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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

February 26, 2015 • $1.00 Volume 84 • Number 39

State’s high court will hear opponents’ appeal on N.Y.U. megaproject BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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n the latest chapter in the community’s ongoing struggle against N.Y.U.’s South Village expansion plan, the state’s highest court has agreed to hear an appeal by a coalition of faculty, activists and neighborhood groups battling to preserve

public parkland. The lawsuit has already passed through two lower courts, with differing results. The stage is now set for a verdict by the Court of Appeals, and it could have far-ranging ramifications on how the city and the state deal with public parks in the N.Y.U., continued on p. 4

BY ZACH WILLIAMS

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otorists’ speeding and failure to yield remain top concerns under Vision Zero as the initiative to eliminate traffic fatalities in New York City enters its second year. The city Department of Transportation emphasized improvements to street de-

sign and increased enforcement measures to counter such behavior in its 2015 Pedestrian Safety Action Plan for Manhattan, released on Feb. 17. Fifteen intersections and 10 traffic corridors located between Canal and 14th Sts. will, by the end of 2017, likely receive traffic cameras and VISION ZERO, continued on p. 24

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

Vision Zero report says trucks, seniors, nighttime involved in more fatalities

Baaa-ck to the future! The sheep was supreme at Sunday’s Lunar New Year Parade in Chinatown. See Pages 8 and 9 for more photos.

Stars and friends remember Tallmer as writer, encourager BY ALBERT AMATEAU

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an of the theater, consummate journalist, mentor and friend: Jerry Tallmer was all that and more to his friends and colleagues who gathered on Feb. 23 for his memorial at The Theater for the New City. For the 150 theater and newspaper folk at the event, and for many others who sent messages, Jerry Tallmer, who died last November, is still among us.

They recalled his integrity and openheartedness, his humor and his vision. When playwrights like Samuel Beckett, Jean Genet and Edward Albee were little known, he wrote about them. When theater off Broadway was virtually ignored by the mainstream press, he gave it his attention and respect. “Jerry Tallmer got it,” was the consensus of the crowd at the Monday gathering. “It was because of Jerry Tallmer that there is a Theater for the New City,” said

Crystal Field, director of the theater founded in 1971 and located for the past 28 years on First Ave. at E. 10th St. “He was the voice of all of us who were trying to change the nature of art in America. With Jerry Tallmer in the Village Voice, we began to find our public,” Field said. “Jerry was the only one of us who knew how to put out a newspaper,” said Ed Fancher, who with Dan Wolf and Norman Mailer foundTALLMER, continued on p. 12

Silver indicted, pleads not guilty.....................page 6 L.E.S. rapper slain in Wald Houses................page 10 Sweet home Alabama, it wasn’t......................page 15 ‘Iceman’ chillin’ at BAM..............page 19

www.TheVillager.com


CHIEF-OF-STAFF HANDOFF: Moving on to an exciting new opportunity is Matt Borden, who recently left his post as chief of staff to Assemblymember Deborah Glick to become assistant commissioner of Government and External Affairs at the city’s Department of Homeless Services. Taking over as Glick’s new chief of staff is Sarah Sanchala, who was formerly her deputy of chief of staff. With that kind of experience, it should be a seamless transition — to use a football analogy, just like when Steve Young took over from Joe Montana. (Of course Glick would be 49ers coach Bill Walsh.) And while we might be seeing a bit less of Matt, Villager readers will still be able to enjoy reading great articles about photography in this paper by Matt’s dad, Norman Borden. GOUDA MOVE! Karen Loew, director of East Vil-

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CORRECTION: An article in last week’s issue on the Hudson River Park Trust’s approval of the Pier55 project, stated that the pier’s lease calls for 100 events annually. However, according to Madelyn Wils, the Trust’s president, the lease agreement calls for a minimum of 30 events annually.

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lage and Special Projects for the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, reports that East Village Cheese, everyone’s favorite discount cheese store, on Third Ave. between Ninth and 10th Sts., will move to a new home this summer at 211 Avenue A, where Destination bar formerly was, or possibly 208 Avenue A, where the laundromat was. The cheese shop is being forced out of its current spot due to — what else? — an expansion by its neighbor, Duane Reade. Well, D.R. has more “cheddah,” so...

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February 26, 2015

TheVillager.com


A familiar tune as another music venue closes BY GERARD FLYNN

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PHOTO BY GERARD FLYNN

ong, long before Jack Kerouac ever stepped into one of its dive bars, Greenwich Village was synonymous the world over with literary and musical greatness. That was then. However, today, along Bleecker St., skyrocketing rents are giving a whole new meaning to the ’60s slogan “out of sight,” as chain stores and banks are supplanting the strip’s famed live music scene and making it virtually impossible for small-business owners to survive. Choga, a Korean bar and restaurant located next door to the aptly named Bitter End on Bleecker St., is one of the remaining live music haunts around the Village, but will be closing by the end of this month. After more than 20 years in business, the owners were notified by their landlord that their lease would not be renewed. Over the decades, the venue has gone through many incarnations. In the 1960s it was called the Tin Angel. Memoirs about rock legend Jimi Hendrix mentioned the place, in passing, as a spot where the guitar great would sit quietly with friends, drinking shots and writing songs on napkins. One of the Choga’s partners, Jinho Jang, told The Villager that while he was sorry to go, there was little he could do. “A lot of businesses are struggling, especially live music places,” he said. While an upscale real-estate broker around the corner from the place told The Villager that the neighborhood was “booming,” Jang credits the celebrated music culture’s demise to a “a bad

He then walked downstairs, leading a reporter on a short, nostalgic tour next door to what was left of the old neighborhood and to The Bitter End, New York’s oldest rock club. There he pointed to a black-and-white photograph of the venue, showing the canopy of the Tin Angel in the background. Of the performers, he said, “They don’t want it to go. They feel more sorry than I do. They loved it. I revived the live music scene here.” Jang isn’t sure what the landlord will do with the 2,000-square-foot space. But he’s somewhat puzzled at the closures of so many area venues, he said, since they often end up being shuttered for years. Or, he noted, pointing to a space across the street, they live might open for a few months before abruptly closing again. Jang doesn’t fault his landlord, whom he declined to name, for deciding not to renew his lease, since Choga struggled like so many others to pay the rent on time. He said that Terra Blues, which is also on the block, is the only local live blues venue left. Yet, as more chain stores and banks come in, he’s hearing from other businesses that, like Choga, Terra Blues is “struggling to make ends meet.” While Jang said he sees himself continuing in the music business, he needs some relaxing time. He will continue, though, to work sending American musicians to his native Korea. “I have been doing this for more than a quarter of a century,” he said, “so I need a break.”

Jinho Jang, a partner in Choga, said the Village’s music venues are struggling.

economy, and higher rents. These are the two big things,” he said. He’s not the only one unhappy about the neighborhood’s rapid transformation. “Performers have been complaining about the banks,” he said. “They don’t have to worry about the rent. Landlords can raise their rent — small businesses can’t survive.” As he sat perched at the bar, Jang pointed to the new floor and sound system he installed two years ago and which now must go. “It’s not an investment. It just happened,” he said of the improvements that cost him a hefty $30,000. “I just love live music.”

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High court to hear appeal on N.Y.U. plan Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association Overall Design Excellence, First Place, 2013 Best Column, First Place, 2012 Photographic Excellence, First Place, 2011 Headlines, First Place, 2011 Spot News Coverage, First Place, 2010 Coverage of Environment, First Place, 2009

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The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 00426202 is published every week by NYC Community Media LLC, One Metrotech North, 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no part may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher - © 2011 NYC Community Media LLC. PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR

The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue. Published by NYC Community Media, LLC One Metrotech North 10th floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (718) 260-2500 • Fax: (212) 229-2790 On-line: www.thevillager.com E-mail: news@thevillager.com © 2012 NYC Community Media, LLC

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future. The case will likely be argued later this year. Last Oct. 14, the Appellate Division’s First Department overturned a State Supreme Court justice’s earlier decision that would have spared three green spaces — Mercer Playground, LaGuardia Park and LaGuardia Corner Gardens — from destruction under New York University’s current expansion plan. According to the lower court’s ruling, all three of these so-called “open-space strips” are public parks, and so entitled to protection. Justice Donna Mills agreed with the argument that the public has been using these spots as parks for many years, making them “impliedly” parkland, with the city funding, labeling and maintaining them as parks. But N.Y.U. and the city then appealed, counter-arguing that these strips aren’t really parks, since they were never technically “demapped” as streets and are nominally overseen by the city’s Department of Transportation. The strips are left over from a mid-20th-century street widening for the Lower Manhattan Expressway, an aborted cross-town speedway that would have been bulldozed through the Village. They have never been used as streets, however. The Appellate Division’s decision, if allowed to stand, would allow the university to raze these parkland strips to make way for its nearly 2 million-square-foot expansion plan. Advocates contend this “would set a precedent that could potentially threaten countless public parks throughout the city and the state.” The petitioners are a broad coalition including N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan,  Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Historic Districts Council,  Washington Square Village Tenants’ Association, East Village Community Coalition, Friends of Petrosino Square,  LaGuardia Corner Gardens, Inc., Lower Manhattan Neighbors’ Organization, Soho Alliance, Bowery Alliance of Neighbors, Noho Neighborhood Association, Assemblymember Deborah Glick and 10 other individuals. They are being represented pro bono by Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, with Randy Mastro — a former New York City deputy mayor — as lead attorney.  In their motion papers, the petitioners’ attorney argue that “the First Department’s decision disregarded well-established common law principles for determining when municipal land has been impliedly dedicated for parks usage.  In recognition of the unique value that public parks hold for children, families and communities, the Public Trust Doctrine accords parkland special protection.” Andrew Ross, an urbanist and director of the American Studies program at N.Y.U., is one of the many faculty back-

FILE PHOTO

CONTRIBUTORS

N.Y.U., continued from p. 1

A State Supreme Court justice and the Appellate Division’s First Department have issued conflicting opinions on whether the LaGuardia Corner Gardens — which have been flourishing along a strip of city-owned land on LaGuardia Place at Bleecker St. since 1981 — are implied parkland.

ing the lawsuit. Many of the school’s faculty live on the two superblocks — between Houston and W. Third Sts. and Mercer St. and LaGuardia Place — and cry their lives would be turned upside down by the “20-year construction project. “These parks have been a vital part of the Greenwich Village community’s daily life for decades,” Ross said. “Not only do we want to save these parks from N.Y.U.’s reckless, unnecessary expansion, but we want to do the same for the parks that will be threatened elsewhere if the lower court’s decision stands. “If these parks can be handed off to N.Y.U. in spite of the Public Trust Doctrine, it sets a terrible precedent, and the outcome for similar cases is bleak.” The petitioners warn that the First Department’s decision, if upheld, would have the effect of abolishing “implied dedication” — a consequence with widespread negative effects, not just in New York City, but throughout the state. Parks and open spaces are protected by the Public Trust Doctrine, under which the government holds title to certain waters and lands in trust for the people. In New York State, if a developer — or a university, in this case — wants to build on or remove a parcel of parkland from public ownership and use, either permanently or temporarily, the state Legislature must “alienate” the property. However, the petitioners argue — and Justice Mills agreed with them in her initial ruling — that no “alienation” was done regarding the South Village open-space strips along the superblocks’ edges. N.Y.U. needs use of the strips to facilitate construction of its megaproject, which includes a total of four buildings. Under Mills’s ruling, two new “infill” buildings slated for the northern superblock were blocked. The so-called

“Zipper Building” — which N.Y.U. hopes to build on its current Coles gym site — could have been built, though. The university maintained it could also still have built on the Morton Williams supermarket site by “coming in” from Bleecker St. rather than through the LaGuardia Corner Gardens. But the Appellate Division’s ruling cleared the way for all four buildings to be constructed. Professor Mark Crispin Miller, president of N.Y.U. FASP, said, “Green spaces like these parks play an imperative role in keeping New York livable. We hope that the Court of Appeals overturns the First Department’s decision before it can do irreparable harm to the Public Trust Doctrine.” Actor Mark Ruffalo, an outspoken environmentalist, said letting the Appellate Division’s ruling stand would open the floodgates to using park spaces for green — as in cash. “These public parks have been a vital part of the Village for decades, and they have benefitted the public in numerous ways,” he said. “Without the Court of Appeals’ intervention, not only will they be given to a private corporation for its own financial gain, but such a thing could become a common and unremarkable occurrence throughout New York.” However, the school’s spokesperson expressed confidence that, at the end of the day, the university will prevail in court. “This project — indispensable to meeting N.Y.U.’s pressing academic space needs — was approved 44 to 1 by the City Council, and was strongly and unanimously upheld by the Appellate Division,” said John Beckman. “N.Y.U. continues to believe fully in this project and in the strength of our case, and we are optimistic about another positive outcome when the Court of Appeals ultimately rules.” TheVillager.com


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Silver indicted on fed charges, pleads not guilty BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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PHOTO BY MILO HESS

ormer Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver was indicted last Thursday in connection with his arrest last month on federal charges. A federal grand jury indicted him on mail fraud, wire fraud and extortion. On Tuesday, during a brief court appearance, Silver pleaded not guilty. It was reported that Silver’s attorneys, Joel Cohen and Steven Molo, declared they will “fight for his total vindication.” Silver’s lawyers said they will move to dismiss the case based on press conferences by U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, in which they said Bharara “improperly prejudiced” the grand jury and any future trial. “These were situations where the U.S. attorney excoriated the defendant and basically deprived him of his presumption of innocence and extolled his guilt,” Molo said. After turning himself in for arrest at F.B.I. headquarters on Jan. 22, Silver was slapped with corruption, extortion and fraud charges in connection with two alleged scams, dating back to 2002, to net himself $4 mil-

Former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, center, was out and about in Chinatown on Sunday to take in the Lunar New Year Parade. Joining him were, from left, Councilmember Margaret Chin, Public Advocate Letitia James, State Supreme Court Justice Doris Ling-Cohan, Queens Assemblymember David Weprin and state Senator Daniel Squadron.

lion. He allegedly did not declare this cash on disclosure forms required for legislators. The corruption charges, however, were subsequently dropped, for what reason, it was not immediately clear. Silver led the Assembly for more than 20 years. He resigned as speaker on Feb. 2 after the Democratic majori-

ty said he could no longer continue in the post with major federal charges hanging over him. Silver meanwhile continues to hold onto his Assembly seat, saying the district’s voters put him there. If convicted of a federal crime, though, he’ll be forced to resign from the Legislature, giving up the Lower Man-

hattan 65th Assembly District seat he has held since 1976. In addition, Bharara announced that he will be taking aim at Silver’s pension, if the former speaker is convicted and can’t pay back the ill-begotten cash. Silver stands to receive an annual pension of $87,120, which would total more than $1.1 million over his expected lifespan, according to the Empire Center for Public Policy, the New York Post reported. Asked for comment on Silver’s indictment, Assemblymember Richard Gottfried said, “I don’t know the facts of the case, but Shelly Silver’s legacy of leadership on issues critical to New York and progressive causes should not be forgotten, whatever the outcome. Whatever the underlying facts may be, I do hope this helps get reforms enacted relating to public officials’ outside income and broader disclosure.” Assemblymember Deborah Glick did respond to a request for comment by press time. State Senator Brad Hoylman was one of the first to call for Silver to step down after the former speaker’s arrest. Asked by The Villager for comment on Silver’s indictment, Hoylman said, “The justice system will run its course.”

Cause of Con Ed plant boom: Breaker broke due to icy rain BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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ast Village residents reported hearing a loud bang from the E. 14th St. Con Ed plant on Saturday evening, seeing a flash of light in the sky and then experiencing a brief moment when electrical power dimmed. The power plant is famous for its mysterious, booming nocturnal noises. During Superstorm Sandy, the substation was flooded, forcing the utility to shut off electrical power to Manhattan south of the 30s to protect the plant from sustaining further damage. Right before the shutdown, there was a huge boom and burst of light. Speaking Monday, Sidney Alvarez, a Con Ed spokesperson, said what happened Saturday night was due to the weather’s effect on a breaker. “Basically, in a nutshell, we had some equipment malfunction within our facility,” he said. “In a nutshell, a breaker popped — and the cause was freezing rain.” The Fire Department responded, but there was no fire and no injuries,

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Alvarez reported. The spokesperson didn’t disagree that East Villagers had likely heard a thunderous bang. “I’m sure they would have heard something,” he said. As for a flash in the sky, he said, there was no information on that in an internal report, but he didn’t deny it could have happened. “But there was no fire, no spark,” he noted. Where exactly within the plant the breaker broke was unclear. The E. 14th St. Con Ed complex includes a steam-generating operation and two electrical substations. Saturday’s East Village breaker pop was not connected to a power outage in Chelsea on Friday, according to Con Ed. In that earlier incident, 730 customers on two blocks at W. 30th St. between Eighth and Ninth Aves. lost power starting at 7 a.m. Six hundred of them had power restored by 3 p.m., the rest by 5 p.m. “They’re still investigating,” Alvarez said. “Basically, it was a feeder [cable] that went out in the Chelsea area. But it could have been weather related as well.” TheVillager.com


TheVillager.com

February 26, 2015

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PHOTOS BY MILO HESS

Things really got wild and wooly in Chinatown The word “sheeple” has taken on a pejorative meaning in some parts. But at Sunday’s Lunar New Year Parade in Chinatown, the sheep were out and proud. So were elaborately costumed characters of all sorts, from kings and queens to...Birdman? (Umm...wrong animal, buddy!) On Thursday, scores of spectators enjoyed the annual fireworks ceremony in Sara D. Roosevelt Park to help usher in the Year of the Sheep, also variously known as the Year of the Goat or Year of the Ram, or — to be on the safe side — the Year of the Yang (the catchall Chinese character for “horned animal”).

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February 26, 2015

TheVillager.com


Solutions to Save Small Businesses A Community Forum Thursday March 5, 2015 7-9 PM Judson Memorial Church 55 Washington Square South New York City Join your neighbors, local businesspeople, and a panel of experts to discuss how we can save and protect the small businesses that are the lifeblood of our community and our city. Landlords now have all the rights that determine the destiny of owners, their workers, and the character and culture of an entire community. Because the gateway to the American Dream has been locked, the key freely given to big Real Estate…let’s throw a life line and empower our struggling small businesses drowning in a sea of greed.

Let your voice be heard on taking real action to save our businesses, art community, neighborhood’s identity, middle class and jobs. For more information, contact Sharon Woolums at haroses19@yahoo.com or news@thevillager.com

Sponsored by The Villager and Village Independent Democrats TheVillager.com

February 26, 2015

9


POLICE BLOTTER

PHOTO BY C4P

Police at the Lillian Wald Houses on Monday after Shemrod Isaac’s fatal shooting. Shemrod Isaac a.k.a. Sham Da God in the video for his Superstorm Sandy rap, “Zone A.”

Hunt for L.E.S. rapper’s killer On Mon., Feb. 23,  at around 4:30 p.m., Shemrod Isaac, a 33-year-old aspiring rapper, was fatally shot in front of 20 Avenue D, where he lived in the Lillian Wald Houses. Police and E.M.S. responded and, the victim was transported to Beth Israel Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival. On Tuesday, police identified a suspect wanted for the shooting, Shaquille Fuller, 21, a resident of 60 Avenue D, a neighboring building in the Wald Houses. Isaac, who performed under the name Sham Da God, leaves a young daughter, who he featured in one of his rap videos about being a dad. “I would always pass him [in the hallway],” a neighbor told Bedford + Bowery. “He always had Pampers and baby formula.” The gunman, who was wearing a tan jacket, blue pants and multicolored hat, reportedly fled into a building on F.D.R. Drive. The two men had been overheard arguing right before the shooting, witnesses told police. Isaac reportedly was ready to take his budding rap career to the next level. His videos span the gamut from raps about his daughter or dealing drugs to Superstorm Sandy. In his video for his rap “Zone A,” Isaac is shown wearing a hooded rain slicker over his baseball cap. The video starts with a clip of Mayor Bloomberg warning people to evacuate from Zone A flood areas. Isaac raps, “She don’t play, nah, Sandy, she don’t play... Zone A is our home and we goin’ stay.” His flow also references FEMA, contaminated water, long waits post-Sandy at gas lines and the fact that the Lower East East’s public housing is built on landfill. “And in the Good Book, they say foolish men build they houses on sand,” he raps. “From Second Ave. all the way down to Canal St., it’s all landfill. See, the river was once bigger than it used to be. ... The river will one day reclaim its turf.” Isaac reportedly had a criminal record, mostly for drugs and resisting arrest, according to police sources.

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Anyone with information is asked to call the Police Department’s Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577TIPS (8477). Tips can also be submitted by logging onto the Crime Stoppers Web site, www.nypdcrimestoppers.com, or by texting them to 274637 (CRIMES), then entering TIP577. All tips are strictly confidential.

DSW thief a real heel Police responded to a report of larceny just in time on Sat., Feb. 21, to observe the alleged perpetrator struggling with store security at the DSW shoe store at 40 E. 14th St. During the altercation, the suspect flung an uninvolved 6-year-old girl to the ground as he was fleeing about 2:40 p.m., police said. The child was transported to the Lenox Hill HealthPlex where she was treated for a minor concussion and black eye, according to a police report. Andrey Desmond, 21, was arrested the next day and charged with robbery. A $100 pair of Mizuno shoes taken from the chain store was not recovered.

Le iPhone thief A 31-year-old man was caught red-handed just after midnight on Feb. 21 stealing from patrons at Le Poisson Rouge, at 158 Bleecker St. Two witnesses said they saw the alleged perpetrator, Amadou Thiam, removing property from some of the 11 victims, all females in their 20s, police said. Nine iPhones, two wallets and 10 bank and credit cards were found in Thiam’s back pants pockets, according to police. The $1,900 worth of loot was returned to the victims, police said. Thiam was charged with grand larceny.

Barback smackdown Mistaken identity slowed police efforts to locate a suspect in an assault at the end of last year inside Automatic Slims, at 733 Washington St. A 46-year-old man told police that he was attacked by a barback inside the bar on Wed., Dec. 21, just after 3 a.m. The two men got into a dispute before the employ-

Police say they are searching for Shaquille Fuller, above, in Shemrod Isaac’s murder.

ee hit him in the face with either a closed fist or an empty bottle, according to a police report. Cops who responded to the scene could not find the barback, who had fled northward on Washington St. A subsequent canvass of the area did not locate him. The victim, who suffered swelling to his left cheek, refused medical attention at the scene. Police recorded the suspect’s name as “Brian Espineo” but did not have more information until last week. Bryan Espinal, 24, was arrested Fri., Feb. 20, and charged with misdemeanor assault in connection with the Dec. 21 incident.

Teen tagger gets taught A teenager was caught trying to make a name for himself on the graffiti circuit at about 3:30 a.m. on Sat., Feb. 21. Police said they observed the 17-yearold throwing up the tags “Ratchet” and “Senna” on the exterior of 118 W. 14th St. A search of his person revealed tools of the trade, according to a police report. The tag-painting perp was charged with making graffiti, a misdemeanor. His name was withheld by police because he is a juvenile.

A turn for the worse Failing to signal a right-hand turn resulted in yet another legal problem for a man who already had seven tickets on his record. Police say they discovered that Ariel Chetrit, 24, had a suspended license shortly after pulling him over near the southeast corner of Broadway and E. Eighth St. just after 10:30 p.m. on Wed., Feb. 18. He was charged with a misdemeanor violation of vehicle traffic law.

Zach Williams and Lincoln Anderson TheVillager.com


SUMMER CAMP

Winter is the time to plan for kids’ summer camp

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ummertime will soon be here, and it’s never too early to start thinking summer camp. A good camp experience can offer a child the opportunity to try new activities, learn new skills, make friends and gain a sense of independence. Where to begin? It is essential for parents to understand their children and to know their interests when choosing a camp. Some questions to ask might include: Does the child have a special interest, such as drama, music, a particular sport, nature study or arts and crafts? Has he or she expressed interest in learning a particular new skill? Are swimming and water sports important? Does the child do well in a structured environment, or is a relatively relaxed setting more appropriate? Would the child be more comfortable in a day camp near home, or is he or she ready for a sleep-away experience? The child’s age, past experience and personality will be factors in determining his readiness for a particular type of program. Camp can be lonely for some youngsters, especially those attend-

Matching kids with the right camp more enjoyable summer experience.

ing for the first time. But a camp that strives to promote friendship among its campers can reduce, if not eliminate, any feelings of homesickness. Choosing a camp should be a thoughtful process that involves interviewing the director, reviewing information, getting references from other parents and visiting the camp in progress. The whole process should be a cooperative parent-child effort. Parents should begin their inquiry by calling the camp for a brochure and some basic information about the program. Find out if the camp will be

having an open house or will be represented at a local camp fairs during the winter. Some camps have videotapes or slideshows that give a visual impression of typical camping experiences and the facilities. Parents should know what the camp’s philosophy and goals are, how the staff is trained and supervised, their makes for a ages and experience and the staff-camper ratio. One indication of the camp’s success is the rate of return of both campers and staff, including the director. It’s also good to ask about the camp’s vetting process for hiring new staff, including the extent of background checks. What is the camp’s daily schedule? What happens on rainy days? Many parents want their youngsters to have a well-rounded experience, while others might want their kids to attend a more specialized camp, focusing on sports or music, for example. When considering specialized

camps, ask the representative if kids will have the chance to simply have a little fun and what types of recreational activities are planned to give campers a break from often rigorous schedules. Are any special events planned? What do the camp’s facilities include — pools, sports fields, art studios? Is there a trained nurse or doctor on site? Is there appropriate water sports supervision? The more questions parents ask now, the fewer surprises will be encountered later. It’s a good idea to ask the camp director for references of parents whose children have gone there in the past. As an alternative to a typical day camp or sleep-away camp, summer activities for children can also be found at local community centers, neighborhood playgrounds, Scout programs and public libraries. These can range from arts-and-crafts classes and swimming lessons to other recreational programs. Good summer camps do fill up early. So it behooves parents to start thinking about camps for their kids in winter, before camps start filling out their rosters in early spring.

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February 26, 2015

11


Stars, friends remember Jerry Tallmer, writer, TALLMER, continued from p. 1

12

February 26, 2015

PHOTOS BY TEQUILA MINSKY

ed the Village Voice in 1955. Fancher recalled a party in 1954 where Tallmer, who was then working at The Nation, complained about his writer’s block. A year later at the fledgling Voice, Tallmer agreed to write movie reviews for the Voice and “never complained about writer’s block again,” Francher said. While The Villager was a strong and established, albeit stodgy, paper back then, he noted, they were precarious days at the Voice. “In the spring of 1956 we were running out of money,” Fancher said. “Jerry and I added up our accounts receivable and found we had $25,000 coming. We found an ex-boxer, heavy and menacing, and were able to collect some of it,” Fancher recalled. Then there was the time the Voice threw a big benefit in the 3,000-seat Loews Sheridan Square, starring the great jazz musicians of the day. Billie Holiday was booked as the last number. “But Billie had a gig in Philadelphia, so Jerry, who had a car, drove down to bring Billie and her boyfriend back to the concert,” Fancher said. With the theater crowd impatiently waiting, “Jerry finally arrived with Billie, who stopped for a shot before she came in, and she went on to sing the closing number,” recalled Fancher. In 1957 Tallmer founded the Obie Awards for Off Broadway theater, an event soon picked up by the daily press. Needing a real salary in 1960, Jerry Tallmer went to the New York Post. “We never quite forgave him for that,” said Fancher. “Jerry was the most principled man I ever met,” said Diana Maychick Foote, a fellow writer who Tallmer mentored at the Post. “He was an idealist and still a child at heart. I never really learned to write until I had Jerry Tallmer at my side. He loved words. He loved words as if they were people, and he loved the beguiling Fran [Frances Tallmer, Jerry’s wife].” Jerry Stiller, who with his wife and acting partner, Anne Meara, became Tallmer’s and Fran’s good friends, recalled that he was once engaged to play Launce in Joe Papp’s production of “Two Gentlemen of Verona” for Shakespeare in the Park. Another actor was hired to play Crab, Launce’s dog, but a real stray dog that attached himself to Stiller replaced the actor. “Tallmer wrote about the show, and the dog got the review,” said Stiller. “We kept the dog until Anne got pregnant and he had to go,” he added.

Jerry Stiller with his daughter, actress Amy Stiller.

Cabaret singer Baby Jane Dexter belted out a bluesy number in Jerry Tallmer’s honor.

Ed Fancher, founding publisher of the Village Voice.

Frances Monica Tallmer, Jerry’s wife.

Jonathan Slaff, the actor and theatrical press agent who was master of ceremonies at the Monday memorial, read a column that Tallmer wrote for The Villager about his being a young radar/radio man in a B-17 that was in the sky over Japan when the plane dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, and watching the mushroom cloud rising from 130 miles away. “ ‘I didn’t like it then and I don’t like it now,’ “ Tallmer wrote. Slaff read tributes from the cartoonist Jules Feiffer, whom Tallmer hired for the Voice soon after it opened. Pete Hamill, the legendary newsman and novelist, wrote that Tallmer was one of his great teachers in the newsroom. “He was a superb writer and a generous teacher,” Hamill wrote. “He never wrote down to the reader. He didn’t believe in making people dumber.” Playwright Terrence McNally wrote a tribute and so did Tom Stoppard, the latter who met Tallmer when he first came to New York. “In fact,” interrupted Fancher, “Stoppard slept in the Voice office for a night or two. He didn’t have a place to stay, so Jerry told him he could sleep in the office.” Actor Austin Pendleton said, “His good reviews were a call to responsibility and his critical reviews never felt like an attack. It was more like a caress… . He made people feel humble, because he was humble. I told him that he was humble because he was so secure, and he said he was secure because of Frances.” Playwright Mario Fratti effusively said that a good critic’s job is to encourage not to tear down artists, and that Tallmer was all about nurturing TALLMER, continued on p.13 TheVillager.com


encourager; Career spanned nearly six decades TALLMER, continued from p. 12

young talent. “He loved women, he loved Frances,” said John Sutter, former owner of The Villager, which ran hundreds of Tallmer’s columns over the last 25 years. Sutter read a column that Tallmer wrote about a 1971 roundtable in which Norman Mailer sparred with a trio of prominent feminist writers. Bill Ervolino, a humor writer and standup comic, recalled meeting Tallmer at the Post 27 years ago. “I was the younger kid in the office,” he said. “We all looked up to him. He was so smart and so generous. He knew the answer to everything. There are times, when I don’t know what I’m going to do, I say, ‘What would Jerry do?’ I do it and it’s mostly the right thing to do.” The evening’s final speaker was Lincoln Anderson, The Villager’s editor in chief, or as Slaff put it, “Jerry’s last editor.” “Bukowski said of great writers, ‘He could lay down a line,’ ” Anderson said. “Jerry could lay down a line. He laid down billions of them. He told me he liked to pull disparate ideas together in his columns, and that he had to get angry to write a good piece. But I don’t think he was always angry. He was great to work with. Some writers are neurotic, difficult, but he was at the other end of the spectrum, always a gentleman. “I was honored Jerry asked me to cover his induction into The Players Hall of Fame, when Edward Albee praised him as the preeminent theater critic of his era,”

Anderson added. “I was happy for him when he won first place in 2012 for Best Column for his Villager talking points and notebooks in the New York Press Association’s annual newspaper contest. The key with Jerry was to find pieces of his that tied into current issues, because the contest criteria is for an ‘issues-based column.’ His best piece that year mixed his great nostalgia with current events, as he reflected back on Rupert Murdoch’s ruthless takeover of the Post, while relating it to the phone-hacking scandal. “Again, in addition to being an amazing arts writer, Jerry’s op-ed columns helped also us win awards for Best Editorial Pages several times,” Anderson said. “And he frequently helped us take first place for Best Obituaries, since he knew so many prominent people and, of course, because he was such a fluid writer. Jerry knew everyone who was anyone. “I was glad that I got to work with Jerry and edit him in the latter portion of his career,” Anderson said. “I think it’s cool that he started out as a founding editor at the Voice but then wound up writing for The Villager. I think it’s a nice connection. People say The Villager today is like the early Voice in ways. “I was honored to know Jerry Tallmer and to work with him,” Anderson said. Jerry Tallmer, born in 1920 in Manhattan, entered Dartmouth, the Class of 1942, but joined the Army Air Force soon after Pearl Harbor and graduated in 1946. Leo Caproni, president of the Dartmouth Class of 1942, sent a letter of tribute to the memorial.

John Sutter, The Villager’s former publisher.

Crystal Field, Theater for the New City’s director.

Jonathan Slaff, the event’s emcee. TheVillager.com

Lincoln Anderson, The Villager’s editor in chief.

Diana Maychick Foote, a protégé at the Post. February 26, 2015

13


Finding solutions to save our small businesses EDITORIAL

E

very week, it seems, The Villager runs an article on yet another favorite local business being forced to close due to rising rent. This week, for example, it’s Choga, a Korean restaurant / live music venue on Bleecker St. — just the latest local live music spot to be forced out of the Village area. Some will shrug and say, “That’s life,” that it’s just the way things are in our free-market system. After all, New York has always been an intensely mercantile city, ever since its founding by the commerce-minded Dutch. But in 2015, we’re now facing an undeniable crisis, one that Bill de Blasio focused on in his successful campaign for mayor, namely, the affordability crisis. Luckily, many New Yorkers can still manage to hold onto their apartments, though just barely, due to rent regulation — yet it’s a system that will eventually expire unless something is done to extend it. No such protections exist for small businesses, however. And in fact,

we’re told, it would be illegal to regulate commercial rents, though a form of such protections did exist at one point in the past. In short, we’re at a turning point, a crossroads. The loss of beloved small businesses — replaced by drugstore chains, banks and Starbucks outlets — is just one of the most visible signs of how the city is rapidly becoming a place that only the super-wealthy can afford. Mom-and-pop shops help give us our sense of community. They ARE our community. As part of an effort to find solutions and to push them forward, The Villager and the Village Independent Democrats club are co-sponsoring a community forum on Thurs., March 5, at Judson Church, at 55 Washington Square South, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Spearheading the effort for the forum have been Sharon Woolums, a V.I.D. member whose series of columns on small businesses’ plight have run in The Villager, and Steve Null, known as “the collector” of information on all things small business. The event’s name, “A Call to Action: Solutions to Save Our Small Businesses,” says it all — in that, it’s time

for action. In that vein, there’s a reason why local politicians will not be among the panelists. Namely, legislation calling for arbitration for small business rent renewals — which advocates say is the key that could turn the tide — has sat idly in the City Council for decades. This bill would give merchants the right to negotiate “fair lease terms” and 10-year leases. Advocates say it’s no coincidence that this bill, the Small Business Jobs Survival Act, has been stymied for so long. Real estate’s influence on New York politics has only been increasing during this time, while the bill has been prevented by successive City Council speakers from coming to the floor for a vote. In an encouraging new initiative, however, the city is now asking Albany to pass legislation establishing a property tax credit for commercial landlords who “voluntarily” limit rent increases. This could also be part of the solution. Panelists at the March 5 event will include Sung Soo Kim, president of the Korean-American Small Business Organization. Known as the “Godfather of Small Businesses,” he has been pushing for a form of the

S.B.J.S.A. since 1993. Joining him will be Alfred Placeras, president of NY State Federation of Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, and Jack Segan, a representative of Jetro, a major wholesale food merchandising operation that supplies 17,000 New York City delis, bodegas and restaurants, representing 10 percent of the city’s small merchants. Also on the panel will be Mark Crispin Miller, president of N.Y.U. Faculty Against the Sexton Plan, an outspoken critic of overdevelopment and gentrification; and Jenny Dubnau, a member of the Artist Studio Affordability Project. Rounding things out will be Bob Perl, president of Tower Brokerage, who has been dubbed the “East Village’s counterculture landlord.” The moderator will be Lincoln Anderson, The Villager’s editor in chief. After a period for the panel discussion, the forum will be opened up to audience questions. Again, while politicians are encouraged to attend, this time the advocates will have the floor. There is a crisis facing our small businesses, and it’s one that has gone unchecked too long. It’s time for solutions.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Tolls would kill commerce To The Editor: Re “Group hopes to build support for tolls on East River bridges” (news article, Feb. 19): Tolls and congestion pricing would kill commerce in Manhattan, in my opinion. Right now many people shop in New Jersey where free parking and lower sales tax are a big attraction. Those sales will never return to Manhattan if tolls and congestion pricing are implemented. Move NY, the group

behind this plan, must have an ulterior motive. Perry Rothenberg

Drawing the line on ISIS To The Editor: Re “Why are we at war with ISIS? Do we need to be?” (talking point, by Ted Rall, Feb. 19): After they beheaded the 21 Coptic Christians for being Christian, they announced they’ll be

coming to Rome soon. I’m not sure that is such an idle boast. I think it is foolish to dismiss them as being the same as our allies Saudi Arabia and the Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan. Surely, they don’t share the same goals. How long before they infiltrate the Gaza Strip? Will Rall reverse his position then? Where do you draw the line? Steve Kennedy

Ferry good news

EVAN FORSCH

To The Editor: Re “Grand St. affordable ferry service to set sail by 2018” (news article, Feb. 12): Thanks to The Villager for publicizing my petition to bring the ferry here, and helping make this possible. Joseph Hanania E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 1 Metrotech North, 10th floor, Brooklyn, NY, NY 11201. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. Anonymous letters will not be published.

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February 26, 2015

TheVillager.com


We’re nearly at Dothan; Roll marriage tide, roll! TALKING POINT BY TROY MASTERS

A

s a crimson tide of same-sex marriage rolls across Alabama, lives are being transformed right before our eyes. Last week marks another huge stage in the paradigm shift that has remade that state in the past 50 years. And if racial progress upended a way of life in Alabama centuries old, gay marriage manages to go beyond race, straight to the core of every family, black and white. I was raised in 1960s Nashville, where my stepfather — originally from Dothan, Alabama — was a prominent musician. From a very early age, I had a deep sense of pride in the privilege I enjoyed, with chances to tour the country with him, meeting thousands of people. I met people I was in awe of — musicians with great skill and extraordinary ambition who taught me a lot about having a mission in life. My sister and I would travel to Dothan to spend summers there, and those childhood memories — good and bad — have shaped us throughout our lives. Getting in the car to leave Nashville, I would always say, “Let us go to Dothan,” the tag line of the local newspaper, the Dothan Eagle, that was borrowed from the Bible. My sister and I would always laugh at our silly inside jokes, as we counted and categorized cars and read billboards that were the basis of crazy narratives we would invent. We were always excited to see Granny Alabama. She’d cook for a week before we arrived, and no matter what hour we showed up, we were showered with buttered biscuits, red-eye gravy, black-eyed peas, collard greens, red velvet cakes, banana pudding and countless other treats all cooked up with love. Papa would always be there, stoic, wearing his overalls, showing his love in playful glances. The cotton fields surrounding their home were like endless rows of dreams. In my youngest years, Alabama seemed to be a place of infinite love and security. Summers there seemed so alive. Dothan, located in Houston County at the state’s border with Georgia and Florida, is denying marriage to all couples rather than issue licenses to same-sex couples. But as I grew to understand more about adult conversation — often filled with derogatory expletives about blacks and Jews — I came to feel my safety there was fragile. During one of those summers, I was exposed to the first evidence that others could see what was so different about me. “Troy is a queer,” I overheard my stepfather say with energetic disgust to another family member. Even at 13, I understood that my feelings for other boys were supposed to be secret. Now I knew terror. What my stepfather said humiliated me, sending an icy panic through my body that changed my demeanor and ruined my confidence. For the first time in my life, I felt depression and I became painfully shy. Alabama became a place, not of love, not of shelter, not of the magic of family, but of fear. I wanted somebody to turn to for understanding. One of my stepfather’s band members that summer was blind, and in those days it didn’t seem strange that he was nicknamed Blind Jack. But he was also called a “homo” by almost everyTheVillager.com

My sister Tammy and me more than four decades ago.

one. Jack was the object of unending ridicule and I instinctively knew to avoid him. I was also desperate to know him. One day, Jack and I were alone at the dinner table and he asked me to read the newspaper to him. After I read to him for a while from the Eagle, he asked me if there was anything wrong, if there was something I wanted to talk about. Jack never denied he was a “homo,” and he had overheard gossip about me.

My summer paradise had become a hostile hell full of hate. I burst into tears and told him what I had overheard my stepfather say. I wanted to run away, I said, and I wished I had never been born. Assuring me that everybody is different in some way and that sometimes other people just can’t understand, he told me that I was a good boy and that he loved me, that even my stepfather loved me, and that one day I would be happy. At some point, he said, people just wouldn’t care. Shortly after that conversation, my stepfather fired Jack and I always imagined it was my fault. The secret that I had associated with Blind Jack was out, and some of the adults who had taunted Jack began to say, “Troy is a homo.” Their kids said it, too. At the public pool, kids would scream, “faggot,” “queer,” “chicken,” “homo,” as they tried to dunk my head under the water. At one point, a big crowd joined in — including kids I had known all my life — and I was terrified they were trying to drown me.

My depression became dangerous and I remember thinking of ways to hurt myself. Alabama now seemed life a hostile hell full of hate. I gave up going there in the summer even though that meant missing out on the love of Granny Alabama and Papa. And in time, I began to associate my experiences there with what I learned about Alabama’s recent past: the church bombings, the police dogs attacking black people. The slurs I heard about blacks, Jews and Yankees now seemed pretty much the same as my stepfather’s ugly phrase “Troy is a queer.” But that Alabama is not the Alabama of tomorrow. The night before a federal ruling legalizing marriage equality went into effect, Roy Moore, the chief justice of the State Supreme Court, ordered county probate judges not to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. But as of last week, with further action by the federal court, 50 of the state’s 67 counties are now complying with the mandate for equality. The Dothan Eagle ran an editorial criticizing the chief justice and the probate judges following his lead. Like George Wallace before him, history will judge Moore as the personification of a fading legacy of bigotry, a gasping mouse, one of the last of his kind, a demagogue taking his last Rebel stand in order to pander to a mob. Still, as I watched counties in Alabama gradually fall in line, my jaw dropped as I recalled the way my summer dreams were crushed there decades before. Had all this happened when I was 13, so much would have been different for me. I hope that for every L.G.B.T. 13-year-old in Alabama today — many of them still feeling isolated and perhaps even more in danger — this month’s events, boisterous and contentious as they are in many parts of the state, can also make a big difference. Jack was right. Masters is associate publisher, Gay City News, a sister paper of The Villager February 26, 2015

15


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Artist dies in E. 16th St. fire

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n Mon., Feb. 23, shortly after midnight, police responded to a call of a fire at 132 E. 16th St. Upon arrival, they were informed by firefighters there that, after extinguishing an apartment blaze at the location, they discovered a 59-yearold man unconscious and unresponsive. He was immediately removed to Bellevue Hospital, where he was pronounced DOA. The victim was ID’d as Ed Albers, 59. Artnet News said Albers was a Dutch-born painter. Also killed in the blaze was his beloved German shepherd, Captain. His artwork was described as “mostly abstract paintings with biomorphic-looking forms and experiments with light and illumination.” Fire officials said an extension cord caused the fire in the apartment, located near Union Square.

Ed Albers’s painting style abstract and experimental.

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Of Bullies, Bigfoot, Haters and Hope Freeman spins a ripping yarn about rumors and reality THEATER I WAS A SIXTH GRADE BIGFOOT Written & Performed by Cyndi Freeman Directed by Sara Peters A Frigid Festival Presentation At UNDER St. Marks 94 St. Marks Place, btw. First Ave. & Ave. A Feb 28, at 10:30 p.m. PHOTO BY BEN TRIVET

March 4 at 8:50 p.m. March 8 at 5:10 p.m. Tickets: $10, $8 for students/seniors Visit FRIGIDnewyork.info Artist info: heroicsinhotpants.com

Elusive truths and hidden agendas abound, in Cyndi Freeman’s look back on the high price of tall tales. “I Was a Sixth Grade Bigfoot” plays the Frigid Festival through March 8.

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

W

hether brightening local burlesque stages as her slinky and sweet alter ego Cherry Pitz or exposing her true self on the storytelling circuit, Cyndi Freeman has an uncanny knack for coaxing epic images from intimate moments. The two-time NY Fringe Festival award-winning solo performer — whose work as an instructor with The Moth Community Outreach Program has empowered disabled adults, nurses and the in-

TheVillager.com

carcerated tell their stories — has a brand new tale of her own, based on old wounds and earned wisdom. A world premiere in Horse Trade Theater Group’s annual Frigid Festival, “I Was a Sixth Grade Bigfoot” charts the myths and misunderstandings that define an 11-yearold’s shattered public image. Victimized by an elaborate homeroom smear campaign and regarded as a violent pathological liar by teachers, young Cyndi draws strength from research books and “Six Million Dollar Man” episodes about a reclusive

Pacific Northwest monster that lashes out only when attacked. But there’s no retreating to the forest during a school assembly, at which classmates weigh in on the emotional cost of bullying — while the target of their wrath sits on display like a captured creature. Joined on stage by a tiny Sasquatch action figure, Freeman’s heartbreaking anecdotes (filled with wry impressions of her cruel tormenters) often end with the performer out of breath and scanning the horizon for some sense of justice in the universe — or just

going silent, letting us fill that momentary blank space with our own empathetic image of a friendless little girl who instinctively knows that oddball traits have a way of becoming great strengths. It helps, a little, that her engineering genius dad declares, “We Freemans are different” — while her mama grizzly makes a trip to principal’s office and growls, “I will tell you what I tell her...She is honest, honest to a fault.” Freeman peppers her quest to expose grade school falsehoods with accounts of hoaxes perpetrated by major players in “American Bigfootery.” Making some disturbing observations about the ease with which we check our skepticism at the door when there’s a juicy tale to help spread, she nonetheless musters a bit of admiration for the conspirators who pulled their stunts more out of opportunism and boredom than a malicious desire to destroy another human being. Revelations about the true nature of those much-hyped Sasquatch sightings are every bit as surprising as the “Where are they now?” tidbits, during which Freeman recalls accepting a string of emotional apologies that will one day enable her to reassure a troubled young girl that things change for the better — and sometimes, so do people. Occasional basketball columnist and burlesque performer Sara Peters directs, making sure the potentially depressing story moves at a brisk pace towards its hopeful and wonderfully well-adjusted conclusion. And that’s the truth! February 26, 2015

17


Living their dream by giving you nightmares ‘Slice’ dissects the messy business of murder BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC

F

PHOTO BY DUSICA SUE MALESEVIC

iguring out the distinction between a murder spree and serial killing is not something many would willingly dive into — but for Marzy Hart and Daniel Ferry, it was essential research for their YouTube web series. “Slice” follows protagonist Lily Drover as she fulfills her need to, ahem, well, you’ll have to watch and see. Hart, who plays Lily and produced the series, and Ferry, the director and writer, sat down with Chelsea Now to talk about their “dark comedy thriller” web series, now an official selection for two web festivals. “We knew it was going to be a female lead,” said Hart, who drew inspiration from the television show “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” “I’m always super excited about being a badass girl in something.” Ferry and Hart agonized over a backstory for Lily and what drives her to commit her crimes. “And then we’re like, ‘Why does there have to be a why?’ If it’s a guy, people don’t question it,” noted Hart. With the anti-hero the character du jour, Ferry said, “It [was] not a bad angle to take.” “Also, saving the princess is so cliché now,” added Hart. Building on each other ’s thoughts in conversation is second nature to the two, who met when they were teenagers in Chelsea. Ferry, 27, grew up and lives on W. 23rd St. His mom was one of the first tenants in the building 33 years ago, when the neighborhood was dramatically different, he said.

“Slice” creators Marzy Hart and Daniel Ferry.

Hart, 25, is originally from Volgograd, Russia. “We moved to Coney Island in ’95, when I was six,” she explained. “When I was 13 we moved to Penn South.” Neighborhood teenagers used to congregate at what is now called Pinwheel Park, between W. 24th and 25th Sts. (and Eighth & Ninth Aves.). Ferry and Hart met one night at the park, dated briefly, and then remained friends. “We would totally still be friends ’cause we’re awesome,” said Hart as Ferry laughed. “I knew I wanted to be an actor and Dan decided he wanted to do film. And we knew that we wanted to do stuff together at some point.” Hart said that she always knew that she wanted to be an actor. “I first figured this out when we

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February 26, 2015

were in Russia and I didn’t think that it was a possibility,” she said. “But my parents always had this dream of going to America. So when we came here, I knew I wanted to do it, but I was busy learning English and all that stuff.” She loved Harry Potter growing up, and said it became clear that she needed “to do things like this in my life. There’s so many things that interest me and I think with acting, you get to play so many different parts. You don’t have to be just a scientist or just a — anything. You can explore.” She studied her craft for eight years and took classes at Acting on Impulse, a small NYC school, she explained, that teaches improvisation-based scene, monologue and Shakespeare workshops. Ferry took a different route to directing, starting out as a political science major at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania. While thinking about his thesis topic, he honed in on the gentrification of neighborhoods, something that he saw firsthand in Chelsea. “Growing up in the city, I saw a lot of those mom and pop shops go,” he said. “Even now…there aren’t very many left at all. Growing up I was noticing it.” He chose Chelsea Guitars — a ground floor shop in W. 23rd St.’s Chelsea Hotel building that has been part of the neighborhood since 1989 — as an example of how Chelsea has changed. View the

work at vimeo.com/31529509. “I realized, being actually interested in the subject matter and interested in potentially creating change, that writing a paper would not be as sufficient as maybe making a short film — and that’s kind of what sparked the interest in film. And then from there on, it just became the passion,” he recalled. He switched his major to communication arts and minored in political science. When he moved back to New York, he began working as a freelance editor. One of his jobs was with Greencard Pictures, an independent production company that does a lot of commercial work, he explained, “but they have a strong drive to want to put out independent, fun content and short films.” Greencard Pictures offered Ferry the use of their equipment and that lit the fire to do the web series. “They were there with me all the way,” he said, as they also helped with the script, in developing his directorial style, and securing some locations. Many scenes were filmed in Bushwick, where Hart now lives, and her apartment was used as a set. Ferry wrote the script, although he said it was a collaborative effort. They began filming late last summer and released the first episode around Halloween. “Everything takes longer than you think it’s going to take,” said Ferry. The duo didn’t raise money, and worked with a small budget — spending under $3,000 for the cost of locations, props and food for the cast. The actors worked for free and were either people they knew or were recommended by friends. The first season is comprised of six episodes, with the last one cut into two parts. Each episode is short, running anywhere from two to five minutes. Hart said, “Web series are interesting because you have to make bite-sized episodes. “There’s a difference between when you’re watching content online and when you’re watching it on TV,” she continued. “You sit down, you’re like ‘I’m going to watch a show on Netflix’ — you know you’re giving half an hour to MURDER, continued on p. 20 TheVillager.com


Long night’s journey into death THEATER THE ICEMAN COMETH Written by Eugene O’Neill Directed by Robert Falls Through March 15 Tues.–Sat. at 7 p.m. / Sun. at 2 p.m. 4 hrs. 45 min., with three intermissions At Brooklyn Academy of Music, Harvey Theater 651 Fulton St. Btw. Rockwell Pl. & Ashland Pl. Visit bam.org or call 718-636-4100 PHOTO BY RICHARD TERMINE

BY ANDY HUMM

T

he Iceman Cometh” starring Nathan Lane and Brian Dennehy in top form along with a flawless ensemble is first and foremost as good and true a rendering of Eugene O’Neill’s epic drama of alcoholism and despair as we are likely to see. The creative team from the Goodman Theatre in Chicago led by director Robert Falls is firing on all cylinders at BAM, but there is a challenge for the audience as well –– a marathon confrontation with the humanity of life’s losers who seem to be at rock bottom when the curtain rises on them in a Greenwich Village bar’s dark backroom, but who, we soon learn, have even farther to drop as the stage and their lives are illuminated over the course of almost five hours. There are no Wednesday and Saturday matinees, just one exhausting performance a day six days a week of characters who are –– in the main –– exhausted from the get-go, often sleeping at their tables or sitting in vacant, alcoholic stupors staring into space (looking out at us and making it hard to look away). That is the guts of Dennehy’s turn as the spent radical, Larry Slade, who brushes off the intrusions of his imprisoned ex-lover and comrade’s young son, Don Parritt (Patrick Andrews, outstanding in a pivotal role), and of anyone else who tries to stir him from his wait for the release of death. TheVillager.com

Lee Wilkof and Stephen Ouimette (in foreground), with Brian Dennehy, Nathan Lane, and Salvatore Inzerillo in Eugene O’Neill’s “Iceman Cometh” at BAM through March 15.

O’Neill’s ‘Iceman’ at BAM is a brilliant ordeal Late in the first act, traveling salesman Theodore “Hickey” Hickman (Lane), a graduate of Harry Hope’s (Stephen Ouimette, suitably pathetic) saloon, makes his semi-annual appearance –– much anticipated by the down-and-out patrons thirsty for his free drinks and glad-handing bull. But Hickey has come this day in 1912 with an unbelievably dark secret and a new agenda for the men and the hookers who also hang there: saving them from their “pipe dreams.” It’s a phrase from the 19th century for the kind of dreams one has when smoking opium and here it is repeated ad nauseam (44 times to be exact), but it is cheap liquor and unbearable reversals in life that drive these men’s delusions. “Have the guts to be who you are,” Hickey tells them –– an exhortation familiar to us in the LGBT movement –– but all he succeeds in doing is throwing their lives into turmoil. “Dat Hickey,” Joe Mott, the lone black denizen (John Douglas Thompson in a standout performance) says, “he gets my head all mixed up with craziness.” A lay this deep and long gives us an opportunity to reflect on lots of things beyond its great stagecraft. I

But Hickey has come this day in 1912 with an unbelievably dark secret and a new agenda for the men and the hookers who also hang there.

couldn’t help think at age 61 about the state of my own dreams –– pipe, personal, and political. There is a character for most everyone to identify with at some level –– and each gets a chance to tell his or her story in the spotlight. I saw echoes of “Our Town” (written in 1938, the year before O’Neill wrote this play, which was not produced until ’46) with its indelible graveyard scene where the dead sit and talk to the recently departed Emily. In “Iceman,” the near dead occupy the landscape similarly –– less relating to each other and more biding their time before the end. It also presages the tragicomedy that Samuel Beckett perfected in “Waiting for Godot” in 1953 — homeless tramps by the side of a country road

instead of in a dingy bar (Kevin Depinet’s breathtakingly simple set design lit moodily by Natasha Katz); like Godot, the iceman never comes, but he’s breathing hard offstage. And Hickey’s subversive party games made me think about the setpiece in Mart Crowley’s “The Boys in the Band” that bowed in 1968. It may be heresy. It may not be permitted by the O’Neill estate. But while there are merits to lingering until midnight with these terrific actors and characters and deeply contemplating their lives and ours, even Shakespeare plays often get cut without any loss of impact –– and this one could be, too. But two characters notwithstanding, you can’t hurry death much as you may desire The End. February 26, 2015

19


‘Slice’ web series prepping second season

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS

L to R: “Slice” cast members Coby O’Brien, Michael Patrick Lane and Marzy Hart. More episodes are in the works, with the first season up on YouTube now and in two web festivals next month. MURDER, continued from p. 18

45 minutes. But online where you can quickly type in a new link or there’s always suggestions popping up — ‘click here’ and ‘watch this’ and ‘watch that.’ You want to be able to get your point across really fast.” “It makes more sense just [to] be short,” said Ferry. “People have two to three minutes to spend,

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February 26, 2015

they don’t have 12 minutes.” “Slice” isn’t their first endeavor together. Hart and Ferry worked on a web series called “Teamwork Like Wolves,” which came out in early 2013. Only the pilot was released, and it was over ten minutes, said Hart. “We learned a lot from that and that’s maybe when the interest of doing a web series kind of really started,” said Hart. “We already know what we’re getting ourselves into. We know what we did

wrong and why [Wolves] didn’t really take off.” Hart, who also promotes the series on social media, submitted “Slice” to several web festivals. It was selected for the Vancouver Web Fest and HollyWeb Festival, which are both in March. “When we put out ‘Slice,’ people just started sharing it, I didn’t have to ask,” said Hart, who is writing the second season. “Here’s our first episode and then six or seven people shared it, and I was like,

‘Oh, my God.’ It felt really good.” “[‘Slice’ is] truly driven by people who just enjoy making film,” said Ferry. “We did our best not to let financial restraints stop us. When people tell you, ‘You can’t pull it off” — that’s the time to push.” Follow “Slice” on social media. For Instagram/Twitter: @slicetheseries. Also, slicetheseries.tumblr.com and facebook.com/slicetheseries, Watch the entire first season at youtube.com/ slicetheseries.

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When a straight Irishman stumbles into a gay parade What drummer Brian Fleming learned about inclusiveness in Queens

THEATER A SACRILEGIOUS LESBIAN & HOMOSEXUAL PARADE A Frigid Festival presentation At UNDER St. Marks COURTESY OF HORSE TRADE THEATER GROUP

94 St. Marks Pl. Btw. First Ave. & Ave. A Feb. 28, Mar. 4 at 7:10 p.m. March 7 at 12:30 p.m. March 8 at 1:50 p.m. Tickets: $15; $10 for students & seniors Visit FRIGIDnewyork.info

Brian Fleming presents his “A Sacrilegious Lesbian & Homosexual Parade” at Frigid New York.

BY KATHLEEN WARNOCK

I

t all started with the big drum. “I had built the biggest drum in the world, 15 feet in diameter,” Brian Fleming said. “The drum they called the biggest drum in the world, it looked like a little bongo compared to mine!” Fleming, who lives in County Clare, Ireland, decided that the world’s largest drum needed to come to America. For St. Patrick’s Day. “I phoned up the Fifth Ave. parade, and they said they don’t do floats,” he recalled. “So I found the St. Pat’s for All Parade and [its founder] Brendan Fay, and it turned out he was on his way to Dublin. So we ended up meeting. And I was thinking: a New York City gay rights activist, this guy was going to be dressed like Elton John or Liberace, but he was just a raving normal guy and we got to talking and talking and talking… I could see how passionate he was about the parade, and he could see how passionate I was about my drum.” The drum never made it to New York. It would have cost a fortune to ship it. But the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs did send Fleming and several other Irish musicians to the St. Pat’s for All Parade, the inclusive parade in Sunnyside,

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Queens, begun in response to Manhattan’s exclusion of LGBT groups. It was the start of a relationship that has spanned more a decade and encompassed dozens of musicians, concerts, parades, and now a solo show, “A Sacrilegious Lesbian & Homosexual Parade,” written and performed by Fleming. Directed by Raymond Keane, it’s having its US premiere at Horse Trade Theater Group’s Frigid Festival. When he got to New York, Fleming “couldn’t believe the drama going on around the parade and what Irish-Americans were saying about it, and that the Church was sort of lining up against Brendan. At that point in Ireland, we were just starting to have a lot of influx of immigrants. We had one Nigerian member in our band, playing djembe, and then we get to Queens and finally got to see the actual melting pot that people talk about all the time in places where it hasn’t happened. Queens, where you have every race under the sun living together and mostly getting on.” On the day of the parade, Fleming recalled “it was so uplifting. When you look up and see people leaning out of the buildings: all different colors, all different ethnicities, all enjoying the parade, it’s a great example of what a St. Patrick’s parade

could be. And the whole thing of making Irishness an excuse for exclusivity is anathema to me.” Fleming’s musical career includes more than 40 albums and work in dozens of countries, and his travels gave him the urge to write about his experiences and how they changed him. “A lot of the work I do is as a drummer/musician,” he said. “You’re the guy backing people. You make songs happen and it’s not always clear to the person listening what it is you did. Often it’s very hard for me to point out that’s the bit I did. A builder builds a house. ‘I made it, people live in it.’ In music, you can find it very difficult to say, ‘This is me, this is what I did.’ ” Fleming’s first show, “Gis a Shot of Your Bongos Mister” (2011) was about “some parts of my life where I was traveling over to Africa and bringing African musicians to Ireland, to working class neighborhoods in Dublin. I sent it to the Fringe in Dublin, and they accepted it. Then they send you to some workshops on writing. I didn’t have my drums and had to read a bit of the piece. They didn’t laugh or throw me out or call me a fake. And I realized that the writing is valid. It passes.” In his next show, “Have Yis No

Homes To Go To” (2013), about joining a troupe of Clowns Without Borders to tour Rwanda, he used more words and visuals and less drumming. “So by the time I got to this one, I didn’t feel obliged to put in a whole lot of drumming,” he explained. “That’s my other thing. This is a theater thing. So I wanted to make a show about St. Pat’s for All.” Originally, Fleming said, he had trouble with show’s arc and point of view. “I was actually intending to play a character called the Naked Panti Boy, who would be a cross between the Naked Cowboy and [Irish drag queen and activist] Panti Bliss,” he recalled. “Thankfully, dramaturg Michelle Read didn’t get that character at all. I’ve been saved that. Audiences should all be grateful to her.” What Fleming was trying to sort out was how to include — or whether to mention — that he’s straight and that he felt the parade was Brendan Fay’s story. “There are liberties you can take if you’re gay and you’re talking about other people persecuting gays in the way Panti does; she gives them an awful teasing,” Fleming said. “If you’re straight, you don’t feel you have the right to talk about things in the same way. And I was trying to figure whether and when I should out myself as straight.” Bliss’ manager, advising him to play it “straight” from the start, pointed out the significance of the play in the context of the public debate over the upcoming marriage equality referendum in Ireland. “He said, ‘This is important. When the equality referendum comes up, we all know which way the gay people are going to vote, but we need this middle ground of allies who can see it from their own point of view,’” Fleming recalled. “‘Your perspective is valuable and valid too.’ ” With that Fleming went back to work. “I ended up taking a sort of gonzo Irish perspective: stumbling into things clumsily and going on and discovering stuff that way,” he said. “I just stumble in as a heterosexual Irish person trying to dress up camp to fit into the parade and not really getting it, which is the way it was. I brought the Irish musicians and had no idea of LGBT issues, just knew I had met some really good people and we were having a good time and doing something right.” February 26, 2015

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FLYING POINT 1080 REAL ESTATE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/4/15. Office in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Auda Management Inc., 888 7th Ave., 41st Fl, NY, NY 10106. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TREAD- WATER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/15/2014. Office location, County of New York. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 15 West 81st Apt 3H, NY NY 10024. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015 A & A ADVISORS LLC Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 01/23/15. Latest date to dissolve: 12/31/2065. Office: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 330 East 38th Street, Apartment 45H, New York, NY 10016. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF JAVLIN NINE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 12/3/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LINE-S9D, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/20/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Gleason & Koatz, LLP, 122 E. 42nd St., Ste. 518, NY, NY 10168. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PN3 LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/19/2014. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The LLC, 300 EAST 71ST STREET APT12L, NEW YORK, NY, NOTICE OF FORMATION 10021. Purpose: To enOF 1266 MADISON EZ gage in any lawful act or activity. LLC Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015 Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/14. Of- NOTICE OF QUALIFICAfice location: NY County. TION OF URBAN EDGE PROPERTIES LP Princ. office of LLC: 1064 Madison Ave., NY, Authority filed with NY NY 10028. SSNY desig- Dept. of State on 1/8/15. location: NY nated as agent of LLC Office upon whom process County. Princ. bus. addr.: against it may be served. 210 Route 4 East, ParaSSNY shall mail process mus, NJ 07652. LP to the LLC at the addr. of formed in DE on its princ. office. Purpose: 7/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015 LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: NOTICE OF FORMATION c/o CT Corporation SysOF PARLOR CLUB NYC tem, 111 8th Ave., NY, LLC. NY 10011, regd. agent Arts. of Org. filed with upon whom process may Secy. of State of NY be served. DE addr. of (SSNY) on 2/4/10. Office LP: 1209 Orange St., location: NY County. Wilmington, DE 19801. SSNY designated as Name/addr. of genl. ptr. agent of LLC upon whom available from NY Sec. of process against it may be State. Cert. of LP filed served. SSNY shall mail with DE Sec. of State, process to: The LLC, 457 401 Federal St., Dover, Broome St., Ste. 3B, NY, DE 19901. Purpose: any NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. lawful activity. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015 Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015

DDR MARYLAND REAL ESTATE LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 12/10/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, c/o Lance G. Harris Esq., 1211 Ave. of the Americas, 40th Fl., NY, NY 10036. General Purposes. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF DRINNEN-NY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/20/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1455 Market St., 4th Fl., San Francisco, CA 94103. DE address of LLC: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VORAUS-NY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/20/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1455 Market St., 4th Fl., San Francisco, CA 94103. DE address of LLC: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SPA AHH LA CARTE LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/26/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: The SPA AHH LA CARTE LLC, c/o National Registered Agents, Inc. 111 8th Ave, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/12 - 03/19/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HYBRID ENTERTAINMENT LAB, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 304 W. 77th St., NY, NY 10024. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/05 -03/12/2015 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kane Kessler, P.C., 1350 Ave. of the Americas, 26th Fl., NY, NY 10019, Attn: Darren S. Berger, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF THE BRAND ASSEMBLY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/22/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/18/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/05 - 03/12/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF EXACT NME II LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/13/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 477 Madison Ave., 6th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BRIDGE STREET 2015, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/14/15. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 1/9/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 200 West St., NY, NY 10282, principal business address. DE address of LP: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/address of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 19 BROADWAY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Janine Duffin, 27 W. 72nd St., QUALIFICATION OF GSO Apt. 511, NY, NY 10023. NOTICE OF FORMATION CHURCHILL PARTNERS Purpose: any lawful ac- OF URBAN PROPERTY DATA NYMD, LLC tivity. II LP Application for Authority Vil: 01/29 03/05/2015 Authority filed with the filed with Secretary of Sect. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/14. Of- NOTICE OF FORMATION State of New York (SSNY) fice Loc: NY County. LP OF KIDZ BOP TOUR LLC on 1/5/2015. Office loformed in DE on Arts. of Org. filed with cation: NY County. SSNY 11/13/14. SSNY has Secy. of State of NY has been designated as been designated as (SSNY) on 1/7/15. Office an agent upon whom County. process against the LLC agent of LP upon whom location: NY SSNY designated as may be served. The adprocess against it may be served and shall mail agent of LLC upon whom dress to which SSNY process to: 345 Park process against it may be shall mail a copy of any Ave, 31st FL, New York, served. SSNY shall mail process against the LLC NY 10154. DE address of process to: c/o Razor & is to: CT Corporation SysLP: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, Tie Direct, LLC, 214 Sul- tem, 111 Eighth Ave, Ste 210, Wilmington, livan St., 5th Fl., NY, NY New York, NY, 10011. 19809. Name/addr. of 10012; Attn: Craig Bal- Purpose: To engage in genl. ptr. avail from sam. Purpose: any lawful any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 SSNY. Cert. of LP filed activity. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 RIVINGTON CLINTON, with DE Sect. of State, 401 Federal St, Ste 4, LLC QUALIFICATION OF Dover, DE 19901. PurArt. of Org. filed with the BLACKSTONE TACTIpose: any lawful activity. SSNY on 01/15/15. LatCAL OPPORTUNITIES Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 est date to dissolve: FUND II.F L.P. 12/31/2115. Office: New Authority filed with the QUALIFICATION OF York County. SSNY desBLACKSTONE REAL ES- Sect of State of NY ignated as agent of the TATE PARTNERS (SSNY) on 1/20/15. OfLLC upon whom process VIII.F-2 L.P. fice Loc: NY County. LP Authority filed with the formed in Cayman Is- against it may be served. Sect of State of NY lands on 1/15/15. SSNY SSNY shall mail copy of (SSNY) on 1/16/15. Of- has been designated as process to the LLC, c/o fice Loc: NY County. LP agent of LP upon whom Bruce D. Hermann, 49 formed in DE on process against it may be West 24th Street, 10th 1/14/15. SSNY has been served and shall mail Floor, Suite 1003, New designated as agent of process to: 200 Bellevue York, NY 10010. PurLP upon whom process Pkwy, Ste 210, Wilming- pose: Any lawful puragainst it may be served ton, 19809. Cayman Is- pose. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 and shall mail process to: lands address of LP: 190 c/o The Blackstone Elgin Ave, George Town, Group L.P., 345 Park Grand Cayman, Ave, New York, NY KY1-9005, Cayman Is10154. DE address of lands. Name/addr of genl LP: 200 Bellevue Pkwy, ptr avail from SSNY. Cert Ste 210, Wilmington, of LP filed with Registrar 19809. Name/addr of of Exempted Limited genl ptr avail from SSNY. Partnerships of the CayCert of LP filed with DE man Islands, 133 Elgin Sect of State, 401 Feder- Ave, George Town, Grand al St, Ste 4, Dover, DE Cayman, KY1-9000, 19901. Purpose: any Cayman Islands. Purlawful activity. pose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 February 26, 2015

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B.P.C. woman is killed by van on Canal St. BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

A

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

63-year-old Battery Park City woman was struck by a van on Canal St. on Wed., Feb. 18, shortly after 11 a.m., and died from her injuries the next day, police said. Following an investigation, police reported that Yu-O Pan, of 380 Rector Place, was attempting to cross Canal St. midblock from south to north near Mott St. when she was hit by a 1998 Ford van traveling eastbound on Canal St. Responding officers found Pan lying on the ground with body trauma. An EMS ambulance transported her to Bellevue Hospital where she succumbed to her injuries on Feb. 19. The vehicle’s driver remained on the scene and the investigation is ongoing, police said. The woman’s son, Gary Pan, 35, said his mother had been shopping for items for the Chinese Lunar New Year. “She was buying stuff like oranges, chicken, pork, stuff like that,” he said. He said she owned a restaurant in Brooklyn Heights, though declined to name it. Originally from Taiwan, she came

Police at the scene a few hours after Yu-O Pan was fatally struck on Canal St.

to the U.S. with her husband in the early 1970s. She lived in various spots in Downtown Manhattan, including Bayard St., Broadway, Bayard St. again, then Brooklyn Heights, before settling in on Rector Place at Battery Park City, where she lived with her son and husband. They were a very close-knit fami-

ly, said her son, who works in IT. He was their only child. They have no other relatives in America. No services have been held, he said, due to the “surprising cost of funerals.” He said he couldn’t provide a photo of his mother because they never really took family photos, which he

regrets now. “I haven’t had time to digest it,” her son said of the tragedy. “They said she was crossing on the green, but that she was hit pretty hard. They said she popped out between two cars — that was the account of the driver — but she was hit pretty hard.”

Report targets dangerous streets and conditions VISION ZERO, continued from p. 1

exclusive pedestrian crossing times under the plan for Manhattan, which also prioritized 61 intersections and seven thoroughfares located outside this area. Houston, Canal and 14th Sts. were among the priority corridors. Troublesome intersections, such as Canal St. and the Bowery, Seventh Ave. South and Bleeker St., and Delancey and Essex Sts., were among the intersections targeted for safety upgrades. These along with the other designated streets, intersections and a prioritized area stretching roughly from Canal St. to 59th St., accounted for two-thirds of traffic-related injuries and fatalities across the borough from 2009 to 2013, according to the report. The New York Police Department will concentrate enforcement efforts in that broader area this year. Increased blitzes against trucks will offer greater incentives to drivers to stay on established routes and yield to pedestrians, according to the report. Similar enforcement in 2014 spurred 126 percent and 42 percent increases citywide in failure to yield and speeding summons, respectively, according to D.O.T.

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February 26, 2015

Such measures represent a proactive approach to instituting a culture of safety that eliminates the word “accident” from the equation, Vision Zero proponents say. Pedestrians account for 73 percent of traffic deaths in Manhattan compared to 58 percent citywide, according to the report. “This plan acknowledges this injustice toward pedestrians and the synergies that can be realized by improving pedestrian safety for overall traffic safety, well-being and urban livability,” said Mayor de Blasio said in a statement accompanying the report. Expanding the city’s network of protected bike lanes can also boost safety, according to the report, which added that city streets with such infrastructure have seen a 22 percent reduction in pedestrian injuries. Several trends differentiate Manhattan traffic dangers, however, from those of the outer boroughs, according to the report. Trucks in this borough are involved in a quarter of traffic crashes that kill pedestrians — which is double the city average. Seniors, meanwhile, comprise just 14 percent of the borough population, yet account for 41 percent of people killed or seriously injured in crashes, a prob-

lem particularly acute in Chinatown, given its relatively high elderly population, according to the report. As The Villager reports in this week’s issue, Yu-O Pan, 63, died on Feb. 19 after she was hit by a van on Canal St. while doing Lunar New Year shopping. Manhattan has the highest or lowest rate of traffic-related injuries relative to its population, depending on whether daytime commuters and visitors are included in the equation. The borough averaged 34 pedestrian fatalities between 2011 and 2013, according to D.O.T. Despite the doubling of its population during the day, only 18 percent of weekday fatalities occur during the morning and afternoon rush hours, when 40 percent of Manhattan’s pedestrian travel occurs. By contrast, 48 percent of the borough’s pedestrian fatalities occur between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m., necessitating increased enforcement at those times and changes to traffic signal patterns, the report states. “The impact of ‘safety in numbers’ may be particularly powerful in Manhattan,” the report states. “Not only is it the only borough whose population increases during work days, but Manhattan also has the highest share of

peak-hour commuting (74 percent).” But pedestrians share the blame as much as motorists for making dangerous decisions that lead to fatal traffic crashes, in contrast to other boroughs where drivers account for a greater proportion. Manhattan is the only borough where failure to yield was the top traffic concern for residents (23 percent) rather than speeding, the report notes. City Councilmember Margaret Chin said in a statement that the report’s scope reflects the seriousness with which the de Blasio administration is approaching Vision Zero, as well as the seriousness of the traffic-related dangers within her district, which includes Chinatown. A bill she has put before the City Council aims to require that D.O.T. study how established truck routes impact pedestrian and cyclist safety. “Among other things, the Manhattan plan accurately identifies Canal St. and some other corridors in my district as areas along which we must continue working to improve safety,” Chin said. “I have repeatedly highlighted the dangers of the chaotic and congested atmosphere on Canal St., which is one of the city’s major truck routes.” TheVillager.com


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26ELRO LLC Arts of Org filed NY Secy of State(SSNY) 12/31/14. OFC in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ronna Ullman 93-02 70th Ave Forest Hills NY 11375. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP NE TOWER LESSEE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/08/15. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/06/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF STX NY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/6/15. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1100 Glendon Ave., Ste. 1600, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VCC, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/12/10. NYS fictitious name: VCC General Contracting and Construction Management, LLC. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 216 Louisiana St., Little Rock, AR 72201. LLC formed in DE on 7/11/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF EVANSVIEW 17B, LP Certificate filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 01/07/15 Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: EVANSVIEW 17B, LP, c/o Boyer Law Firm, P.L., 9471 Baymeadows Road, Suite 404, Jacksonville, FL 32256. Name/address of each general partner available from SSNY. Purpose: To engage any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 180 ORCHARD GARAGE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/02/15. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: Meir Cohen, 375 Third Ave., Ste. 2400, NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #1283413 has been applied for by A Spice Lane Inc. to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 216 3rd Avenue NY, NY 10003. Vil: 02/26 - 03/05/2015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by 174 Rivington Street Corp to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 174 Rivington Street NY, NY 10002. Vil: 02/19 - 02/26/2015

Fans of Year of the Sheep

PET SET These two Great Pyrenees, a brother and a sister, were loving the cold weather on Church St. in Tribeca. A very old breed, this dog has traditionally been used to guard flocks of sheep on the Pyrenees Mountains in southern France and northern Spain.

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CAVIT PROJECTS LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/14/2014 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/22 -02/26/2015

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF WMQF L01 FUND LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/15. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/08/15. Princ. office of LLC: 666 Fifth Ave., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10103. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State - Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015

PHOTO BY MILO HESS

NOTICE OF FORMATION of SUNSTRATEGIC LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/22/15. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: SUNSTRATEGICLLC, 4 PARK AVE, APT 7 O, New York, NY 10016. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/29 - 03/05/2015 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP NE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/08/15. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/06/15. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/22 - 02/26/2015

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In Washington Square Park on last Sunday’s balmy afternoon, all that was left of what had been two snowmen playing chess just a few days earlier, resembled one rapidly melting polar bear. But not to worry, more subfreezing temperatures were on the way!

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 at 2:00 P.M. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for ZONOR REST. CORP. to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk cafe at 225 W 4th ST in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of four years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 02/26 - 03/05/2015 TheVillager.com

February 26, 2015

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February 26, 2015

TheVillager.com


Hawks sink Narwhals, soar in art school tourney SPORTS BY ROBERT ELKIN

T

his is the time of year — late February through early March — when college basketball conferences stage their post-season tournaments. The winner of each conference then gets an automatic bid into the very prestigious NCAA tournament. But that certainly doesn’t go for colleges that play an independent or nonleague schedule. They compete on their own. Such was the case with The Cooper Union and The New School, two Downtown schools not traditionally known for high-powered sports programs. These two teams, along with Massachusetts College of Art and Design and Rhode Island School of Design, joined together to compete in the Second Annual NASBI, or Northeast Art School Basketball Invitational, hosted by Baruch College last Saturday and Sunday. It just was too bad that this tourney didn’t provide closer games. For the most part, the contests were runaways. But some of the student athletes did perform very well on the court, to the excitement of the fans, as well as parents and friends of the competitors. Cooper Union’s teamwork, defense and offense, led by Vlad Ciocoi’s 26 points, along with Adam Jamia-O-Connor’s 10 rebounds and Andrew Keane’s 11 boards, paved the way to a 74-60 victory over The New School and to the NASBI championship. When Andrey Kovalev converted a layup with 15:19 left in the second half, Cooper enjoyed a 19-point bulge and the outcome was just about over at that time. The Hawks actually didn’t hold the edge over the Narwhals in many categories during the contest, yet still managed to pull out the win. They shot 51 percent from the field to New School’s 33 percent. But the latter shot 62 percent to Cooper’s 33 percent from the charity line. The battle on the boards was even: Each team hauled in 40 rebounds. Defensively, Cooper stole the ball 10 times, while New School had 14 steals. The Hawks committed 23 turnovers while The New School coughed up the ball 16 times. The New School’s Benjamin Irving stood out by corralling 14 caroms, yet it didn’t offset the board-crashing duo of Jamia-O-Connor and Keane. Kovalev’s 12 assists led the playmakers. “We suffered a tough loss,” said David Privat-Gilman, The New School squad’s head coach. “We’re 1 and 2 against them this year. Coming into the tournament, we were looking for first place, but we got second, which was pretty good. Coming into the game, our plan was to let them shoot, and the stats TheVillager.com

The Cooper Union Hawks’ good teamwork helped them torpedo the Narwhals in a close game.

are usually in our favor.” Instead it went in Cooper Union’s favor. “We couldn’t really stay together as they made big runs,” Privat-Gilman added. “Cooper came out and played a heck of a game.” The Hawks were flying high in the first half, blowing it open thanks to some good runs, and led 42-27 at halftime. The real key for the winners, however, was teamwork, and specifically stopping the Narwhals’ scorers from putting the ball in the basket. Also critical for Cooper Union was breaking the Narwhals’ press and executing and communicating. according to Rami Said, the Hawks’ head coach, and his players. Right from the outset, Cooper displayed good team chemistry. (After all, they are known for their Engineering School!) On Saturday evening, in the semifinals, The New School routed Massachusetts College of the Arts and Design, 101-19 (that’s right!), as six Hawks scored in double figures, while Cooper Union, in a tougher contest, turned back RISD, 86-60. In Sunday morning’s consolation game, RISD made a mess of MassArt 92-46, as Connor Griffith racked up 30 points and teammate Forest O’Donoghue added 23 and Michael Moyal grabbed 11 rebounds. Afterward, players and coaches alike said it had been a tremendous tournament.

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Imported

Assorted Varieties

2/ 3

Jarlsberg Cheese Wedge

lb.

Yellow Cheddar Cheese

Previously Frozen

lb.

2

$ 99

$

NY State

Fresh • Premium Quality Farm Raised • Atlantic

Prime Fillet Solid White Albacore In Water

3.75 oz. Can

5 oz. Can

7 Grapes $ 99 6 $ 99 7 Nectarines $ 99

Imported • Seedless Red or Green

SuperFresh Frozen Seafood Entrees

8

$ 99

9.2-10.4 oz.

lb.

lb.

Red Ripe

lb.

Tomatoes on the Vine

lb.

Imported from Chile Tree Ripe

lb.

lb.

BONUS SAVINGS CARD SUPER SPECIALS!

Assorted Var. • 8-15 oz.

4C Bread Crumbs

Gel or Powder • 75 oz.

Finish Automatic Dishwasher Detergent

Assorted Var. • 12 oz.

No Yolks Dumplings or Noodles

100 Sq. Ft.

Saran Premium Wrap

Assorted Var. • 19.6 oz.

Pepperidge Farm Layer Cakes

1 $ 49 5 $ 29 2 $ 99 2 $ 89 3 $ 99

Excluding Decaf • 10.3-11.3 oz.

Chock Full O’Nuts Coffee

Assorted Var. • 9.9-50 oz.

Purex Liquid Laundry Detergent or Pacs

Assorted Var. • 28-29 oz.

Hunt’s Tomatoes

Assorted Varieties 15.25-18.9 oz.

Pillsbury Cake Mix

Assorted Var. • 48 oz.

Breyers Ice Cream

3 $ 99 4 $ 99 1 $ 79 1 $ 99 4 $ 99

Excluding Decaf • 12 oz.

McCafe Coffee

Assorted Var. • 12-16 oz.

Barilla Pasta

20 oz. Family Size

Quaker Cap’n Crunch Cereal

2 $ 49 2 $ 88 1

$ 99

7 $ 99 1 $ 69 4 $ 99 3 $ 99 6 $ 99

100 Grand, Butterfinger, Crunch or Baby Ruth 11-12.5 oz.

Nestlé Fun Size Chocolate Bars Assorted Var. • 89 oz.

Tropicana Orange Juice

WE TAKE PHONE ORDERS AND WE DELIVER ————————— See Your Store For Details —————————

At GRISTEDES, your opinions and suggestions count. If you have a complaint or problem, call our CONSUMER HOTLINE at 212-956-5770 ext. 1100, or e-mail us at customeradvocate@gristedes.com • Prices Effective 2/27–3/5/15 28

February 26, 2015

TheVillager.com

THE VILLAGER, FEB. 26, 2015  

THE VILLAGER, FEB. 26, 2015

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