continued on page 22


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For Folkies, 70 is a Good Gig

Photo by Michael Lydon

The site of the old Folk City (now the Village Underground).

Continued from page 21 through the Northeast folk circuit a couple of times a year, and last summer he packed The Gaslight, briefly re-opened for a folk revival concert series produced by Bob Porco (Mike Porco’s grandson). “I first met Bob Dylan in 1960,” remembers guitarist-songwriter Danny Kalb. “I was a student at the University of Wisconsin, and Dylan crashed with me for a few weeks in Madison on his way from Hibbing, Minnesota to New York. We had so much fun, I dropped out and followed him. The Village scene then? Wonderful! Dave Van Ronk became my teacher. I heard great artists like Fred Neal and Tim Hardin. Soon I was gigging, had a record out. But us folkies were about more than music. We were out to change the world. I went on a Freedom Ride, spent three days in a Baltimore jail.” A long run leading the hit group, the Blues Project, took Kalb on coast-tocoast tours, headlining top venues like the Fillmore East and West. But after the first wave of success ebbed away, he

Photo by Michael Lydon

Dany Kalb, circa 2013, in his Park Slope apartment.

faced the challenge of keeping his career going through leaner times. “What saved me? I always loved music,” Kalb said, sipping coffee as a Thelonious Monk CD played softly in his Park Slope apartment, crammed like Frandsen’s with guitars and musical gear. “Music kept me going, through a nervous breakdown, through a heart attack, through a stroke that, luckily, left my hands intact for playing.” A beatific smile crossing Kalb’s Buddhalike face. “You see, I’m happy! I still feel my music is growing, evolving. I love my new CD, ‘Moving in Blue.’ Now I’m 70, but seniors aren’t pushed to the side today. We can join the public debate, give back what we’ve learned from experience. When we were young, we were too dogmatic. But fanaticism, I’ve learned, is the enemy. Now I enjoy life, the bad and the good.” Jonathan Kalb, Danny’s younger brother, started out at 19 playing bass with the Fugs at the Players Theatre. “Jimi Hendrix was playing at the Cafe Wha? next door, and he’d call me in, saying, ‘Hey, Johnny, you gotta hear my latest song!’ Then he went

to England and came back a star.” Jonathan hasn’t become as well-known as his older brother, but he’s steadily made his living as an all-around musician — playing guitar, bass, keyboards and even drums. “I spent years touring Germany, France, England and Scandinavia,” Jonathan recalls. “I’ve opened for B.B. King, played in soul bands, funk bands, you name it. For me, the secret is: keep playing, no matter what! I’m not sure how much I have to do with it — the music inside me keeps itself going!” Not every 60s and 70s folkie, of course, has survived. Most famously, Phil Ochs committed suicide in 1976 and, most recently, Frank Christian died this past December. But Sefan Grossman, David Massingill, Cliff Eberhardt, Tom Pacheco and other lesser-known performers are still banging out old and new songs of love, peace and protest. On May 21, many of them will be take the stage at the Village Underground (130 West Third Street) — site of the second Folk City — for “The Freewheelin’ 50th Anniversary All-Star Jam,” a concert Bob Porco is producing to celebrate classic

CZECHOSLOVAKAMERICAN MARIONETTE THEATER in by PETER ZACHARI and DAMON MAIDA KING EXECUTIONER Directed by Written & Directed by PETER ZACHARI VIT HOREJS Thursday - Sunday March 21 - 31 Thursday - Sunday Thu - Sat at 8pm March 21 - April 7 Sun at 3pm Thu-Sat 8pm, Sun 3pm All Seats $15 Students/Seniors $10 All Seats $10/tdf

songs, including “Blowing in the Wind” and “Masters of War,” from Dylan’s second album (“The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan”). As MacDougal Street hipsters used to say, be there or be square.

AL L AG ES E CL AS SE S FO R MU SI C & DA NC

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

FAT ASSES: THE MUSICAL

Photo by David Gahr, courtesy of Danny Kalb

Blues guitarist Danny Kalb, in the 1970s.

LAST WRONGS

Written by WALTER CORWIN Directed by DAN KELLEY Thursday - Sunday, March 21 - 31 Thu-Sat at 8pm Sun at 3pm All Seats $10/tdf

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

MP ARTS CA SUMMER ULY 26 J 4 2 E N U J

20I3

AGES 3-6

MUSIKGARTEN & PRE-BALLET A G E S CHAMBER MUSIC, BAND & GROU P GUITA R DANCE AND PIANO WORKSHOPS ADULTS CHILDREN AND TEENS

INDIVIDUAL MUSIC LESSONS ALL AGES

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235 EAST 11TH STREET (BETWEEN 2ND & 3RD AVENUES) • TELEPHONE 212-777-3240 FACSIMILE 212-505-2520 • WWW.THIRDSTREETMUSICSCHOOL.ORG


March 21 - 27, 2013

23

Sexy fun is the coin of the realm

High and low get it on at one of the city's most notorious nightclubs

OPERA GOTHAM CHAMBER OPERA ELIOGABALO By Francesco Cavalli Directed by James Marvel Music Direction by Grant Herreid Assistant Direction & choreography by Austin McCormick Costumes by Mattie Ullrich Through March 29 8pm Thurs., March 21 Sat., March 23 Tues., March 26 Fri., March 29 At The Box (189 Chrystie St.) Tickets: $30-$250 Visit ticketcentral.com Call 212-279-4200 Visit gothamchamberopera.org

BY TRAV S.D. If you had asked me a few days ago if I were a fan of late 17th century Venetian opera I would have said, “I really don’t know…but my guess would be not.” While I’m a veteran theater reviewer, the extent of my opera savvy consists of an affection for the works of Gilbert & Sullivan and a couple of dozen productions from the traditional repertory canon which I watched (with boredom, mostly) from the nosebleed section of the Metropolitan Opera. But strange to relate, I really do believe Gotham Chamber Opera’s production of Francesco Cavalli’s 1668 “Eliogabalo” (now at the nightclub The Box) has made a convert of me. The 12-year-old Gotham Chamber Opera specializes in reviving obscure small scale operas. “Eliogabalo,” one of Cavalli’s last works, was long thought lost. Unperformed until 1999, the current production is its U.S. premiere. It treats of the last days of the reign of the Roman Emperor Heliogabalus (203-222). Gibbon’s “History of the

Photo by Richard Termine

Christopher Ainslie (center) with Baroque Burlesque performers, Micaëla Oeste and Randall Scotting.

Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” paints him as one of the worst in a long chain of monsters, making more familiar names like Caligula and Nero seem like Boy Scouts. Eliogabalo came to the throne at age 14 through the agency of an assassination. His own reign ended four years later through the same means. In between, there was a lot of murder, injustice, depraved favoritism, religious heresy and wild and very creative fornication. Cavalli’s opera mostly concerns the efforts of the titular boy-king (Christopher Ainslie) to wed and bed a couple of desirable females (Susannah Biller and Micaela Oeste). Much scheming and intimidation ensues over the course of three acts, culminating in Eliogabalo’s attempt to rape the elusive object of his affections — which is thwarted when he is stabbed to death by his own guards. (Yeah! But can you DANCE to it?). Then or now, it’s absolutely over the top, and the only way to do it is with relish — which is precisely what this company brings to it. Somewhere up there in Barqoue Opera heaven, surrounded by fat, kitschy little angels, I have no doubt Cavalli is smiling. Director James Marvel does an admirable job of bridging the 345 years that have elapsed, treating the libretto and score with fidelity and bringing a bit of modern flair to the staging (but all the while, grasping the synchronicities between then and now). Intimately ensconced on The Box’s modest stage (normally the locus of some of the city’s raciest after-hours burlesque shows), the cast of two dozen or so shares the space with a pocket orchestra made up of a string quartet,

a harpsichord, and an archaic curiosity known as a theorbo (a lute that looks about six feet long). Sung in the original Italian with

supertitles, the interpretation seems respectful of its source material. I can’t imagine that musically or lyrically, it’s much different than what Cavalli intended. Yet we are in The Box. Half the action is staged on a catwalk thrust into the middle of the audience, where cast members strut and fret their halfnaked bodies inches away from the ticket-holders. One character Nerbulone (Brandon Cedel, marked in the program as a baritone though it sure sounded basso to me) did a couple of old-fashioned vaudeville style nip-ups and then demanded our applause. Apropos of little but showmanship, aerialist Brian Joseph Ferree spun over our heads on a piece of fabric (this kind of circus act would not have been at all out of place in the 17th century). The one iffy note of the evening also occurred on this platform: a seemingly improvised pre-show dance done by a small troupe in platform shoes seemed a tad clumsy, under-rehearsed and possibly dangerous. But on the whole, the historical choreography, by Company XIV’s Austin McCormick, was typically

Continued on page 24

Starring Michael Urie

Buyer& Cellar a new play by Jonathan Tolins directed by Stephen Brackett

now playing through May 4 www.Rattlestick.org - 866.811.4111


24

March 21 - 27, 2013

Sexy fun at the opera

Photo by Richard Termine

The cast of “Eliogabalo” wants to convert you…into an opera fan.

Continued from page 23 captivating. Several of the principal parts are gender reversed, a convention in Baroque opera that speaks just as easily to our own time. Marvel’s version is livened with more than a little Ridiculous style camp, inevitable in a world where the

sexual permutations are apparently limitless. As the Emperor’s scheming assistants Lenia and Zotico (John Eastman and Daryl Freedman) seem particularly inspired, each playing the other’s gender, and similarly attired in black, like a pair of androgynous bookends. Costumes by Mattie Ullrich reinforce this vision — a confectionary hodgepodge of fashion styles evoking

glam, steampunk, disco and 80s-style New Romanticism. Eliogabalo sports a multi-colored neo-classical tailcoat that wouldn’t be out of place in Prince’s wardrobe. The Praetorian Guard, sporting black shoulder pads, look like they have just trotted here from the playing fields of the XFL. Sexy fun is the coin of the realm. Riding crops and whips are wielded for our amusement. A tray full of red Jell-O molded into the shape of female breasts is brought out. When one character sings of his love’s “delicate cheeks,” Marvel stages it so that the performer sings it to her butt cheeks. The show moves at a brisk, merry pace (atrocities notwithstanding) and the entire evening clocks at about 2 hours, 15 minutes — nearly half as long as the usual time commitment when

one signs on for a night at the opera. Furthermore, we’re at The Box, which means that food and drink are available and can be consumed during the show (and aside from the famous $900 bottles of champagne, most of the prices are reasonable). In short, populism without philistinism. That’s the kind of high culture I can embrace. Long-time NYC Community Media arts contributor Trav S.D. is the author of the just-released “Chain of Fools: Silent Comedy and Its Legacies from Nickelodeons to Youtube” as well at the critically-acclaimed “No Applause, Just throw Money: The Book That Made Vaudeville Famous.” Follow him daily at Travalanche (travsd.wordpress.com).


March 21 - 27, 2013

25

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

HUDSON GUILD THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS: “FRANKENSTEIN”

Like a good idea that refuses to die, Mary Shelley’s classic horror story has been reimagined countless times since her novel was first published in 1818. Now, Hudson Guild Theatre Company puts its stamp on “Frankenstein” with a new stage adaptation that draws on the wildly imaginative (and unexpectedly witty) 1931 film version directed by James Whale (starring Boris Karloff as the lumbering, mute and misunderstood reanimated creation). Over 75 tight and tense minutes, a cast of 18 will perform the play on a set (designed by Sheryl Liu) which incorporates modern industrial materials to create a cold world of ruthless experimentation and unbridled scientific research. Appropriate for ages six and up. Fri., March 22 & 29 at 8pm; Sat., March 23 & 30 at 2pm & 8pm; Sun., March 24 at 3pm. At the Hudson Guild Theatre (441 W. 26th St., btw. Ninth & Tenth Aves.) Admission: Pay what you wish. For reservations, call 212-760-9817. Visit hudsonguild.org.

THIS CHAIR ROCKS: HOW AGEISM WARPS OUR VIEW OF LONG LIFE

Photo by Tommy Mintz

Larry Littman, in HGTC’s production of “Genius (by Chopin).” Littman does Blind Hermit duties in “Frankenstein.”

The Who were just a bunch of cocky pups when they sang “I hope I die before I get old.” Well, they’re still singing — and we’re still talkin’ about their generation. But even though the children of the 60s (who warned us not to trust anyone over 30) are redefining what it means to be active and aware contributors, they’re not immune to ageism (both internalized and cultural). This talk by blogger Ashton Applewhite takes a look at stereotyping and discrimination on the basis of age — and why it’s so damaging. Prep for the Q&A by reading some of Applewhite’s blog work, on This Chair Rocks and Yo, Is this Ageist? — or go all old school and thumb through her book (“Cutting Loose: Why Women Who End Their Marriages Do So Well”). Free admission. Mon., April 8, 6:30pm. At The Cooper Union’s Rose Auditorium (41 Cooper Square, E. 7th St. & 3rd Ave.). For info, visitcooperunion.edu, call 212353-4195 or find The Cooper Union at facebook.com/cooperunion and at twitter. com/cooperunion.

Carter Burden Gallery Presents: “18 Artists”

Formerly known as Gallery 307, one of Chelsea’s most unique art spaces has changed its name to The Carter Burden Gallery — but its purpose (to give a voice to NYC’s re-emerging older professional artist) remains unchanged. The current group show contains paintings, assemblage pieces, photographs and sculpture from a core group whose work has been featured since the gallery’s 2009 debut. From the colorful strata of Hedy O’Beil’s gestural abstraction to the organic architec-

Image courtesy of the artist and Carter Burden Gallery

Carol Massa’s “Eye of the Creator” (oil, 36" x 48"), on display through March 28, is part of Carter Burden Gallery’s “18 Artists” group show.

ture of David Cerulli’s large scale painting to Jonathan Bauch’s delicate steel sculpture and Leslie Shaw Zadoian’s assemblage piece reflecting the weight and wisdom of her found objects, “18 Artists” is a collection of diverse voices uniquely relevant to contem-

Photo courtesy of Ashton Applewhite

Yo, Ashton raps...about ageism…on April 8.

porary artistic discourse. The next exhibit is Barbara Coleman’s “Letting the Light In” (opening reception Thurs., April 11, then on view through May 16). Free admission. “18 Artists” is on view through March 28, at the Carter Burden

Gallery (548 W. 28th St., #534, btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Gallery Hours: Tues.-Fri., 11am-5pm & Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 212564-8405 or visit carterburdengallery.com. For info about the Carter Burden Center and its programs, visit carterburdencenter.org.


26

March 21 - 27, 2013

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Notice is hereby given that an on-premises license, #TBA has been applied for by Insiang LLC d/b/a Maharlika to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 111 1st Avenue New York NY 10003. Vil: 03/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant brewery license, #TBA has been applied for by Paulaner Brauhaus & Restaurant LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 265/267 Bowery New York NY 10002. Vil: 03/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Formation of OPP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Salvatore D’Avola, c/o Restored Homes, 150 Broadway, Ste. 2101, NY, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: THE MAK ORGANIZATION LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 37A Orchard Street, New York, New York 10002. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: PUSHPOINT, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/04/13. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2113. Office location: New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 400 Townline Road, Suite 150, Hauppauge, New York 11788. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of MOMIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/5/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 10 Bank St., Ste. 560, White Plains, NY 10606, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013

Notice of Formation of Caldera Brand Development LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/6/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 171 E. 84th St., Apt. 31E, NY, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of Anat Nev, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Ellyn Roth Mittman, Esq., 110 E. 59th St., 23rd Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Formation of Travis Quinn Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 445 W. 23rd St., #15A, NY, NY 10011, Attn: Travis Quinn. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of Ladder Capital Realty Finance III LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 345 Park Ave., 8th Fl., NY, NY 10154. LLC formed in DE on 5/16/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of THL Credit Advisors LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/22/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 570 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in DE on 6/26/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013

Notice of Qualification of Rose Moss Associates, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/14/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/22/00. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Toback, Bernstein & Reiss, LLP, Att: Leonard Reiss, Esq., 15 W. 44th St., 12th Fl., NY, NY 10036. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Duke & York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of SPRINGS 6 LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/20/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 11/1/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o John Silberman Associates, 145 E. 57th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: c/o National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 S. DuPont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/14 - 04/18/2013 Notice of Qualification of TARGET SOURCING SERVICES LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/25/13. Princ. office of LLC: 500 Seventh Ave., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, DE Dept. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Formation of SHAP ENTERTAINMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 415 Madison Ave., 20 Fl., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of AIG PORTFOLIO SOLUTIONS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/15/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/19/12. Princ. office of LLC: 80 Pine St., NY, NY 10005. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy of State, DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013

Notice of Formation of DRS Productions LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 601 West 26th St., Ste. 1762, NY, NY 10001, also the principal office. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of AMERICAN DIAMONDS UNLIMITED, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 579 5th Avenue Suite #888, NewYork NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF STRIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: VIJAY BACHANI 330 E 33RD ST, APT #5C, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful act. 2038871 Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 FORMATION NOTICE OF THE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: APPLE RESIDENTIAL VENTURES LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Secretary of State (SSNY): February 13, 2013. The LLC was originally filed with Secretary of State of Delaware: April 15, 2011. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 230 West 41st Street, Suite 1102, New York, New York 10036. Purpose: All lawful purposes. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Registration of Rich Michaelson Magaliff Moser, LLP. Certificate filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/20/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLP, 340 Madison Ave., 19th Fl., NY, NY 10173. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Formation of 528-534 West 39 L.L.C Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/10/12. Office location: NY County. Principal business location: 666 Fifth Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10103. SNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Rockrose Development Corp., 666 Fifth Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10103, Attn: General Counsel. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013

Notice of Qualification of Long John Silver’s LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 6/6/69. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of Premier Research International LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/19/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/16/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/07 - 04/11/2013 Notice of Qualification of Redwood Income Fund LLC App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/13. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Steven Katz, 227 E. 56th St., Ste. 401, NY, NY 10022. DE address of LLC: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 874 Walker Road, Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of 150 NYC LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/15/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Isaacs & Associates, PLLC, 260 Madison Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 LUXURY CHAUFFEURED SERVICE LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/9/11. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Nissim Holand, 270 11th Ave., NY, NY 10001. General Purposes Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013


March 21 - 27, 2013

27

Publ ic Notice s Notice of Formation of DURST WARREN STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/14/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rosenberg & Estis, P.C., Attn: Gary M. Rosenberg, Esq., 733 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of ECHO INVESTORS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to M. Nader Ahari, 524 Broadway, Ste. 405, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Formation of HANG WU REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/19/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o 349 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10016. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 12/31/2035. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Qualification of 205E45 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: William R. Hagner, 135 E. 57th St., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Address to be maintained in DE: The LLC, 3500 S. Dupont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. MF ROSE COMMUNICATIONS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 82-30 98th Street, Woodhaven, New York 11421. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF POINTE TIBET RETAIL LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/14/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 1 Little West 12th St New York, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013

Notice of Formation of TessAnnieK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/7/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 30 Crosby St., NY, NY 10013. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Mihir Patel, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, 55 E. 52nd St., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10055. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Qualification of National Women’s Soccer League, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/8/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1801 S. Prairie Ave., Chicago, IL 60616. LLC formed in DE on 12/12/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 Notice of Qualification of VTR Hertlin House, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/3/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10350 Ormsby Park Pl., Ste. 300, Louisville, KY 40223. LLC formed in DE on 11/27/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC:The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/28 - 04/04/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SWEET ANGEL GARMENT CARE LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/8/13. Office New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 713 Washington St. New York, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of Palmer Sound NYC LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 01/03/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 65 Downing Street Apt A New York, NY 10014. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of APAC LIVING, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Gartner+Bloom PC, 801 2nd Ave #1505 NY, NY10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of CCD OF NEW YORK, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/07/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/27/11. Princ. office of LLC: The Learning Experience, 4855 Technology Way, Ste. 700, Boca Raton, FL 33431. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State - DE, Corp. Dept., Loockerman & Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Formation of PHIPPS HPS GP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/07/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 13th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of GATEWAY CENTER PARKING ASSOCIATION, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/07/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/04/13. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 THE GRAMERCY CENTRE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/4/13. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 38 Gramercy Park Apt. 3E New York, NY 10010. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013

Notice of Formation of Wild History, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/28/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 604 E. 11th St., NY, NY 10009. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Formation of North 9 Joy LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/6/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Joy Construction Corp., 40 Fulton St., 21st Fl., NY, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Formation of New Heights Tech. LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stanley K. Anderson, 13 Pierson Curt, Mahwah, NJ 07430. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/21 - 03/28/2013 Notice of Formation of Leondari Marine Advisors LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/30/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Seward & Kissel, 1 Battery Park Plaza, NY, NY 10004. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Formation of SK Reade LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/21/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Qual. of Village 2 JV SPE LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/4/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 12/3/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Notice of Qual. of Sydell Freehand Williamsburg LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/7/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Qual. of Altalis Capital Management LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/2/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 7/19/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Sam Elder, 11 E. 86th St., Apt. 2C, NY, NY 10028. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SG@NYC, LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: c/o Stephanie Garcia 1569 York Ave NewYork, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 75 WALL STREET LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 118 Baxter St 402 NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of HEI Fund GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/15/2013. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/02/2013. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 477 Madison Ave. 8th Flr., NY, NY 10022. DE address of LLC: c/o Maples Fiduciary Services (Delaware) LLC, 4001 Kennett Pike, Ste 302, Wilmington, DE. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Notice of Qualification of OUT OF EGYPT LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/06/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/22/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Louis R. Piscatelli, Esq., Withers Bergman LLP, 430 Park Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of the State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Notice of Qualifica-

Notice of Formation

tion of Landmark

of ATF COMMODITIES

Infrastructure

LLC

Holding Company LLC

Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.

Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/13. Office location: NY County.

LLC formed in

Delaware (DE) on 12/8/10.

of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom

SSNY designated as agent

process against it may be

of LLC upon whom process

served. SSNY shall mail pro-

against it may be served.

cess to: 64 Waterman Ave.,

SSNY shall mail process to:

Rumson, NJ 07760. Purpose:

National Registered Agents,

any lawful activity.

Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY

Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

10011, also the registered agent. Principal office: 1700 E. Walnut Ave., Ste. 400, El

Notice of Formation of 426 East 9th LLC

Notice of Qualification of MKP OPPORTUNITY PARTICIPATION FUND LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/01/13. Princ. office of LLC: 4 World Financial Center, 250 Vesey St., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10080. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Segundo, CA 90245. Address

County. SSNY designated as

mont LLC

Notice of Qualification of VOYANT CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/04/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/31/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Millennium Management, LLC, 666 Fifth Ave., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10103. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State - Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

agent of LLP upon whom

Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of

process against it may be

State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/13.

served. SSNY shall mail pro-

Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY

cess to:The LLP, 261 Madison

designated as agent of LLC

Notice of Qualification of SOFT SERVE FRUIT CO LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/01/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/04/10. Princ. office of LLC: 337 Park Ave. South, 5th Fl., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101,

Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org.

8/24/12. Office location: NY

filed with the DE Secretary

County. SSNY designated as

of State, John G. Townsend

agent of LLC upon whom

Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4,

process against it may be

Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:

served. SSNY shall mail

any lawful activities.

process to: c/o The LLC, 636

Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Registration of GUSY VAN DER ZANDT LLP Certificate filed with Secy.

Broadway, Ste. 820, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

of State of NY (SSNY) on

Notice of Formation

5/19/09. Office location: NY

of Eldridge Beau-

Ave., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013 Notice of Formation of AR ROZA FEE LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Andrews Kurth LLP, 450 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

State of NY (SSNY) on 4/2/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY

Notice of Qualifica-

designated as agent of LLC

tion of Zuckerberg

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Steven E. Plotnick, 227 E. 58th St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Media, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/8/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 5/7/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process

Notice of Formation

against it may be served and

of Roth Group LLC

shall mail process to: Jeffrey

Arts. of Org. filed Secy.

Paik, Zuckerberg Media, LLC,

of State of NY (SSNY) on

960-970 O’Brien Dr., Menlo

6/21/11. Off. loc.: NY County.

Park, CA 94025. DE addr. of

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Steven E. Plotnick, 227

LLC: National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE

E. 58th St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY

Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,

10022. Purpose: any lawful

Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:

activity.

any lawful activity.

Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013

Vil: 02/14 - 03/21/2013


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March 21 - 27, 2013

Housing Authority infill plan is on the fast track Continued from page 20 West Side — grilled Rhea on whether there would really be a demand for the new market-rate units. “There’s demands for all kinds of housing,” he assured, noting, “The city is pioneering micro-units, for example.” Kavanagh pushed for details about the height of the new buildings. Harris and Rhea said that would be up to the developers to decide when they respond to the R.F.P. Could they be, for example, 50 stories tall? Kavanagh asked. Rhea said that would be very unlikely since it would result in a “pencil building.” However, Harris later told The Villager that because the new buildings would have to be rental, they would likely not be extra-tall (which is not as cost-efficient), Photo by Peter Mikoleski/NYCHA

‘You’re saying to us that this is a proposal. But “proposal” to us means that we can negotiate.’ Damaris Reyes

and would be “fatter” — similar to the buildings AvalonBay constructed in the Cooper Square Renewal Area, at Bowery and East Houston St. (including the building housing the Whole Foods Market and Chinatown YMCA and the one across the street adjacent to the Liz Christy Garden). Kavanagh also said residents hope the new buildings would at least have groundfloor commercial uses, but Harris and Rhea said zoning doesn’t allow it. A prevailing concern is that the new mixed-income buildings will open the door to privatizing the NYCHA complexes. “Our headline is ‘Trojan horse,’ ” attorney Joel Kupferman told The Villager. He said he’s representing tenants at the Smith Houses.

BARUCH HOUSES MEETING As part of the community outreach process, this past Monday night, Cecil House, NYCHA’s general manager, and Harris gave a presentation to Baruch tenants. About 100 local residents turned out for the presentation, at nearby Bard High School, on the snowy and blustery evening. Many of them have been living in Baruch for decades, if not their whole lives. House kept cool under fire as residents repeatedly peppered him with complaints about ongoing problems at the complex and lack of services, and slammed the new plan.

Monday’s informational meeting for Baruch Houses tenants drew about 100 people on a snowy, slushy evening.

Photo by Lincoln Anderson

This parking lot at East Houston St. and Baruch Drive would be developed with a new 405-apartment “80/20” building under the plan.

Baruch tenants complained about “rats as big as horses,” a lack of outdoor benches for seniors, problems with recurring sewage backups on the complex’s grounds and a “temporary sink” plan a few years ago that bombed. Members of GOLES (Good Old Lower East Side) also protested that NYCHA pays $100 million annually to the city for police patrols, but that this should be free, and that if the agency could keep that money, it wouldn’t need any new infill buildings. Damaris Reyes, executive director of GOLES and a Baruch resident, objected to the 80/20 breakdown, saying the formula should also include middle-income NYCHA residents. “You’re saying to us that this is a proposal,” she said. “But ‘proposal’ to

us means that we can negotiate. Many of our families are middle-income, being doubled- and tripled-up [in apartments].” She demanded to know what the market-rate units’ rents would be. Harris said studios would be more than $2,000 per month and one-bedrooms more than $3,000. Reyes warned that adding new development would only exacerbate the complex’s sewage problem, noting, “Our infrastructure is antiquated — a new building will result in hundreds of thousands of flushes.” But that issue wasn’t addressed, and, in fact, Harris noted there’s room at Baruch for even more than one new building. “I’m hoping this will be so successful,” he said, “that in a couple of years you’ll come to us and say, ‘Please, give us another of these wonderful buildings.’”

Regarding concerns about parking, Harris said, the new buildings won’t be required to provide it. NYCHA residents who currently have parking spaces will be able to keep them, Rhea assured. Councilmember Rosie Mendez noted that letters had been put up falsely saying the Baruch meeting was canceled. As a result, she called for another outreach meeting. House said they’ll consider whether to hold “a supplemental meeting.” Mendez chairs the City Council’s Committee on Public Housing, which will hold a public hearing on the infill plan on April 5. Last month, a group of local elected officials, including Kavanagh and Mendez, Congressmembers Carolyn Maloney and Nydia Velazquez, Assembly Speaker Silver, Councilmember Margaret Chin, Borough President Scott Stringer and state Senators Brad Hoylman and Daniel Squadron, as well as C.B. 3 Chairperson Gigi Li, wrote to Mayor Bloomberg and Rhea calling for “greater transparency” on the infill plan and a slowdown on issuing the R.F.P. Last Friday, the mayor responded, saying that the plan “must be undertaken in close collaboration” with local residents, the community and elected officials, but not indicating there would be any change in NYCHA’s aggressive timetable. Speaking after receiving the mayor’s response, Kavanagh told The Villager that, in fact, he doesn’t oppose the infill plan and actually thinks it’s “a good idea” for NYCHA to use its own property this way. But Kavanagh said he wants to make sure the new buildings “make sense in the context in which they’ll be built and that they’ll benefit the residents in these communities — if they get buy-in from the community.” Also, he added, “NYCHA has to be more open and accountable than it has been in the recent past.”


March 21 - 27, 2013

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letteRS to tHe editoR Continued from page 12 approve rezoning of the Hudson Square area without immediately providing landmark protections for the South Village is a disaster for our neighborhood. The promise to “study and consider” landmarking one section of the South Village and leave the southernmost section “to be surveyed” sometime before the end of the year is little more than a thinly veiled attempt on the part of Speaker Quinn to secure some political cover in the neighborhoods that she has left wholly at the mercy of rapacious developers dressed up as nonprofits: N.Y.U. in the northern part of the South Village and God’s Love We Deliver, working with Quinlan-Tavros Development, to the south. Particularly vexing is the fact that with the City Council’s “pledge,” the southern part of the South Village — which directly abuts the soon-to-be-rezoned Hudson Square district and so faces the greatest development pressure from this new district — remains wholly unprotected. And if that weren’t bad enough, the time frame of “before the end of the year” for any new landmarking in the South Village will allow developers ample opportunity to snap up properties, secure demolition permits and wreak havoc. The City Council might as well have announced: “Developers, rent your backhoes, get out your checkbooks, and let the land grab begin!” Now is the time to ask ourselves: “If this is how Speaker Quinn protects the residents of her own district, how can she be trusted to look out for the interests of New Yorkers if she were elected mayor?” The Landmarks Preservation Committee has had more than four years to study the proposed South Village Historic District. And while I’m all for studying — I’ve done plenty of it in my lifetime — some times simply call for action. If we can’t count on our elected representatives to take appropriate action to protect our neighborhoods, we will have to look for other avenues of redress and new political leaders. Micki McGee McGee is a member, South Village Neighbors

Commission moves so slowly To The Editor: Re “Hud. Sq. rezoning O.K.’d; S. Village landmark pledged” (news article, March 14): It’s really a bit late already, isn’t it? Children’s Aid Society is gone. Who knows what huge building they’ll put there, turning the neighborhood into another replica of the gentrification of Soho. What a pity. The Landmarks Preservation Commission should be replaced with people who are

more timely in studying important sites such as the South Village.

Artists and ‘F.D.D.’

Parks and partnerships

Sylvia Rackow Rackow is a member, The Committee to Preserve Our Neighborhood

To The Editor: Re “Feel the burn! Theater for New City pays off mortgage” (news article, Feb. 7): In response to David Amram’s assessment that this is an age of egotism, narcissism and bad taste, I have to agree — but it helps to investigate the nature of this narcissism. For openers, many artists lack selfesteem due to the lack of money and success in a very competitive, materialistic society. They compensate for their fame deficit disorder by pumping up their ego. The real question for me is whether they are nice or nasty narcissists. I found that collaborative art forms, like theater and music and dance, produce a nicer breed of narcissism due to the humbling experience of working with others; while solitary artists, like poets and painters, are more delusionary. Many nasty narcissists will spread misinformation and lies about their perceived rivals, and this helps immensely to have power to get the nicer narcissists to do their bidding. Such is the nature of the beast.

To The Editor: Re “You gotta have parks: Green scene” (Progress Report, by Rich Caccappolo, March 7): Just to clarify one point, the Hudson Square Connection is prepared to make a significant contribution to the renovation and expansion of Soho Square as part of a public-private partnership with the city. We look forward to Community Board 2 support and help in identifying the public portion of these as-yet-uncommitted city capital funds. Once the space is renovated, the BID is also prepared to assume responsibility for the ongoing maintenance of the space.

Time for new park ideas To The Editor: Re “Why is funding the Hudson River Park so contentious?” (talking point, by Tom Fox, March 14): We’ve seen this same article from Tom Fox in so many words previously. Everyone appreciates your work and history with the park, but what are you recommending we do, what is your idea, your plan, your solution? Do you want us to march, do you want us to do something politically to change the Hudson River Park Act or amend the city tax code? Is there something we can do to force the Hudson River Park Trust and the city and state to honor the original agreements? If so, guide us, lead and we will follow. What’s the plan? There is an obvious disconnect between aspects of the Trust and the community, with intransigence and condescension coming from individuals on both sides. And that includes sniveling, rote condescension from individuals within the Trust who are strictly thinking in Economic Development Corporation terms — as well as ridiculous arrogance from both elected officials and longtime Village residents who view any compromise by those of us who have been here only twenty-something years as some affront to their “hard won” ’60s way of life. Guess what? Both sides are getting in the way of a Pier 40 solution. For the Trust, open your eyes: This isn’t and never will be the usual “it’s a done deal,” force-it-down-your-throat, luxury housingtype situation. For the Village old-timers, your inability to accept that the new guard has a progressive and pragmatic bent is killing any hope of salvaging Pier 40. It was your job to make sure those old park-related financial agreements were honored, and you failed. Good economy or bad, you failed, and if you have no solution now, you must step aside and let us come up with an acceptable, non-housing,commercial plan for Pier 40. Re “Doing my part in the critical fight against fracking” (Progress Report, by Rachel Lavine, March 7): This is simply one of the best pieces ever in The Villager. This, and other inside views of how both elected and unelected officials’ work really happens on the ground, should be a regular piece. Keep up the great work, Rachel. And who doesn’t love Florence... . Patrick Shields

Richard West

Ellen Baer Baer is executive director, Hudson Square Connection business improvement district E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager. com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


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March 21 - 27, 2013

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pUblic n o ticeS PUbLic Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 27th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from 156 tenth Avenue Restaurant LLC to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 156 Tenth Avenue in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/14 - 03/21/2013


March 21 - 27, 2013

The Lady Blazers continued their city dominance.

It’s Sweet 15 for Bergtraum; Lady Blazers win PSAL again SpoRtS By DanieL Jean-LuBin At some point, you would think this streak would have to end. At some point, Murry Bergtraum may catch a hot team and see their Public Schools Athletic League championship dominance come to an end. We’ll have to find out next season to find out, however. After a torrid comeback by top-seeded South Shore came up just short, No. 2 Murry Bergtraum held on to win, 48-43, in the PSAL girls championship game this past Saturday morning at Madison Square Garden. The Murry Bergtraum Lady Blazers (252) entered the game hungry for revenge after suffering a 46-54 loss at home to South Shore on Dec. 7. During that game, the Lady Blazers leading scorer, Jasmine Nwajei’s game-high 23 points could not push the Blazers past the Lady Vikings. Last Saturday, the Lady Blazers found themselves in an unusual position, trailing early on in the game, as the South Shore Lady Vikings (22-5) began the first quarter shooting very well. Bergtraum found their offensive spark from the team’s second-leading scorer, Ashanae McLaughlin, who notched the Blazers’ first few points. McLaughlin finished the game with 15 points and 4 assists. Despite the early difficulties, the Lady Blazers found their defensive legs and also found themselves carrying an 11-point lead, making the score 17-6 well into the second quarter. Bergtraum kept the offensive pressure cranked all the way through the second quarter and ended the half up by double digits. But South Shore stormed back onto the court in the third quarter, shooting

very well from all angles and keeping their title hopes alive. With the game winding down in the fourth quarter, the Lady Vikings pulled within 2 points thanks to Brianna Fraser’s layup with 1:38 left on the clock. Fraser’s powerful move provided momentum, possibly enough to propel them to steal a win. But a clutch rebound by Bergtraum’s Kimberley Viafara paved the way to a game-winning free throw from her teammate Nwajei. With Nwajei’s shot the resulting score was 48-43 and Murry Bergtraum had won their 15th straight PSAL championship. The Lady Blazers will take on Bishop Ford High School in the New York State Federation Class AA semifinals on Friday.

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The Villager, 3/21/13