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West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

February 7 - 13, 2013

Gristedes owner tosses his hat into mayor’s race By LincoLn anderSon John Catsimatidis, the billionaire owner of the Gristedes supermarket chain, announced his entrance into the race for mayor of New York City last week, running as a Republican. A main platform of Catsimatidis’s campaign is to bring the World’s Fair back to New York City — to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, where it occurred in

1939 and 1964. As a youngster who grew up poor, Catsimatidis attended the ’64 fair and was awestruck by it, and he wants others to share that experience. He immigrated to America from Greece at 6 months old and grew up in Harlem on 135th St., going on to attend Brooklyn Tech High School. Today, he’s worth $3 billion,

Continued on page 18

Hundreds march against violence ‘King of the hill, top of the heap’ and guns on L.E.S. Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio

Ed Koch’s casket was borne out of Temple Emanu-El on Monday to the jaunty strains of “New York, New York” on the synagogue’s organ and a standing ovation by the 2,000 people in attendance. It certainly was a fitting tune for the colorful, larger-than-life former mayor. See inside for extensive coverage on Koch.

City plans to lease nYCHA sites for luxury development By Sam Spokony In an attempt to generate millions of dollars in revenue desperately needed to fill a budget gap and fund more than 400,000 stalled building repair orders, the New York City Housing Authority plans to lease land within some of its Manhattan developments to private developers, who would be able to build luxury apartments on those lots. Five of the potential lease sites are

in the East Village and Lower East Side, according to sources who have been briefed on the plans. Those sites include parking lots and/or recreational areas within Campos Plaza, Baruch Houses, Smith Houses, LaGuardia Houses and Meltzer Tower (a building exclusively for senior citizens). NYCHA bluntly ignored this newspaper’s request for more — or even any — specific details on the

plans, instead sending a statement saying that strategies like this leasing idea are “vital to improving the circumstances of NYCHA’s residents and buildings.” But according to “internal documents” obtained by the Daily News and published on Wednesday, the authority’s entire eight-development scheme would allow private develop-

By Sam Spokony Just after hundreds of Lower East Side parents and children walked together in an emotional rally against gun and youth violence, the mother of Raphael Ward — the 16-year-old Baruch Houses resident who was shot and killed on Jan. 4 — spoke candidly and forcefully to that crowd. Though she never would have asked to

Continued on page 28

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be placed upon this pedestal of grief, Arlene Delgado knew that the happy memories of her child might just be enough to spur the change her neighborhood needs. “I’m strong because of the kids,” said Delgado, who didn’t shed a tear until after she stepped away from the microphone. “If

Continued on page 5

edITORIAl, leTTeRs PAGE 12

TAllmeR’s kOch mOVIe mOmeNT PAGE 13


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February 7 - 13, 2013

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Keepsakes from Koch campaigns Villagers bedecked with Ed Koch campaign buttons attended the former mayor’s funeral Monday at Temple Emanu-El on the Upper East Side. Above, Barbara Steinberg, former social committee director for the Village Independent Democrats, Koch’s original political club, sported a scarf full of Koch buttons, including for one of his mayoral campaigns and his gubernatorial campaign. Below, former Councilmember Alan Gerson had a button for one of Koch’s re-election campaigns pinned to his overcoat, along with one for his late mom, Sophie, when she ran as a delegate for presidential candidate Al Gore in 1988. Koch also backed Gore in that election, according to Gerson.


February 7 - 13, 2013

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BROADWAY PANHANDLER

scOOPY’s NOTeBOOk geBaLLe WinS round 1: After all the buildup, the district leader election at last Thursday’s convention of the local County Committee for the 64th Assembly District, Part A, turned out to be a blowout. Jon Geballe, former president of Village Independent Democrats, won with 55 votes to Arthur Schwartz’s four and Deley Gazinelli’s two. Schwartz is hoping to recapture the district leadership, which Brad Hoylman took over from him six years ago. “We knew that we were going to win, but we didn’t know it would be by this much,” Tony Hoffman, current V.I.D. president, said after last week’s vote. Geballe was backed by Hoylman and Assemblymember Deborah Glick, and Congressmember Jerrold Nadler also threw in his endorsement just hours before the election. However, Schwartz vowed to run in the upcoming primary election, no matter what. But he’ll be facing an organized opposition, just as he did in last week’s County Committee election, which was held to fill the seat until the primary. “We’ve been working on this ever since Brad resigned” as district leader to become state senator, Hoffman noted. “I don’t think Arthur’s mailings — without any support from elected officials, without any grassroots support — can beat our grassroots support.” While Schwartz was able to rebound from losing the district leadership to knock off incumbent State Committeeman Larry Moss six years ago, Hoffman scoffed that was only because Moss ran a limp campaign. Geballe, in his allotted three minutes of comments to the County Committee before the vote, pointedly remarked that, if elected, he would stand with Glick to “protect the waterfront” from overdevelopment — referring to proposals for residential housing at Pier 40 being pushed by the local youth sports leagues and the Hudson River Park Trust. Noted Hoffman, “Arthur has a very different vision of the waterfront than the activists do — he supports development. Arthur’s and Deborah’s vision of the waterfront are 180 degrees opposite. The V.I.D. and most of the people in the West Village support Deborah Glick’s vision of the waterfront.” Of the four people who voted for Schwartz, one was notably Rich Caccappolo, a former president of Greenwich Village Little League who recently took over from Schwartz as chairperson of Community Board 2’s Parks and Waterfront Committee. Also on the waterfront, Hoffman added that Geballe is one of the pro-bono attorneys fighting the Spectra gas pipeline at Gansevoort Peninsula. “Basically, there was an extremely well-organized effort,” Schwartz conceded after his pummeling. “Tony Hoffman is a very good organizer — he was a district leader for 10 years. He had all his ducks lined up. My hat’s off to him.” He also accused Hoylman and District Leader Keen Berger of packing the County Committee with “friends.” Speaking of Berger, Schwartz intimated that she may face a challenge. “I may have a female candidate,” he noted. “I can’t say yet. But I would say that having two straight district leaders would be inappropriate for the Village.” Geballe, Berger and Schwartz are all straight. Hoylman, Berger’s former co-district leader, is openly gay. Hmm, would Schwartz enlist his former co-district leader, Aubrey Lees, with whom he publicly feuded ferociously? “Yeah, right!” he laughed at our suggestion. We told Schwartz that Hoffman guaranteed their grassroots effort will trounce him, and it sounded like the longtime waterfront activist bristled a bit. “O.K., and my response to Tony is when he ran for Assembly he came in fourth with his grassroots effort, against Deborah Glick in 1990,” he noted, “which is why he disappeared for 20 years. Now, he says he’s back.” Schwartz said he’s running on his record of activism in the community, and that his record beats Geballe’s by a long shot. As for the waterfront, Schwartz said,

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Showing the love for Jon Geballe, center, after his win in last week’s County Committee election for district leader were, from left, Brad Hoylman, Keen Berger, Deborah Glick and Tony Hoffman.

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frankly, he doesn’t believe there’s that much opposition out there to the residential plan — save for the same few activists from decades ago who turn up at meetings on the issue, like Ben Green and Marcy Benstock. For her part, Berger is happy Geballe won. “I am very excited to be working with Jonathan,” she said. “I am so glad that I have a district leader that I will be able to consider a partner in this difficult Assembly district.” To Schwartz’s threat to run a lesbian against her, Berger replied, “I believe that I am a good district leader for everyone — that’s my goal. I do represent everyone, of every sexual orientation, of every age, of every economic background. To choose someone specifically because of these particular qualities — it’s just not what the Village needs.” When we spoke to the winner, Geballe, this week, he reiterated his strong position on the waterfront. “I will be standing with Deborah,” he said, “and like Deborah, I feel that residential development on the waterfront is not the way to go for the community. The Pier 40 Champions plan — to the extent that it has residential on the waterfront — is not the way to go. The Durst plan, for adaptive reuse and mixed use, seems to be much more the way the community should be going,” he added, referring to the office space-and-retail plan, without residential housing, for Pier 40 being promoted by developer Douglas Durst. “I certainly want the kids to have enough field space,” Geballe said. “But putting residential on the waterfront ignores the fact that we’ve had two hurricanes in two years.” Ironically, while it was Maria Passannante-Derr who nominated Schwartz for district leader at the County Committee election, the president of the Village Reform Democratic Club, Schwartz’s home club, didn’t vote for him, and, in fact, most V.R.D.C. members also went for Geballe. Asked to explain that discrepancy, Derr told us, “I nominated Arthur Schwartz to remind people that he has a progressive record of community advocacy. However, we disagree on his pro-residential development of the waterfront. I voted for Jon Geballe because, he has stated, on several occasions, that he is committed to park development options other than residential.”

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February 7 - 13, 2013

Community going postal over Chelsea P.O. sale threat By Liza Béar On Jan. 22, while at the Old Chelsea Station to return a package ordered online, Village resident Barbara Ruether, 79, noticed a two-page letter pinned to the wall in the entrance that referred to the proposed sale of the historic, landmarked building. A few days later she acquired a PDF digital copy of the letter, plus the preservation covenant attached to it, and circulated it widely via e-mail to neighbors and local officials, who had not been notified previously. After fighting to stop the closure of St Vincent’s Hospital, where she worked for 35 years in the Department of Community Medicine, Ruether said that with the potential loss of another neighborhood fixture, “life was dissolving around her.” Old Chelsea Station, at 217 W. 18th St., is a two-story, red brick, limestonetrimmed, Colonial Revival-style structure built in 1937 under F.D.R.’s New Deal. The building is amply proportioned at 41,865 square feet. Its lobby retains green and buff marble floor and fullheight pilasters, as well as the deer and bear relief panels carved by Paul Fiene. It’s one of 29 Depression-era post offices in New York City. Dated Jan. 14, the letter, addressed to the Historic Preservation Field Services Bureau at the New York State Office

of Parks, Recreations and Historic Preservation, is to date the sole public reference of the sale — and of a 30-day public comment period, which expires Feb. 11, regarding possible adverse effects. Even Chuck Zlatkin, legislative and political director of the New York Metro Area Postal Union (APWU, AFL-CIO), who lives a few blocks away from Old Chelsea Station, said that he learned of the intended sale only a few days ago and that the union had not been notified. “This is endemic,” said Zlatkin on the phone. “Every time they do something, they keep it hidden. They didn’t contact the union or the community directly. It’s unacceptable. But they claim that’s all they’re required to do.” In its ongoing march toward privatization and deficit-reduction, the United States Postal Service has sold at least a dozen historic post offices nationally in the past year. Locally, protests by postal workers and supporters are being held on Feb. 6 against the sale of the Bronx processing and sorting facility, and on Feb. 9 against the pending closure of the Staten Island processing plant, which will impact services throughout the area. In an e-mailed statement in response to questions, Congressmember Jerrold Nadler urged U.S.P.S. “to keep its station at the Old Chelsea Post Office and to maintain all of the services currently

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available, without any reductions. “This post office is heavily used and provides a critical service to Chelsea residents,” he wrote, “many of whom are seniors or otherwise unable to travel far to conduct postal services. I am also distressed by the absence of clarity or transparency by the U.S.P.S. surrounding the sale of its Chelsea property. We should not learn of an impending sale and closure only through a letter to the state agency on historic preservation. Along with the Chelsea community and elected officials, I am asking U.S.P.S. to reconsider its closure of the Old Chelsea Post Office and to engage in a public dialogue on its plans.” Community Board 4 is taking up the issue at its full board meeting on Feb. 6, according to District Manager Robert Benfatto, who said that most likely C.B. 4 will authorize a letter to U.S.P.S. detailing “the importance of an up-andrunning post office staffed by people in Chelsea, the importance of the building they presently use, the importance of an open and transparent process, and the importance of clear information to keep the community well-informed.” In addition to the Prince St. Station (sold to Apple), recent post office closures in Manhattan include Tudor City Station, Dag Hammarskjöld Station and Empire Station, each of which has been

replaced with an automated postal center; in the Bronx, Van Nest Station, Crotona Park Station and Oak Point Station; in Queens, La Guardia Airport Station in Flushing and the parcel post annex in Long Island City. Reached by phone in Tampa, Florida, and asked for clarification, Ann M. Yarnell, the Postal Service’s facilities environmental specialist, and the author of the U.S.P.S. letter, aware of the concern and confusion in the Chelsea community, gave her account of what happened. It appears that her letter, regarding historical landmark issues only, was —contrary to standard procedure — sent out before the normal notification letter regarding the actual sale of the building. The latter is due to be sent in the next week or so. For confirmation of the exact date, Yarnell referred questions to Joseph J. Mulvey, U.S.P.S. real estate specialist for the region who would be writing that letter. However, on his cell phone in Massachusetts, Mulvey said that he could not answer questions from the news media and that he would forward the request to Congetta Chirichello at U.S.P.S. corporate communications, but that he could not guarantee that she would contact him for his answers. At press time, Chirichello had not responded.

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February 7 - 13, 2013

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Rally slams violence, pushes parental responsibility Continued from page 1 it took my son’s death to save all the kids in my community — if that’s the sacrifice that had to be made — then let’s make a change that way.” The Jan. 31 unity rally, which was organized and led by a broad coalition of youth-based organizations, settlement houses and elected officials, began at the corner of E. Sixth St. and Avenue D, and concluded near the corner of Columbia and Rivington Sts., just steps away from where Ward was murdered. And although so many mourners continue to turn to religion in this, and other, times of crisis, Delgado called on her neighbors to never lose sight of their personal responsibilities. “We’re gonna pull through this together,” she said. “But it’s us, the parents — we have to do this. We have to be more proactive. We can’t just let them walk out the door and say, ‘God protect my baby, I’ll leave it in God’s hands, I know my son’s going to be fine.’ That’s not it. It’s us, along with God.” Those words echoed a fast-growing sentiment among a community — one dominated by public housing — whose residents and representatives say it is dangerously lacking in positive youth programs, antiviolence outreach and support for struggling, low-income parents. Later, Delgado also announced that a sports-oriented youth foundation will soon be created in her son’s name, while adding that it is still in the early planning stages. Numerous other speakers also highlighted the need for an even stronger reaction to the plague of illegal guns that grips the Lower East Side, as in so many other neighborhoods within this city, as well as throughout the nation. Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh, who last week called for another district attorney-sponsored gun buyback event — which allows people to anonymously turn in firearms in exchange for cash — drilled those points home once again after the Jan. 31 rally. “We’ve been to many of these events in our community,” Kavanagh said, “where we’ve had to ask: Why? Why does this have to happen again and again? And part of it is that people, when they look around and believe they see danger within their community, they think, ‘I have to arm myself too. I have to get a gun. I have to be careful. I have to be ready.’ “But we have to make sure that people understand,” he continued, “that if you’re picking up a gun, you’re only making yourself more vulnerable, you’re making other people more vulnerable, and you’re only bringing on another tragedy. We just don’t need the guns in this community.” The Lower East Side’s first gun buyback event, last October, took 50 guns off the street. More recently, officials announced that a Feb. 2 buyback in Brooklyn took in 113 weapons.

Photos by Sam Spokony

Arlene Delgado, the mother of slain L.E.S. teen Raphael Ward, spoke at the Jan. 31 unity rally, flanked by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, left, and Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh.

Local children joined their parents in marching through the L.E.S. on Jan. 31, calling for an end to gun violence.

A representative of the Manhattan D.A.’s office said, at a Jan. 17 community forum, that the office is considering holding another buyback — and Kavanagh recently said that he has been part of those discussions for the past several weeks. And those two powerful messages — one of parent and community responsibility, and another of antigun fervor —

were perhaps most eloquently juxtaposed by Jackie Rowe-Adams, who co-founded the group Harlem Mothers SAVE (Stop Another Violent End) in 2006 after losing two sons to gun violence. “You want to talk about stop and frisk? Frisk your kids before they leave the house!” Rowe-Adams said. “Parents need to stay involved. Yeah, it’s about getting more programs, but you need to take your

kids there. You gotta get up, get out from in front of the TV, stop smoking weed with your kids — yeah, I said it! — and take care of your kids and pay attention.” At one point, she also led the crowd in a chant to remind them of a somewhat commonsense obligation that might be forgotten amidst the day-to-day action of urban life. “If you see something, say something, because the guns are coming from out of town,” Rowe-Adams said, mirroring a point made by Kavanagh about the dangers of gun trafficking. “But somebody around here is putting them in these kids’ hands. So if you see somebody giving somebody a gun, you must say something!” And the cry for help came not only from parents, but from the children of the Lower East Side. Of the many young people in attendance that night, two stepped forward to share their thoughts. They were Jasmine White, 19, and Mesha Moore, 17, two Baruch Houses residents who were close friends of Raphael Ward. The two girls spoke briefly, but they shared a poignant reminder about the power of communication within a family. “As kids, there’s only so much we can do,” White said. “We need parents, and other adults, to help us. If you know your child is doing wrong, don’t just let them keep doing wrong. Talk to them about it. And even if they don’t listen, talk to them anyway. “Yeah, we may argue with you, or tell you we hate you,” the teen said, “but the things you say will always stick there in the back of our minds.”


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February 7 - 13, 2013

Ed Koch, Village pol who became mayor, dies at 88; OBITUARY By Albert Amateau Edward I. Koch, three-term mayor of New York City who began his political career in Greenwich Village and defeated Tammany chief Carmine DeSapio 50 years ago, died Feb. 1 at the age of 88. In and out of the hospital over the past few months, he died of pneumonia on the day that “Koch,” a documentary film by Neil Barsky, opened in the Village. Outspoken and brash, Ed Koch guided the city as mayor from 1978 to 1989 as it emerged from the depths of fiscal insolvency, a homelessness crisis and a crippling transit strike. He was by turns a pragmatic and combative politician whose philosophy shifted by the time he became mayor from progressive to what many of his old Reform Democratic colleagues viewed as right of center. His third term as mayor was marred by scandals that ended in disgrace and jail for several politicos with whom Koch had been friendly, although the mayor was not tainted personally. Nevertheless, the Koch legacy includes municipal financial stability, a $5 billion middle- and low-income housing program and reform in the selection of judicial candidates. He was also an important supporter of the state-sponsored 42nd St. Development Project.

Ed Koch in 2003 at his law office at Bryan “As he did for a generation that grew up in a very different city than the one in which we live today, he inspired me to pursue a career of service to our the city,” said Muzzy Rosenblatt, director of the Bowery Residents’ Committee (BRC) — a nonprofit housing agency based in Chelsea — and former acting commissioner of the city Department of Homeless Services. “At the BRC gala in 2012, he spoke with passion

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about his administration’s achievement of the largest affordable housing program of any city in the nation and of our duty to reach out to people in need and provide them with care. Because Ed Koch, our best champion, left this legacy to our city, he will always be with us,” Rosenblatt said. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance said in a statement, “New York would not be

one of the safest big cities in America if Ed Koch had not spearheaded one of the most important criminal justice reforms in the city’s history: the selection of Criminal Court judges based on merit instead of political connections,” Vance said, citing Koch as having had foresight, vision and courage. As mayor, Koch extended the Manhattan Reform policy of establishing screening panels to pass on judicial appointments citywide. His outsized personality and zealous focus on his political career and on his image kept him in the public eye long after his defeat for a fourth term as mayor in 1989. In 2008, after a couple of hospital stays, Koch bought a burial plot in Trinity Cemetery on 155th St. and Broadway for $20,000. He erected a marble headstone that proclaimed his Jewish faith with an English translation of a Hebrew prayer. The headstone goes on to say Koch fiercely loved the city of New York, its people and, above all, fiercely loved his country and served in its armed forces in World War II. Born in the Bronx and raised in Newark, N.J., Ed Koch earned a law degree at New York University in the Village, where he campaigned for Adlai Stevenson for president in 1952 from a soapbox in Sheridan Square, according to Andrew Berman, director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. A resident of the Village since the 1950s, first

Continued on page 7


February 7 - 13, 2013

A liberal turned centrist Continued from page 6 at 81 Bedford St., then 72 Barrow St., then 14 Washington Place and finally 2 Fifth Ave after he left office, Koch was one of the founders of Village Independent Democrats (V.I.D.). A Reform club that included former members of the Stevenson campaign, V.I.D. was part of a movement to defeat Tammany, partly because the old guard did not go all out for Stevenson against the war hero, Dwight Eisenhower, who was elected president. By 1961 when Koch was V.I.D. vice president and Village demographics were changing, Carol Greitzer, who later became a city councilmember, and James Lanigan won the co-district leader race against DeSapio and his running mate. But the Tammany chief ran again for male district leader in 1963. Koch, who always said he became the Reform candidate because no one else wanted the task, beat DeSapio by a scant 41 votes. He won again with more comfortable margins in 1964 and 1965. “We saw him evolve into the political personality that everyone knows,” Greitzer told a reporter for this paper last week. “He was a strong speaker for Stevenson and other candidates but he was a terrible campaigner for himself,” she said of Koch’s early races. In 1962 he ran in the Democratic primary against state Assemblymember William Passannante and positioned himself to the left of the incumbent by promising to liberalize state laws against sodomy, abortion and divorce. Koch lost, taking only 38 percent of the vote. “He said himself that he ran a terrible campaign, but he became more confident the next year after he beat DeSapio,” Greitzer said. In 1967 Koch ran for City Council from the Silk Stocking District, which then included the Village as well as the Upper East Side. He won, campaigning in person at subway stations, issuing newsletters and answering every piece of constituent mail. The same kind of campaign in 1969 won him the congressional district seat. The city’s finances tumbled and its infrastructure crumbled in the 1970s, and Koch ran for mayor in 1977 as a centrist candidate who would stand up to municipal employee unions and make the city whole. He won, and won twice more, but in 1989 lost the primary to David Dinkins. In 1982, when Koch ran for governor, his own V.I.D. club refused to endorse him against Mario Cuomo and Koch joined the V.I.D. offshoot Village Reform Democratic Club, but he fell out later with that club, too. Tony Hoffman, current V.I.D. president and a former Village district leader, recalled the club’s split with Koch as the mayor became more politically conservative. “It’s understandable that a progressive Village club would have a different take on things from the mayor of the city, but Koch didn’t understand that,” Hoffman said. “He didn’t like to be questioned. The differences escalated. We thought his closing of Sydenham Hospital in Harlem during his first term was racially insensitive. Koch later acknowledged that. We also supported the teachers’ union

when he turned against it. “I blame Ed for the bitter split,” Hoffman said. “He was mayor and should have gotten people together amicably. But that wouldn’t have been Ed Koch; he was pugnacious.” Koch demanded loyalty from his friends and would break completely with old comrades who did or said things he didn’t like. One permanently broken Village friendship was with the late Ed Gold, a member of Community Board 2 and a journalist who frequently contributed articles to The Villager. Sometimes, however, Koch remained cordial with old friends despite irreconcilable differences, like with the late Martin Berger, who succeeded Koch as district leader. “By the time he invited us to a dinner event at Gracie Mansion, he knew we disagreed on a lot of issues but he didn’t consider us enemies,” said Keen Berger, Martin’s wife and currently the Village’s female district leader. Betsy Haggerty, who worked in the Mayor’s Office of Single Room Occupancy (S.R.O.) Housing from 1980 to 1985 and at one point led the Family Hotel Inspection Unit, recalled the complex relationship between Koch and housing advocates. “We were dealing with families living in crowded apartments under terrible conditions,” Haggerty said. “We saw our jobs as defending S.R.O. tenants, families living in welfare hotels, and educating the mayor about how things were. The policy was that we could tell the administration anything and disagree with the city’s responses. They didn’t always do what we wanted but they listened. They expected us to push and we did, often pushing further than they liked,” Haggerty said. Koch never married, and his sexuality was an issue in his 1982 try for governor. One poster in that campaign said, “Vote for Cuomo, not the Homo,” but Andrew Cuomo, who was running the campaign for his father, denied being responsible for it. Koch said often that it was nobody’s business, but he told a reporter in 1989 that he was heterosexual. Nevertheless, when Gay and Lesbian Independent Democrats (GLID) criticized him for what they said was the city’s weak response to the AIDS epidemic, pro-Koch gays organized the Stonewall Democratic Club. Koch, who often crossed party lines to endorse candidates, became friendly in recent years with the black activist Reverend Al Sharpton, who used to picket the mayor’s Washington Place apartment. A civil rights marcher in Mississippi in the 1960s, Koch as mayor had lost favor with black leaders. Congressmember Jerry Nadler called Koch the “quintessential New Yorker.” Nadler said in a statement that he was proud to have been at Koch’s side “…on so many issues affecting the city and the state of Israel, of which he was an unflinching supporter.” “He was irrepressible,” said George Arzt, a public relations executive who had covered City Hall for the New York Post, served as the mayor’s press secretary during Koch’s third term, and remained a friend. “His leadership qualities were often underestimated,” Arzt said, adding, “He always wanted to do the right thing and he raised the bar for public service.”

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February 7 - 13, 2013

i knew Ed Koch before he became Ed Koch; Rebounded By caroL greitzer Knowing Ed Koch for well more than 50 years guarantees lots of memories — some good, some not so good — some surprising — some amusing. But as I listened or read about people’s recollections, I realized that these were mostly anecdotes from the mayoral years. And that doesn’t give the complete picture. So I found myself saying to someone, “I knew Ed Koch before he was Ed Koch.” Before there existed the brash, in-your-face personality everyone conjures up when his name is mentioned. We met during the 1956 presidential campaign as members of the Stevenson-Kefauver Committee, which was located in one room at 224 W. Fourth St. Ed was one of the few people who would go out on the street as a stump speaker for our candidates (and did very well at it), whereas the rest of us took our campaign cards and went door to door to turn out the vote.

My reports to the club were very straightforward, but Ed would embellish his, upgrading them to the level of entertainment. That was undoubtedly the start of the Ed Koch persona. The election over, in December of ’56 the group convened to form the Village Independent Democrats. Most of the people were enthusiastic, but a few recommended a different strategy. Rather than become an insurgent club facing an uphill battle to defeat Carmine DeSapio’s “regular” Tamawa Club, Koch suggested joining Tamawa and “boring from within.” The fact that women couldn’t be members of that club and were relegated to a sort of ladies auxiliary was just one of the reasons Koch’s idea was rejected. Nevertheless, he and a couple of others left the group and did join Tamawa, only to return in frustration several months later. While Ed was great as a stump speaker, on his return he was somewhat diffident (would anyone believe it if I described him as almost shy?) possibly because he was regarded with suspicion by some. Gradually, he became an active, accepted member of the club…but only one of several lawyers — and others — who articulated issues and debated endlessly at weekly meetings. All around

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Co-district leaders Carol Greitzer and Ed Koch circa 1965, sharing a serious moment at a V.I.D. meeting as they looked toward the speaker’s podium. “I think it was something we were concerned about,” Greitzer said, not recalling the specific issue.

town the joke was that V.I.D. meetings lasted till 1 a.m. That probably did happen on occasion. In 1960 I decided to run for vice president in the club elections. But when I heard that Ed was planning to run for president, I said to myself, “If he can run for president, so can I!” And I did. And I won, maybe because some folks still felt uneasy about Ed. Then, in the tradition of unity that characterized V.I.D. at that time, I appointed Ed the club’s law chairman…and we worked together harmoniously ever after — or at least for several years. Flash forward to 1962. Ed decided to run for the Assembly against popular Assemblyman Bill Passannante. Bill was a Tamawa member but he had a liberal voting record. By his own acknowledgement later, Ed was a terrible candidate, despite having an interesting, substantive, S.A.D. campaign — to change the laws on sodomy, abortion and divorce. It turned out that the Ed Koch who could speak effectively on behalf of others, was as yet unable to do so for himself. But he learned. When he ran for district leader in 1963 he was more comfortable in the role of candidate. But the road to becoming a candidate wasn’t easy. After his dismal 1962 performance, many people began beating the bushes to come up with a suitable candidate after Jim Lanigan, who ran successfully with me as district leader in 1961, left V.I.D. and formed a club of his own. Jack Kaplan, founder of the J.M. Kaplan Fund, told me

he had a great idea. Why not get Jane Jacobs to run? he asked. I explained that party rules called for a male district leader and a female district leader, and that we needed the male. He didn’t seem to think much of that rule! Ed campaigned with amazing energy and enthusiasm. In those days you could get into buildings pretty easily, except for some with doormen. In elevator buildings you’d ride to the top and work your way down, ringing Democrats’ doorbells as you went. In walk-ups, you’d go up, one floor at a time. Most folks opened their doors back then, particularly if a female voice responded when they asked, “Who’s there?” There were many amusing incidents. I recall one person who opened the door stark naked and said, “Oh. I thought you were someone else.” When we’d get back to the clubhouse every night after canvassing, we’d both give reports as to how the evening went. My reports were very straightforward, but Ed would embellish his. He didn’t exactly lie, but somehow, raconteur style, he’d work in a few side remarks that upgraded his reports to the level of entertainment. And that was undoubtedly the start of the Ed Koch persona other New Yorkers came to know and, mostly, love. Winning that district leader race, even by only 41 votes, and then decisively winning the rerun gave Ed the confidence in himself that was not altogether evident earlier. When as democratic leaders we did the unthinkable — at that time — endorsing Republican John Lindsay for mayor, we had to go on trial before our colleagues — the Executive Committee of the New York County Committee, formerly known as Tammany Hall. The meeting took place in a basement dining room at the old Commodore Hotel. We were represented by our club member Stanley Geller and were both confident that day. All they could do was expel us. But we knew, and they did too, that if they did so, our local County

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February 7 - 13, 2013

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after his ‘boring from within’ Tammany tactic tanked Continued from page 8 Committee members would simply reelect us. So nothing really happened, and we emerged from the meeting, with TV cameras operating, into the rush-hour throngs of Grand Central. Events like this helped build up the Koch media archive, which, of course, was to become quite extensive in ensuing years. On club nights in Greenwich Village, Ed was known to rush down to the Sheridan Square newsstand to check on the morning papers when he thought he might be in them. Back then there were seven dailies in New York, and the Village was geographically between the Downtown location of papers like the World Telegram, the Post and the Sun and the Midtown location of the Times and Tribune, so we got lots of coverage. Some of the cultural changes in the ’60s had an influence on all of us living in the Village. The coffeehouses and music scene on Macdougal St. caused noisy crowds that became a campaign issue for the residents — mainly Italians. As a founder of the Macdougal Area Neighborhood Association (MANA), Ed developed a new, nonpolitical relationship with South Village Italians. He went to social functions and drank wine with people like Dina Nolan, Harry Risetto and John Perazzo. Dina was a warm, beautiful, earth mother type who took Ed under her wing and soon had him singing “Mala Femina” and other Italian love songs along with the group. This informal side of him manifested itself even after he became mayor. When he visited me for weekends at Fire Island, he joined the barefoot crowd, helped in the garden and schmoozed with the local shopkeepers, just as we’d see him shopping at Balducci’s and, later, Citarella here in the Village. But while the warm, friendly Ed was being nurtured, the witty, acerbic side was also beginning to develop. When some woman began haranguing him for not doing enough to stem cruelty to animals, he told

Koch and Greitzer campaigning for district leader around 1963, talking to voters in Sheridan Square.

her it was an issue he cared deeply about. “In fact,” he assured her, “I think we ought to do something about the poor lobsters being thrown into boiling water!” When Ed was running for mayor, some pundits complained that he had no executive experience. I laughed at that… because any time we had a project, like saving the colorful pushcarts on Bleecker St., or planning a Park on the Pier (POP) event to advocate for a recreation pier, Ed organized the committees and delegated authority. You get the posters. You get the drinks. You’re in charge of entertainment, etc. He did it quickly and efficiently; I

knew it would serve him well when he became mayor. And I was right. Ed once invented a toy for young children. It wasn’t exactly successful… but it must have given him the invention bug. Because then he invented Ed Koch. Let me conclude with an incident that took place just a few weeks before he became mayor, but after he was elected. Several of us attended the wedding of Steve Berger and Cynthia Wainwright on a boat moored at W. 42nd St. That evening it poured and poured and never let up. Even when we left it was still raining hard. We couldn’t get a cab; a bus never came; and we walked all the way from the river

to the Port Authority terminal where we could pick up subways or buses. Drenched as we all were, Ed was cheerful and philosophic about the situation. “Can you imagine the mayor of New York not being able to get a taxi and having to walk in the rain?” he asked, both rhetorically and incredulously — simultaneously. Knowing Ed, I’m sure it never happened again. After being district leader, Greitzer was elected to the City Council in 1969, representing the Village, Chelsea and Midtown, holding office for 21 years until ’91.

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February 7 - 13, 2013

Police BLOTTER Spring fire murder charge

Ladies to the rescue

  The man accused of starting a fire in his Spring St. apartment building on Jan. 10, killing one person, has been indicted on murder and arson charges. Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced on Feb. 5 that Wei Chu Hu, 45, has been charged in State Supreme Court with two counts of second-degree murder, one count of first-degree arson and one count of second-degree assault. Hu is believed to have started the fire around 6:30 p.m in his second-floor apartment at 41 Spring St., after an argument with his wife. As he was fleeing the building, Hu also attacked a police officer who was responding to the scene, according to court documents. Renee Lea Williams, 66, who lived above Hu, was killed in the blaze. Officials found her fatally burned body on the building’s fourth-floor fire escape, according to court documents.  

  In a “Charlie’s Angels”-esque scene, three women foiled a thug’s attempt to make off with a stolen cell phone near Union Square on Jan. 30. The victim, a 53-year-old woman, told police that while she was walking past the corner of E. 13th St. and University Place around 6 p.m., William Cox, 28, smacked her cell phone out of her hand, causing it to fall to the ground. She said Cox then picked up the phone, shoved her and started to run away. But, according to the police report, three female bystanders who witnessed the crime surrounded the thief and stopped him from fleeing. After holding him back, police arrived on the scene and were able to apprehend Cox, charging him with robbery.  

Hostage gunman convicted   A State Supreme Court jury has convicted the man who shot three people and held more than a dozen others hostage in an East Village bar in 2002. Steve Johnson, 45, was found guilty on multiple counts of attempted murder, kidnaping, assault and weapons charges, D.A. Vance announced on Feb. 4. Around 2 a.m. on June 16, 2002, Johnson begin his rampage armed with a .380-caliber semiautomatic pistol, a .22-caliber semiautomatic pistol, a .22-caliber Derringer pistol, more than 100 rounds of ammunition, a sword, an expandable baton, a combustible accelerant and two barbeque lighters, according to court documents. Johnson first approached a group of four people on the sidewalk near E. 11th St. and Second Ave., and shot a man in the stomach, Vance said. He then followed the injured man into Bar Veloce on Second Ave., where Johnson shot him again and proceeded to take 15 bar patrons and employees hostage at gunpoint. A 45-minute standoff later ensued, with Johnson exchanging gunfire with police while using a hostage as a human shield. Eventually two of the hostages were able to tackle Johnson and allow officers to enter and apprehend him. No one was killed that night. “This was a hateful and meticulously planned attack on innocent victims,” Vance said. “The defendant terrorized a roomful of people, who showed tremendous courage during an extraordinarily harrowing ordeal. I thank the jury for its service in this case.” Johnson is expected to be sentenced on March 8, and faces life in prison.  

Cop wasn’t a john   This guy was looking to score cash in exchange for sexual favors, but he made an unlucky choice while trying to turn his next trick. Around 1 a.m. on Feb. 1, Samuel Best, 20, walked up to a plainclothes officer on the corner of Christopher and Hudson Sts. and offered him oral sex for $20, police said. The officer immediately apprehended Best, and also found that he was carrying a gravity knife and several allegedly illegal pills. Best was charged with prostitution, criminal possession of a controlled substance and criminal possession of a weapon.  

‘Gifted’ employee   A convenience store employee was outed by her boss for allegedly stealing more than $1,200 from the shop, and now she’s facing criminal charges. A manager at the Duane Reade on Seventh Ave. near W. 13th St. told police that Ashley Walker, 25, made off with the money by filling up three store gift cards and keeping them for her own personal use. After investigating the matter, officers showed up at the establishment on the morning of Feb. 1 to arrest Walker. She was charged with grand larceny.

Sam Spokony

OCCUPY

Community News


February 7 - 13, 2013

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‘Unchain’ the hood, artists protest on bodega walk By Sam Spokony East Villagers took to the streets on Saturday to protest the spread of 7-Eleven convenience stores throughout the neighborhood, and to show some love for local bodegas that have had roots in the community for years. Bob Holman and Eileen Myles, who are both longtime local residents, activists and renowned writers, led a group of about two dozen demonstrators on a march that started around noon outside the site of a future 7-Eleven at E. 11th St. and Avenue A. “This is about free expression, and it’s about people taking pride in their neighborhood and their delis,” said Holman, the founder of the Bowery Poetry Club, who made the march while draped in symbolic chain links. “There’s just something awful about the soullessness and facelessness of 7-Eleven, and this is the tipping point.” Along with the aforementioned site, 7-Eleven announced last month that it plans to open dozens more stores in Manhattan over the next few years. The mega-chainstore already has locations on E. 14th St. and the Bowery. So on Saturday, amid chants condemning corporate greed, Holman, Myles and their fellow protesters took a brief tour of the bodegas near Tompkins Square Park. And the antiestablishment crew didn’t just talk the talk, as they also shelled out a few

Photo by Sam Spokony

Bob Holman, left, and Eileen Myles, right, led Saturday’s 7-Eleven protest walk through the East Village.

bucks to their local proprietors, for a cup of coffee or a sandwich. “All right, I’m gonna go buy something!” Holman barked as the group made their first stop outside the Deli & Grocery on E. 11th St, between Avenue A and B. The other members followed suit, with some also sharing stories about how their

blocks’ bodegas had given them a helping hand after Hurricane Sandy struck. Outside the Sheen Brothers bodega, on Avenue B between E. Ninth and 10th Sts., Myles told of how the store had shared candles and generator power in the days of power outages following the storm. “They showed that they’re a real neigh-

borhood place,” she said. Later, outside Tompkins Finest Deli, on Avenue A near E. 10th St., another protestor told of how bodega employees had let him use their flashlight to shop and navigate inside the store in the dark after Sandy. And two blocks up, outside Poppy’s Gourmet Deli, also on Avenue A, the group took on another member when a resident of that building heard the commotion and came outside to join the protest. “I’m so glad to see them out here doing something, because I’ve been asking about how to get involved,” said Sherry Beth, 29, who has lived above the deli at 191 Avenue A for about two years, after moving from a previous apartment in the East Village. “I go to Poppy’s all the time. It’s great, and I just don’t want another 7-Eleven around here.” Holman said there will probably be a similar march planned within the next couple of weeks, although he added that this particular march was “all organic,” and somewhat spontaneous in its planning and the events of the walk itself. And in a move uncharacteristic of an East Village radical, Holman also gave a nod to Detective Jaime Hernandez, a Ninth Precinct community affairs officer, who the poet said was “pleasant” and understanding throughout the peaceful and nondisruptive protest. 

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February 7 - 13, 2013

edITORIAl

Soho street vendors At its January full board meeting, Community Board 2 unanimously passed a resolution calling on Mayor Bloomberg and the city to take steps toward dealing with chaotic street congestion caused by the massive number of street vendors along Broadway in Soho. The board wants Bloomberg to finally convene the Street Vendor Review Panel — something he has failed to do over the course of his three terms — in order to draw up and implement sensible new regulations. We agree that convening the review panel — which would include representatives from the departments of Small Business Services, Transportation and City Planning — is the right first step toward solving the vendor and pedestrian congestion along Broadway. The mayor and city basically chose to ignore this issue for more than a decade, as inconsistent or nonexistent enforcement of current laws compounded the problem, so the ball truly is in their court at this point. The C.B. 2 resolution came out of the board’s Environment, Public Safety and Public Health Committee — and the committee chose to tackle this difficult problem because they wanted to do the right thing by responding to the concerns of Soho residents. But as Committee Chairperson Bob Ely and neighborhood activist Pete Davies have pointed out, this shouldn’t be seen as a fight against the everyday people working as street vendors. These are simply people who have to make a living and feed their families. The point here isn’t to sweep hard-working people into the gutter. This is, plain and simple, a beef with the sluggishness of Mayor Bloomberg and the city. Now is the time for them to sit down and put some real effort into making Soho’s Broadway a safer, cleaner and more enjoyable place for everyone to be — whether they’re locals, tourists or vendors. These sort of street conditions might be the sort of things the proposed Soho Business Improvement District could focus on, were it ever to come into existence. However, many local residents are dead-set against the BID. Regardless of whether there is or isn’t a BID, though, there’s no reason the panel can’t be convened — now — to take a fresh look at the situation on the ground. If vendors-rights activists like Robert Lederman of ARTIST (Artists’ Response to Illegal State Tactics) feel that any review of the current conditions will only lead to an infringement of liberties and an overstepping of authority, they are free to make their case, and should do so. Defending art as free speech is one thing. But is a chicken kabob sandwich on a pita — or a hot sausage with onions and relish, or a potato knish — free speech, especially when purchased and eaten? Lederman rarely loses in his court challenges, but if sidewalk crowding and other issues attributed to food carts are real concerns in Soho, then let the vendor panel take a good look at them and make its own, studied determination. The panel’s purpose, after all, is to achieve a positive result. But the failure to even convene the body means there’s no oversight whatsoever, except for sporadic penalties against the carts and vendors by city inspectors. And perhaps the vendors themselves have issues that they’d like to air in this sort of forum. In short, this can be a win-win for all concerned. Above all, we cannot fathom why the city blatantly refuses to respond to the pleas of Soho residents and C.B. 2 to convene the Street Vendor Review Panel. Why does this panel even exist at all if its only purpose is to remain dormant, toothless and invisible? Convene the panel.

leTTeRs TO The edITOR Menin is the most progressive To The Editor: Re “B.P. race: Lappin meets and greets; Post blasts Menin” (news article, Jan. 31): I am supporting Julie Menin because she is the most progressive candidate in the race. Her opponents all voted for Chelsea Market and the N.Y.U. 2031 expansion plan and thus against the interests of Village and Chelsea residents. One of her opponents voted to overturn term limits. Lappin was useless on the Living Wage Bill. I could care less about Julie’s party registration more than a decade ago. Julie is the only true progressive in this race and has a terrific record on progressive issues. Allen Roskoff

Berman nails it again To The Editor: Re “Noho and Soho’s firewall against N.Y.U. is at risk” (talking point, by Andrew Berman, Jan. 31): Andrew Berman scores again with a well-crafted, sobering opinion piece on the N.Y.U. expansion boondoggle. If the eminently capable, well-versed and articulate Mr. Berman does decide on a City Council campaign launch, he will receive a flood of support. As for N.Y.U. President John Sexton, perhaps he should heed the wise words of folk philosopher Will Rogers: “When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging” — particularly in the Soho and Noho neighborhoods. Joseph Gross

Restrict vendors? Think again To The Editor: Re “Board 2 asks city to review vendors jamming Broadway” (news article, Jan. 31): Community Board 2 has a very long history of harassing and persecuting street artists and vendors. I have testified many times before C.B. 2, the First Police Precinct Community Council and the City Council, explaining that draconian new laws and new restrictions are not what is needed. Enforcing the existing vending laws, which are 60 pages long, very detailed, and which cover all possible

scenarios, is what is needed. When C.B. 2 first started persecuting street artists it caused us to go to court and win the first in a series of rulings that greatly strengthened vending rights. I suggest before you open up this next can of worms, that you might ask former Councilmembers Kathryn Freed and Alan Gerson what to expect from trying to eliminate artists and vendors from your community. You might also ask your community board why it approves almost 100 giant-sized street fairs in your district each year, some of which are fronts for organized crime, and each of which causes more congestion than all the vendors being complained about create in their entire lifetimes. Ironically, C.B. 2 is falling into a trap with this entire idea, which is directly associated with the planned Soho Business Improvement District. BIDs want to take over vending for themselves. Open and unobstructed sidewalks are the very last thing they are interested in. Helping them to do it by reopening the Street Vendor Review Panel will ultimately bring you far more congestion, noise, dirt and tourists than you complain about now. And if you want to relieve sidewalk congestion right away, why not eliminate the thousands of illegal sidewalk planters that landlords and stores have installed on Soho’s narrow sidewalks? Robert Lederman Lederman is president, ARTIST (Artists’ Response to Illegal State Tactics)

Why i had to leave the L.E.S. To The Editor: Re “Trying to save our community on a changing L.E.S.” (Clayton, Jan. 31): I remember living on the seventh floor of a building between Avenues A and B on First St. I was a student attending Hostos Community College in the South Bronx at the time. I had nothing except some furniture that I had purchased from my best friend’s parents and which we carried up those seven flights to my walk-up. My sister lived two blocks away near Tompkins Square Park, and I remember eating minced eggs at Ratner’s early in the morning while we talked about politics, philosophy, religion, art and all kinds of things like that. That was 40 years ago. My sister died of AIDS, my brother-in-law died of an overdose and I went on to get a Ph.D. I saw what was happening, and I’ve lived overseas for about 15 years.

Continued on page 14

IRA BlUTReIch

The spirit of Ed Koch will always live on.


February 7 - 13, 2013

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City Hall to silver screen: The filmic life of Ed Koch NOTeBOOk By Jerry taLLmer Fifty years is a long time to have known somebody, and it has been all of 50 years and more since we of the new weekly Village Voice were cultivated by a clean-cut, Uptown, reform Republican named John Vliet Lindsay and a Downtown, legal eagle, reform Democrat named Edward Irving Koch. Each of these gentlemen, tall, gracious, idealistic Lindsay, certified WASP, and tall, gabby, balding Ed Koch, certified Hebe, repeatedly — and often at the same moment — found their way up a narrow flight of stairs to the rattletrap, floor-through, editorial office and birthplace of The VV at 22 Greenwich Avenue, next door to Sutter’s bakery, across 10th Street from the Women’s House of Detention. There, at our desks, they each in turn, or both together, Lindsay and Koch, would shoot the breeze with editor Daniel Wolf, publisher Edwin C. Fancher, and even with me, certified culture vulture of the “back of the book” — the theater and arts section — of the paper. I do not remember that we — Koch and I — ever much talked about movies. We talked about how to try to unseat the dark-eyeglassed Tammany Hall district leader Carmine De Sapio who, in conjunction with hard-driving, young Robert Kennedy, this crucial year of 1960, seemed to have a stranglehold on the

Again, I doubt if Koch and Wolf discussed movies a great deal. Too much real-life, Spike Lee-type cinema unreeling on all sides. So imagine my surprise when, one fine day eight or nine years ago I found myself wandering through a movie review in this paper, The Villager (not Village Voice), by one Edward I. Koch. And again the following week. And the next. And every week thereafter. They weren’t movie reviews as such. They were reviews of other people’s reviews, and/or stuff like the weather that day, and what this reviewer — Ed Koch — had had to nosh during the picture, and whether the movie at hand had been worth the price of admission, and if the theater seat had been too comfortable, or not comfortable enough, and whether his weekend moviegoing companion had enjoyed it or hated it, and so on and so forth. Finally, Karen Cooper, who founded and runs the invaluable, impeccable Film Forum on Houston Street, and takes film (particularly documentary film) very seriously indeed, had had enough. She wrote a long, angry dissection of the Koch critical process which The Villager printed in full, and then — by way of balance I suppose — The Villager’s then publisher John W. Sutter called me up and asked if I’d like to spend a Saturday

accompanying Ed Koch to the movies and writing up how the former mayor went about creating his review or reviews of same. Koch would like to do it, John Sutter said. I said, sure. I’m always interested in how things work. We picked a Saturday and a movie and a theater — the Angelika, I think — and one week later I was almost out the door on the way to the assignment when the telephone rang again. It was John Sutter. “It’s off,” he said. “He changed his mind. He doesn’t want to do it. He’s afraid of what you might do to him.” So now we’ll never know. I’m sorry, Ed. You were many things, good and not so good, but as your old antagonist Al Sharpton said the night of the day you died, you were — unlike so many other people in your business — always authentic, always flesh and blood. And you played a supreme joke on the universe: You kicked the bucket at New York Presbyterian (where you’d arrived saying: “How’m I doing?” 88 years earlier), at 2 o’clock in the morning of the day that Neil Barsky’s “Koch,” a documentary all about you, was itself arriving at the Angelika movie theater on Houston Street. That’s entertainment.

I was to join Koch at the movies and report on how he created his reviews — at least that was the plan. entire looming Democratic National Convention. We all know how that turned out — and ended in Dallas, Texas, November 22, 1963. Ed Koch’s three terms as mayor of New York City still lay distantly before us. And so did his career as film critic, much less my own as all-purpose critic, reporter, feature writer and editorialist for Dorothy Schiff’s New York Post for thirty-something years until disposed of by Rupert Murdoch in his night of the long knives. Koch knew how to squeeze a nickel. Gracie Mansion be damned. To the end, he clung onto his $450-a-month, rentcontrolled Greenwich Village apartment, from which you could spy all those rooftop water tanks that Joseph Kahn, veteran New York Post investigative reporter, loved to paint. I mean, paint pictures of. Koch let him come in every so often and do it, hanging out Koch’s window. When Fancher and Wolf sold The Village Voice in 1970, Mayor Ed moved Dan Wolf, as an unpaid adviser — on race relations and everything else — right to a special desk in a room next to Koch’s own locale in City Hall.

Koch came back to Loisaida

Ed Koch paid a visit to the Sixth Street Community Center in June 2005 to take a look at “Viva Loisaida,” Marlis Momber’s exhibit of her photographs of the Lower East Side from the 1960s and ’70s. Momber invited Hizzoner to sign one of the photos that showed him and activists in 1987 at a City Hall ceremony at which he signed legislation co-naming Avenue C “Loisaida Avenue.” Koch inscribed the photo “Hooray — You Won,” recognizing the activists’ efforts to name their community.

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February 7 - 13, 2013

letters to the editor Continued from page 12 Now, I live in Japan. Here, there are mom-and-pop stores and the streets are safe. I recall going back two years ago and seeing what had become of the Lower East Side. It is as you say. There is a lot that I don’t recognize anymore. But, after traveling much of the world, I’ve come to realize that we cannot hold onto the past forever. The only absolute law of nature is change, and that while we need to remember the past, we must embrace the present and look forward toward the future. I celebrate the past but my nostalgia is merely a memory of a romanticized past that was really never as great as I recall. It was just reality, as the present is now. Ralph Mora

One of the last of a breed To The Editor: Re “Trying to save our community on a changing L.E.S.” (Clayton, Jan. 31): This article says it all. Clayton is one of the last of a great New York City breed. He comes from a time when artists and thinkers cared about the truth and had the integrity to stand against the status quo. I miss the time when New York City artists were respected for the content of their work instead of how much money they earn for creating corporate propaganda. The Lower East Side was created by guys like Clayton and destroyed by college grads with daddy’s money. I guess it’s still the best city in the world, but that doesn’t say a lot about cities. Stuart Braunstein

Where is our Eastbeth? To The Editor: Re “Creative pioneers under assault on the new L.E.S.” (Clayton, Jan. 24): Clayton, we all owe you a continuous debt for your commitment to all of us. This nightmare news about Taylor Mead, Harry Antonopoulos and MM Serra is reaching me courtesy of Miss Moossy here in Bangkok. It is truly absurd that the hip quotient Taylor practically invented is what has been co-opted by the heartless money people, and I don’t just mean the landlords. All those hipsters are completely unaware of what is going on around them — ageist as most of them are. Elder abuse, and that is what we are talking about here, cannot go on. Judith Malina, whose situation is a bit different, is going into an assisted-living situation while the Living Theatre tries to

regroup. Where is our Eastbeth? All this reminds me of the high hopes we had for Howl and FEVA. We need to revive the artist housing issue. I know that it was going to be put back on the table through The Actors Fund, which became involved in the new Howl. Frankly, as the rest of us age, it looks pretty grim. Where is the young Clayton who will be looking out for artists under siege in our future? Penny Arcade

Bedbugs as eviction weapon To The Editor: Re “Creative pioneers under assault on the new L.E.S.” (Clayton, Jan. 24): The Villager’s article and letters about artists being forced out of their apartment studios really struck a nerve with me. I hold an older, stabilized lease in a building that also houses several other artists, many of whom also hold older leases. As we all know, that usually means the landlord has a vested interest in trying to drive us out. In our case, we suffered a plague of bedbugs that lasted for more than three years. Some of us took our computers and work equipment, along with our clothing, etc., out of the building for that period of time while the landlord dealt ineffectively with the infestation. Frankly, it seemed like the the bedbugs were being used as a tool in an attempt to evict us, and that is why the bugs were omnipresent throughout that period of time. Finally, after three-plus years of complaints and confrontations with the landlord,  the bedbug plague has apparently been eradicated. At least that is how it appears, though we are all holding our breath. To celebrate the possible end of the plague, the landlord is now suing some of us for eviction because we were not in the apartment during the plague. What nerve! The tenants in our building created a Web site to document what we had been going through. It’s funny, that when New York City tenants get together it is often to swap war stories about their landlords. Lawrence White

E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager. com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


February 7 - 13, 2013

presents Photo by Billy LeRoy

‘Captured’ caught Koch’s eye CLAYTON

Ed Koch appeared in the movie “Captured,” a biopic on Lower East Side documentarian Clayton Patterson, and he attended its New York premiere in June 2008 at a Rooftop Films screening atop New Design High School on Grand St. on the Lower East Side. The rock band A.R.E. Weapons also played at the screening, which was attended by a mainly young crowd of about 1,100 people. Also at the screening with Koch was Henry Stern. During the clashes between police and radical activists in Tompkins Square in ’88, Koch was mayor and Stern was the city’s Parks Department commissioner. In a note afterward to Jenner Furst, the film’s editor and one its producers, Koch wrote, “I thought the film was very well done, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I wish you much success and appreciate your including me in it and inviting me to the premiere. The immense size of the audience attending was a sign of your certain success.”

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‘Pie Man’ got Koch out of joint Aron Kay, the “Yippie Pie Man,” offered Ed Koch a marijuana joint at a book party at Elaine’s in 1979, to which an annoyed Koch responded, “Why do you always have to be so obnoxious, Aron?” Kay, recalling the incident, which was covered by High Times, told The Villager, “Koch shows up and Dana [Beal] and I were smoking Colombian. And Dana and I agreed let’s go up to Koch and blow smoke in his face. We wanted to mess with his head.” Koch already knew Kay from another incident two years earlier during the mayoral campaign. “He saw me pie Abe Beame,” Kay said. “I pied Beame at a debate at Cooper Union.” On the stage with then-Mayor Beame were his rivals, Koch — who would win the race — Bella Abzug, Mario Cuomo, Percy Sutton, Barry Farber and Joe Harnett. Kay snuck into the Great Hall using a fake press pass “from a reliable source.” “The cops hated Beame. He had cut back on the cops,” Kay recalled, adding, “Cop discipline was a lot looser. A couple of them knew I had a pie in my bag.” Kay’s pie of choice for Beame was an apple crumb, the message being: “He’s just a big crumb in the Big Apple.” At the decisive moment, Kay rushed toward the raised stage and heaved the pie up toward Beame, grazing his shoulder with it. Abzug, sitting next to Beame, was laughing, Kay said. “Cuomo tried to jump me, but he didn’t get me,” the “Pie Man” said. “He was really pissed, and wrenched his back.” Police ushered out Kay and took him to the Ninth Precinct. At least one officer seemed impressed by his running throw. “One cop asked me, ‘Did you ever play stickball?’ One shook my hand,” he recalled. Beame didn’t press charges and Kay was released after an hour. He went back to Yippie Headquarters, at 9 Bleecker St., to celebrate with Beal and his friends who had been watching the debate on Channel 13.

Lincoln Anderson

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February 7 - 13, 2013

The night when ‘gay rage’ boiled over against Koch By Lincoln Anderson Ed Koch came under furious assault in the 1980s during the AIDS crisis from activists who charged he didn’t do enough to publicize and combat the plague — much less come out himself. They declared he was a closeted homosexual and a hypocrite. In 1990, John Penley was a freelance photographer covering the Downtown scene for the daily newspapers as well as The Villager. One evening he was shooting a march by the group ACT UP. There had been a gay-bashing on St. Mark’s Place and the demonstrators were starting out in the West Village and heading over to the scene of the attack. Suddenly, former Mayor Ed Koch appeared and tried to get through the ACT UP protesters to return to his Two Fifth Ave. residence. “He was coming home from a movie,” Penley recounted. “He had a police detail with him. He wasn’t mayor at that point, but he still had police protection.” Typical of Koch, he tried to plow right through the protesters, but it quickly turned tense. “I’m surprised he walked through them,” Penley said, though adding, “That’s Koch: ‘F--you, I’m walking through.’ It was ACT UP, they hated him. People got right up in his face. I think he thought he was going to get hit. They got him out of there pretty fast when the guy stuck his finger in his face.” Penley, who was also an East Village activist, felt the protesters’ anger on a personal level. “Back in those days, you were going to die,” he recalled of people with AIDS. “It was just how much you were going to suffer. There was no saving them.” Penley had friends with the virus in the Tompkins Square Park “Tent City” homeless encampment who went through sheer hell before they perished, as they were ravaged by the disease, he said. “It seemed like almost every week one person you knew was dying,” he remembered. “If you’d go to ACT UP meetings, the leadership would always be changing because people were dying.” Penley personally didn’t yell anything at Koch that night, because he was too busy snapping shots. “I took my film right away to the New York Post,” he recalled. “I said, ‘Great, I’m going to get some money and this is my revenge on Ed Koch.’ I knew I was going to sell it somewhere.” A photo of Penley’s similar to the one above, but slightly different, ran on the Post’s front page the next day with the headline “Gay Rage” and is one of the photographer’s all-time favorite shots of his. “My feeling was that Koch’s crime was to stay silent during the AIDS epidemic,” Penley said. “Koch said nothing, and to me that’s unforgivable. “Some of the media reports I read said that he was afraid it would hurt tourism to New York City. I always thought he was worried if he did talk about it, people would ask if he was gay. “I think he was,” Penley said. “I really do. I think it’s pretty much commonly accepted. He didn’t come out of the closet. On top of that, he became a conservative.” In later years, Penley and Koch would joust in the pages of this paper. “We had some back-and-forths in The Villager,” he recalled.

Photos by John Penley

ACT UP marchers confronted and yelled at former Mayor Ed Koch as he tried to return to his home at Two Fifth Ave. in 1990.

Keith Haring at a City Hall protest. The artist died of AIDS in February 1990.


February 7 - 13, 2013

Photo by Lorenzo Ciniglio

Presidential politics in the air Exiting Temple Emanu-El on Fifth Ave. Monday after Ed Koch’s funeral, Governor Andrew Cuomo and former President Bill Clinton shared a look. Of course, Cuomo and Hillary Clinton are potential presidential candidates in 2016. Bill Clinton spoke at Koch’s funeral, at one point, riffing on Koch’s trademark line — “How’m I doin’?” — by saying that the city is doin’ much better because of Hizzoner’s efforts.

koch

on film A major movie buff, Ed Koch immensely enjoyed writing his “Koch on Film” column for The Villager. Although he stopped writing for the paper in recent years, he continued to send his film reviews to his e-mail list. His columns sometimes featured political commentary and observations on the theaters themselves or the audiences. Below are a couple of his columns from The Villager.

“Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (-)

This is a terrible and loony film. The critics who gave it a good review should take a vacation. The plot involves Willy Wonka (Johnny Depp) and his chocolate factory. Although it is huge in size and production, no employees have been seen entering the building and no visitor has been allowed inside the factory for 15 years. By finding a ticket in a chocolate bar that he purchases, young Charlie Bucket (Freddie Highmore) is one of five children winning a tour of the factory promised by Willy Wonka. Charlie, the hero of the movie, lives in squalor with his mother (Helena Bonham Carter), father (Noah Taylor), and his four grandparents. Inside the factory, tiny workers (resembling munchkins) and ferocious squirrels operate the machines. During the tour the children, each accompanied by a parent, suffer unbelievable trauma. This picture is far too scary for children ages nine or younger, and parents should be warned that it is not a likeable version of the

1971 film, “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” starring Gene Wilder. When the lights went up after the show, I spoke with several people in the audience and ascertained that they shared my opinion. If I had to sum up this film in one word, it would be “evil.” Freddie Highmore, with his wonderful English accent, is excellent in the role of Charlie. Depp’s bizarre performance is that of a one-trick pony, and it does not contribute positively to his impressive resume to date. I would hope he would like to forget his participation in this film. I know that I would certainly like to forget seeing it.

“Team America” (+)

Not as good as its predecessor, “South Park,” but very good. It’s also totally obscene and is definitely not for children. The movie is often hilarious as it spears the Hollywood radicals, particularly Alec Baldwin, depicted as their leader. The sex scenes between two marionettes are unbelievably graphic and funny. Who knew that pieces of wood could be so lewd? There is a plot: the good guys against the bad guys. The bad guys are led by the North Korean dictator, Kim Jong II, whose unwitting stooges are Baldwin’s Hollywood crowd, including Tim Robbins, Susan Sarandon, Sean Penn and Michael Moore. They get their comeuppance at the end. Interestingly, the reviews were mixed and titled towards the lower end of the star chart, although the New York Post gave it four stars. There is ideology here, but the movie spears everyone. People should enjoy the comedy, whatever their politics. I enjoyed it much more than I did Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11.” It was also very satisfying to see Moore skewered in this lampoon on the political scene. It is worth seeing, maybe even more so after the election.

Ed Koch

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February 7 - 13, 2013

Catsimatidis: A ‘half-assed hospital’ is not enough Continued from page 1 with most of that generated by an oil company based in Western Canada that he owns. “If I only had Gristedes, I’d be riding a bicycle,” he quipped during a phone interview with The Villager last Sunday afternoon. His company has its own pipeline from Canada, which supplies oil “from Buffalo to Pittsburgh,” as he put it — to western New York, western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio. He owns a chain of 400 Red Apple gas stations and accompanying convenience stores in those areas. As for his local supermarket empire, he started out with 10 Red Apple markets on Manhattan’s West Side, and later bought the Gristedes chain. He merged the two companies, and today owns 32 supermarkets. A source of pride for him, he founded both the Columbus Ave. and Amsterdam Ave. festivals. “I enjoyed creating those festivals,” he said. “I consider myself a creator. I create new things and make them work.” In that vein, Catsimatidis is a big believer in public-private partnerships. It’s a strategy he feels could have helped create a new hospital after St. Vincent’s Hospital closed three years ago. The free-standing emergency room and comprehensive care center by North Shore-L.I.J. slated for St. Vincent’s former O’Toole building, at 12th St. and Seventh Ave., simply won’t be adequate to meet the area’s health needs, he said. “I really, really believe that a patient should not be more than 10 or 15 minutes away from a facility by ambulance, to save his life,” he said. “You don’t want a hospital that’s only — pardon my language — a halfassed hospital. “You know how traffic is in our city — with those bicycle lanes,” he said, quipping, “That was a joke. … We should have everything there to keep a patient alive,” he stressed. His idea is similar to the 80/20 program for new housing, under which developers get a tax break for making 20 percent of their units affordable. Except, in this case, if the developer would set aside 20 percent of the project for a community use — such as medical facilities — “they can build three or four stories higher,” Catsimatidis offered. “That could be a home run,” he said of his idea, adding, “That’s why you need a business person at the helm [of the city].” Regarding the O’Toole site, he said, for example, Bill Rudin, who is residentially redeveloping the former hospital’s main campus, could fund the construction of five floors atop O’Toole, and, in return, would then be allowed to build taller on his project. “We go and make a deal with Columbia Presbyterian or N.Y.U. to give them cheap space and maintain the facility,” Catsimatidis explained. “Give them a 99-year lease. Who’s the developer there? Billy Rudin? I’d say, ‘Billy, five extra floors or four extra floors — you have a taller building with better views and the

Photos by Jefferson Siegel

John Catsimatidis announced his mayoral run last week at a press conference on the City Hall steps. At right, behind him, are his son, John Jr., and daughter, Andrea.

city would operate the hospital facility.’ ” The reporter noted that the Rudin residential conversion project is already well underway, and also that the state Department of Health has to approve the opening of new hospitals. “I don’t know how far along he is with the project,” Catsimatidis replied, “but I’ve given you my idea on what can be done.” He said he tried to work a similar deal for a project he’s developing in Brooklyn about 10 blocks away from Prospect Park: He wanted to build higher, and in return would have contributed $10 million toward the park. But it didn’t work out as he would have liked. “They told me, ‘There’s no mechanism in place to do that,’ ” he said. In Catsmatidis’s thinking, developers would even be able to construct new public schools next to their projects so that they can build bigger. “I’m just shooting my mouth off — but it’s doable,” he said. More to the point, Catsimatidis said, St. Vincent’s — which was buried under a crushing mountain of debt — never should have been allowed to close. “I think it comes down to the fact that a politician of the stature of the mayor of New York has the ability to talk to the governor and make a deal,” he said, adding, “The governor doesn’t want the mayor going on TV and confronting him.” Asked to describe his politics, it eventually came back to business. “I am a commonsense New Yorker,” he said. “I am a Republican. Growing up on the West Side of Manhattan, I had a mentor, Murray Siegel,” the former executive director of the West Side Chamber of Commerce.

“He taught me one thing — that for the residential community to do well, the business community has to do well.” At the same time, proclaiming, “I am a liberal,” he expressed compassion for immigrants, saying doctors must help everyone, regardless of their status, if they’re injured or sick. “Most of all, we are Americans — Americans help all people,” he stated. “I would like to put someone in jail who doesn’t give treatment to that person with a broken arm.”

That said, his daughter, Andrea, is married to Richard Nixon’s grandson, Christopher Nixon Cox, whose father, Ed Cox, is chairperson of the New York State Republican Party. On the other hand, Catsimatidis is a big fan of Bill Clinton and contributed to his campaign. “Clinton was my hero,” he said. “My daughter and her husband went to Africa with Bill Clinton, seven or eight countries,” he said. “My daughter is busy buying shoes in New York. She called me from, I think it was Mozambique, and said — she was nearly crying — ‘These kids don’t have any shoes at all.’ … I told her to make a check to the Clinton Foundation.” Since he’s an oil company owner, it was natural to ask Catsimatidis his thoughts on fracking. “It it’s done right, and monitored carefully, then it should be safe,” he said. “But you have to have continuous monitoring.” However, he said, in those parts of Pennsylvania where fracking is happening, the returns are great. “To use an expression of immigrants,” he said, “the streets of those counties are lined with gold.” While Catsimatidis supported Bill Clinton, he didn’t back President Obama, but rather Mitt Romney in the past presidential election. “Obama started class warfare every day,” he charged. “He blamed the 2 percent of the country for the wrongs.” Sanctioning entire companies for financial malfeasance is just unfair, he said. “Don’t hurt a whole banking company,” he stressed. “What about the secretaries? Prosecute the wrongdoers! What does the secretary do to you?”


February 7 - 13, 2013

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villager arts & entertainment

Slow like a turtle, crazy like a fox Edward Albee and his ‘Woolf ’ still flourishing THEATER WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? Written by Edward Albee Directed by Pam MacKinnon Through March 3 At the Booth Theater 225 W. 45th St. (btw. Broadway & 8th Ave.) Running Time: 3 hours (includes 2 intermissions) For tickets, call 212-239-6200 or visit telecharge.com

BY JERRY TALLMER They’ve taken Edward Albee’s heart apart and put it back together again — oh yes, kiddies, unlike the Tin Woodman, Edward always had a heart — but America’s threetime Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright has lost none of his salt. “You never saw the film?” Albee said (exploded gleefully) to a journalist who’d just confessed to the sin of never having absorbed the Richard and Elizabeth celluloid version of George and Martha’s long, dark, tumultuous night of truth and untruth telling, fun and games, verbal violence, a touch of physical violence and endless consumption of firewater. “Never saw the movie?” Albee exclaimed again. “Good! I didn’t want to have to talk about it. It’s a very different thing from what I wrote.” The journalist had, however, seen three flesh-and-blood state versions of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” — from its longago opener on October 13, 1962 at what was then called the Billy Rose Theatre on West 41st Street, with masterful Arthur Hill and unforgettable Uta Hagen as two people — a staid professor of history at “a small New England college” and his tumultuous wife Martha — tearing themselves and everybody else (cocky young George Grizzard, kooky young Melinda Dillon) apart; and then, 43 years later (March 20, 2005, Longacre Theatre), its topnotch rebirth at the skillful hands of Bill Irwin and (yes!) Kathleen Turner; and

Photo by Michael Brosilow

Long night’s journey: Carrie Coon, Tracy Letts, Amy Morton and Madison Dirks.

now, going-on-eight-years later, the Chicago Steppenwolf (no pun) production that opened at Broadway’s Booth Theater on October 13, 2012, exactly 50 years to the day from its Billy Rose premier, and has now drawn enough enthusiastic viewers to be twice extended. “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” ran for 664 performances (plus previews) in its first crack at Broadway, for 117 performances in the 1976 renewal, for 177 performances in 2005, and the current show is now a little beyond 100. Total, 1962-2013, more than 1,000 “Woolfs” and counting. What other straight play gets 1,000 performances on Broadway these days? Edward Albee, adopted child, born March 12, 1928, was 34 years old and already quite famous as progenitor of “The Zoo Story,” “The American Dream” and other short, caustic plays when the three-

hour “Virginia Woolf” hit the scene — and exploded it. Albee is now 84 and heir to the various human erosions of those years. This past June 4, he underwent crucial open-heart surgery conducted by Dr. Gabriele Di Luozzo at Mount Sinai Hospital in this city. It has slowed Albee down, but not stopped him. Does he mind talking about it? “I don’t care. I don’t mind. Let’s see. Well, my heart problems were getting a little complex. Then, you know, they [the medics] give you a choice, right?” Live or die? “Yes.” Some few years earlier, when a stent procedure as portal to that same heart was deemed necessary, Edward had allowed as how he’d get around to it in a couple of weeks. In a couple of weeks, you’ll be dead, he was informed. “Oh,” Edward had

said. “In that case, I’ll do it tomorrow.” And did. Around that time, Albee said to the above journalist — oh heck, said to me — “I plan to go on writing till I’m 90 or gaga.” Well, he’s getting up toward 90 and he’s not gaga, even if names, dates and places have an occasional tendency to float off into Otherland. Are you happy, Edward? “I wish I were more…” he says, then stops, regroups. Then: “I wish I were more in command of…everything…of my memory. I wish I wasn’t forgetting things. But I’m still pushing ahead.” I’m not sure you’ve forgotten anything, Edward, the journalist declares, then tacks on: I myself go blank nowadays on a lot of proper names. “I go blank on improper names,” Albee

Continued on page 20


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February 7 - 13, 2013

Together again: George, Martha, Albee, heart One is a play called ‘Laying an Egg.’ I’ve got two acts of it. And maybe something else that’s just called ‘Silence.’ ” Which brings us to Mr. Samuel Beckett, of late renown, whose masterwork “Waiting for Godot” seems to this hapless lifelong consumer of drama to pervade much of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” from title to fadeout, cradle to grave.

Continued from page 19 shoots back. Slow like a turtle, crazy like a fox. How do you like this Steppenwolf version? “I thought it was a good solid production,” the playwright says. “Lots of threedimensionality and…” Yes, yes — go on. “I’m finished,” says Edward Albee. George Bernard Shaw used to divide his output into Plays Pleasant and Plays Unpleasant. “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is both — funny as hell and ruthless as hell, all in one package, skillfully knitted together this time by Obie-winning director (for last year’s “Clybourne Park”) Pam MacKinnon and four skilled Steppenwolf actors: Amy Morton (Martha), Tracy Letts (George), Madison Dirks (Nick) and Carrie Coon (Honey, the skittish young booze hound who “blew up and then she went down” in a false pregnancy matching Martha’s long-ago real or imagined miscarriage — or had Martha and George’s hidden trauma been, gracious goodness… shhh…a dark-ages abortion?). Remember, this is the same Edward Albee who, 36 years after “Virginia Woolf,” would scare the bejeezuss out of us with his cryptic, remorseless “The Play About the Baby.” Tracy Letts, a Steppenwolf mainstay, may in fact be a bit too gifted. He is a playwright as well as an actor. As playwright, he won a Tony Award and a Pulitzer Prize for his 2008 “August: Osage County” (and repelled me with “Killer Joe”). But on stage at the Booth, he never stops acting for one minute, be it through ceaseless zigzagging vocal effects or a Saint Vitus Dance jitterbug physical underscoring of hands, feet, shoulders, elbows, fingernails, eyebrows, what have you. Which makes this George’s play, rather than the Martha’s play or the even-steven seesaw play I had absorbed through all these years. Still and all, Albee himself, in admiration of Bill Irwin’s quiet power in both “Virginia Woolf” and the even more daring “The Goat,” now says, “I always

VLADIMIR: Moron! ESTRAGON: Vermin! V: Abortion! E: Morpion! V: Sewer-rat! E: Curate! V: Cretin! E: Critic! I can still see Bert Lahr collapsing in a swanlike swoon at this final thrust direct. And now…George and Martha (yes, kiddies, as in General and Mrs. George Washington): Photo by Michael Brosilow

A total invention: George and Martha sprung from Albee’s imagination — not his family album.

thought George was more important to this play than Martha. If you just play the real character that I wrote, it’s okay with me. It is true that George is more subtle than Martha.” To director Pam MacKinnon, who goes back a long way with Albee, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is the direct answer to Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh” — where the guiding principle is “We Need Our Pipe Dreams.” And George says: “No!” There is even a touch of Sandy Hook 2013 in this drama of 50 years ago — a boy who, mocked by everyone for verbal ineptness, slays his mother with a shotgun, his father with an automobile. Whose idea was it to bring “Virginia Woolf” back to Broadway at this particular time? “Some bright guy,” says Albee with a cryptic smile below his once trim, now flourishing, moustache. The bright guy — says Albee’s whip-smart

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CHILDREN OF PARADISE A Play with Mime

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OFF THE KING’S ROAD Written by NEIL KOENIGSBERG Directed by STEFANIE SERTICH

Tuesday - Sunday February 9 - 23

Tue 7pm, Wed - Sat 8pm Sat - Sun 3pm

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TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

young assistant, Jakob Holder — may have been Broadway producer and PR man Jeff Richards, who saw the Steppenwolf production in Chicago. It may also have been Richards who suggested holding off the New York opening until the precise 50-year anniversary. Albee may be a little bit more careful at 84 than at 24 — but he has not lost his tartness of tongue. “Truth or illusion, toots — who knows the difference? That’s what this play is all about. I don’t think: Is this going to be effective? I just try to figure out what’s happening, what’s going on. “People shouldn’t read plays — it has a bad effect. Broadway is so many revivals these days — plays that don’t deserve revival.” There is a fleeting mention of a telegraph delivery boy in “Virginia Woolf.” Well, the young and hungry Mr. Edward Albee was once himself a bicycling telegraph delivery boy in this city. “Oh, I put myself in my plays all the time,” he says. And Martha — is she a precursor of “Three Tall Women?” Is she to any degree your, how shall we say — your adoptive mother? Albee jumps up from his chair and fairly explodes with a mix of laughter and “That - - - - !” (An ugly, ugly word — the ugliest word in the English language.) But sits back down and says, “Martha’s a total invention.” And George is not? “I didn’t say he wasn’t. I invented them both.” What would you have thought if 50 years ago somebody had said this play will still be around, 50 years from now? “I would have been delighted.” Is Edward Albee writing anything new these days? “I’m getting back to it. A couple of things.

GEORGE: Monster! MARTHA: Cochon! G: Bête! M: Canaille! G: Putain! That’s fun and games. What is more serious, more telling, more of a mournful Beckettian (or Godolian) dying fall, is the final drawing together of “Virginia Woolf,” of which I reproduce just a condensed fragment. As follows: GEORGE: All right…Time for bed. MARTHA: Yes. G: Are you tired? M:Yes. G: I am. M:Yes. G: Sunday tomorrow; all day. M: Did you…Did you…have to? G: Yes...It was time. M: Was it? G: Yes. M: I’m cold. G: It’s late. M: Yes. G: [long silence] I will be better… M: I don’t know… G: Are you all right? M: Yes. No. G: (pets her hand) Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf? Virginia Woolf…Virginia Woolf… M: I am, George. I am. Edward Albee may deny it — he says he prefers the short, terse later plays of Beckett, when Beckett “was more in control” of his medium — but take it or leave it, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” with its battle between humanism (George) and letter-perfect, blue-eyed genetic fascism (Nick), resounds with the Beethoven’s Seventh chords of “Waiting for Godot”— a greater play, but not an unrelated one.


February 7 - 13, 2013

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Solid ‘Roof ’

Operatic love triangle among Maggie, Brick, and Skipper just as tragic as ever THEATER CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF Through March 30 Tues. at 7 p.m., Wed.-Sat. at 8pm; Wed., Sat. at 2pm; Sun at 3pm At the Richard Rodgers Theatre 226 W. 46th St. For tickets ($75.75-$152.25) visit ticketmaster.com

BY DAVID KENNERLEY Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” is one of the most frequently staged plays on Broadway. While no one disputes that Tennessee Williams’ 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about familial infighting on a gracious Mississippi Delta estate is a masterwork, more than a few eyebrows were raised when yet another revival emerged, the third in less than a decade. Questions swirled around the new production. Would director Rob Ashford inject some unusual twist that might uncover fresh dimensions while staying true to the original? What could Scarlett Johansson possibly bring to Maggie the Cat beyond what we’ve already seen with Anika Noni Rose, Ashley Judd, or Kathleen Turner? Can Benjamin Walker’s bourbon-soaked Brick stand his ground against Maggie and Big Daddy while wearing an ankle cast? Would the true nature of Brick and Skipper’s bond be brought more vividly out of the closet? For those of you looking for a big, juicy exposé, you’ll be disappointed. This is not the train wreck some wags were forecasting, nor is it a definitive revelation, either. What we simply have here is a solid, affecting version that should satisfy purists and tourists alike.

Photo by Michael Brosilow

Benjamin Walker and Scarlett Johansson in Tennessee Williams’ “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” directed by Rob Ashford.

Unlike the 2008 experimental revival, which assembled an African-American cast and had the audience guffawing when the defeated Brick was writhing on the floor begging for his crutch, Ashford has wisely stuck fairly close to the original. But it was not always that way. The inventive director, best known for his musical

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Breakin’ their hearts on valentine’s Day!

work (“Evita,” “Promises, Promises”), originally toyed with inserting Skipper’s ghost to haunt the proceedings, perhaps stressing the homoerotic nature of his relationship with Brick. In an interview with Playbill. com, Ashford said it was “very important to give the image of Skipper as not effete but as another Brick.” But the device just wasn’t working. Perhaps bowing to howls of protest from critics in the blogosphere, the ghost was banished. Johansson, who won a Tony Award for her first outing on Broadway, “A View From the Bridge,” is a worthy, cat-like Maggie. She does indeed sound like she’s been “running upstairs to warn somebody that the house was on fire!,” as Brick observes. During her

impressive tirades that dominate Act 1, her voice shows signs of hoarseness beyond her hunger for the sexual attentions that Brick, pickled in liquor, will not or cannot provide. What’s more, she’s a knockout in that formfitting silk slip. “Oh, I might some time cheat on you with someone, since you're so insultingly eager to have me do it!,” she hisses. “Well, I’m taking no chances. No, I’d rather stay on this hot tin roof.” Not that Maggie is the only character with the claws out. Firstborn son Gooper (Michael Park) and wife Mae (Emily Bergl), a “good breeder” with five children, are scratching to wrest the estate from Big Daddy, who’s dying of cancer but doesn’t yet know it (they lied and said it was just a spastic colon). As played by Irish actor Ciaran Hinds (known stateside for HBO’s “Game of Thrones”), Big Daddy registers as a vindictive devil bent on making others’ lives hell while he makes plans for pleasure. Hinds’ Big Daddy, a self-made tycoon lording over 28,000 acres of cotton, is plenty full of “hawk” and “spit” and viciously insults poor Big Mama (Debra Monk), but lacks the vulnerability required to make us truly empathize with him. For the most part, the plucked and buff Benjamin Walker (“Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson”) looks like he stepped out of a Dolce & Gabbana ad. Clad in a white towel or a wife-beater and silk pajama bottoms, his Brick is as hard and cold as the ice he plunks into his highball glass. It’s not until his epic showdown with his father in Act II, revealing the dirty truth behind Skipper’s death, when Brick comes to life. He claims he is disgusted with “mendacity” and people wishing Big Daddy a happy 65th birthday and many happy returns when they know there won’t be any. But it’s also disgust with himself for not facing the truth about Skipper’s love. Appropriately, Ashford sees this tragedy as an opera and amps up the mood with a whale of a thunderstorm, fireworks, and a chorus singing spirituals. One minor misstep is in the casting of those “no-neck monsters” that Maggie complains about repeatedly during the first act, bitter because she has failed to produce a child. The kiddies’ rickety dance number, a “present” for Big Daddy that’s meant to be insufferable, comes off as charming. These kids are flat-out adorable. They are not fat brats — they all possess visibly slender necks.


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February 7 - 13, 2013

Photo courtesy of La MaMa

LA MAMA KIDS

SHOW WAY

Shadow puppets, dance, music, storytelling and mask-making for youngsters and their families all figure into the schedule of events that will be part of “La MaMa Kids.” This new series of creative workshops, La MaMa’s first such regular series of programming for family audiences, is sure to inspire a love of theater — and probably help inspire a whole new generation of theatrical performers! The series (which runs through June) begins with “Immerse Yourself.” This hands-on workshop features longtime Downtown puppeteer Jane Catherine Shaw. The heart and soul behind “Universe Expanding” and “Folktales of Asia and Africa” will demonstrate how to make and manipulate shadow puppets. The debut installment of happens at 11am on Sat., Feb. 9, at La MaMa’s Ellen Stewart Theatre (66 E. 4th St., 2nd floor). Each workshop or performance is approximately one hour. Workshops happen on the second Saturday of every month, with performances on select Saturdays. Admission is $10 per family. For a full schedule of events and more info, call 212-475-7710 or visit lamama.org.

Vital Theatre Company’s world premiere of “Show Way” is a musical based on the Newbery Honor-winning book by Jacqueline Woodson (and illustrated by Hudson Talbott). Designed with kids ages seven and up in mind, it’s the perfect introduction to both musical theater and a uniquely American tale — specifically, the journey of modern-day Brooklyn girl Toshi Georgiana, whose search for a beloved family heirloom leads to an even richer discovery (about the generations of women who came before her — from slaves who sewed paths to freedom to civil rights marchers who pass on their stories, and teach Toshi to reconnect with the past while celebrating the possibilities of the future). Sat. & Sun. at 11am & 1pm, through March 3. For tickets ($25; premium seats for $30), visit vitaltheatre.org or call 212-579-0528. Vital Theatre Company’s McGinn/ Cazale Theatre is located on the 4th floor of 2162 Broadway, on Manhattan's Upper West Side btw. 76th and 77th Sts.

SATURDAY FAMILY PROGRAMS AT THE SKYSCRAPER MUSEUM Dinosaurs aren’t the only big and tall creations to fascinate the very y o u n g a n d v e r y s h o r t . To w e r i n g s k y s c r a p e r s a l s o h a v e a p u l l o n t h e 7 + s e t — a n d t h e r e ’s n o b e t t e r p l a c e t o s e e t h e m t h a n r i g h t h e r e , in the world’s foremost vertical metropolis. But why crane your neck looking upwards? Explore tall buildings as objects of design, products of technology, sites of construction and places of work and residence (and build one of your own!) at The Skyscraper Museum. Their winter/spring “Saturday Family Program” series features workshops

designed to introduce children and their families to the principles of architecture and engineering through hands-on activities. On Feb. 9, the “Valentine’s Day Card Creations” workshop lets you climb to the t o p o f a l o v e d o n e ’s h e a r t b y m a k i n g t h e m a h o m e m a d e s k y s c r a p e r card. All workshops ($5 per family) are for ages 7+ and take place at 10:30am. Registration is required. Call 212-945-6324 or email education@skyscraper.org. At 39 Battery Place (btw. First Place & Little West St.). Regular museum hours are Wed.-Sun., 12-6pm. Admission is $5 ($2.50 for students/seniors).

THE SCHOLASTIC STORE Held every Saturday at 3pm, Scholastic’s instore activities are designed to get kids reading, thinking, talking, creating and moving. On Sat., Feb. 9, the “Chinese New Year” event invites kids ages 4 and up to break out their favorite red clothing and ring in the Year of the Snake! Make paper lanterns and find out what animal you were born under on the Chinese Zodiac. Plus, make your own Paper Flying Dragon! On Sat., Feb. 16, celebrate Clifford the Big Red Dog’s 50th birthday. This all-ages party has face painting, dancing and cupcakes for all — plus the chance to make a birthday hat, then wear it while having your picture taken with the birthday boy…ah, we mean, birthday dog! On Sat., Feb. 23, meet Stephen Savage, who’ll read from his new book, “Polar Bear Morning” (a follow-up to the popular “Polar Bear Night”). After meeting the author, make your own pom-pom bear to take home. This event is perfect for ages 3 and up. At 11am every Tues., Wed. and Thurs., the Scholastic Storyteller brings tales to life at Daily Storytime. At 557 Broadway (btw. Prince & Spring Sts.). Store hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-7pm and Sun., 11am-6pm. For info, call 212-343-6166 or visit scholastic.com/sohostore. FANCY NANCY THE MUSICAL The Vital Theatre Company’s tuneful a d a p t a t i on o f t h e be l o v e d b oo k s e r i e s f i n ds t h e g i r l w i t h a f l a i r f o r fancy words, clothes and décor in the middle of a serious personal crisis. Along with good friends Bree, Rhonda, Wanda and Lionel, Nancy has landed a role in the school play (“Deep Sea Dances”). That’s the g o o d n e w s . T h e b a d n e w s : N a n c y w o n ’t b e a g l a m o r o u s m e r m a i d , just a dreary and dull tree. After the initial disappointment, our heroine resolves to use her trademark flair to make the small part into something as entertaining and unique as she is. Every Sat. & Sun., at 3:30pm, at the McGinn/Cazale Theatre (2162 Broadway, at 76th St.). For tickets ($30), visit vitaltheatre.org, or call 212-579-0528.


February 7 - 13, 2013

23

Just Do Art! BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THE 28th ANNUAL NY SWORD DANCE FESTIVAL

Sword dancing is a winter celebration that’s come down through the ages from the coal mining regions of northern England. This family-friendly yet loyal interpretation of that tradition is accompanied by live fiddle and accordion music. In both stately longsword and rapper sword dancing, the dancers are linked in a ring by the “swords” they hold in their hands while they work as a team to weave intricate figures and patterns without breaking the circle. Free. Sat., Feb. 16 and Sun., Feb. 17 (throughout the day and throughout the city). The Sat. schedule includes a 9:30am performance at the Pier 17 Atrium (on the third floor of 89 South St., at the South Street Seaport) as well as 1pm & 3pm performances at Jefferson Market Public Library (425 Sixth Ave., at 10th St.). For a full schedule and more info, visit halfmoonsword.org.

Photo by Jeffrey Bary

At the Whitehall Street Staten Island Ferry Terminal, members of Half Moon Sword leap over flexible metal swords, in a flashy display of English-style rapper sword dancing.

TWO TALKS, AT 92YTRIBECA

Short of a building a time machine and quite possibly wreaking havoc with your family tree, there’s no better way to safely revisit risky 1940s and 1950s America than spending the afternoon of Tuesday, February 12, at 92YTribeca. At 12pm, cultural historian Richard Lingeman (a longtime senior editor of The Nation and the author of “Small Town America, Don’t You Know There’s a War On?”) looks at the cultural milieu from 1945 to 1950, tracing the effects of a period that enveloped America in the aftermath of WWII and the beginning of the Cold War (think psychological insecurities, cultural isolation and the overall anxiety reflected by film noir’s bathing of its moody antiheroes in harsh light shining through venetian blinds). At 2pm, film historian Philip Harwood (currently hard at work on a book about famous film couples of 1935) presents an installment of a series in which he’ll present eight Golden Age live TV dramas. After each screening, social issues and performance are discussed. This time up: Rod Serling’s 1956 Playhouse 90 production of “Requiem for a Heavyweight.” At 92YTribeca (200 Hudson St., at Canal St.). Tickets to “Noir” are $21, and $28 for “Golden Age.” For reservations and more info, visit 92YTribeca.org or call 212-601-1000.

BIG FLOWER EATER

When she pastes her late grandmother’s fortunes up on the bathroom wall of her Lower East Side apartment, a young Taiwanese-American woman stirs up ghosts (figuratively, the bygone cultural status afforded to shamanistic women — and literally, her late grandmother). Soon, grandma’s spirit takes up residence in the ceiling, attracting both the lost soul of an epileptic Hmong girl and her granddaughter’s paranormally aware (and very much alive) Korean-American friend. Culminating in a re-enactment of a Korean shamanistic ritual (with traditional drumming by Vongku Pak), the title of Victoria Linchong’s “Big Flower Eater” is taken from a deroga-

Jacket design by Henry Sene Yee

My moody America: Richard Lingeman tracks the post-WWII milieu, in his “Noir Forties” lecture (Tues., Feb. 12, 12pm, at 92YTribeca).

Photo by Jonathan Slaff

L-R: Kira Onodera, Victoria Linchong and Katherine Yew, in “Big Flower Eater.”

tory Chinese term that colloquially means dreamer or fool. “I was inspired by two books on Asian shamanistic beliefs,” says Linchong. “ ‘The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down’ by Anne Fadiman, in which an epileptic Hmong girl becomes the center of a struggle between the California medical establishment and her refugee family’s traditional beliefs; and ‘Comfort Woman’ by Nora Okja Keller, about a young girl’s troubled relationship with her mother, whose traumatic experience as a comfort woman during the Korean War has exacerbated her preternatural ability as a spiritual medium.” Through Feb. 24, Thurs. through Sat. at 8pm; Sun. at 3pm. At Theater for the New City (155 First Ave., at 10th St.). For tickets ($12), call 212-254-1109 or visit theaterforthenewcity.net.

THE BOND STREET EUTERPEAN SINGING SOCIETY PRESENTS: LOVE IN THE PARLORS: A VALENTINE IN CONCERT

They’ve scared up some spook-tacular theatrics in their Halloween-themed concerts — and entertained with festive Christmas songs in the guise of their holiday persona (The Tinseltones) — but The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society do their very best work (the Merchant’s House Museum Arts Group-in-Residence) does some of their very best work when presenting the lush, romantic vocal music of the world’s great 19th-century composers. That this concert takes place in the Merchant House Museum’s spectacular Greek revival double parlors certainly doesn’t hurt

Photo courtesy of BSESS

Charming Cupids: The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society is all about love, when they perform “A Valentine in Concert” at Merchant’s House.

when it comes to making the19th-century come alive. “Love in the Parlors” features Anthony Bellov, Rosalind Gnatt, Jane Elizabeth Rady and Dayle Vander Sande (and pianist Jai Jeffryes) performing romantic and melancholy music by Rossini, Schubert, Liszt, Brahms, Stephen Foster, Amy Beach, and more. Sweet! Thurs., Feb. 14, at 7pm. At the Merchant’s House Museum (29 E. Fourth St., btw. Lafayette & Bowery). Admission is $30 ($20 for students/seniors, $15 for museum members). For reservations, visit merchantshouse.org or call 212-777-1089. Proceeds benefit the Merchant’s House Museum.


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February 7 - 13, 2013

Feel the burn! Theater for New City pays off mortgage By Lincoln Anderson Crystal Field, co-founder and artistic director of Theater for the New City, joined local activists and theater board members in a joyous torching of the theater’s mortgage on Sat., Jan. 26. The event was a celebration of not only paying off the mortgage on the theater’s space at First Ave. and 10th St., but of the Downtown institution’s four decades of persevering as a leading incubator of the performing arts. Speaking before the mortgage went up in flames at the end of the evening’s program, Field recounted how T.N.C. had been forced to relocate several times during its history. “This is our fourth location, so I know all about artists being kicked out of neighborhoods. We started in Westbeth,” she recalled. “I won’t go into it — but we lost our lease there and we moved over to the Jane-West welfare hotel.” The far West Village back then was a neighborhood of abandoned warehouses. Parked in front of the hotel were trucks inside which hookers turned tricks. The West Side got more pricey, and T.N.C. next moved to a space on Second Ave. that had once been a top theater but had become a key club and a porno theater. “And there had been a murder there,” Field noted. But then the rent there escalated, too, going from $2,500 to $8,000 a month, and

Photo by Sam Spokony

Doing the honors at the burning of Theater for the New City’s mortgage on Jan. 26 were, from left, Chino Garcia, director of CHARAS/El Bohio; Kitty Lunn, a disabled choreographer and artistic director of Infinity Dance Theater (hidden in photo); Bina Sharif, a Pakistani-American playwright; Jerrell Williams, a T.N.C. volunteer; Michael David Gordon, a leading actor with T.N.C. Street Theater; Mark Marcante, T.N.C. actor, writer, composer, set designer and production director; Crystal Field, T.N.C. executive artistic director; Briana Bartenieff, a young T.N.C. actress (hidden behind Fields); and Elizabeth Ruf, community activist, theater artist and De Colores Garden co-founder.

again the alternative theater space needed a new location. They found the former city market building — their current home. Built in 1939 by Mayor LaGuardia to get pushcart vendors

‘In an age of egomania, narcissism and bad taste, we have this beautiful theater that’s still community oriented, where everyone can be creative.’ David Amram off the streets, it was a mess. “There was three and a half feet of garbage in the basement,” she recalled. “There were cars parked in here. There were old burlap sacks with beans and rice.” T.N.C. bought the building from the city for $717,000, at fair market value, with a mortgage that has finally been paid off. “Now it’s zero,” Field told the audience, as they applauded. She added that the theater’s name came from a speech that Mayor John Lindsay gave. “He wasn’t a good politician but he was a great mayor,” she said. “And he had in one of his

speeches that this would be a new city. And he tried and he tried, he really tried — it wasn’t.” Councilmember Rosie Mendez and an aide to Borough President Scott Stringer presented proclamations to Field. Charles Busch, one of the alumni of T.N.C. who went on to stardom after getting his start there, was among the artists who spoke about how important the space had been to their artistic growth. “I think I am a perfect example of what Theater for the New City has to offer,” he said. “My first play was performed here.” He noted that first effort, a drama about a pair of incestuous brothers, was “terrible, awful. I was trying to write some sort of ‘Equus’ play. The highlight of the play was I take off all my clothes and I…f--- myself.” But the gender-bending performer kept returning to T.N.C. and kept honing his craft, and went on to success on Off Off Broadway as well as on Broadway, where his “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife” in 2000 was a hit. Speaking before the event, Reverend Billy recounted a similar story to The Villager. “She gave me my first show in 1988,” he said. “It was two little one-acts. It was called ‘The American Yoga.’ It’s about that moment that people relax before a car accident.” It wasn’t exactly a heavenly show, but again, it was a start. David Amram, 82, with his son Adam Amram on congas, performed a jazzy, scat-filled tribute to Field and the theater, and recounted his collaboration with legendary Beats Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and Neil Cassady on the score of the 1959 film “Pull My Daisy.” “In an age of egomania, narcissism and bad taste, we have this beautiful theater that’s still community oriented, where everyone can be creative,” he said. “Small is beautiful and always will be beautiful.” Westbeth artist Richard West was admiring the old fliers from past performances hung up outside in the theater’s hallway space, including one for his own “Bohemia on Wry,” which was directed by his longtime partner, Lissa Moira, in the 1990s. “Oh, it’s an incredible history,” he said of all the shows T.N.C. has put on. “It gave people a chance. In these days, you need a lot of money to make it. It used to take two years to get your play put on in this place.” Some controversy swirled around T.N.C. in the late 1990s when the city sold off air rights above it to allow construction of a 14-story, market-rate, residential condo tower. People thought the theater owned the air rights, which wasn’t the case. But the theater had to O.K. the project and give up 2,000 square feet of its space for it. In exchange, the city restructured their mortgage from a 15- to a 30-year term, and from $6,500 to $2,000 a month, which was critical for the theater. “It was either that or close,” Field said of the deal, in a follow-up interview this week. “We were in trouble. “We never owned the air rights and we don’t get any money from the tower,” she said. “We tried to buy the air rights, but they wouldn’t sell them.”


February 7 - 13, 2013

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NOTICE OF FORMATION of Graves, Horton, Askew & Johns, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 02/22/12 Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Graves, Horton, Askew & Johns, LLC, 1750 K St., NW, #200, Washington, DC 20006. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of HOSPITAL MEDIA NETWORK, LLC Authority filed with Secy of State of NewYork on 01/28/13. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Connecticut on 5/1/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th floor, New York, NY 10011. NRAI is registered agent as well. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 1 Station Place, Stamford, CT 06902. Arts of Org filed with the Secretary of State of Connecticut, Commercial Recording Division, 30 Trinity Street, Hartford, CT 06106. Purpose: Patient room TV advertising. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Holland Hunt LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/11/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: US Corp Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave Ste 202. Principal business address: New York. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 NOTICE OF CONVERSION OF Charles, Frederic & Co., LLC Cert of Conversion filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/5/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: The Bank of New York Mellon, Securities Dept., One Wall Street, NY, NY 10286. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE ALCHEMY SHOP LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 333 E 109TH STR #6C NY, NY 10029. Purpose: any lawful act. 2023960 Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: URBAN KINGS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/22/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 245 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1001, New York, New York 10016. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 STONE & WILLIAMS PARTNERS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/26/12. Office in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Kaplan Fox & Kilsheimer LLP Attn: Theodore N. Kaplan, Esq., 850 3rd Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10022, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 800 BP NYC, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/27/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1150 Ave. of the Americas, Fl. 5, NY, NY 10036. General Purposes. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 WINDSOR PARK, LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/19/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 54 W. 21 St., #905, NY, NY 10010. General Purposes. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of One Jewelers LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Tylan W. Davis, 1050 2nd Ave., #19, NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Re-Inked LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 225 W. 13th St., NY, NY 10011. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Hunter Gray at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of RGN INSTRUMENTS AND COLLECTIBLES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/29/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 1700 Broadway, 39th Fl., NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013

Notice of Qualification of STAPLE STREET GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES FUND, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/07/13. Princ. office of LP: 24 W. 40th St., NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LP at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Nasser A. Ahmad, c/o Staple Street Global Opportunities Holdings LLC, 24 W. 40th St., NY, NY 10018. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of YAMPA, L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/22/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/18/13. Princ. office of LLC: 350 Park Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 NOTICE TYPE: Certificate of Assumed Name Certificate of Assumed Name: KSA RETAIL LLC is doing business as EQUIPMENT; their principal place of business in New York is 80 West 40th St., #40, New York, NY 10018. Business will be transacted at 110 Wooster St., New York, NY 10012. This certificate was filed with the State of New York, Department of State on 12/18/12. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Unit 500, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 62 W. 47th St., Ste. 501, NY, NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of October Management LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Libra Capital US, Inc., 134 E. 40th St., NY, NY 10016, Attn: Bert Diaz. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013

Notice of Formation of DANA Building LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/7/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Naomi Avigdor, 45 W. 85th St., NY, NY 10024. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Valet Parking Services LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Icon Parking Systems, 211 E. 38th St., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of NYNP LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of J2FIT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1382 First Ave., Apt. 19, NY, NY 10021. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Gallagher’s Famous, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. LLC formation on 1/1/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 228 W. 52nd St., NY, NY 10019, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Formation of Gallagher’s National, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. LLC formation on 1/1/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 228 W. 52nd St., NY, NY 10019, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice is hereby given that a license number 1268034 EL NUEVO RINCONSITO DEL SABOR LATINO CORP has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Wine / Beer at retail in a restaurant establishment under the alcoholic beverage control law at 254 E 204th street Bronx NY 10458 for on premises consumption Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Lazard Emerging Markets Debt Blend (US), L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in DE on 1/11/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 30 Rockefeller Plaza, NY, NY 10112. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of MKP Opportunity HedgeFocus Fund LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/14/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 11 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10010. LP formed in DE on 12/10/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/07 - 03/14/2013 Notice is hereby given that a license number 1266922 for MEXICO 2000 DELI RESTAURANT CORP has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Wine / Beer at retail in a restaurant Deli establishment under the alcoholic beverage control law at 369 Broadway, Brooklyn NY 11211 for on premises consumption. Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by 169Thompson Restaurant LLC d/b/a The Lobster Club to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 169 Thompson Street New York NY 10012. Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1268478 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 228 West 52nd Street, New York, NY 10019 for on-premises consumption. GALLAGHER’S FAMOUS LLC d/b/a GALLAGHER’S Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1266921 has been applied by the undersigned to sell wine at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 30 west Street, North Store a/k/a 38 West Street, New York, NY 10004 for on-premises consumption. CAFÉ CASANO LLC d/b/a INATTESO CAFÉ CASANO Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013

NOTICE TYPE: Certificate of Assumed Name Certificate of Assumed Name: KSA RETAIL LLC is doing business as JOIE; their principal place of business in New York is 80 West 40th St., #40, New York, NY 10018. Business will be transacted at 1196 Madison Ave., NewYork, NY 10128; 429 14th St., New York, NY 10014; 114 Wooster St., New York, NY 10012. This certificate was filed with the State of New York, Department of State on 12/27/12. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 OTCEX LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/20/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Kaiser Saurborn & Mair, P.C., 111 Broadway, Ste. 1805, NY, NY 10006. General Purposes. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of J + G Interior Design, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 01/11/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: J + G Interior Design, LLC, 1 University Place, Apt. 5G, New York, NY 10003. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of formation for 753 Ninth Ave Realty LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY county. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail a copy of any process to: 1461 First Avenue, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of formation for 753 Ninth Ave Holdings LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY county. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail a copy of any process to: 1461 First Avenue, New York, NY 10075. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of formation for 212 East 72nd Street LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY county. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail a copy of any process to: 212 East 72nd Street, New York, NY 10021. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Real Time Neuromonitoring Associates, PLLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/14/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Tennessee (TN) on 12/31/08. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: URS Agents, LLC, 25 Robert Pitt Dr., Ste. 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Principal office address: 3004 B Poston Rd., Nashville, TN 37203. Arts of Org. filed with the TN Secretary of State, 312 Rosa L. Parks Ave., 6th Fl., Nashville, TN 37243-1102. Purpose: to practice the profession of medicine and any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of Golf Manhattan Instruction LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/30/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of Luis Guerrero, PLLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of Yield Curve Capital, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/3/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Att: Amir Sadr, 105 Duane St., #44F, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of WiSH Trading LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/3/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Att: Amir Sadr, 105 Duane St., #44F, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of PFNY, LLC filed under the original name PFNY Operating Company, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/27/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 320 Yonkers Ave., Yonkers, NY 10701. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013


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February 7 - 13, 2013

Pub l ic Notice s Notice of Qual. of Armistice Capital, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/4/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 4/11/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Steven Boyd, 237 Park Ave., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10017. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Formation of GNYHA Purchasing Alliance, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o GNYHA Ventures, Inc., 555 W. 57th St., Ste. 1500, NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Qual. of Manor Road Investment Partners, LP Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/25/12. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 6/19/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: John Ku, 900 Third Ave., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Formation of Hudson Empowerment LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/11/13. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 826 Broadway, 11th Fl., NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Formation of MAGNACARE IPA, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Penn Plaza, Ste. 4630, NY, NY 10119. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Attn: Craig B. Greenfield at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of THR WASHINGTON II, L.P. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/18/13. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. DE addr. of LP: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of SOLUTIONSTAR REALTY SERVICES LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/16/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 350 Highland Dr., Lewisville, TX 75067. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Merrimac Marine Insurance, LLC Fictitious name in NY State: Merrimac Marine Insurance LLC, Brokerage. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Off. loc.: NY County. LLC formed in Florida (FL) on 6/27/02. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. FL address of LLC: 1020 North Orlando Ave., Ste. 200, Maitland, FL 32751. Arts. of Org. filed FL Secy. of State, 2661 Executive Center Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of SES Wealth Advisors LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 237 Park Ave., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of Weiter, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 405 Howard St., Ste. 550, San Francisco, CA 94105. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of HIROAKI, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/12/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Hawaii (HI) on 12/5/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Keiko Ono Aoki, 645 Fifth Ave., Ste. 905, NY, NY 10022, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. HI addr. of LLC: 1136 Union Mall, Ste. 301, Honolulu, HI 96813. Cert. of Org. filed with HI Commissioner of Commerce & Consumer Affairs, 335 Merchant St., Honolulu, HI 96810. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Libra TE, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/17/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 11/13/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 777 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017, Attn: Ranjan Tandon. DE address of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of Thorley Industries LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/10/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in PA on 6/15/05. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. PA and principal business addr.: 40 24th St., 2nd Fl., Pittsburgh, PA 15222. Cert. of Org. filed with PA Sec. of the Commonwealth, 206 North Office Bldg., Harrisburg, PA 17120. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of SP HHF Sub Brook Avenue LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/19/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Storage Post HHF Venture LLC, Two Buckhead Plz., 3050 Peachtree Rd. NW, Ste. 580, Atlanta, GA 30305. LLC formed in DE on 12/17/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of Zion Rootswear L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in FL on 2/8/99. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office addr.: c/o Bravado International Group Merchandising Services Inc., 1755 Broadway, 2nd Fl., NY, NY 10019. Cert. of Org. filed with FL Sec. of State, 2661 Executive Center Cir., Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/31 - 03/07/2013 Notice of Formation of CawsVideo LLC Articles of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 116 Pinehurst Ave., Suite J23, NewYork, NY 10033. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 MANHATTAN COGNITIVE – BEHAVIORAL THERAPY / PSYCHOLOGY, PLLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 12/10/2012. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC 276 Fifth Avenue, STE # 905, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ARAVO HOLDINGS LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/9/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 118 Baxter St Ste 402 New York, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 TJD 21 LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/21/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 245 Park Ave., NY, NY 10167. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 LENOIR LAW FIRM, PLLC, a domestic PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: S. John Lenoir, 2753 Broadway, Ste. 251, NY, NY 10025. Purpose: Law Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013

COMGROUP GLOBAL HOLDINGS LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/18/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Trief & Olk, Esqs., 150 E. 58th St., 34th Flr., NY, NY 10155. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/10/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Street.com, c/o James Cramer, 14 Wall St., 15th Flr., NY, NY 10005. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of LINCOLN PLAINS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to M. Nader Ahari, 524 Broadway, Ste. 405, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of SASHA WOLF GALLERY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/20/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 70 Orchard St., NY, NY 10002. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of METLANG LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/08/10. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Battery Park Holdings Subsidiary LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 12/21/2012. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Brookfield Properties W 33rd Co. L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/11/13. LP formed in DE on 04/15/1986. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, NewYork, NY 10281. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. avail. from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of BOP West 31st Street LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/15/1999. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of SN Compliance LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/4/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: USPO Village Station, P.O. Box 132, NY, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of Foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Global Tax Network Northeast, LLC. Application for Authority was filed by the Department of State of New York on: 01/02/2013. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Organized on: 01/30/2008. Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to principal business address: 7950 Main Street N., Suite 200, Minneapolis, MN 55369. Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware: One Commerce Center, 1201 Orange Street, Suite 600, Wilmington, DE 19899. Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building, 401 Federal Street, Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013

Notice of Formation of Philal LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/6/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013

Notice of Formation of THREADSTONE RETAIL TRACKER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Treadstone Advisors, 477 Madison Ave., 24th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

Notice of Qualification of Potenza Capital (GP), LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/28/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 12/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013

JONATHAN RAIBLE ARCHITECT, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/24/12. Office in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 370 Riverside Dr., #8B, NY, NY 10025. Purpose: To practice the profession of Architecture. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DONG & GU REALTY LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 82 Rutgers Slip Apt 18G New York, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of EEGO West 44 Owner, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jonathon K. Yormak, c/o East End Capital, 600 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Address to be maintained in DE: 27111 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808, c/o Corporation Service Company. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of MARGULIES FAMILY PLAN, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Savanna Circle, Mt. Sinai, NY 11766. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Steven Margulies at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of 50HT LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/7/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Corporate Filing Solutions, LLC, 425 Boylston St., 3rd Flr., Boston, MA 02116. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: PARKER ROSE LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 39 Broadway, Suite 3300, New York, New York 10006. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of New Ballon Holdings, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 105 East 29th Street, Suite 5, New York, New York 10016. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of Charles Realty Associates, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/07. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013


February 7 - 13, 2013

Publ ic Notices Notice of Formation of 57 Reade 20A LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/11/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o David Chen, 57 Reade St., #20A, NY, NY 10007, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of 9 Gramercy Park South LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9 Gramercy Park So., NY, NY 10003. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Bleakley Platt & Schmidt, LLP, 1 N. Lexington Ave., White Plains, NY 10601. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NEGBA LLC Arts. of Org filed NY Secy of State(SSNY)10/10/12. OFC in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 109-23 71st Rd NY NY 11375. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of Catamaran LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed inTX on 12/4/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office address: 2441 Warrenville Rd., Ste. 610, Lisle, IL 60532. Cert. of Org. filed with TX Sec. of State, PO Box 13697, Austin,TX 78711. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of Guard Control PMD, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 12/6/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 200 West St., NY, NY 10282-2198. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., P.O. Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Elizabethan Sq., 4th Fl., Phase Four, George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

Notice of Qualification of FEC08 LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/21/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in OH on 12/6/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the OH and principal business addr.: c/o David A. Lightner, FSM Capital Management, LLC, 2000 Auburn Dr., Ste. 330, Cleveland, OH 44114. Regd. agent upon whom process may be served: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of VE LAIGHT MEMBER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o VE Equities LLC, 12 Mercer St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10013. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Formation of 136 W44TH ST MIRROR LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rosenberg & Estis, P.C., Attn: Gary M. Rosenberg, Esq., 733 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Formation of 87 Baxter Street Realty LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/6/03. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 87 Baxter St., NY, NY. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 56-38 218th St., Bayside, NY 11364. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of Lennon, Murphy, Caulfield & Phillips, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/18/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CT on 4/12/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.:The LLC, 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 300, NY, NY 10170. CT addr. of LLC: 2425 Post Rd., Ste. 302, Southport, CT 06890. Cert. of Org. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06106. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013

Notice of Qualification of RGN-NEW YORK XVI, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/2012. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/4/2012. Princ. office of LLC: 15305 Dallas Pkwy., Ste. 400, Addison, TX 75001. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G.Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St.-Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of SAL88 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Charissa Chang, 175 E. 96th St., Apt. 23M, NY, NY 10128. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G.Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of RAVID MIDDLE NECK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Cohen Equities, 675 Third Ave., Ste. 2400, NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of 95 THAYER STREET, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/04/12. Princ. office of LLC: 1065 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 1801, NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corportion Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Lookerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Qualification of 4848 BWAY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/04/12. Princ. office of LLC: 1065 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 1801, NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Lookerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of 72 Poplar Owner, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o The Daten Group Inc., Attn: David Ennis, 444 Madison Ave., Ste. 510, NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of LD Acquisition Company 6 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/3/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 1700 E. Walnut Ave., Ste. 400, El Segundo, CA 90245. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of KB 320 East 110 LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 167 E. 65th St., NY, NY 10065. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of 12 West 45th Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, One Union Square West, NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

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CITATION File No. 2011/765 SURROGATE’S COURT, New York COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: The heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of VERA SAVOYKA, deceased, if living; and, if any of them be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest, whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence A petition having been duly filed by Public Administrator of the County of New York who is/are domiciled at 31 Chambers Street, Room 311, New York, New York 10007 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, New York County, at 31 Chambers Street, New York, Room 509, New York, on March 22nd, 2013, at 09:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Vera Savoyka lately domiciled at 20 West 64th Street, Apt. 31V, New York, New York 100237129, United States admitting to probate a Will dated September 30, 1994 a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Vera Savoyka deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: Letters of Administration c.t.a. issue to Public Administrator of the County of New York Further relief sought (if any): that Letters of Administration heretofore issued to the Public Administrator of the County of New York be revoked. Dated, Attested and Sealed, January 29th, 2013 HON. Nora S. Anderson Surrogate, Diana Sanabria Chief Clerk, Steven R. Finkelstein, Esq. Attorney, (212) 363-2500, 90 Broad Street, Suite 1700, New York, New York 10004-2286. NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. Vil: 02/07 – 02/28/2013 Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from Summit of the World Inc. to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 75 Greenwich Avenue in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 02/07/2013 Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from Meath Trails Inc to continue to, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 61 2nd Avenue in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013

Public Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition from Slice West Village LTD to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 535 Hudson Street in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUESTS FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 01/31 - 02/07/2013

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February 7 - 13, 2013

Five East Side complexes slated for luxury towers Continued from page 1 ers to build around 3 million square feet of new housing, including more than 1 million square feet within Smith Houses and around 175,000 square feet within Baruch Houses. NYCHA will offer 99-year leases on all the sites, according to sources, and currently expects 80 percent of the new housing to be market rate, with the other 20 percent being affordable housing. No current residents would be displaced. Sources who have been briefed on the scheme also said that NYCHA plans to release its requests for proposal (R.F.P.s) to private developers by mid-March — a little more than a month from now. NYCHA Chairperson John Rhea originally announced the plan last fall, without providing any specific details about whom it would affect. The authority’s action in this case does not require approval under the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP). Notably, this means that community boards and the City Council will play no formal role in approving the lease plan. Instead, the scheme requires authorization by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, under Section

18 of the Housing Act of 1937. Section 18 approval, however, does require there to be “resident consultation” regarding the overall plan, according to the text of the Housing Act, and NYCHA

Baruch, Smith, Laguardia and Meltzer has not yet occurred. State Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh told this newspaper that at an Assembly hearing last week, NYCHA’s leadership

‘It’s a travesty, that NYCHA thinks they can just build on top of our community rather than doing the right thing and fixing up our buildings, as if we don’t have families, as if we’re not human beings.’ Aixa Torres, Smith Houses T.A. president will have to include a “description of the manner in which resident consultation was accomplished” when submitting its application to HUD. While NYCHA representatives have already spoken with tenant leaders of the affected developments, as well as area elected officials, about the lease plan, direct consultation with the more than 10,000 combined residents of Campos,

claimed it will in fact hold a public forum in the near future that will allow all potentially affected residents to learn about and weigh in on the details of the plan. “During their testimony, they made a firm commitment that there will be a public meeting at which everybody will be able to see what’s happening,” Kavanagh said. To that end, he stressed that the Assembly is currently prepared to do “whatever is necessary” to make sure that residents’ concerns are legitimately taken into account, adding that the Assembly has considered the possibility of new legislation that would impose state-level restrictions on this process. “We’re very open to hearing what NYCHA is proposing — and we’re certainly not at this point yet — but if NYCHA doesn’t work with us on this, we could just flat-out oppose the plans whenever we have the opportunity to make our feelings known,” Kavanagh said. And in a statement sent to this newspaper on Wednesday, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver directly called upon the housing authority to take the issue of resident consultation seriously. “I am very concerned about the possibility of NYCHA residents losing critical amenities such as playgrounds, recreational areas and parking lots,” Silver said. “NYCHA needs to address the concerns expressed by its tenants, and it must work collaboratively with residents, tenant leadership and our entire community.” At this point, concerns with NYCHA’s lease plan — among not just residents, but also other area elected officials and Community Board 3 — are numerous, and, in some cases, vehement. After hearing heaps of negative feedback from tenant leaders, residents and representatives of community organizations, the C.B. 3 Land Use Committee voted on Tuesday night to draft a letter to NYCHA, asking the housing authority to

not send out R.F.P.s until more “meaningful” community outreach has taken place. City Councilmember Margaret Chin said she’s also concerned about a lack of outreach, as well as the proposed 20-percent figure on affordable housing for the new buildings, adding that she believes that number is “simply not enough.” “I understand NYCHA’s capital needs and I want to be supportive of efforts to try and raise revenue, but I have serious concerns,” Chin said. “It’s all going to depend on what we can negotiate. I’m not sold yet.” And at the C.B. 3 committee meeting, Aixa Torres, Smith Houses Tenant Association president — alongside a dozen of her residents — condemned NYCHA’s lease plan in a diatribe of sheer fury. She explained that she completely opposes any new building within the development, and instead wants the housing authority to conduct long-overdue repairs to boilers that have caused numerous gas outages over the past year. “It’s a travesty, that NYCHA thinks they can just build on top of our community rather than doing the right thing and fixing up our buildings, as if we don’t have families, as if we’re not human beings,” Torres said, who later added that NYCHA never reached out to the nearly 2,000 residents of her complex about the plans. “They think we’re just pieces of paper, and that our homes are just pieces of property. They think we don’t have a voice, but we do. I guarantee you that we’ll be knocking on every door.” In the statement it sent to this newspaper, NYCHA said that, since announcing the lease plan last fall, it has “closely engaged” with residents, community leaders and elected officials. “We look forward to continuing that outreach,” NYCHA said. However, when this reporter spoke to Torres over the phone on Wednesday, she responded by saying that the housing authority’s leadership should, instead, “just go and jump in the river.”

Community News

Yes we can!


February 7 - 13, 2013

8th St. problems were piling up FLASHBACK From The Villager, Feb. 8, 1973 A Page 1 article, “Crime and Garbage Top List of 8th St. Woes, Poll Says,” reported on a meeting to address downward-spiraling conditions in the Central Village. “The Main Street of Greenwich Village,” Eighth St., was swamped with trash, and crime ran rampant through the neighborhood. A survey filled out by neighborhood residents indicated these issues were among their chief concerns for the health and well-being of the street. In response, a local group, the Community Service Committee, convened a meeting for residents and merchants. At the meeting, Ed Peggi and Mortimer Matz, representatives of Nathan’s restaurant, expressed their interest in assisting the community in dealing with the problems. Community members accused police of

failing to successfully patrol the neighborhood, citing as factors, lack of manpower and the “quality of the patrol work itself,” charging that officers weren’t manning their beats. At this point, the Community Service Committee had been holding weekly meetings to gather information and raise public awareness to combat the slow decline of Eighth St. Danielle Sandow, the chairwoman of the C.S.C., claimed that the meetings’ ultimate goal was to spur the actual residents of the street to take action and help fight the neighborhood’s problems. At the meetings, she said, there was an “air of moving forward,” suggesting that those who attended had a positive attitude about the possibility of turning around the neighborhood. In addition to crime, at the end of the meeting, zoning issues were also raised. Separate groups were established to deal with crime and zoning, with future plans to create smaller subgroups to tackle specific issues.

T. Schoen

Lower East Side PEOPs project by Fly - peops.org

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Public N otices Notice of Formation of Sunny Smiles I LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/25/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 557 W. 148th St., Unit 3E, NY, NY 10031. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Formation of A & J Hoffman Realty Enterprises LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/7/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

Notice of Formation of R&M HORSFORD LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Robert Horsford, 75 W. 126 St., Ground Fl., NY, NY 10027. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

SSNY shall mail process to:

Notice of Formation of CA 5-15 West 125th LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1412 Broadway, 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Office location: NY County.

c/o Alter Mantel, LLP, 90 Park Ave., NY, NY 10016, Attn: Irving D. Alter, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of DIESSEBI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/3/12. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o DeGaetano & Carr, 488 Madison Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Formation of Mark Tavern Management, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/25/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 130 E. 18th St., Apt. 16D, NY, NY 10003, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of PRIORITY SENIOR SECURED INCOME MANAGEMENT, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/07/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

PROBATE CITATION File No. 2012-1293B SURROGATE'S COURT – NEW YORK COUNTY CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: Anne Marie Grasso, David Tortelli, Michael Conniff;, Richard Conniff, Christine ‘Conniff’, Karen ‘Conniff’, Dina ‘Conniff’, Diane “Conniff”, each if living, and if dead, to his/her heirs at law, next of kin and distributes whose names and places of residence are unknown and if he/she died subsequent to the decedent herein, to his/her executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose name and places of residence are unknown and to all other heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr., the decedent herein, whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained. A petition having been duly filed by John R. Mirvish, who is domiciled at 9113 Volunteer Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22309. YOU ARE HEREBY CITEDTO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, NewYork County, at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on March 1 st, 2013, at 9:30 o'clock in the forenoon of that day in Room 509 why a decree should not be made in the estate of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr, lately domiciled at 11 West 8th Street, Apt. 6-E, New York. New York 10011, admitting to probate a Will dated October 9.1978 and a Codicil dated May 21, 1991, copies of which are attached, as the Will of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr., deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that Letters Testamentary issue to John R. Mirvish. Dated, Attested and Sealed January 10, 2013 Dana L. Mark, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner

Anthony Coleman - 08/23/2k11 - Lower East Side

HON. NORA S. ANDERSON, Surrogate Diane Sanabria, Chief Clerk 212-609-6838 Telephone Number

McCarter & English, LLP, 245 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10167 Address of Attorney [NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you Vil: 01/17 – 02/07/2013


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February 7 - 13, 2013

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Loc#1: 8,130SF gnd+cellar, Loc#2: 2,200SF gnd+cellar, Loc#3: 2,600SF gnd+cellar, Loc#4: 2,400SF gnd+cellar, Loc#5: 3,700SF gnd+cellar, Loc#6: 4,400SF gnd+cellar. $80/SF call ELIOT @ 212-431-7500

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February 7 - 13, 2013

Photo by Sam Spokony

The hard work of Mark Miller, president of the Lower East Side BID for the past four years, center, was recognized, as he received an iPad, presented by Bob Zuckerman, the BID’s executive director, left, and Michael Forrest, the BID’s vice president, right. The iPad was jokingly hidden inside a toaster box.

L.E.S. BID touts Sandy fund, honors former president Miller By Sam Spokony The Lower East Side Business Improvement District held its annual meeting Monday night at the new Finale nightclub, at 199 Bowery. The BID’s successes of the past year were lauded, notably including the establishment of a nearly $10,000 grant fund for member businesses that were affected by Hurricane Sandy. The BID announced that nine L.E.S. businesses received grants of either $500 or $1,000, those being Saxelby Cheesemongers, Goodfellas, Congee Village, Georgia’s Eastside BBQ, Melt Bakery, Boubouki, Heritage Meats, Delicate Raymond Jewelry Bar and The Living Room. Among other things, the meeting also included a big “thank you” to Mark Miller, who owns 92 Orchard St. and who served as the BID’s president from 2008 until the end of this past year. Miller’s fellow board and staff members called his leadership “nothing short of extraordinary,” as he was instrumental in developing an awardwinning marketing campaign, the N.Y.C. Apple Day event series and the BID’s

newly designed Web and social media presence. Miller’s hard work was rewarded with a proclamation from the office of Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, as a well as a plaque and gift of an iPad from the BID, which was presented by Executive Director Bob Zuckerman and Vice President Michael Forrest. On another note, during his opening remarks for the evening, Zuckerman stressed that he and the BID will remain active players in the ongoing development process for the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA). “We’re going to continue to be a major influence and stakeholder in SPURA, without forgetting about the small merchants who helped us get to this point in the first place,” he said. As for the event’s venue, Finale has already become the source of some neighborhood complaints. Word is that residents are going to be storming next week’s Community Board 3 S.L.A. Committee meeting in attempt to have the place’s liquor license revoked.

DATING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

A Tekserve Event Saturday, February 9, 6-8 PM First dates and the language of OkCupid. Jazmin Hupp and Bentley McBentleson tell you all about it. Meet, mix, shop, imbibe and learn about this brave new world.

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119 W 23rd St | 212.929.3645 | tekserve.com

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February 7 - 13, 2013


The Villager, Feb. 7, 2013