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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

February 27, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 39

Affordable units will be part of project in Hudson Square BY SAM SPOKONY

A PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

Some of the 40 to 50 photos of the fallen Euromaidan heroes at a memorial outside 136 Second Ave. on Sunday.

Ukrainians rejoice at revolution yet mourn Maidan’s fallen heroes BY TEQUILA MINSKY

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ast Saturday, hundreds of Ukrainians and other New Yorkers walked across the Brooklyn Bridge in support of democracy demonstrators in Ukraine. Meanwhile, in Washington, D.C., Ukrainians gathered outside the White House, commemorating heroes of the “Heaven’s Hundred” — those who had fallen just days before.

They sang songs dedicated to Kiev’s Independence Square, or Maidan Nezalezhnosti, the epicenter of the “Euromaidan” uprising. More than 80 demonstrators were killed there during Feb. 18-20, ruthlessly picked off by the Berkut, specialforces snipers, who aimed for the head, neck or heart. In a fast-moving, daily-changing political landscape, on Feb. 22, the Ukrainian Parliament impeached the country’s president, Viktor Yanukovych.

Antigovernment demonstrations had been ongoing since November. Protesters ramped up actions last week, as government forces fired on their own people, to the outrage of the international community. The escalated skirmish was brief, costly, but ultimately victorious for the opposition. On Monday, an arrest warrant for the president was issued for the “mass murder” of protesters. However, as of press time, Yanukovych’s

new proposal by the Extell Development Corporation could bring the first batch of affordable housing to Hudson Square, following the neighborhood’s major rezoning last year. Extell wants to construct a 22-story residen-

tial building at 68 Charlton St., between Hudson and Varick Sts., on a currently empty lot where, several years ago, the developer had once sought to build a hotel. The proposed project calls for 116 total units: 91 market-rate co-ops and 25 affordable apartments. Of the affordable units, Extell HOUSING, continued on p. 4

Johnson takes lulu but says process has been reformed BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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ew City Councilmember Corey Johnson is denying that he has flipflopped on the issue of accepting Council stipends, also known as “lulus.” The annual payments, in the past ranging from $5,000 to $15,000, have traditionally been doled out

to members as compensation for chairing committees. But they have also been seen as a way for the speaker of the Council to wield influence and control among its members. When he was running for office last year, Johnson responded to a questionnaire by the goodJOHNSON, continued on p. 8

UKRAINE, continued on p. 14

Will Bill kill pavilion bistro plan?........................page 6 Editorial: Garden and housing.........................page 10 www.TheVillager.com

Violence in Venezuela.......page 15

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elting snow and salt caused an electrical fire that left two Canal St. buildings with a partial loss of power on the afternoon of Feb. 25, officials said. About 50 firefighters rushed to the scene around 1:15 p.m., in response to reports of a smoking manhole just west of Hudson St., near the mouth of the Holland Tunnel. They soon realized that the blaze was coming from a Con Edison service box under the street, according to a Fire Department spokesperson. Utility company workers quickly shut down the system, as firefighters put out some flames that had traveled to the base-

ment of 499 Canal St., a four-story residential building. The blaze was under control by 2:25 p.m., the Fire Department spokesperson said. Con Ed workers shut down the box around 3 p.m., leaving several apartments in the residential building and part of the adjoining 497 Canal St., a two-story commercial building, without electricity until around 4:30 p.m., according to a Con Ed spokesperson. There were no injuries and no evacuations, authorities said. Con Ed spokesperson Sidney Alvarez said last week’s warming temperatures melted leftover snow and ice, causing the incident. “This kind of problem is caused basically because of snow and salt getting down into the service-box system,” said Alvarez.

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February 27, 2014

Astor alert: Hot sidewalks BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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ccording to anecdotal reports, dogs have been getting shocked by sidewalk stray voltage at a higher rate this winter due to all the slush. In the worst incident, Bella, an 11-year-old pit bull-terrier mix, was killed Feb. 15 by electrical current from a scaffolding on Clinton St. Monday morning, Con Ed workers responding to apparent stray voltage on E. Eighth St. were taking no chances. The street’s south side along the curb was cor-

doned off for about 100 feet with yellow cones and tape, along with Con Ed’s new signs, stating, “Warning: Do Not Enter: A possible electrical condition is being investigated. For your safety, please keep people and pets away from this area.” Parts of the curb were also cordoned off on Lafayette St. and around onto Astor Place. About the only thing that wasn’t off limits was Jerry Delakas’s newsstand. People are protected from sidewalk stray voltage by their shoes. Con Ed spokesperson Sidney Alvarez confirmed, “Yes, the signs indicate that some sort of stray voltage was detected and crews are making the necessary repairs.”

TheVillager.com

in the article. Was it the same Jim Walden who, along with his partner, Randy Mastro, won the recent stunning victory that has thrown a major monkey wrench into N.Y.U.’s South Village superblocks development plan? “Yes, and it should be very interesting,” Walden said of his latest client. Meanwhile, we read a while back that Mastro is representing another major media figure enmeshed in a huge scandal of his own, none other than Governor Chris Christie. Mastro was brought in as “Bridgegate” was beginning to spiral out of control — very much like the Knicks’ season. Is there anyone that the Gibson & Dunn dynamic duo isn’t representing? They seem to be on every big case. “We try to be!” Walden said.

versal pre-K, Mayor Bill de Blasio came to P.S. 130, at 143 Baxter St., Tuesday morning, where he visited a pre-K class with 20 students and three teachers, including Aimee KoaChan. De Blasio complimented one young boy for being “articulate” for smoothly pronouncing the mayor’s name. He then read to the kids from Dr. Seuss’s “The Foot Book,” saying of Seuss, “He is one of the great, great writers of books.” De Blasio read aloud — and we quote — “Left foot, left foot, right foot right. Feet in the morning, feet at night. Left foot, left foot, right foot right. Wet foot, dry foot, low foot, high foot.” After finishing, the mayor told the toddlers, “Tell your parents to get ‘The Foot Book.’ ” He then asked if the kids would like to read more books by Dr. Seuss, and laughed when one loudly shouted, “No!” Most said, yes. De Blasio then asked if any of the children would like to give him a hug or handshake. He received a few of each. One of the girls, Layla, who hugged him was celebrating her birthday. Before leaving, de Blasio asked if they could sing, but was told that was coming later in the day.

AND IT’S WALDEN WITH THE ASSIST! He can win victories against New York University’s development plan and for keeping Long Island College Hospital open, but can attorney Jim Walden do the impossible — namely, help the Knicks? Make that, help even just one Knick? Reading the news about the beleaguered New York hoops team’s latest woes on Wednesday — that jilted point guard Raymond Felton was arrested on felony charges for having a loaded, unlicensed firearm in his home — we noticed Walden’s name

PHOTO BY SCOOPY

OFF ON THE RIGHT ‘FOOT’: Kicking off his push for uni-

HOFFMAN MEMORIAL K.O.’D: The memorial to late actor Philip Seymour Hoffman on the front doorstep of 35 Bethune St. was going strong and showing no signs of diminishing until the big snow-and-slush storm two weeks ago finally knocked it out. Any pieces of paper and written notes, paintings, etc., were taken inside and dried out and will be given to his family, we’re told. The flowers, well, forget about it — they were totaled. According to a source, however, it was about time for the memorial to go, and the entranceway is now devoid of one. “It was a bit morbid,” a source told us. “It’s not a funeral home. People kept coming by to take photos.” We’re told that Hoffman’s longtime partner, Mimi O’Donnell, and his personal assistant, Isabella Wing-Davey, had been stopping by the building last week, apparently in anticipation of the police finally allowing the apartment in which he O.D.’d to be unsealed.

one day meet in person.” Silvia, 3, was in the news herself last week when The New York Times profiled her and her dads, state Senator Brad Hoylman and filmmaker David Sigal, in a big article on surrogate childbearing and the effort to legalize it in New York, one of the few states where it’s banned — though it is legal here if it’s voluntary, where there is no payment to the surrogate. Silvia was born in California.

NEWS ON NEWS VENDOR: Astor Place newsstand operator Jerry Delakas hasn’t had his kiosk open lately due to health concerns. He told us he was recently walking up the subway stairs when he lost his breath. A doctor gave him a breath test and told him he has bronchitis, and also gave him a CAT scan. We happened to catch him opening up the stand briefly earlier in the week with this sign, above. Delakas, from what we understood, is resting up a bit and waiting for the doctor’s O.K. before returning to work. Meanwhile, down the block at Astor Place Hairstylists — where de Blasio gets his hair cut, but not that day — Worrell St. Ange a.k.a. “Speedy” noted he hasn’t seen the vendor lately. Told about Delakas’s taking some time out to rest up, he said he wasn’t surprised. “Just coffee and cigarettes — he never eats any food!” Speedy said with concern. TREE-MENDOUS MARY SIGHTING: East Village activist Anna Sawaryn informed us that, along with the Ukrainian revolution, there is another accompanying miraculous story SCOOPY’S, continued on p. 25

KIDS’ KORNER: Congratulations to Matt Borden and his

wife, Rachel Henes, on the birth of their son, Noah James Henes-Borden, above, who made his debut back on Dec. 21. Borden, Assemblymember Deborah Glickʼs chief of staff, gave us the scoop: “Noah’s favorite book is ‘A Is for Activism,’ and he has already expressed concerns about the pressing school-overcrowding issue. His favorite body part is his tongue, which he sticks out at inappropriate development, especially inappropriate development in parks. His style icon is Silvia Hoylman-Sigal, who he desperately hopes to

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Affordable housing is on its way to Hudson Square HOUSING, continued from p. 1

representatives said 22 would be two-bedroom apartments and three would be studios, with initial rents ranging from $830 to $1,080 per month. Since slightly more than 20 percent of the units are affordable, Extell has said it will be applying for a 421a state tax break. The developer is also taking advantage of an inclusionary-housing bonus — a key zoning element of the new Hudson Square Special District, which provides a big boost in F.A.R. (floor area ratio) —  in this case, from 9 to 12 F.A.R. — in exchange for the addition of affordable units. That bump is what’s allowing Extell to build to a relatively large residential height; a proposal on the 68 Charlton St. lot last year was for an all-luxury condo building, and would only have risen to 13 stories. Extell will soon submit an application to the inclusionary-housing program under the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development, and will require the agency’s approval before its project can move forward. Under that program, the building’s affordable units would be available to individuals or families who whose income is around 60 percent of New York City’s area median income, as established by H.P.D. That means an individual looking to rent a studio would be eligible if he or she makes around $35,000 per year, and

a family of four would be eligible if they make around $50,000 per year. The project technically consists of two equal-sized towers — one facing Charlton St. and the other facing Vandam St. But there will be no “poor door,” as Extell representatives pointed out in a presentation to Community Board 2’s Land Use Committee on Feb. 12. The only lobby will sit on the Charlton St. side, and a ground-level walkway will connect the entrance to an elevator bank serving the Vandam St. side. At its Feb. 20 full-board meeting, C.B. 2 ultimately voted to recommend that the city approval the development, along with the inclusionary-housing component. However, C.B. 2 did include two stipulations in its recommendation, both regarding the amenities Extell plans to offer residents of the building, which include a pool, gym, steam room, courtyard, basketball court, bicycle parking and a children’s playroom. In its resolution, which was drafted by the Land Use Committee, C.B. 2 called on the developer to give all residents of the affordable units free and equal access to the building’s courtyard, basketball court, bicycle parking and children’s playroom. As for the pool, gym and steam room, the board said those should also be offered to affordable tenants, on a month-to-month basis, for a maximum fee of $50 per month for the two-bedroom units, and $40 per month for the studios. That represents an 85 percent discount compared

to what would be paid by the market-rate residents for the same amenities. Extell has committed to honor those stipulations. In a Feb. 20 letter to C.B. 2, Extell Vice President Jeffrey Dvorett agreed to give the affordable tenants free access to the amenities proposed by the board, and also agreed to the fee structure for the fitness elements. However, C.B. 2 also made a request that Extell has not yet addressed, regarding the placement of the 25 affordable units within the building. The developer currently plans to construct all of those units within the Vandam St. side of the building, with all of them stacked between the second and 15th floors. Practically speaking, that relegates the affordable tenants to one very specific section of the overall structure, largely separate from the market-rate residents. Under the inclusionary-housing guidelines, no floors of a building are allowed to consist entirely of affordable units, but Extell technically isn’t violating that rule because, although the two sides of the building are separate, they would be constructed as part of the same overall address. “Their distribution of the units does follow the letter of the rule, but the purpose behind all this is really to make sure there’s integration of the populations,” said Tobi Bergman, chairperson of the board’s Land Use Committee. “We’re just not sure that purpose is 100 percent served yet.”

PHOTOS COURTESY MAYOR’S PRESS OFFICE

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February 27, 2014

But Bergman, like many others on the board, has expressed great enthusiasm at the prospect of affordable housing coming to the Hudson Square district, which spans from Canal St. to W. Houston St., roughly between Sixth Ave. and Greenwich St. “The inclusionary-housing element of the Hudson Square rezoning was always something that made it attractive to our community board, and we want developers to take advantage of it,” he said. “It’s definitely something new for us, but we’re wading into it, and we’re looking forward to success.” And while big developers like Extell typically don’t have great relationships with block associations across the city, that doesn’t seem to be the case so far for 68 Charlton St. Richard Blodgett, president of the Charlton St. Block Association, was at Extell’s initial Feb. 12 presentation and said he was impressed by the plans. “I think they did a nice job with it, and it should fit well within the context of the neighborhood,” said Blodgett. “Frankly, I thought nobody was going to do the inclusionary housing here, because you don’t really see people doing it Downtown. But these guys seem like they’re really going for it, and I’m pleasantly surprised.” Although Extell has shown renderings of the planned 68 Charlton St. building to C.B. 2, the developer declined to provide this newspaper with any of those renderings for publication. But neighbors have not objected to the designs they have seen.

It’s a big day for pre-K kids as mayor reads them Seuss As part of his pre-K plan campaign, Mayor de Blasio visited a classroom at P.S. 130, on Baxter St. in the Chinatown / Little Italy area, Tuesday. He went with a classic — reading Dr. Seuss’s “The Foot Book” to the pre-kindergarteners, before giving it his mayoral endorsement. And before he left, if they wanted, he gave kids the option of a hug or a handshake with him.

TheVillager.com

Ice-cold hack attack

Police arrested cab driver Driss Quorra, 49, on Feb. 19 after he allegedly attacked one of his passengers during a payment dispute. The alleged victim, 43, told cops he was riding in Quorra’s taxi with his young daughter — taking her to the Little Red School House, on Sixth Ave. at Bleecker St. — around 7:45 a.m. When they reached the destination, the man said he opened the back door as he was in the middle of swiping his credit card to pay, after which the cabbie, assuming the worst, reportedly turned around and told him, “You better f------ pay me.” Following that outburst, the fare apparently chose to get his daughter away from the situation before completing the transaction, and walked her into school before returning to the cab, according to his statements to police. At that point, Quorra and the man began arguing over the payment. When the passenger turned away moments later, Quorra reportedly picked up a block of ice and used it to bash him on the back of the head. When the man then turned back to face him, Quorra reportedly whacked him in the face with another ice chunk. After officers arrived shortly afterward, the passenger was taken to Beth Israel Hospital and treated for a cut to the bridge of his nose and swelling around his left eye, police said. Quorra was charged with assault and criminal possession of a weapon — the ice chunks.

Subway sleeper theft

Calvin Brown, 22, was arrested Feb. 22 after he reportedly swiped a cell phone from a sleeping straphanger. A plainclothes officer, according to his report, was riding a northbound E train through Soho, around 2:40 a.m., when he saw Brown sneak up next to the sleeping man, 29, and snatch his Samsung Galaxy phone out of his pocket. The officer apprehended the perpetrator moments later when the train stopped at the W. Fourth St. station, and quickly recovered the phone from Brownʼs jacket pocket, police said. Brown was charged with grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property. He also has a history of theft charges, and last May pleaded guilty to petty larceny after a different incident in Manhattan, according to court records.

Botched burglary

Police arrested Bradly Huff, 21, on Feb. 20 for trying to break into a van in the South

TheVillager.com

Village. According to police, the driver of the van, belonging to Brooklyn-based Tri-Star Plumbing and Heating, told officers he had parked it on Bleecker St. between Wooster St. and LaGuardia Place, and was walking back to it around 4 p.m. He then reportedly spotted Huff, holding a screwdriver, standing next to the van’s rear door beside an unidentified associate. The door’s lock was busted open, and a witness later told cops he had seen Huff break it, and then try to enter the van moments before the driver returned. Although the alleged accomplice fled, avoiding rest, Huff was charged with criminal mischief and auto stripping.

Meat-cleaving district

James Baker, 52, was arrested Feb. 22 because police said he was carrying a meat cleaver on a Meatpacking District sidewalk. Officers said they spotted Baker at the corner of Hudson and W. 13th Sts. around 3 a.m., holding an open container of alcohol, and subsequently stopped and searched him. They reportedly found the cleaver stashed in Baker’s jacket pocket and a glass pipe with alleged crack cocaine residue in another pocket. Baker was charged with criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Busy bank robber

Police are seeking help in locating a suspect in two attempted bank robberies and a completed robbery in the First, Sixth and 19th Precincts.   On Sat., Jan. 25, around 11 a.m., the suspect entered a Chase bank at 101 Barclay St., passed a note to a teller and demanded cash before fleeing with about $6,000.  Tues., Feb. 18, about 11:10 a.m., the suspect entered a Bank of America at 1107 Third Ave., at E. 63rd St., passed a teller a note and demanded cash before fleeing without any property. Later that day, around 3:50 p.m., the suspect entered a Chase bank at 204 W. Fourth St., at Sheridan Square, passed a teller a note and demanded cash before again fleeing without anything. The robber is described as a 35-to-45-yearold black male, 5 feet 9 inches tall, with a thin build, wearing a black knit hat and black trench coat. Anyone with information is asked to call the Police Department’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800-577-TIPS.  Tips can also be submitted by logging onto WWW. NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting to 274637(CRIMES), then entering TIP577.

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Sam Spokony February 27, 2014

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POLICE BLOTTER

Opponents want Bill to block bistro pavilion plan BY SAM SPOKONY

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eaving park advocates and local elected officials dismayed, the state’s highest appeals court ruled last week that the city’s plan to place a restaurant in Union Square Park’s northend pavilion can go forward. The ruling will allow the hotly disputed bistro to open as early as mid-April. This follows a decade-long debate over the plan, which was then further delayed by legal battles after the city signed a deal with entrepreneur Simon Oren — the restaurant’s owner — in 2012. In a statement responding to last Thursday’s ruling, the city’s Law Department called it “a win for the community.” But members of that community, in assocation with the park advocates, said they are now undertaking yet another effort to kill the plan, by making a direct appeal to Mayor Bill de Blasio. “We’re not giving up on this, and the fight is far from over,” said Carol Greitzer, speaking in a phone interview the day after the ruling. A former city councilmember, Greitzer was one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit against the project. Under the court’s ruling, the city’s Parks Department has the authority to terminate the restaurant’s license at any time. So

de Blasio could tell Parks to block the plan once and for all — and that’s exactly what its opponents are hoping he will do. “We are calling on the mayor to cancel this Bloomberg-era contract and instead return the historic Union Square pavilion to the children and the community,” said Assemblymember Richard Gottfried, in a statement released immediately after the decision. “The area around Union Square Park has the least amount of playground space and the highest concentration of restaurants in the city, and it is therefore terrible public policy to transform municipal parkland into a commercial use. Our parks should not be for sale.” Geoffrey Croft, of New York City Park Advocates, explained that he and his allies have been prepared to take the fight in this direction ever since it began. “We always knew there were two options,” he said on Feb. 21, the day after the ruling. “One was legal, the other was political. The fact is that it’s very simple for the mayor to just kill this.” And de Blasio did, in fact, oppose the restaurant when he served as the city’s public advocate. Last fall, amid the ongoing legal battle, he even sent a letter to the State Liquor Authority on behalf of the restaurant’s opponents, urging denial of its request for a liquor license. Croft pointed out that this issue will now be a “test” for the mayor, specifically

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A rendering obtained by NYC Park Advocates showing the design for the seasonal restaurant in the Union Square pavilion that was approved by the Bloomberg administration.

of whether or not he will stand by his previous position on the issue. “And there’s nothing more progressive than maintaining desperately needed open space for seniors and children who live in that area,” said Croft, referring to the political buzzword found in many of de Blasio’s statements and proposals. A particularly impassioned and strongly worded appeal to the mayor has come from Mary Brosnahan, president of the Coalition for the Homeless and a longtime E. 17th St. resident. In a letter sent to de Blasio last Thursday, she defended the pavilion as an essential public space for both residents with children — like herself — and for homeless kids. “I write today as a 25-year resident of the Union Square community — as well as an advocate for homeless children in NYC — to ask you to please preserve the historic pavilion space so our children, their caregivers and everyone in our community can continue to enjoy this public space for years to come,” Brosnahan wrote. “Homeless kids need green space perhaps even more than those fortunate enough to have a home,” she continued, later in the letter, “as parks provide essential respite and restore hope to those most in need. I know you agree that turning over public park space to commercial interests will only increase the massive gulf in opportunities between the rich and everyone else in New York City. So, please,

stop this plan to give away yet another piece of New York’s heritage to the highest bidder.” But with all the power now in his hands, de Blasio still has not yet taken a public stance on the issue. The Mayor’s Office did not respond to request for comment. The Union Square Community Coalition was the lead plaintiff on the suit and paid the legal fees. “We just don’t want the pavilion commercialized,” said Edith Charlton, U.S.C.C. chairperson. “And they’re not only taking the pavilion, they’re taking the outside space for tables and chairs.” The restaurant’s price point is irrelevant, according to Charlton. “We don’t want high-end food or lowend food,” she said. “We do not want anything commercial in there.” Under the city’s plan, the pavilion would remain open on its northern and southern side; though there would be a trellis for greenery on the southern side to provide a bit of a barrier with the playground. The restaurant would be seasonal, operating only during the warm weather. “They’re very happy to give it back to the public in the winter,” Charlton noted. “There’s no heat.”

With reporting by Lincoln Anderson

TheVillager.com

Mayor stops NYCHA police payments, but for how long? BY SAM SPOKONY

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ayor Bill de Blasio took what he called a “crucial step” toward fulfilling one of his campaign promises when, on Feb. 12, he released a preliminary budget plan that, among other things, temporarily allows the New York City Housing Authority to stop paying millions of dollars extra for police services. The mayor earmarked $52.5 million in his budget plan specifically for NYCHA’s thousands of long-overdue building repairs — and he was able to set aside that funding by relieving the housing authority of what it owed to the New York Police Department through the end of the current fiscal year. Ever since a 1994 agreement was signed between the two agencies, NYCHA has had to pay the N.Y.P.D. around $70 million each year for policing of public housing. De Blasio also provided a matching $52.5 million to the N.Y.P.D. in his preliminary budget — which will have to be approved by the City Council in June — in order to offset the cost of temporarily releasing NYCHA from that agreement. In announcing the plan, the mayor described his decision as a “crucial step forward for NYCHA.” The housing authority

has also said that, along with tackling its repair backlog, part of the newly available funding will go toward creating an independent inspection unit that will make sure building repairs are properly completed. The N.Y.P.D., which currently assigns roughly 2,000 officers (or nearly 6 percent of its total force) to public housing, declined to comment on the announcement. “It’s a beginning, at least,” said Aixa Torres, the tenant association president of NYCHA’s Smith Houses, on the Lower East Side. Along with many others, Torres has condemned the extra policing payments as a kind of double taxation on public housing residents. And to Torres and her allies, it’s hopefully the beginning of the end of the hefty “tax” as they call it. During his mayoral campaign last year, de Blasio promised he would permanently stop the payments by tossing out the 20-year-old policing agreement — known as a memorandum of understanding, or M.O.U. However, even though he has now broken ground on the issue, de Blasio, since taking office in January, still has not actually publicly committed to ending the M.O.U. permanently. Practically speaking, this means that, unless the mayor takes further action, NYCHA will have to begin paying the

Police Department all over again once the current fiscal year ends on June 30 — just four months from now. When The Villager asked if de Blasio will commit to ending the M.O.U. later this year, his office declined to comment. “We have to get rid of [the M.O.U.], but I’ll give the mayor some time to take baby steps on this, since there are so many things on his plate right now,” said Torres, when asked about the mayor’s reticence. “It takes time to rebuild.” But the NYCHA tenant leader also said she believes the mayor should, sooner rather than later, reaffirm his campaign promise. And she pointed out that he could take a next step in that direction by publicly supporting legislation introduced last November by state Senator Daniel Squadron, whose district includes the Lower East Side’s public housing. Squadron’s bill — which was also introduced in the state Assembly by Democratic Assemblymember Walter Mosley of Brooklyn — would, among other things, end the M.O.U. once and for all. When asked for the mayor’s views on that legislation, de Blasio’s office once again declined to comment. Squadron, who has been calling for an end to NYCHA’s policing payments long before introducting the bill, said he applauds the mayor’s recent action, while

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adding that there are still steps “we need to take” as time goes on. “The important thing is that this puts us in a very different starting place as things go forward,” said Squadron, contrasting de Blasio’s stance with, what he called, the largely antagonistic relationship between former Mayor Bloomberg and public housing advocates. However, Squadron still did not seem optimistic about the prospect of his bill swiftly passing the Senate, where a powersharing agreement between Democratic and Republican leadership has often stymied such issues. “Unfortunately, conversations in the Senate generally focus less on substance than on politics,” Squadron said, when asked about the likelihood of getting sufficient Republican support. “But,” he added, “the goal isn’t just passing the bill; it’s about changing the policy.” And now — unlike under Bloomberg — changing the policy is at least a possibility. “We think our goals and the mayor’s goals are closely aligned,” said Squadron, “and going forward we’re just going to have to see what the best legislative partnership is.” And for Torres, the sooner the better. “It’s not like we’re asking for charity, or for handouts,” she said, of the push to end the M.O.U. “This is our right.”

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February 27, 2014

7

Johnson takes lulu, saying process has been reformed JOHNSON, continued from p. 1

FILE PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

government group Citizens Union, one question of which was specifically on the extra payments. “What is your position on limiting stipends or ‘lulus’ to only members holding majority or minority leadership positions?” candidates were asked. Johnson’s response was marked down as “Support.” However, the Daily News recently called out four councilmembers, including Johnson, for allegedly saying they would not accept the stipends, but then changing their position and “pocketing the money.” The other three include Ydanis Rodriguez of Manhattan, Daneek Miller of Queens and Vincent Gentile of Brooklyn.   In addition, the News said its editorial board had asked candidates whether they supported limiting the stipends to the very top leaders of the Council, “as is the case in virtually every other legislature in America, [which] would strip the speaker’s power to pay for support or slash the salaries of members who buck her.” A total of 35 members who were sworn in this Jan. 1 reportedly backed lulu reform. However, of those, according to the News, only 10 have followed through and are refusing the money outright: Dan Garodnick, Ben Kallos, Mark Levine and Helen Rosenthal of Manhattan; Brad Lander, Alan Maisel, Carlos Menchaca and Mark Treyger of Brooklyn; Andy Cohen of the Bronx; and Steve Matteo of Staten Island. An additional 16 councilmembers are accepting the money, but saying they will give it to charity. Each must give a public accounting of what he or she does with the funds. The News called this position a “dodge,” however, noting that Public Advocate Letitia James, for one, when she was a councilmember, took lulus, saying she would donate the cash to charity, but that her tax returns didn’t indicate she took a deduction for doing so. Under new Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, though, the playing field has been leveled on lulus. In the past, the amount of the stipends varied among committee chairpersons, but now the payments have been made the same across the board — $8,000. According to a source, a few councilmembers still may get additional funds, such as the chairperson of the large and important Finance Committee, as well as the majority and minority leaders. Under law, the stipends cannot be used by members to pay their staff. In a statement to The Villager last week, Johnson said he did not flip-flop, and he defended taking the stipend. “In January, I was honored to be appointed as chairperson of the Council’s Committee on Health,” he said. “This is an extraordinarily important committee that has oversight of the Health and Hospitals Corporation, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, health clinics,

Corey Johnson, left, and Melissa Mark-Viverito, before her swearing-in ceremony as speaker last month, appear to have a good working relationship.

school health facilities, as well as animal welfare and control. With my appointment came an $8,000 stipend, which is the same amount that 37 other chairpersons of committees and subcommittees received. “The Citizens Union questionnaire did not specifically ask about turning down stipends for chairing committees,” Johnson noted. “The allotment of stipends has changed considerably under the leadership of Speaker Mark-Viverito. There has been an equalization so that no chairperson is punished with regard to politics. The City Council has a Rules Committee meeting on Feb. 24 where it will discuss reforms, including on how stipends are allotted. I’m a reformer and look forward to supporting many of the reforms that will be presented.” In addition, Johnson said that he never told the Daily News his position on lulus during the campaign. “As a citizen, candidate and now councilmember, I never met or sat with the Daily News editorial board,” he said. He admitted he did speak to that paper about the subject, but only two weeks ago — for the article that ultimately criticized him. As for why he decided to take his stipend as personal income rather than donate it to charity, Johnson indicated he feels it’s appropriate compensation for the amount of

work he’ll be doing as a committee chairperson. “All public employees have a right to do as they see fit with their paycheck,” Johnson told The Villager. “Donating any amount to charity is admirable and kind. Receiving an additional amount of money for chairing any committee is reasonable, in my opinion. The Health Committee is one of the most active committees in the Council, and we have a comprehensive and full agenda to tackle this year.” Councilmembers make a pretty good salary, around $110,000 per year. On the other hand, Johnson, who is 31, didn’t have a job when he was campaigning for office, and no one can deny that the cost of living in Manhattan keeps rising. Does Johnson, who lives in Chelsea, perhaps simply just need the extra money? “No matter where anyone lives, New York is not an inexpensive place to call home,” the councilmember said. “I am and will be a full-time councilmember that will not be seeking outside income apart from my Council salary. I worked hard to get elected, and will work tirelessly as the councilmember for the Third District and also as chairperson of the Committee on Health.” An article in The Villager last Oct. 3 noted that in a Sept. 16 op-ed, the Daily News called on Johnson and 11 other new councilmembers to make good on their “past promises” to ban lulus and reform so-called member items — also known as discretionary funds, which councilmembers allocate in their districts — which have allowed Council speakers to effectively buy political support by providing extra funding to friendlier members. Johnson said he welcomed that early scrutiny. “This is the first order of business,” he said then. “So people really should be watching over the next few months, as we plan to make some significant reforms in the Council. I’m looking forward to teaming up with all these good folks in the Progressive Caucus who want to reform the Council to make it more democratic, to empower individual members, to take favoritism out of the member-item process and to make staff allocations and committee assignments more fair.” The News article also noted that four councilmembers who are “on the outs” with Speaker Mark-Viverito were the only ones denied lulus, including third-term Councilmember Rosie Mendez, who no longer chairs a committee. Last week, Mendez told The Villager that, when she used to get lulus, she used them for charitable purposes, such as, in one case, reported by the newspaper a few years ago, helping a family pay for a funeral. But she noted that, after that report, she got a huge flood of requests from constituents who also wanted help, and so ever since then, chose not to publicize how she used her stipends to help the community.

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8

February 27, 2014

TheVillager.com

Paul Colby, 96, owner of Bleecker St.’s Bitter End OBITUARY BY ALBERT AMATEAU

P

TheVillager.com

FILE PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

aul Colby, owner of The Bitter End, the little club on Bleecker St. where countless folk singers and comedians, the celebrities and the obscure, first found their fans, died on the night of Feb. 13 at his home in Montclair, N.J., at the age of 96. Fondly known as “Our Colonel” to The Bitter End staff because he had been in the Army in the 1940s, Paul Colby was also loved by his Greenwich Village neighbors. Last year, the neighborhood civic association Friends of LaGuardia Place honored him. Along with former City Councilmember Alan Jay Gerson, Colby was involved in the effort to create a folk music museum in Greenwich Village. “I will always remember with gratitude how Paul, with his good friend Art D’Lugoff, produced one of my first campaign fundraisers at The Bitter End,” Gerson said in a recent online tribute. “Pete Seeger and Odetta were on the stage, and my beloved folkie mother, Sophie, in the audience or directing or chatting with them backstage,” Gerson recalled. The Bitter End announced Paul Colby’s passing on Feb. 14. “It is with a heavy heart The Bitter End announces the loss of our colonel, Paul Colby, who passed away last night at the age of 96,” the club said. “In his 70-plus years in the business, Paul has touched the hearts of countless musicians and patrons and helped to launch many great careers in the music industry. Paul was sharp, witty and happy until the end. Paul will never be forgotten as his legacy will live on Bleecker St. The name says it all: Paul Colby’s The Bitter End. A memorial celebrating his amazing journey will be announced shortly,” the club said. Paulʼs friend Doug Yeager, a music producer and manager, recalled that although Paul had a leg amputated last year, he was adjusting and remained upbeat. “We became friendly when I was managing artists who worked at the club,” Yeager recalled. “Our friendship grew as we dedicated ourselves along with Art D’Lugoff, Odetta and Councilman Gerson to create a National Museum of Folk Music in Greenwich Village,” Yeager recalled. “Paul was always devoted to the artists who played his club. I remember when Mickey Newbury was ill, Paul got on a plane and flew across the country to be with him,” Yeager said. Newbury, a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and a recording artist, died in 2002 in Oregon. The list of folk singers and comedians that Paul Colby presented and nurtured at the club at 147 Bleecker St. includes the likes of Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Woody

Allen, Van Morrison, Kris Kristofferson, Neil Diamond, Jackson Browne and Stevie Wonder. The club was opened in 1961 by Fred Weintraub, who quit a family baby-buggy business to run Cock and Bull, a Bleecker St. cafe that he eventually renamed The Bitter End, booking musicians and comics. After a series of managers who didn’t work out, Weintraub hired Colby, who had worked in the music business years before, plugging sheet music to big bands in New York and eventually becoming an assistant to Frank Sinatra. His Sinatra duties included picking up Ava Gardner at the airport, delivering Frankʼs gifts to her and squiring her to events when Sinatra was busy elsewhere. In his 2002 memoir, written with Martin Fitzpatrick, “The Bitter End, Hanging Out at America’s Nightclub,” Colby immodestly proclaimed that he was the best manager the club had ever had from 1965 until 1974, when Weintraub fired him. Despite Colby’s success as manager, Weintraub was displeased because Colby had bought a bar, Now Bar, adjacent to the club, where patrons and artists repaired for drinks because The Bitter End had no liquor license. Nevertheless, Colby was able to buy the club in 1975 because he got to know the landlord, who drank at the bar, which Colby called The Other End. Colby eliminated the wall between the two locations and ran it as The Other End until the name The Bitter End became available a few years later. Born in 1913 in Philadelphia to a tailor and his wife, Paul Colby moved five years later with his parents and three brothers to the Lower East Side. He went to Textile High School on W. 18th St. (now the Bayard Rustin Education Complex) where he learned how to design and make furniture. A friend who worked for music publishers introduced him to the music business, which eventually led to Sinatra. But Frank moved to Hollywood, and in 1950 Paul and his then wife also went to California. On the West Coast, Paul did not achieve the success he sought in the music business, so he returned to New York and started a new career designing furniture. Doing business as Colby Associates, Paul created furniture for clients who included Duke Ellington, Tony Bennett, Diahann Carroll and Miles Davis, according to Paul’s memoir. In 1961, a friend took him to the Village for the folk and rock scene — very different from the big band/Sinatra era of the previous decade. He first went to Weintraub’s The Bitter End with a friend who suggested that they might see Simon and Garfunkel. “When we got there, I was confused. I thought Simon and Garfunkel was a drug store,” Paul wrote in his memoir. But 50 years later, his name is forever linked with the folk stars of the era. His wife, Pamela Ann Wilson, and a brother, Morty Colby, survive.

Last November, Paul Colby was among the honorees who received a LaGuardia Medallion award from the Friends of LaGuardia Place at the group’s 18th annual gala event. The LaGuardia Medallion is presented to individuals “who have worked tirelessly to improve the quality of life of Greenwich Village.” 

February 27, 2014

9

Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

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Member of the New York Press Association

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February 27, 2014

Board 2 calls it right on garden and housing EDITORIAL

H

ousing and open space are essential commodities. In New York City, especially, both can be extremely hard to come by — especially affordable housing. What’s going on right now in Community Board 2 is very encouraging on both fronts. In January, the board bucked both City Councilmember Margaret Chin and the Department of Housing Preservation and Development by voting to recommend that the Elizabeth St. Garden, between Spring and Prince Sts., be preserved permanently as open space. Chin and H.P.D. would like to see the 20,000-square-foot through-lot developed with up to 70 units of affordable housing as an add-on to the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area project. But where the garden is located — whether you call it Nolita or good, old Little Italy — is one of the most open-space-starved spots in a sorely open-space-starved community board district. Yes, the garden couldn’t really be called public in the past; it was rented on a monthly basis by Allan Reiver of the Elizabeth Street Gallery. He cleaned it up, planted it with foliage, and has used it to display his artifacts and monuments, as well as host private, paid events. But realizing they had a precious resource at risk of being lost, neighbors rallied togeth-

er and are creating a nonprofit to operate the space as a garden permanently. Reiver would no longer be involved. In backing the housing project for the site, some local advocates — and a couple of board members — said there is nowhere else in C.B. 2 to create affordable housing. Yet, what’s transpiring in Hudson Square puts the lie to that argument. In short, the rezoning’s inclusionary-housing component — which offers increased development square footage in return for including affordable housing in a project — is, as C.B. 2 predicted, panning out, and even quicker than anticipated. The first residential project — a 22-story building planned at 68 Charlton St. — would include 25 affordable units out of 116 total apartments. C.B. 2 approved this project last week. The unanimous vote was accompanied by members’ applause, acknowledging the significance of their vote. Indeed, it’s been a long time since genuine affordable housing was created in Board 2. And now we hear the board has received an application by The Related Companies for the second new residential project slated for Hudson Square, which calls for 41 affordable units. Clearly, it’s a trend; developers want the extra square footage — not to mention the tax breaks they are eligible for under the pre-existing 421a program — for adding affordable units. So, just a month after C.B. 2 — in its resolution recommending preserving the garden —

said it would focus on locating sites for affordable housing elsewhere in the district, there are already plans for 66 new affordable units on the table. That already equals what H.P.D. and Chin envision at the Elizabeth St. Garden. And plenty more is likely coming down the pike. According to the draft environmental impact statement for the Hudson Square rezoning, up to 3,330 residential units could be created in the district, of which up to roughly 700 would be affordable. Admittedly, the inclusionary-housing program is voluntary, but, again, developers seem to really like it. As for the garden, Chin has indicated it could be developed partially with housing, and with part of it left as open space. But, according to C.B. 2, H.P.D. says a “viable” affordable housing project would need the entire site. The board is also going to work on preventing the loss of existing affordable units. And, if the St. John’s Center building, across from Pier 40, is eventually developed, hopes are it would include affordable housing, too. As for linkage between SPURA and the Elizabeth St. Garden, frankly, they are nearly 20 blocks away from each other. Plus, let’s get real: Fifty percent affordable housing at SPURA was a great achievement. One hundred percent affordable housing was never going to gain consensus. Open space and housing aren’t just some boxes on a Monopoly board, but are, again, precious commodities. It’s time for Chin and H.P.D. to back off from the garden.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Villager scores! To The Editor: Re “Is it a 2-on-1 game again? City files notice on N.Y.U.” (news article, Feb. 20): Another excellent article covering the N.Y.U. plan and the community’s opposition. Thank you, Villager, for this, and for raising the question, “Where does the mayor stand?” Minerva Durham

Village from the Bronx in recent history. For the record, N.Y.U. first moved to the Village in 1835, four years after its founding, not the 1950s, and has been a constant presence in the Village ever since. The article also quotes the plaintiffs in the N.Y.U. court case as saying that, as a result of the recent court decision, the uni-

versity should go “back to the drawing board” for its expansion plans. However, the article did not mention that Justice Donna Mills specifically rejected the plaintiffs’ effort to overturn the City Council’s ULURP approval. A fairer reporting of the facts would show that the ULURP approval was upheld by the court

and that is why the plaintiffs are now appealing four actions where the court ruled in favor of the city and N.Y.U. Philip Lentz Lentz is director, N.Y.U. Public Affairs

LETTERS, continued on p. 13

EVAN FORSCH

N.Y.U. cries foul To The Editor: Your article of Feb. 20, 2014 (“Is it a 2-on-1 game again? City files notice on N.Y.U.”), contained several inaccuracies that we feel compelled to correct. Actor John Leguizamo suggested in his quote that New York University moved to Greenwich

TheVillager.com

Birth of a Voice, Chapter 4: The best job in the city NOTEBOOK

and had edited before and after WW II, we had a filler that became a running gag: I guess it was originally plucked off some AP wire. Here it is: “In 1938, the State of Wyoming produced one-third of a pound of dry edible beans for every man, woman, and child in the nation.”

BY JERRY TALLMER

J

ules Feiffer and Bill Manville not even didn’t get paid, they schlepped their weekly drawing and/or written contributions in by hand — their own hands and feet — every Sunday, to where I, all alone in the office, was preparing the next edition for the printer. One such Sunday I looked up from proofreading all of next week’s ads ($4.50 an inch) to find “Saloon Society’s” Bill Manville, the hotshot $30,000-a-year uptown advertising executive — that would be $300,000 today, or maybe $3 million — looking down at me as, handing over his copy, he said, with wonder and astonishment: “Why, you have the best goddamn job in this whole f------ city!” I thought I did — knew I did — too. So I was — we all except Susan and Florence were — at zero income, followed by a couple of years at bare-survival income. Until I gritted my teeth and squeezed out from Ed a bare-subsistence raise when, four years on or so, it became apparent that new wife Louise and I were soon going to become the parents of twins. Forget all that. I wasn’t in it for that, for the money. None of us were. Not in the beginning. We were out to change the shape and scope of journalism — in my own case, to restore the id, the ego, the personal statement, the vocally identifiable point of view — oh hell, the soul — of journalism in general and theatrical / cinematic / literary / artistic criticism in particular… . Off Broadway was bursting into bloom at that very instant in American culture. A perfect match. The Off Broadway theaters were almost all within walking distance of the VV’s dingy little floor-through, one flight up at 22 Greenwich Avenue, next to Sutter’s Bakery, across 10th Street from the Women’s House of Detention where Dorothy Day and her warrior Catholic Workers would stand on the sidewalk for many frozen days at a time, singing Christmas carols to the inmates calling down from behind iron bars above. Let me tell you two things Susan Ryan and Florence Ettenberg did to keep The Voice alive and breathing in its first few months of existence: When we had gone from a printer down on Warren Street to a printer in Washington, Pennsylvania, the other side of New Jersey, and had no other place to go after they each had thrown the job out as too difficult and finicky, Susan looked at me and said: “How about Clay Matthews?”— the agreeable Irishman out at Bay Shore, Long Island, whom we had talked with, had drinks with, and had forgotten months earlier. Clay now took us in, like orphans from the storm, and that’s where The VV was cheerfully printed from that week onward for a number of years. P.S. Anybody who for some strange reason thumbs his way through ancient issues of The Voice, may be curious about a tiny item between hairline rules in the middle of a theater review by yours truly back in November of 1960. Here it is: Final score, November 25 Kennedy 1, Tallmer 2 November 25, 1960. That was the day John F. Kennedy, Jr. was born. It was also the day that Abby and Matthew Tallmer — Louise’s and my twins — were born.

TheVillager.com

Jerry Tallmer.

Years later, long after John-John had saluted that coffin and pierced the heart of the world, around the time he was fooling around in New York with actress Daryl Hannah, I was introduced to him at an Upper West Side restaurant for which Frances was doing publicity. I seized the moment to mention that tiny 1950 birthday joke to J.F.K. Jr. He looked at me as if I were in need of help. Every newspaper — print newspaper — has what are called fillers: Short half-inch or 3/4-inch items to plug a space at the bottom of a column. (It was one such one-

Mailer wrote his columns — an exploration of hipness intermingled with sneering put-downs of Village intelligentsia — by hand, and always filed them way beyond deadline, and always too long.

inch filler in The New York Times that in those same 1950s would draw the attention of a Chicago-born rebel named Barney Rosset to a strange new play in Paris called “Waiting for Godot” — a play that, as it happened, a young New Yorker named Howard Fertig would actually have seen, in London, before he showed up at The Village Voice one day to write about it.) At The Dartmouth, the college daily — “oldest college newspaper in America” — on which I learned my trade

That ran, unexplained, every now and then in The Dartmouth during my tenure and the tenure of those who proceeded and, I should guess, followed me. I ran it in The Village Voice from time to time, as a beloved joke, and once, some months after Rupert Murdoch took over the New York Post, I planted it there. And nearly got fired for my pains. (The firing would come after Murdoch broke the union — the New York Newspaper Guild and its contracts.) I seem to have left Flo Ettenberg dangling on a limb. But to get to that incident we have to go back to Norman Mailer, whom I met for the first time in my life — two weeks or so after that lunch at the Chinese joint on Eighth Street — at another schlocky Village restaurant, this one up some stairs on the corner of Sixth Avenue at Ninth Street. It was Dan Wolf’s idea, I guess, to bring Norman and me together because we were all going to work together. At some point during the lunch, Norman took the opportunity to tell me what I’d already been told: That he was a silent partner who was only interested in this new (then nameless) newspaper as an investment — to make money. He might contribute an occasional — very occasional — short piece on something or other from time to time, if we asked him. Here I have to borrow from myself — steal from myself — from what I wrote in The Villager (not The Voice) about Norman right after his death on November 10, 2007. As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; They kill us for their sport. And the greatest sport for the gods is when they can knock off two for the price of one. That happened this past week. On Sunday’s obit pages in The Times there is a photograph taken in 1969 by Fred McDarrah, the longtime Village Voice picture editor who died at 81 in his bed in Greenwich Village, sometime during this Monday / Tuesday birthday night of November 5 and 6, 2007. The photo is of Daniel Wolf, the first (and best) editor of The Village Voice, at his desk in Sheridan Square, listening with amusement to a dramatic arm-waving harangue by Voice founding partner and sometime columnist Norman Mailer, who is now himself dead, in Manhattan, at 84, of acute renal failure, early Saturday morning, November 10. These two men, McDarrah and Mailer, together and separately, mostly separately, live on in the photo gallery — more properly, the timeless, spaceless, dimensionless, ceaseless, motion-picture screening room — in my own head. On the opposite page are some of the things I remember about Fred McDarrah. Here, what I remember first is the early morning in 1956 when, with one more issue of the struggling young Village Voice put to bed at the printers, I came into the office — there was no one else there — as the telephone was ringing. I picked it up. A raging voice — Mailer’s voice — said: “Tallmer, you schmuck, why don’t you take your thumb out of your asshole? It’s nuance … nuance,’ not THE BEST JOB, continued on p.12

February 27, 2014

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More park air rights mean more safeguards are needed TALKING POINT BY ANDREW BERMAN

S

ometimes you don’t want to be right. One of those times was at the Feb. 12 Land Use Committee meeting of Community Board 2. It was there that Madelyn Wils, the Hudson River Park Trust’s president, finally provided an answer to a question I and others had long been asking about the Hudson River Park air rights provision passed by the state Legislature in 2013. Wils acknowledged that, yes, as we had feared, the legislation did arguably create many more transferable air rights, and from a much broader swath of the park, than we were originally told — not only from the nine “commercial piers” within the park (ones like Chelsea Piers, where some commercial development is allowed and there is little or no park space), but from the more than a dozen other recreational-use park piers, as well. In effect, this means that, in addition to the roughly 1.6 million square feet of air rights we were originally told the legislation allowed to be transferred inland for new development, the new law actually creates hundreds of thousands, and possibly millions, of additional square feet of air rights and development potential. Wils tried to assure us all that this would never happen — that neither she nor the city would ever entertain the use of air rights from these noncommercial piers. That was nice to hear, but as the old

saying goes, that and a token gets you on the subway. Neither Wils nor any of the other current players will be in charge of their respective agencies forever; even if they were, a verbal assurance such as this is hardly a guarantee, especially when hundreds of millions of dollars of potential real estate development and profit are at stake. And certainly in recent years we have seen many city officials go back on their word and approve land-use deals that they not only pledged to oppose, but that we might have never dreamed possible. This is a vivid reminder that the airrights legislation passed by our local state legislators creates an enormous potential for vastly increased development along our waterfront. A certain, limited use of air rights to generate needed revenue for the park might be appropriate in some cases. But the legislation currently simply creates a vast pool of possibilities, and leaves it up to city officials to decide how and when they can be used — city officials who have, in the past, given us the N.Y.U. expansion plan, the St. Vincent’s/ Rudin rezoning, and the Chelsea Market upzoning. That is why it is critical that we insist that safeguards and limits be put in place now to prevent future overuse and abuse of this open-ended air-rights provision, and to protect our neighborhood from overdevelopment. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, along with a coalition of Village, Downtown and Chelsea community groups, including the Council of Chelsea Block Associations and Greenwich Village Block Associations, representing nearly every block association in

those areas, as well as nearly every Democratic club from Chelsea to Tribeca, are calling for three principles to be included in any plan for moving ahead with use of air rights from the park. First, extinguish all air rights from the noncommercial piers. If, in fact, no one ever intends to use these air rights, this should be a no-brainer. There is no reason why park piers, which are actual park space, should have development rights that can be transferred inland. The same state legislators who approved the original air-rights plan — Assemblymembers Glick and Gottfried, and state Senators Hoylman and Squadron — should draft and pass new legislation that disallows air-rights transfers from these piers and other parts of the park. And the City Council and City Planning Commission should rezone those parts of the park to eliminate any development rights. Second, pursue measures to fund the park without upzoning our neighborhood and increasing development along our waterfront. Perhaps the scariest thing about the air-rights transfer plan is it makes funding the park dependent upon increasing the size of allowable development in our neighborhood, above and beyond the already substantial size of development currently allowed. But there are ways to fund the park without upzoning and overdeveloping our neighborhood. These include assessing a fee on all new nearby development to fund the park; pairing any air-rights transfer with a downzoning, so that the allowable amount of new development is not increased as a result; and attaching airrights transfers to a change in allowable use, rather than an increase in allow-

able size (i.e. allowing development of a 10-story residence instead of a 10-story hotel as part of an air-rights transfer, rather than increasing the allowable size of a hotel development from 10 to 15 stories, as the current thinking would require). Third, make any use of air rights dependent upon meeting agreed-upon definitions of financial need for the park. The purported purpose of the air-rights legislation is to fund the construction and maintenance of the park, but the amount of air rights created could generate vastly more revenue than necessary for doing so. Currently, there is nothing in the legislation saying that air-rights sales must stop when the park’s financial “needs” are met. Therefore, it is critical that a standard be established for defining what the park’s real financial “needs” are that the air-rights sales are supposed to address. No air-rights sale proposal should be allowed to advance through the public review and approval process if it does not first meet this established “needs” test. Now will likely be our one chance to put in place the limitations needed to ensure that air-rights sales are not misused in the future and do not result in overdevelopment of our waterfront. If we don’t insist upon these measures from the beginning, we are setting ourselves and our neighborhood up for disaster.  Powerful real estate forces can and no doubt will find a way to ensure that every one of the millions of square feet of development that this legislation allows in our neighborhood is used. And once approved, it will be impossible to reverse. Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Birth of a Voice, Chapter 4: The best job in the city THE BEST JOB, continued from p. 11

‘nuisance!’ ” I said: “Norman, don’t talk to me like that,” and hung up, still body-weary and half-asleep, not having the least idea what the hell he was talking about. And thus began the great Village Voice battle of the typo, an internal war that almost strangled that infant newspaper in its cradle. Brief explanation. Norman Mailer, the silent partner (“I’m only in this for the money”), waited about 15 minutes after Volume I, No. 1 of The Voice, to launch himself as a weekly columnist, beginning with a great quote from Andre Gide: “Please do not understand me too quickly.” He wrote the columns — an exploration of hipness intermingled with sneering put-downs of Village intelligentsia — by hand, with pen or pencil,

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February 27, 2014

in a sort of looping grade-school script, and brought or sent them in, always too late, much beyond deadline, and always, always, far exceeding the allotted space. Our two secretaries, Susan Ryan and Flo Ettenberg, would decipher them, type them, and off we’d all (less Norman) go at 6 in the morning, having had little or no sleep whatever the past 72 hours, all the way across New Jersey to the printers in Washington, Pennsylvania. Somewhere along in there, the three words “nuances of youth” in Norman’s column that issue, had come out “nuisances of youth.” Nobody had caught it. We were lucky, in our blinding exhaustion, to have caught “t-h-e.” And when you come to think of it (as I did, much later), “nuances of youth” and “nuisances of youth” aren’t all that far apart and make almost equal sense. But not to Norman. Dan Wolf was one

of Norman’s oldest friends. Danʼs wifeto-be, Rhoda Lazar, was best friends in Brooklyn with Norman's kid sister, and worshipped Norman himself. To Norman Mailer, extreme Socialist, who prided himself on “trying to throw a ladder from Marx to Freud,” Dan now acidly declared: “Norman, you’re acting like the worst caricature of a capitalist in The Daily Worker.” Long story short: Ed and Dan stood by me. Norman and a rich boy named Howard Bennett tried to grab the paper from them. The war raged, legally and otherwise, for I think almost a year, complicated by the fact that Norman’s father, I.B. Mailer, had been the Voice’s first bookkeeper. In the end, Ed and Dan held onto the paper by some magical numbers and the skin of their teeth. Norman to me, at a party, sometime during all that, as his eyes (which never missed anything) took in my battered off-white saddle shoes: “When are you

going to stop being a college boy?” (I was then 35 years old — and, until The Voice came along, going nowhere fast.) When Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” arrived on these shores, and I was among its earliest and warmest admirers, Norman took pains to write a full-page put-down of the masterpiece he had never yet either seen or read, terming it a hymn to impotence. Later, after he had seen it, and his then wife, Adele Morales, said, as they were leaving the theater, “Baby, on this one you f----- up,” he took out and paid for a full page in The Voice — his own newspaper, so to speak — in tiny type so as to get it all in, an apologia of sorts. Which is to his credit — and Adele’s. Here’s another story to his credit, a counterbalance you might say: In its earliest days and months, The Voice had huge distribution problems. THE BEST JOB, continued on p. 13

TheVillager.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 10

I wasn’t his widow To The Editor: Re “Here we au Go Go again” (arts article, Feb. 20): In the performance schedule for Feb. 24, you identify me as “Dave Van Ronk’s widow.” That’s incorrect. I managed folksingers, including David, during the 1960s, and Dave and I were married. We separated in the late 1960s and remained friends until he died. We’ve both been with other people for many years. Dave’s widow is Andrea Vuoculo. Terri Thal

Post office of the future? To The Editor: Re “Post office openings and closings” (news article, Feb. 20): Our post offices play a vital role for people who cannot afford private mail options. Many depend on them for their contact with the outside. They are community resources. The Office of the Inspector General proposed a way to keep this vital function while offering much-needed services, especially to financially strapped customers. Senator Warren has concurred. The statistics are outrageous: More than a quarter of all U.S. households (roughly 68 million Americans) spent about $89 billion in 2012 on interest and fees for non-bank financial services

(payday loans, check-cashing, etc.), an average of $2,412 per household. Poor Americans spend roughly 10 percent of their income on basic banking services. Many banks offered, in essence, payday loans, with annual interest rates of more than 300 percent. Under the O.I.G. plan, in addition to selling stamps and processing mail, the post office would offer prepaid cards, allowing users to pay bills online and withdraw money at A.T.M.s, as well as perform check-cashing, small international money transfers, small loans and bill paying. The post office would also develop services to let customers save and borrow money. But banks object. They make money off low-income Americans. The median overdraft charge is $34 at large banks and $30 at smaller financial institutions. Banks made an estimated $32 billion in overdraft fees in 2012. Other countries have done this, and O.I.G. says that if even 10 percent of what underserved Americans pay on bank interest and fees went to the U.S. Postal Service, it would generate $8.9 billion in new revenue per year.

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K Webster E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013.

And who thought up the name? THE BEST JOB, continued from p. 12

Most of the distributors were thugs of one sort or another. Finally, Norman volunteered to do the distribution to newsstands by hand, himself, by car, taking along Flo Ettenberg for assistance. One night during this process, Florence said to him with a laugh: “Someday I’m going to tell my grandchildren how I helped Norman Mailer hand-deliver The Village Voice to newsstands.” Norman with his own burst of laughter said: “Yes, and they’re going to ask you: ‘Was that before or after he wrote ‘The Naked and the Dead’?” Let me interrupt this obit for an aside. When we got down to organizing The

TheVillager.com

Village Voice, putting together dummies and all that, thanks to the truly graceful minimal typography of Ed’s friend painter Nell Blaine, who taught me the poetic impact of italics married to boldface — all of which gracefulness was tossed into the garbage can by VV regimes of later years — during all that, we had more than one meeting just to decide on a name for the new newspaper. Norman later said The Village Voice was his name. I thought — still think — it was mine. The truth probably is that we both hit on it at the same time. I do know that the long-running masthead tagline — “A weekly newspaper designed to be read” — was mine. Until it was killed by some later regime. A further truth is that from the beginning The Village Voice looked to be four newspapers.

119 W 23rd St • 212.929.3645 • tekserve.com February 27, 2014

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Ukrainians rejoice at revolution, mourn fallen heroes UKRAINE, continued from p. 1

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February 27, 2014

Buttons for Razom, which means “Together.”

A girl in traditional Ukrainian dress manned a book table at the Razom fundraiser.

A woman served potato pierogis at the fundraiser.

PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

whereabouts were unknown. He was last seen fleeing toward the eastern, pro-Russia part of the country. On Sunday, yellow-and-blue balloons — the colors of the Ukrainian flag —  decked the outside of Plast Domivka, next door to Veselka restaurant on Second Ave., where a fundraiser was being held for the pressing needs of the people in the Maidan in Kiev. The event was held by Razom (which translates to “Together”), an organization that formed in November with a mission to support democratic institutions in Ukraine. Ukrainian music and food were enjoyed alongside sales of crafts and traditional floral headdresses. Among those attending the event was Marta Zahaykevich, 60, from E. Seventh St. She was born after World War II in Ukraine in a displaced-persons camp. “We entered the U.S. by lottery in 1952 — part of the last big wave of Ukrainians — and settled in Newark,” she said. She moved to New York while attending Columbia University and currently works as an emergency-room psychologist. Zahaykevich shared many thoughts on the unfolding events. “Today is a very important day,” she said. “Parliament passed important legislation yesterday. Yanukovych said those votes are illegal. But the laws are vetoproof, having been voted on by over 75 percent of Parliament, and do not require the president’s signature. “We have a new [interim] president and [acting] interior minister with May 25 elections projected,” she added. So how did Yanukovych ever get elected? “The elections were fraudulent,” Zahaykevich said. “Everyday life is based on corruption. Every step you take, you have to pay someone.” With police no longer guarding Yanukovych’s lavish palace, the people are now getting a chance to see how he lived. “Do you know that the toilet seats are in the shape of gold thrones, with armrests?” Zahaykevich asked. She said Ukraine faces serious problems with unemployment, hunger and healthcare. Yet, the former president was unconcerned. “Yanukovych didn’t do anything,” she said. “We want to be part of Europe,” she declared. “We don’t want to be part of Russia anymore.” Regarding the past three months of protest, Zahaykevich pointedly noted that it was the Berfut, the special forces, that fired on their own people. In 2010 — under Yanukovych — a new constitution was implemented. “Parliament has voted to revert back to the 2004 constitution,” she said. “With this Parliament’s newly enacted laws, he’ll have to face his own Parliament. “People are thrilled, pragmatic, realistic,

working step by step in a parliamentarian fashion. We want to take care of him in a legal way,” she said. Razom was raising money for medical supplies, bulletproof vests, cots, oxygen and whatever else was requested, she added. Just a few doorways down the street, in front of the Ukrainian American Youth Organization, at 136 Second Ave., passersby paid homage at a sidewalk memorial to those who died during the Ukraine uprising.

“We want to be part of Europe,” East Villager Marta Zahaykevich said of Ukraine.

TheVillager.com

PHOTOS BY JEFFERSON SIEGEL

Raising voices against the violence in Venezuela Protests against the government have been roiling Venezuela for weeks. At least eight protesters, including a local beauty queen, have already died. On Saturday, hundreds gathered in Union Square to echo the demonstrations against president Nicolas Maduro and the economic inequities wracking the country. Carrying signs reading, “#We Are Your Voice Venezuela” and “S.O.S.” — as in pleas for help — and with faces and hands painted white as symbols of peace, they also called for an end to government repression and media censorship. Lower East Side resident Claudia Semprun, 35, brought her dog, Toby, to the rally, below right.

TheVillager.com

February 27, 2014

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People are P.O.’d over P.O.’s moving on E. 14th St. BY LIZA BÉAR

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PHOTO BY LIZA BÉAR

n Fri., Feb. 21, after months of uncertainty about the fate of the Peter Stuyvesant Station Post Office, a plain sheet of typed paper affixed to the station’s glass doors announced, to the surprise of most, that it was closing early, at 1 p.m., because it was in the process of being moved. The single-story brick building, built in 1952 to post office specifications, sports a 100-foot-long frontage on a busy strip of E. 14th St.’s south side between Avenue A and First Ave. Adjacent on its eastern flank is the long-shuttered and graffitied Stuyvesant Stationery store — an indication, perhaps, that the strip is being readied for development. Lisa Pakulski, a jazz singer who lives on St. Mark’s Place, held out her arms in a what-can-we-do gesture, as she waited online. “The only reason they’re relocating,ˮ Pakulski said, “is obviously because of redevelopment, which seems to be happening regardless of what people in the neighborhood want. Every day something closes and other things open that are not as relevant to us, like a Starbucks or a Duane Reade. I prefer it when things are stable,” she said. “There’s a lot of instability in the fact that maybe that whole block is going to disappear.” To the west of the shuttered post office are functional shops — a 99-cent pizza store, a dry cleaners, a shoe-repair shop and a barber shop — serving the neighborhood, which includes the sprawling Stuyvesant Town residential complex. According to  Conchetta Chirichello, a U.S. Postal Service spokesperson, the station’s lease expired at the start of this year, and they were unable to reach agreement on a new one.  “The landlord had other plans for the building, which is not within our control,ˮ Chirichello stated in an e-mail. Asked what she thought of the relocation, a thin, elderly lady who was leaving the post office, vividly attired in a turquoise coat and purple scarf, carrying two large bags and bent over a cane, mumbled one word, “Disgusting.” The new location is a long cross-town block to the west at 333 E. 14th St., formerly home to a Duane Reade. The purportedly state-of-the-art facility, designed by CTS Group, is sharply angled, a constricted “V,” because of the location of the air-conditioner unit, and the fact that, at 6,940 square feet, it’s only one-tenth of the closed station’s size, 56,900 square feet. The general contractor showed this reporter the architect’s stamp on the drawings. Downsizing translates also into 1,000 fewer P.O. boxes — from 2,622 to 1,600. A question about how many boxes had, in fact, been rented at the old location was referred to the supervisor, and has not yet been answered. On Saturday morning, a smaller sign over the closed station’s shutters read, somewhat melodramatically, “This post office location is closed forever” with the word “for-

A postal worker moved equipment along E. 14th St. to the new post office location last week.

ever” in boldface print. Customers were shuttling hurriedly along 14th St. between old and new locations to collect the keys to their new P.O. boxes and wondering where they could pick up their packages. “It’s a major inconvenience, because of the cost of changing my address,” said a tall blonde woman in red tartan pants and a black leather jacket who wished to remain anonymous. A longtime Downtown resident, she runs a business translating Argentinian tangos and as a language coach. She said she had called the supervisor a week ago about the exact date of the relocation, but that it wasn’t available until Friday. The new facility boasts a U.S.P.S.-brand blue color scheme and pencil-thin radial LED ceiling lighting. “This is a little cold for me,” said a computer engineer working in the space. “I prefer the old architecture.” A postal employee pushing office furniture on a dolly into the narrow side entrance of the facility — which also has a 1,500-square-foot basement — said that 432 E. 14th St., the station’s former location, had been sold. Just before the 1 p.m. closing time, Marilee Santos, a school paraprofessional in a flared black wool coat and sunglasses, a 33-year neighborhood resident, was rushing to pick up her P.O. box key. Now living on Avenue D and

10th St., she said the new location was quite a trek for her. Accompanied by one of her sons in a green Ninja Turtle T-shirt, Darleen, 50, a homemaker with seven children who lives on Eighth St. and Avenue D, echoed Santos’s sentiments. The relocation did bother her, Darleen said, with resignation, because she has scoliosis and can’t walk too well. The movers, pointing toward the new facility, signaled that the new manager, Yvonne Mullings, was now on the premises. An April 25, 2013, article in The Villager on the Community Board 3 public hearing on the Peter Stuyvesant P.O. relocation noted that services would be divided between three locations: The storefront at 333 E. 14th St. would offer retail services, such as stamp sales and P.O. boxes; the carriers who sort and deliver mail to homes and businesses would be moved to the Madison Square Station, on E. 23rd Street near Third Ave.; and large parcel services would operate out of the F.D.R. Station, at E. 54th St. and Third Ave. However, U.S.P.S. Facilities Management must have had a change of heart, perhaps in response to public outcry, because, according to Mullings, “There will be no change in the services offered at the new location.” The new post office was slated to open at 9 a.m. on Mon., Feb. 24.

With E. Broadway escalator back in action, it’s easy riding

A

fter 19 months of delays and several missed deadlines, the M.T.A. has finally gotten its escalator up and running at the East Broadway subway station. Although the new escalator reportedly went out of service — due to electrical problems — just hours after at last being restarted on Feb. 20, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority says it now has

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those issues resolved, according to an announcement by local elected officials. As a result, Lower East Side residents, commuters and visitors the neighborhood can now once again use the F train station without climbing its tiresome, 81-step staircase. “After far too many months, things are finally on the up and up for Lower East Side riders as our escalator returns to service,” said state Senator Daniel Squadron

in the Feb. 24 announcement. “Thank you to the M.T.A. for finally heeding our calls, and to the community for standing together to make sure we were heard.” “I expect that it will remain in service without any more lengthy interruptions,” Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver added, in his statement. Joining Squadron and Silver in the announcement were U.S. Congressmembers

Carolyn Maloney and Nydia Velazquez, Borough President Gale Brewer and City Councilmember Margaret Chin. Last month the politicians, along with local residents, gathered outside the station, at the corner of East Broadway and Rutgers St., to push the M.T.A. to finish the job. The escalator had been out of service since August 2012.

Sam Spokony

TheVillager.com

A window on a way of life long gone Fred W. McDarrah’s eye gives voice to the Village PHOTOGRAPHY Through March 8 At Steven Kasher Gallery 521 W. 23rd St. (btw. 10 & 11 Aves.) Hours: Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm Call 212-966-3978 or visit stevenkasher.com

BY NORMAN BORDEN

“Bob Dylan, Sheridan Square Park” (January 22, 1965).

F

TheVillager.com

“Allen Ginsberg on Central Park Bandstand, 5th Avenue Peace Demonstration to Stop the War in Vietnam” (March 26, 1966).

COPYRIGHT ESTATE OF FRED W. McDARRAH, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK

or those interested in the cultural and political history of New York City during one of its most creative and turbulent periods –– 1958 to 1979 –– you will be enthralled by the more than 130 vintage prints in this sprawling exhibition of Fred McDarrah’s work for the Village Voice. As the Voice’s only staff photographer for more than 20 years, McDarrah captured many of the Downtown scene’s artists, writers and performers who later became cultural icons. He photographed peace marches, hippie be-ins, gay rights demonstrations and parades, the Weather Underground bombing on West 11th Street and countless politicians –– from Mayor John Lindsay to Mario Cuomo, Ed Koch and Robert Moses. McDarrah considered himself a photojournalist rather than a fine art photographer, and the pictures here will only confirm that. His photographs are

COPYRIGHT ESTATE OF FRED W. McDARRAH, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK

COPYRIGHT ESTATE OF FRED W. McDARRAH, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK

FRED W. McDARRAH: SAVE THE VILLAGE

“Demolition of Artist’s Studio, Greenwich Avenue” (May 19, 1960).

straight portraits: artists at work in their studios, musicians on the bandstand, other celebrities and an array of casual street portraits of the soon to be famous (like Bob Dylan hanging out in Sheridan Square). Also intriguing is the sheer diversity of McDarrah’s subjects. He captured everyone — from Mel Brooks and Robert Kennedy to Tennessee Williams and George Lucas, Woody Allen, Mario Puzo, John Lennon, Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Muhammad Ali, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Lee Krasner, Robert Mapplethorpe, Jasper Johns and yes, even a young Donald Trump and his father, Fred. There are pictures of the Café Wha, the closing PHOTOGRAPHY, continued on p.21

February 27, 2014

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The ‘African Clapton’ brings voices of Mali to Varick St. Habib Koité’s new release blends banjo and djembe

PHOTO BY DIRK LEUNIS

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Passionate polyglot vocalist Habib Koité brings his band to City Winery, on March 6.

MUSIC HABIB KOITÉ

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Thursday, March 6 At City Winery (155 Varick St., at Vandam St.) Doors at 6pm, show at 8pm Tickets Range From $28 to $35 For tickets: citywinery.com/newyork For info on artist: habibkoite.com

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February 27, 2014

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uitar virtuoso Habib Koité’s new album tells a very personal story of his home in Mali — and now he’s brought his band halfway around the world to share it with American listeners. The February 25 release, “Soô” — which literally translates to home — shows off Koité’s mastery not only on

the fretboard, but as a passionately polyglot vocalist (singing in three different native tongues) and a solid bandleader. It’s a densely layered, eclectic mix of tunes that all thrive on joyful African rhythms (with the kind of authenticity that only a well-played djembe can offer), along with choral arrangements that pepper rich, call-and-response harmonies throughout. But, unsurprisingly for an artist sometimes referred to as the “African Clapton,” Koité frequently steals the show with his inventive guitar work, navigating the melodic terrain just as nimbly as he does while singing of the villages and people of Mali. The surprise, in this case, is that on several tunes he’s brought a banjo into the mix, putting a refreshing spin on some traditional folk sounds. It’s worth coming out to see Koité at City Winery on March 6 just to hear how nicely that sharp twang mingles with the voice of an African drum. But there’s also nothing wrong with just listening to his words about home — because even if you don’t speak Malinke, Bambara, or Dogon, it’s never too hard to connect when the honest feeling, the soul, is there.

TheVillager.com

Your Local Drop Dance music around New York

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

March 7: Moon Boots (Pete Dougherty) headlines the Girls & Boys dance-party, bringing throwback nu-disco to Webster Hall.

Discovery Recordings brings Baltimore Club scene mainstay DJ Technics to Glasslands Gallery, on March 8.

The Discovery Recordings profile is simple: distilled and purified Brooklyn disco.

BY M. VAUGHAN

the dance floor. Before Moon Boots is Treasure Fingers, a southerner signed to Fool’s Gold records with a flair for making tunes that combine poppy hooks with shuffley, jacking rhythms. He has remixed the likes of Miami Horror, Empire of the Sun and Little Boots for major labels such as EMI. Fri., March 7, at 10pm. At Webster Hall (125 E. 11th St., btw. Third & Fourth Aves.). For tickets ($15), call 212-353-1600 or visit wantickets.com.

and Metro Area, they are carving out a glacial groove in the Brooklyn landscape. Their ears are attuned to a garagey slice of house that both nods at the old school while retaining a touch of Brooklyn’s modern techno grit. So far their label, Discovery Recordings, has begun to mint this sound with a sparse few releases, but their A&R is hard at work. Keep an eye out for more releases and future parties because the Discovery name is at the cutting edge of Brooklyn’s dance music scene. DJ Technics is a mainstay in the Baltimore Club scene. His productions fuse a Baltimore’s signature style (cheap production and schizoid chopped vocals) with deep house and its gospel influence. He is a great live DJ and a vinyl purist. Expect him to manhandle the Technics well into the morning. Sat., March 8 at 11:30pm. At Glasslands Gallery (289 Kent Avenue, btw. First & Second Aves., Brooklyn). For tickets ($12 Presale/$15 Door): residentadvisor.com.

facebook.com/mvaughanmusic soundcloud.com/mikawvawn

GIRLS & BOYS: MOON BOOTS & TREASURE FINGERS

This is Webster Hall’s personal flavor of dance-party. Girls & Boys has been a mainstay in the all-ages club scene for several years. It manages to bring noteworthy acts to an accessible venue without the pretensions of a guest list and bottles atmosphere. Girls & Boys is always sweaty, youthful and fun. Headlining is Moon Boots (Pete Dougherty), one of my personal favorite DJs. He is a quiet, twenty-something from Chicago who makes happy, throwback nu-disco. His label, French Express, has been churning out a brand of house with a glitzy flair to it. Their obligatory 90s R&B samples over drums that sound more disco than electronic offer a perfect mixture for

DISCOVERY MUTUAL DREAMING WITH DJ TECHNICS, BEAUTIFUL SWIMMERS, AURORA HALAL, FREE MAGIC & FA

The website for Discovery is simply: adiscoparty.com. This is a distilled and purified Brooklyn disco. With massive names already making their headlines such as MK

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February 27, 2014

19

Lost lambs on a hero’s journey Shakespeare’s characters go gunning for their creator BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THEATER KILL SHAKESPEARE A Gideon Productions presentation Based on the graphic novel by Anthony Del Col & Conor McCreery

At HERE (145 Sixth Ave., enter on Dominick St.) Tickets: $15 Call 212-352-3101 or visit here.org Also visit killshakespeare.com

ARTWORK BY ANDY BELANGER

March 1-5, 7pm

ARTWORK BY ANDY BELANGER

Directed by Jordana Williams

I

f Shakespeare were around in the 1960s, his mighty pen and massive stable of players might have found a suitable home in the comic book pages — where, like the best Marvel and DC superheroes, their origin stories and epic adventures could be told by the master, then adapted by future generations eager to put their own stamp on classic plotlines and elegantly drawn, psychologically complex characters. What if Romeo and Juliet didn’t die, but didn’t know the other one was alive? What if Hamlet went on a revenge quest that made his ghostly father’s assignment seem comparatively devoid of intrigue — and what if a violent, pissed-off cadre of Shakespeare’s most ruthless baddies went gunning for their creator? Surely that’s something worth seeing in full, rather than reading the Cliff Notes version. Alternate universe scenario geeks, come

Andy Belanger’s artwork puts a muscular spin on Shakespeare’s most iconic characters.

prepared to drool — when, for five nights only, Gideon Productions presents the stage adaption of Anthony Del Col and Conor McCreery’s “Kill Shakespeare.” Part radio play and part comic book, the graphic novel is brought to life with the help of live music and Foley effects, and accompanied by larger-than-life projections of Andy Belanger’s bloody, muscular comic book panels. Drawing from thematic and narrative elements familiar to fans of “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,” “Lord of the Rings,” “The Wizard of Oz” and the Bible, this tale assembles an all-star team of heroes (Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, Falstaff, Romeo and Puck) to do battle with a group of villains (Richard III, Lady Macbeth and Iago) on an epic quest to defeat a reclusive wizard

(William Shakespeare, as he lives and breathes). Along the way, we get some very pulpy twists that lay waste to much of what we think we know when the curtain comes down on Shakespeare’s major works. As a result, many of the Bard’s most iconic characters must reassess which side they’re on, and how much control they have over determining their own fate. Beyond the epic scope, the beautiful artwork and the imaginative pairings (Hamlet and Juliet have a thing going on), “Kill Shakespeare” finds its greatest strength in how it casts the titular character. Everyone, it seems, has major daddy issues with that God-like figure — who turns out to be very human in his flaws, yet immortal in his ability to cast a long shadow over all he’s created.

Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

SOTTO VOCE

The World Premiere of a New Play Written & Directed by NILO CRUZ The Story of the S.S. St. Louis and the 973 refugees from Nazi Germany aboard it.

Set Design by Adrian Jones Lighting Design by Alexander Bartenieff Sound Design by Erik Lawson Costume Design by Anita Yavich Featuring: Franca Sofia Barchiesi*, Arielle Jacobs* and Andhy Mendez*

Performances February 15 - March 9, 2014 (Previews February 13 & 14)

Wednesday - Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 3pm All Seats $20/Students & Seniors $15/tdf

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

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February 27, 2014

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Buhmann on Art BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN stephaniebuhmann.com © LESLIE WAYNE. COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK

PANCHO WESTENDARP: THINGS THAT BARELY EXIST

Westendarp’s drawings, videos and installations  seek  to analyze relationships between time, space, memory and movement. He states, “Developing our own way of measuring time means creating our own notion of history and developing new rituals where time can be practical and playful.” Through March 9, at Robert Henry Contemporary (56 Bogart St., Brooklyn, btw. Harrison Place & Grattan St.). Hours: Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm. Visit  roberthenrycontemporary. com or call 718-473-0819.

McDarrah photo exhibit a vivid Village time capsule Leslie Wayne: “Paint/Rag #32,” (above, 2013, oil on panel, 15 x 9 1/2 x 6 inches) and “Paint/Rag #19” (below, 2013, oil on panel 14 x 7 1/2 x 2 1/4 inches).

COPYRIGHT ESTATE OF FRED W. McDARRAH, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK

“Women of the World Unite, Women’s Liberation Demonstration” (August 26, 1970). PHOTOGRAPHY, continued from p. 17

of the Cedar Tavern and of demonstrators in front of the Stonewall Inn, among other historical events. This exhibition is like a time capsule. For those who were here back in those days, the pictures jog the memory. For those who weren’t, they are a window on a way of life long gone.

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Norman Borden is a New Yorkbased writer and photographer. The author of more than 100 reviews for NYPhotoReview.com and a member of Soho Photo Gallery and ASMP, he currently has an image from the 2013 Village Halloween Parade in the juried show, “Masquerade,” at the New Orleans Photo Alliance. Visit normanbordenphoto.com.

February 27, 2014

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1273366 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 523 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10016 for onpremises consumption. 523 RESTAURANT CORP. d/b/a TED’S CORNER TAVERN Vil: 02/27 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license # PENDING for beer, wine and liquor has been applied for by the undersigned * to sell beer ,wine and liquor at retail in a Restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1271 Broadway unit B NewYork,NY 10001 NewYork County for on premises consumption. 2013 VENTURE CORP. DBA THE HAROLD Vil: 02/27 - 03/06/2014 EL SENOR NEW YORK LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/4/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 159 Essex St., Ste. #C, NY, NY 10002. General Purpose. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INTIMA CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 142 DUANE OWNER LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 150 E. 58th St., 39th Fl., NY, NY 10155. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 144 DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 151 BRUCKNER HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 75 125TH HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAD & DYLAN, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 01/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Rad & Dylan LLC,136W 131 st, apt-1, New York, NY 10027. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1763 AMSTERDAM EQUITIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Exact Capital Group LLC, 100 Park Ave., Ste. 1600, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WINTER ART CO. LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to princ. bus. loc. of LLC: 730 Fifth Ave., 12th Fl., New York, NY 10019. Purpose: any purposes permitted by applicable law. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 158 AVENUE C REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 632 Broadway, 7th Fl., New York, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MEETSNYC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Cooperman Lester Miller LLP, 1129 Northern Blvd., Ste. 402, Manhasset, NY 11030, Attn: Barry R. Carus, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

February 27, 2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VDK, L.P. Cert. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/4/2013. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Virginia Commander Knott Family Trust, 232 Cleft Rd., Mill Neck, NY 11765, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from Sec. of State. Term: until 12/2/2063. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF YORK MULTISTRATEGY HEDGEFOCUS FUND LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/7/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 11 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10010. LP formed in DE on 2/5/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1276495 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 787 7th Avenue, New York, NY 10019 for onpremises consumption. LEBERNARDIN VENTURES LLC d/b/a LEBERNARDIN PRIVE, ALDO SOHN WINE BAR Vil: 02/20 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CRANBERRY FAMILY OFFICE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1301 Avenue of the Americas, NY, NY 10019. Address of the office to be maintained in the jurisdiction of its formation: c/o Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KV URBAN ABSTRACT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/03/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 39 W. 37th St., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Kensington Vanguard Holdings, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF IH4 PROPERTY WASHINGTON, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/14. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/10/14. Princ. office of LP: 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LA CENTRAL MANAGER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 826 Broadway, 11th Fl., New York, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AIMS SENIOR LOAN ACCESS ADVISORS, L.L.C. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/28/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 West Street, NY, NY 10282-2198. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AIMS SENIOR LOAN ACCESS LP App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/28/13. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 200 West Street, NY, NY 10282-2198. DE address of LP: Corporation Service Company, 2711 Centerville Road, Wilmington, DE 19808. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RS JZ GREENPOINT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/3/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9 W. 57th St., 33rd Fl., NY, NY 10019. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/20 - 03/27/2014 PREMIER ASSET LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/21/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Brian Pun, 2 Mott St., Ste. 402, NY, NY 10013. General Purpose. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 LINDSEY POLLAK, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 01/02/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 23 West 69th Street, Suite B, New York, NY 10023. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR GREENWICH STREET HOLDING LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 3/9/2007 LLC. Registered in Delaware on 12/27/2004 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o Vendome Property Management Co., Inc. 330 Spring Street, #1E, New York, NY 10013. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MANHATTAN GLORY - W 37B LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/04/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KEN DEVELOPMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Carl Demler, 211 W. 58th St., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ORCHARD ANALYTICS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/31/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/29/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Angela Ceresnie, 902 Broadway, Ste. 1611, NY, NY 10016. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF LAM FUNDS GP LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/31/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/28/14. Princ. office of LLC: 405 Park Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Jeffrey A Keswin, 405 Park Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WALL STREET PSYCHOLOGISTS, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/03/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o 132 East 35th Street, Apt. 7E, NY, NY 10016. Purpose: to practice the profession of psychology and any lawful activities. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGI LIFESTYLE ENTERTAINMENT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9130 W. Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90069. LLC formed in DE on 11/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/13 - 03/20/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF URBAN RESTORATION, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/23/14. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to:THE COMPANY, c/o Slate Property Group LLC, 850Third Ave., Ste. 16-B, NY, NY 10022, Attn: Martin Nussbaum. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF INTEGRA SERVICECONNECT, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/23/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: 393w49 2W LLC. Articles of Organization filed by the Department of State of New York on: 01/08/2014. Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: c/o Richard E. Feldman, Trustee. Sonnenschein Sherman & Deutsch, LLP, 7 Penn Plaza, Suite 900, New York, NY 10001. The duration date of the LLC is: 12/31/2070 Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL AFFORDABLE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

CERTIFICATE OF CONTINUED USE OF PARTNERSHIP NAME PURSUANT TO 81 OF THE PARTNERSHIP LAW OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK The undersigned, desiring to continue, after the close of business on December 16, 2013, the business previously transacted under the firm name of Cede & Co., a general partnership under the laws of the State of NewYork, with offices located at 55 Water Street1, New York, New York 10041, do hereby certify: 1. The name of the Partnership is Cede & Co. 2. The names and respective places of residence of each of the partners are set forth below: Name Residence Address Michael Ames 183 Bay Terrace, Staten Island, NY 10306, Philip Braverman 505 East 79th Street, New York, NY 10075, Joseph Brennan 457 Benito Street, East Meadow, NY 11554, Debra Cook 4704 W. Neptune Street,Tampa, FL 33629, Raymond Disco 300 East 23rd Street, Apt. 14B, NY, NY 10010, John Faith 7425 Minnow Brook Way, Land O Lakes, FL 34637, James Femia 64-68 83rd Street, Middle Village, NY 11379, Peter J. Gleeson 27 Greenwich Drive, Jackson, NJ 08527, Joseph Graziano 5 Claymore Rd, Fort Salonga, NY 11768, RobertT. Hensey 97 Harriman Woods Drive, Harriman, NY 10926, Kurt P. Holweger 64 Old Estate Road, Manhasset, NY 11030, Jeanne Mauro 14901 Heronglen Drive, Lithia, FL 33547, Donna Milrod 1 Leroy Street, Apartment 5A, New York, NY 10014, Isaac Montal 19 Princeton Road, Elizabeth, NJ 07208, Eric N. Miller 404 Apache Trail, Brandon, FL 33511, Manuel Pires 331 Raccoon Hollow, Mountainside, NJ 07092, Chad Richman 19 Beach Crest Drive, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920, Joseph C. Trentacoste 32 Pell Terrace, Garden City, NY 11530, Lori-AnnTrezza 191 Reid Avenue, Breezy Point, NY 11697, Michael J. Tulaney 228 90th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11209, Susan TyskCosgrove 105 Lawrence Hill Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, Jeffrey T. Waddle 14 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003. 1Formerly at 7 Hanover Square, New York, N.Y. 10004. Related to file #M294/86. The foregoing Certificate duly signed and acknowledged by each of the Partners is on filed at the office of the Clerk of the County of New York, 60 Centre St., New York, NY. Vil: 02/06 - 02/27/2014

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL MARKET LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/29/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/16/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE FRIENDS OF LENOX LOUNGE LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/20/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The Friends of Lenox Lounge LLC, 45 West 132nd Street, Suite 10K NY 10037 Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY4 NBP22 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY4 NBP23 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY5 NBP24 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NYSANDY5 NBP25 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 60 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10023. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ALCHEMY HOUSTON PARTNERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Penn Plaza, 34th Fl., NY, NY 10119. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, One Penn Plaza, Ste. 3406, NY, NY 10119. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 7321 KISSENA LENDER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1407 Broadway, 38th Fl., NewYork, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BK FILM PROJECTS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 750 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BUSTER K DOCUMENTARY PROJECT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 750 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LANDED NY L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1 Sheridan Square, Suite #6E, NYC, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GL FAMILY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Maryellen Goble, PLLC, 302 Fifth Avenue, 8th Fl., New York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ORCA TV, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in VA on 5/22/09. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. VA and principal business address: 10717 Falls Pointe Dr., Great Falls, VA 22066. Cert. of Org. filed with VA Clerk of the Corporation Commission, 1300 E. Main St., Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NAME OF LLC: PPL SERVICES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/24/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Quinn McCabe LLP, 9 E. 40th St., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 118 GREENE STREET PARTNERS (NYC) LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/14. Name amended to 118 Greene Street Partner (NYC) LLC. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 203 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60601. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 118 GREENE STREET (NYC) LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 203 N. LaSalle St., Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60601. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/06 - 03/13/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 165 E 66 PARKING, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/29/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Doveer, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HOT FRESH PIZZA/99C LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: 10 W. 15th ST #1822 NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful act. 2220623 w.o Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NORTHWIND RE, LLP Authority filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/6/14. Office location: NY County. Principal business address: 260 Madison AV, Ste 204, NY, NY 10016. LLP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/03/14. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: 260 Madison AV, Ste 204, NY, NY 10016. DE address of LLP: 1201 Orange St, Ste 600, Wilmington, DE 19699. Articles of Formation filed with DE Secretary of State, Division of Corporations, 401 Federal Street, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NORTHLIGHT REAL ESTATE OPPORTUNITY FUND I L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/14. Office location: New York County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/18/13. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 64 Wall St., Ste. 212, Norwalk, CT 06850. DE address of LP: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Name/ address of genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with DE Secy. of State, Division of Corporation, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NINETEEN WEST REALTY COMPANY LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/03/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/06. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Solow Realty & Development Company, LLC, 9 W. 57th St., Ste. 4500, NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o General Counsel at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ERIN HYNES INTERIORS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 660 White Plains Rd., Ste. 615, Tarrytown, NY 10591. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MOLTON BROWN USA LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/27/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o The Corporation Trust Company, Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801, also the address to be maintained in DE. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEST 87 PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1325 Franklin Avenue, Ste. 255, Garden City, NY 11530. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THREE COHENS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 250 E. 54th St., Apt. 36A, New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WALCOTT SHOE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/24/04. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1536 3rd Ave., 3rd Fl., New York, NY 10028. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AGR EUROPE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/6/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AG OWL GP LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 1/6/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Angelo Gordon & Co., L.P., 245 Park Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10167, principal business address. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BTG PACTUAL COMMODITIES TRADING (US) LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/8/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 400 Atlantic St., Stamford, CT 06901. LLC formed in DE on 10/28/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC:The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/30 - 03/06/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SHEEPSHEAD DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/18/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PVS DESIGN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Phillips Nizer LLP, 666 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 TRIGABO MARKETING LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/15/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 116 W. 23rd St., NY, NY 10011. General Purpose. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 33/34 WEST OWNER LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/12/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/8/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 574 FIFTH AVENUE LESSEE LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/20/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 11/20/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 160 Greentree Dr., #101, Dover, DE 19904, the princ. office addr. of LLC. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WALKER & DUNLOP COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FUNDING, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/07/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/05/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RED AWNING LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/14/13. Princ. office of LLC: 246 W. 44th St., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, New Castle Cnty., DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 BRIGHT BEGINNINGS NYC LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/16/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joseph Ben Moshe, 111 Fulton St., Unit 701, NY, NY 10038. General Purpose. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TPMN INVESTORS VI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Phillips Nizer LLP, 666 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SKILLEDUP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/6/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 205 E. 63rd St., #12D, NY, NY 10065. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/23 - 02/27/2014 S2UARED PRODUCTIONS LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 12/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Staci Sarkin, 415 W. 24th St., Ste. 1K, NY, NY 10011. General Purpose. Vil: 01/16 - 02/20/2014

February 27, 2014

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ACCOUNTING PROCEEDING FILE NO. 2012-2866/A CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO:

Unknown Distributees, Attorney General of the State of New York, Lois Ann Siferd, Janet Swartz, Margaret Malone.

And to the heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Mary-Jo Vogelsang, a/k/a Mary Jo Vogelsang, if living and if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot, after diligent inquiry, be ascertained by the petitioner herein; being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the estate of Mary-Jo Vogelsang, a/k/a Mary Jo Vogelsang, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 2 Washington Square Village, New York, New York 10012. A petition having been duly filed by the Public Administrator of the County of New York, who maintains an office at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York on 10007. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the New York County Surrogate’s Court at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on April 1, 2014, at 9:30 A.M. in Room 503, why the following relief stated in the account of proceedings, a copy of the summary statement thereof being attached hereto, of the Public Administrator of the County of New York as administrator of the goods, chattels and credits of said deceased, should not be granted: (i) that her account be judicially settled; (ii) that the above named person(s) be cited to show cause why such settlement should not be granted; (iii) that a hearing be held to determine the identity of the distributees at which time proof pursuant to SCPA Section 2225 may be presented, or in the alternative, that the balance of the funds be deposited with the Commissioner of Finance of the City of New York for the benefit of the decedent’s unknown distributees; (iv) that the Surrogate approve the reasonable amount of compensation as reported in Schedules C and C-1 of the account of proceedings to the attorney for the petitioner for legal services rendered to the petitioner herein; (v) that the persons above mentioned and all necessary and proper persons be cited to show cause why such relief should not be granted; (vi) that an order be granted pursuant to SCPA Section 307 where required or directed; and (vii) for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated, Attested and Sealed. February 11, 2014. (Seal) Hon. Rita Mella, Surrogate. Diana Sanabria, Clerk of the Surrogate Court. Schram Graber & Opell P.C. Counsel to the Public Administrator, New York County 22 Cortlandt Street, 16th Floor New York, NY 10007 (212) 896-3310 Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have the right to have an attorney-at-law appear for you and you or your attorney may request a copy of the full account from the petitioner or petitioner’s attorney. Vil: 02/20- 03/13/2014

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February 27, 2014

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK -- COUNTY OF NEW YORK – MARIA CRISTINA CASANOVA, Plaintiff, Against VLADEMIR BUCHEL, Defendant - SUMMONS WITH NOTICE -- Index No.:307460-13Plaintiff designates New York County as the place trial, the basis of the venue is Plaintiff’s residence: 445 East 14th St. #1D, New York, NY 10009-- ACTION FOR DIVORCE TO: VLADEMIR BUCHEL - YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear in this action by serving a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff within 30 days after the service of this summons is complete and in case you fail to appear judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demand in the notice set forth below. NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds: DRL§170(7)-Irretrievable Breakdown in Relationship for at Least Six Months. PURSUANT TO the Uniform Rules of the Trial Courts, and Domestic Relations Law §236, Part B, Section 2, the parties are bound by certain automatic orders which shall remain in full force and effect during the pendency of the action. For further details you should contact the clerk of the matrimonial part, Supreme Court, 60 Centre Street, New York, NY 10007 tel. (646)386-3010 TO: VLADEMIR BUCHEL The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Hon. Carol E. Huff a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 23 day of January, 2014 and filed with the supporting papers in the Office of the Clerk of the County of New York. Dated: Jan. 23, 2014 New York, New York – Maria Cristina Casanova, Plaintiff Pro Se DRL 255 Notice. Please be advised that once the judgment of divorce is signed in this action, both parties must be aware that he or she will no longer be covered by the other party’s health insurance plan and that each party shall be responsible for his or her own insurance coverage, and may be entitled to purchase health insurance on his or her own through a COBRA option, if available.

Vil: 02/20- 03/06/2014

TheVillager.com

The Soho Kid: He could have been a contender SPORTS BY PASHA FARMANARA

S

oho resident Joey Goodwin lives two lives. By day, he’s the creative director at men’s clothing label Unruly Heir and Good Days Marketing. But, by night, he’s the Soho Kid, representing his neighborhood in boxing matches. Goodwin currently lives and was raised in Soho, so he takes pride in his ring name. “Soho embodies a lot of great memories for me, from eating at Alidoro to Sullivan St. Park [Vesuvio Playground],” he began. “Dreaming about our fashion brand being up there with the big boys in Soho, to playing ball at W. Fourth. This neighborhood has always been my playground.” Goodwin planned to take part in the Golden Gloves, one of the nation’s bestknown amateur boxing tournaments. After strenuously preparing for the tournament, Goodwin was set back by an injury. “On my last day of sparring at 6:30 in the morning, I took a body shot,” he related. “The punch gave me a hairline fracture to my rib.” After a diagnosis of the injury, it was ruled that Goodwin could not participate in the tournament. Even though this was a crushing blow to his boxing dream, he can still appreciate a good punch. “It was a great shot,” Goodwin admitted. Boxing was not always a part of Goodwin’s life. It began rather recently in a local park. “A good friend of mine took me to the park and started showing me how to hit the pads,” Goodwin explained. “I then went on to fight in an underground boxing match party called Friday Night Throwdown.” After getting the boxing itch, he decided to join a gym to learn how to “do it right.” He became a member at Mendez Boxing, at 23 E. 26th St., to hone his skills. After joining the gym, and working with trainers Salvadore and Carlito, Goodwin dropped 40 pounds. As a creative director for a fashion company, it seems unfitting for Goodwin to take part in such a rugged sport, but he points out, the two activities have their similarities.

SCOOPY’S, continued from p. 3 happening there. That is, the Virgin Mary has been spotted in Stryj. Sawaryn sent us a YouTube clip of the holy vision, which has allegedly appeared on a tree where a branch was cut off. “Stryj is my father’s village,” she told us last week, before President Viktor Yanukovych had thrown in the towel and

TheVillager.com

Joey Goodwin sported a bloody nose and blood-spattered T-shirt after a sparring session while training for the Golden Gloves.

“What made me fall in love with boxing is really the strategy and fundamentals of the sport,” he said. “Things like distance, timing and footwork are at the crux of boxing, but they are equally important in business.” As part of his Golden Gloves effort, Goodwin planned to raise money to fight obsessive compulsive disorder through the International O.C.D. Foundation. He was asking people to pledge funds for the foundation for every round he boxed. Even though his fractured rib knocked the Soho Kid out of the Golden Gloves, he plans to continue boxing, though not competitively. “I will definitely continue boxing,” he said. “I want to keep improving it is an art and a great way to stay in shape physically and mentally!” hustled off into hiding. “The news of Kiev burning is hard to watch. The YouTube is in Ukrainian. However, you can see how desperate people are for just a little hope. The priests are ‘analyzing’ the tree, and have determined that there was no paint applied. They have had to change the road signs and reroute traffic in Stryj, because of all the people coming there to see and touch the tree.” February 27, 2014

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February 27, 2014

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Tent City to tattoo artists, etched in L.E.S. history

CLAYTON

PHOTOS BY CLAYTON PATTERSON

Around 1992, Stanley Sydorowitz a.k.a. “Cowboy Stan” spoke at a memorial in Tompkins Square Park for a woman named Barbara. She had reportedly been struck in the head by a police officer a year or two earlier in one of the neighborhood’s many street clashes during that turbulent time. Also pictured, from left, are Robert Lee Marion a.k.a. “Loanshark Bob,” a man named Alfredo and Barbara’s husband, Chris Henry. Marion was known for stridently proclaiming his theory of “povercide,” that the government was killing people through poverty. Henry and Barbara were members of the sprawling homeless Tent City that had occupied a large swath of the park until it was dismantled under Mayor Dinkins in 1989.

Tattoo artists recently came together to pay homage to Tom DeVita and enjoy his artistry at a show of his drawings, sculpture and shadow boxes at King’s Avenue Tattoo, on the Bowery at Spring St. From left, Nick Bubash, a tattoo artist from Pittsburgh who used to work in New York and learned from DeVita; Lori Leven, owner of New York Adorned, on Second Ave. at Second St.; DeVita; and, standing, Chris Grasso, who recently filmed a documentary on the legendary ink maestro for Vice. “DeVita was famous on Fourth St., between C and D,” said Lower East Side documentarian Clayton Patterson. “He would work from early in the morning until noon. Ed Hardy admired and supported him. DeVita tattooed a lot of the Puerto Rican guys from around here and the Chinese gangs, Sanitation workers who were getting off of their shifts, or starting their shifts. … Things like that.”

TheVillager.com

February 27, 2014

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February 27, 2014

TheVillager.com


FEB. 02, 2014, THE VILLAGER