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Taking aim at guns, p. 4

Volume 82, Number 34 $1.00

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

January 24 - 30, 2013

Zone split O.k.’d for Village schools; reaction split, too BY SAM SPOKONY In a close finish that one member called the hardest decision she’d ever had to make there, the District 2 Community Education Council voted on Wednesday night to split the zone currently shared by Greenwich Village’s two public elementary schools, P.S. 3 and P.S. 41. The 6-to-4 vote — a vote that had been delayed nearly two months due to the exten-

Photo by John Winkleman

Brad Hoylman cut a political profile at his swearing-in at F.I.T. on W. 27th St. on Sun., Jan. 13.

Nice guys don’t finish last; hoylman is sworn into office BY LINCOLN ANDERSON A week before a crowd of hundreds of thousands gathered in Washington to celebrate President Obama’s inauguration, a smaller, but no less passionate group of more than 500 gathered at F.I.T.’s Haft Auditorium in Chelsea for the swearing-in of one of their own — the new state senator for the 27th District, Brad Hoylman. The state Senate district includes Greenwich Village, Hudson Square, most of Chelsea, Hell’s Kitchen, part of the Upper West Side, Midtown and East Midtown and most of the East Village, plus Stuyvesant Town

and Peter Cooper Village. The 27th’s lines, which were recently redrawn, unite Greenwich Village in one district. Major additions are the East Village and part of Midtown, including Times Square, while lost was the Upper West Side north of 72nd St. For President Obama, his inauguration marked the start of his second term, as he now confidently settles into office for another four years, after mapping out a firmly progressive agenda in his speech on Monday. For Hoylman, on the other hand, it was just the start — yet, in a sense, also the end, as in the

fulfillment of his long quest to hold elected office. In 2001, Hoylman ran in a crowded field of candidates for City Council in Lower Manhattan’s First District, finishing a close second in the primary election to Alan Gerson, losing by just 500 votes. Hoylman went on to rise to the chairpersonship of Community Board 2 — no easy feat in itself — and six years ago was elected the Village’s Democratic district leader, an unsalaried, party post. And yet the goal of higher elected office continued to elude him.

sive and passionate debate between teachers and parents from both schools — approves a Department of Education proposal to split the zone that P.S. 3 and P.S. 41 have shared for 42 years. The split will go into effect in 2014. And in an unexpected turn made about an hour before that decision, the council also voted to amend their resolu-

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L.e.S. confronts youth violence; ‘Unity rally’ on tap BY SAM SPOKONY Local residents and youths, community organizations and settlement houses, elected offi cials, police and other stakeholders are working to create new partnerships and dialogue in response to the Jan. 4 shooting that killed a 16-year-old Baruch Houses resident. While it was not their first meeting following the murder of Raphael Ward,

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5 15 C A N A L STREET • N YC 10 013 • C OPYRIG HT © 2013 N YC COMMU NITY M ED IA , LLC

those stakeholders gathered on Jan. 17 at Grand St. Settlement — only steps away from the site of the shooting, and a place where Ward was enrolled in recreational programs — for a landmark discussion about ideas to help quell the plague of youth violence in a Lower East Side neighborhood dominated by public housing. The

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January 24 - 30, 2013

Durst assures tech firms would click with Pier 40 BY LINCOLN ANDERSON Just a few weeks removed from resigning as chairperson of the Friends of Hudson River Park, developer Douglas Durst, earlier this month, presented his concept plan for Pier 40 to the Hudson River Park Advisory Council. His partner in creating the plan, Ben Korman of C&K Partners, was out of town and could not attend. Korman, who was a vice chairperson of the Friends — the park’s chief private fundraising arm — also resigned from the organization along with Durst. The two responded to a request for proposals, R.F.P., for the eroding, 15-acre pier by the Hudson River Park Trust back in 2003. “We are presenting this concept today as interested citizens who care about Hudson River Park and its future, not as developers interested in building out this project,” Durst told the Jan. 8 advisory council meeting, adding, “Because of our longstanding involvement in the park, our familiarity with Pier 40 and our development experience, we thought it would be helpful to explore an adaptive reuse idea for the pier.” A study of Pier 40 last year commissioned by local youth sports leagues concluded that adding residential uses on the pier would offer the highest revenue with the lowest impact for the waterfront park, which is intended to be financially self-sustaining. Durst stressed that his plan would minimize the impact on the pier’s parking operation and sports playing fields while providing

A rendering of how Pier 40’s facade would look under a concept plan by Douglas Durst and Ben Korman.

the income necessary to cover needed capital improvements for the pier and support the operation of the larger, 5-mile-long park. Specifically, Durst and Korman’s plan

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would consolidate the pier’s parking operation in less space, allowing up to 500 more cars to be added, bringing the total to around 2,000, while adaptively converting the existing pier structure for office and retail use. Durst says annual operating income from 415,000 square feet of new office space on the pier would be $27 million, with an additional $13 million generated from 100,000 square feet of new retail uses and $6.5 million from the pier’s parking operation. The final “cash flow” — or the amount the pier would actually yield for the Hudson River Park after operating expenses, plus an annual $3 million deduction for ongoing repair work to Pier 40’s piles — would be around $10 million, by Durst’s reckoning. Significantly, Durst has pegged the repair costs for Pier 40’s thousands of corroding steel support pilings at about half, or $50 million less, the amount calculated by the Trust. Madelyn Wils, the Trust’s president, has repeatedly said the authority stands by its cost analysis. “We think this concept is compelling,” Durst said of his plan, “because the space available at Pier 40 for office use is exactly what is in greatest demand today by the fastest growing sector of New York’s economy. Tech firms want large floor plates, high ceilings, large windows and unconventional and interesting space.” Going with commercial uses on Pier 40, like offices, he said, “avoids the contentious issues of alienation of parkland, housing in parks and the permitting and entitlement process for building residential. Our concept is a relatively simple way to preserve the current uses of the pier and also provide the additional revenue to help the entire park.” Durst said for his concept plan’s financials to work, a legislative change to the Hudson River Park Act of 1998 would be needed,

to extend the 30-year limit on commercial leases in the park. Residential housing either on Pier 40 or right nearby it in the park — as proposed by the Pier 40 Champions youth leagues group — would also require changing the park act, which prohibits housing. According to Arthur Schwartz, chairperson of the park advisory council, David Gruber, Community Board 2 chairperson, is planning a major Pier 40 forum in late February at which various ideas and concept plans for the pier will be presented to the public and discussed by various stakeholders. Schwartz said Durst’s pitch was “politely received” by the advisory council members, but that people wanted to know, “Do the numbers work?” Schwartz personally feels that “all options in the park ought to be legal” — so as to attract the widest possible array of viable proposals. But he said a public body should also be set up, with representatives of the governor and mayor and possibly the Assembly speaker, which could put the brakes on undesirable projects, as occurred when Mayor Bloomberg’s push for a West Side stadium was defeated. However, it wasn’t immediately clear if anyone else supports this idea. Meanwhile, in other Hudson River Park news, it was announced last week that another key player in the Friends, A.J. Pietrantone, the organization’s executive director, is resigning. He’ll stay on through the end of the fiscal year, March 31. Pietrantone oversaw the Friends’ recent morphing from the park’s main watchdog group into a fundraising vehicle. “I’ve been here four and a half years,” he said last week. “I feel I accomplished what I set out to do, which is to get the Friends in a new direction.” A search committee is working to recruit a new executive director for the Friends. Pietrantone said, unlike Durst’s differences with the Trust about residential housing on Pier 40 — Durst has said it wouldn’t work on the pier — he’s not departing due to any conflict. “No, this is a personal decision, my own professional ambitions,” he said. “I’m not leaving in any kind of dispute.” With Michael Novogratz taking over as Friends chairperson, Pietrantone said he’ll be assisting in the transition. He’ll also continue to work on the plan for a Hudson River Park Neighborhood Improvement District, or NID, to create a special, business improvement district-like taxing zone bordering the waterfront, to help raise funds for the cashstrapped park. A second round of public hearings on the NID will be held in early February. He said the hope is for the NID to start winding its way through the City Council legislative process by the end of March, with a vote sometime later. A second round of informational mailings on the NID has been sent to all residents living in the proposed, sliver-like district extending a few blocks inland from the park. It’s only required to be sent to property owners, but Pietrantone said they want to keep everyone in the loop.


January 24 - 30, 2013

Scoopy’s

notebook KOCH ON FILM — LITERALLY: The New York Post recently had a field day with a slur former Mayor Ed Koch uttered about Andrew Cuomo after Hizzoner was unable to get into the governor-elect’s election night headquarters to congratulate him on his victory in 2010. “He’s a schmuck!” are the precise words Koch used. The barb is captured on film in “Koch,” a new documentary by Neil Barsky, which opens in theaters in February. Koch told us that he was simply angry at not being able to get in. “I went to visit him before the announcement of his victory, which is customary,” Koch said. “I was distressed because it’s difficult for me to walk. I said, ‘schmuck’ — which means ‘jerk’ — nothing personal. I was just angry that I didn’t get in. I spent an hour or two to get there.” Koch has actually seen the flick three times already, since he’s been asked to speak at several screenings of it, so figures he might as well stick around and enjoy the show. We asked him if he actually plans to write about it in his “Ed Koch Movie Reviews” column. “I will review it,” he said. And it sounds like this one will definitely be getting a thumbs-up (a + sign from Koch). “I happen to think it’s a terrific movie, very well done,” he said. “I happen to believe Neil Barsky did an amazing job.” We asked Koch his thoughts on Mayor Mike Bloomberg seemingly having cooled on Christine Quinn as his successor, apparently preferring someone more in line with his high-profile caliber, like a Hillary Clinton, Chuck Schumer or Ed Rendell. Koch didn’t have much to say on that one, other than that his support for the City Council speaker is unwavering. “You’ll have to ask him — I’m for Christine,” he told us. OH, MY GOD! Soho residents angry over Community Board 2’s recent approval of a plan to enable God’s Love We Deliver to sell its air rights to an adjacent residential project are now even more incensed that they were unable to weigh in at the Department of City Planning. According to the residents, they had been informed by C.B. 2 that City Planning would hold a public hearing on the matter, at which they could air their concerns. But it turned out there wasn’t a hearing at all and Planning approved the so-called “minor modification” on Tuesday. BOURGEOIS BATTLES ON: If developer Steve Witkoff thinks he’s seen the last of Jean-Louis Bourgeois, he’s sorely mistaken. Yes, admittedly, a lawsuit by Bourgeois, above, and some of his neighbors against Witkoff’s 16-story project at 150 Charles St. has been dropped after the Department

of Buildings reviewed the suit’s claims and responded that the project is within scope and doesn’t violate regulations. But that doesn’t mean the battle against the 98-unit, luxury residential project on top of the former Whitehall Storage building — or the scant remnants that are left of it — is over. Specifically, the case is now before the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals. Barry Mallin, the plaintiffs’ attorney, said that “the venue has changed,” but that it’s the same struggle, and furthermore, he vowed that they will win. The attorney didn’t go as far as to promise, though, that Bourgeois’s full vision for the site will be realized. As Scoopy has previously reported, that would include Bourgeois and his cohorts gaining control of the property, which would then be redeveloped as the Louise Bourgeois Sculpture Garden in Sapokanikan / Greenwich Village. The new open space would feature giant, creepy, metal spiders and other artworks by his late, famous mom, plus a smaller-scale replica of the Washington Square Arch. As an olive branch to Witkoff, a Norwegian-style, wooden, reindeer bridge — primarily to be used by people, but certainly open to reindeer — to be dubbed “The Steven Witkoff Path to the River,” would be built over the highway from the sculpture garden to the Hudson River Park. Meanwhile, Bourgeois told us he’ll be ramping up his opposition by converting a bus he bought in Latin America into a rolling anti-development billboard. One side of the vehicle will feature slogans slamming the Witkoff project, while the other will sport messages decrying N.Y.U. President John Sexton and the university’s 2031 expansion project on the South Village superblocks. Bourgeois told us all this over dinner the other week with a small group of friends at a Thai place on Carmine St. Other guests at the dinner included Jim Drougas, owner of Unoppressive Nonimperialist Bargain Books, from down the block, and a buddy of Bourgeois’s from their days at Harvard who penned a book on the Japanese Army’s inhumanly cruel World War II vivisection and biological warfare experiments. An important book, for sure, but perhaps not the best dinner conversation topic. We brought along an artist friend of ours, so we naturally wanted to hear about Jean-Louis’s famous mom and her legendary salons at her Chelsea home. In fact, these were miserable affairs, Jean-Louis revealed, amounting to Louise simply lecturing the other artists, who never got to say a single word. His relationship with his mère finally hit bottom when at one of these salons, suddenly growing annoyed with another artist, she commanded Jean-Louis, who was sitting nearby, to “Attack

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her!” Jean-Louis, finally somehow finding the strength of will to stand up to his imperious mother, refused — and in doing so, became free. … But he’s certainly not reluctant to go after Witkoff and Sexton. Attack!!! SAILING OFF FROM PIER 40: pierStudios, the nonprofit youth theater group run by Peggy Lewis and formerly located on Pier 40, at West Houston St., is desperately looking for a new home. The pier had been their home since 2001. When they moved in, they had one week to transform the space, which was the former parole office for a prison barge that used to dock at Pier 40 back several decades ago. Over the years there, pierStudios has worked with hundreds of kids, as well as adults, including students with learning difficulties, deaf, autistic, with Asberger’s and Tourette syndromes and many on need-based scholarships. “We have people of all color, size, shape and sexual orientation and we are not for profit. A landlord’s dream tenant,” Director Lewis said. However, pierStudios was seriously impacted by Superstorm Sandy. After remediating as much as possible, Lewis called in an environmental company to do an air-quality test. “The test results make it abundantly clear that we must evacuate our space, permanently,” she said. “We have just signed the surrender document with Hudson River Park Trust, which gives us until Feb. 15 to be completely moved out.” Since Sandy, they have been desperately searching for a new location. Ideally, they would like 2,000 square feet, with no windows and preferably high ceilings (for juggling), a basic Class C space, and taking advantage of pierStudios’ nonprofit status. Preferably, it would be in the West Village, since Lewis’s students and parents are accustomed to being there. H O M A G E TO A COLLAGE MASTER: A memorial was held this past weekend for East Village collage artist John Evans, who died Oct. 5 at age 79. Starting in 1964 and continuing for the next 36 years, Evans made a collage every Photo by Clayton Patterson day. His materials ranged from newspaper clippings, business cards, product stickers and ticket stubs to bits of ephemera or random photos found on the East Village’s streets. He used colored inks to build upon the collage elements. His creations are mini-time capsules that mark the end of the Vietnam War, New York City’s 1970s fiscal crisis, the 1980s club scene and art market and the AIDS crisis and its devastating impact on the art world. He ceased doing daily collages in 2000, the millennium, since he thought it just seemed like a good time to stop. The Villager’s obituary on Evans was displayed on a table at the memorial, above.


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January 24 - 30, 2013

Photos by Tequila Minsky

Moms (and kids and dads) taking aim at gun violence It wasn’t quite a million, but the group One Million Moms for Gun Control drew out 400 moms, dads and kids on Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, for a walk across the Brooklyn Bridge to commemorate the great civil rights leader and raise the call for gun control in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. New York has three chapters of One Million Moms for Gun Control and they’re currently organizing another in Staten Island.


January 24 - 30, 2013

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Two middle schools pitched Dolan to preside at reopening for building at 75 Morton St. of the resurrected St. Brigid’s By Lincoln Anderson Preliminary ideas for what kind of schools should go into a soon-to-bevacant West Village building — and general issues surrounding the starting up of a new school building — were discussed at a meeting of the 75 Morton Task Force last Thursday evening. The task force is a joint initiative of Community Board 2 and the District 2 Community Education Council. According to a School Construction Authority official, a likely possible scenario for the building, 75 Morton St., between Hudson and Greenwich Sts., would be two middle schools, including a number of special education students. The 177,000-square-foot, seven-story building can accommodate 900 seats for students, of which S.C.A. would like 90 seats to be for special-ed students. The building is currently used by the state Office for People With Developmental Disabilities, which was supposed to have already vacated, but the move-out was delayed by Superstorm Sandy. As part of the approval last year of the Rudin residential redevelopment project for the former St. Vincent’s

Hospital campus, the city agreed to buy 75 Morton St. from the state to help address the Village’s shortage of school seats. However, C.B. 2 and C.E.C. members weren’t set on the S.C.A.’s preferred uses for the building, and are still considering different mixes of uses, notably including an elementary school. Bob Eli, a neighbor who championed obtaining 75 Morton St. for a new school, said he felt, if there are to be two middle schools, an appropriate complementary use would be a good, small high school to be located in the building, along the lines of the Upper West Side’s Beacon School, which one of the middle schools could feed into. A big concern of P.S. 3 parents is that they’d like students for the middle schools to be screened by geographical preference, meaning local kids would get first dibs. But, Eli said, as opposed to elementary schools, middle schools generally don’t work that way. District 2 covers a very broad area, stretching from the Battery to the Upper East Side, and students for the middle schools would presumably be drawn from the whole district.

After a lengthy and painstaking renovation and restoration, St. Brigid’s Church will finally reopen this week. According to a spokesperson for the New York Archdiocese, Cardinal Dolan will preside at a dedication Mass this Sunday at the church, at Eighth St. and Avenue B, at 5 p.m. The Mass is by invitation only and will be mainly for congregants of the merged St. Brigid’s and St. Emeric’s churches. Father Ato, formerly of St. Emeric’s, is the presiding priest

at the newly renovated St. Brigid’s. Due to grave structural problems, including a partially detached eastern wall, the “Irish famine church,” built by Lower East Side boatwrights, was on the verge of being demolished by the archdiocese about a decade ago. But in 2008, a wealthy, anonymous “angel” donated $20 million to St. Brigid’s, including $10 million to restore the church and $2 million to endow the parish, plus $8 million to support St. Brigid’s School and other area Catholic schools.  

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January 24 - 30, 2013

Lower east Siders confront plague of youth violence Continued from page 1 gathering was basically a brainstorming session, but some of those present exuded a palpable sense of urgency. They made it clear that, in their eyes, this problem has fallen through the cracks too many times before, and that now is the time for action. Among the more concrete issues raised involved the possible expansion of youth center programming to include more activities, later hours of operation and more outreach within area public housing developments; more collaboration between schools, police outreach programs and other groups; the concept of creating a totally unified, antiviolence message for all stakeholders to impart to local youths; the importance of job skills training for young people at risk; and the equal importance of identifying and aiding parents who are struggling to raise their children safely. David Garza, executive director of Henry Street Settlement, was present at the Jan. 17 meeting, but he already has plans to expand his center’s programming, as told in an interview several days prior. Specifically, he talked about a proposal to extend hours of operation at the settlement’s building at E. Sixth St. and Avenue D from its current 6 p.m. closing time to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The building is currently open until 9 p.m.

Photo by Sam Spokony

Mauricio Pazmino, right, community liaison for state Senator Daniel Squadron, spoke with youths from the P.S.A. 4 Explorers program during the Jan. 17 forum.

only Fridays and Saturdays. Garza said he hoped to expand the programming enough to include 200 additional youths in the center’s activities.

“Key individuals in the community can catalyze larger movements, and we hope to use that strategy,” Garza said. “If we stay open longer and engage more young

‘Peace rallies will help to break down the turf wars.’ Lisah Ellison people, that can have a ripple effect and positively influence even more throughout the community.” Luther Stubblefield, the former tenant association president of Baruch Houses, came to the meeting to stress the importance of parent outreach and skills training for youths. He pointed out that some kids end up spending most of their time on the streets because they either feel like they have no future or because their parents are not taking the time to push them toward positive goals. “We need to communicate with the parents who are just sitting at home and aren’t being responsible enough, and that includes organizations like P.S.A 4 getting more involved to support those parents who are struggling,” Stubblefield said. “About 70 percent of our community is doing well and being positive, but now we have to focus on that other 30 percent.” Police Service Area 4 is the Police Department unit dedicated to patrolling the public housing developments in Manhattan’s Fifth, Seventh, Ninth and Tenth Precincts.

Alongside several police officers, some of the youths enrolled in the P.S.A. 4 Explorers program — which works with boys and girls aged 14 to 20 — were also present at the community forum, and this reporter asked several of them what they would like to see from the adults who aim to stop youth violence. “I really want to see adults show us what they’re trying to do as they’re planning it, and also for them to be clear with us about what they want us to do,” said Braulia Alvarez, 18, who lives in the Lower East Side’s Vladeck Houses. “Kids are mainly just connected to each other, and there’s not always good communication between us and the adults, so it’s not always clear what they’re doing or what they want.” Samantha Isales, 15, a member of the Explorers program who lives in Rutgers Houses, said she believes that, for boys, violence and other issues can often be chalked up to a lack of positive role models — partially echoing Stubblefield’s point about parent outreach. “Boys are too involved in money, and they always want things they can’t get, so they can impress their friends,” Isales said. “I think it’s maybe their older brothers or dads that are teaching them those things, and some don’t even have dads. It has a lot to do with families, but I don’t know if we can really do anything about that.”

A UNifieD MeSSAge? While there was agreement on most of the general ideas raised at the Jan. 17 forum, some disagreement later surfaced over the concept creating a unified mes-

Continued on page 12


January 24 - 30, 2013

Online pioneer, activist is hailed at memorial at The Cooper Union By Liza Béar It was standing room only at The Cooper Union’s Great Hall from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sat., Jan. 19, as family, friends, collaborators and supporters honored the memory of Internet pioneer, computer prodigy and cyber activist Aaron Swartz, 26. Swartz ended his life on Jan. 11 in his Brooklyn apartment, a few weeks before the scheduled start of his controversial Department of Justice trial. He stood accused of breaking into a closet at M.I.T. in September 2010, and downloading 4.5 million articles from JSTOR, a nonprofit, subscription-based, online archive for more than 1,000 academic journals, to which Swartz, as a fellow at Harvard’s Safra Center for Ethics, had access. Although neither JSTOR nor M.I.T. wished to pursue civil or criminal charges, as told by Swartz to The Huffington Post last June, D.O.J. brought 13 felony counts against him under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, or CAFA. As a result, he faced as much as 31 years in jail and/or a $1 million fine, causing incredible stress, according to his partner, Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman, founder of SumofUs.org. A statement on the memorial program referred to Swartz’s death as “the product of a criminal justice system rife with intimidation and prosecutorial overreach.” Efforts are underway to reform CAFA through an initiative called Aaron’s Law, for which signatures are being collected. Repeatedly referred to as a “builder, not a hacker” at The Cooper Union memorial service, Swartz invented an A.T.M. machine. He spent a year in high school and a year in college. At age 14, he helped create the RSS Web feed and became a

Aaron Swartz was facing up to 31 years in jail for downloading articles at M.I.T.

co-founder of Reddit — a social news and entertainment Web site where users vote submissions up or down. By 16 he was considered an expert in his field, contributing to the development of Creative Commons, which provides free and easyto-use, copyright licensing for creative content shared online. At the East Village memorial, Edward Tufte, professor emeritus of computer science at Yale, hailed Swartz as “marvelously and vigorously different.” Holden Karnovsky, co-executive director of Givewell, referred to Swartz’s interest in meta-issues, such as promoting rational altruism. Roy Singham, founder and chairperson of Thoughtworks, who had hired a team of international engineers to work with Swartz, eulogized him as a systems thinker, “a gentle giant who wanted to right the wrongs of the world, a complex and wondrous soul,” but also as “a consummate team member who was developing the next generation of tools for organizing and democratizing campaigning.”

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Photo by Tequila Minsky

Mugging for the camera

Houston Hall, a spacious new beer garden at 222 West Houston St., between Sixth Ave. and Varick St., is open for chugging. The watering hole’s ales and lagers come from Greenpoint Beerworks, which was first established to produce all the beer for Heartland Brewery, and has since branched out to make beer for Six Point, Blue Point, Kelso and He’brew, among others.

• • • • • • PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE • • • • • • The Hudson River Park Neighborhood Improvement District Steering Committee in conjunction with Friends of Hudson River Park will be hosting 4 Public Meetings on the proposed Improvement District. We hope you can join us to get more information, ask questions, and show your support at one of the following meetings:

Monday Feb. 4th @ 6:30pm Little Red School House (272 Sixth Ave.)

Monday Feb. 11th @ 3:00pm Fulton Center Auditorium (119 Ninth Ave.)

Tuesday Feb. 5th @ 6:30pm Hartley House (413 West 46 St.)

Tuesday Feb. 12th @ 6:30pm Manhattan Youth Downtown Community Center (120 Warren St.)

For more information please contact Jeffrey Aser at 212-757-0981 (Jaser@fohrp.org) www.HRPNID.org

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January 24 - 30, 2013

Derelict Canal building and two others to be renovated BY LINCOLN ANDERSON A day after a metal roll-down gate partially fell off a long-vacant building near the western end of Canal St., contractors were at the site constructing a plywood fence around the building in preparation for its renovation. John Mele, property manager for the Pontes, the owners of 502 Canal St. and the two buildings immediately to its west, 504 and 506 Canal St., was at the scene and said that the plan is to fix up all three of the buildings, all three-to-four-story structures dating from the 1800s. “Landmarks wants these all renovated,” he said, referring to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. Dennis Healy, who was also at the scene, noted sadly that it would mean he’d have to close up his discount bike shop, which is in the ground floor of 504 Canal St. “That’s the end of the bike store for me,” he said. Healy said it was his understanding that all three buildings would be demolished and that he and his family members would have to vacate. However, Mele said, the buildings are landmarks and thus cannot be razed, and instead will be renovated and restored in a historically sensitive manner. Mele said, it was true, the bike shop probably would not be allowed to return. Asked about the fate of the residential tenants in 504 and 506 Canal St., he said he didn’t have an immediate answer. Mele said that Healy’s father, mother, aunt and two cousins live in 506 Canal St. Healy’s father, Frank Healy, 87, a former Teamster, grew up on Renwick St. and remembers when the first building on the block got steam heat. A contractor wearing a yellow hard hat at the site on Thursday, who said he would be overseeing the renovation job for the three buildings, said a report by some news outlets that an interior wall of 502 Canal St. had collapsed on Wednesday was not true. “No, I don’t know where [they] got that,” he said. “Trust me, if a wall fell down inside, the building would be on the

Photos by Lincoln Anderson

The three buildings stretching west from the southwest corner of Canal and Greenwich Sts. are all being renovated. The corner building, though, has been uninhabited for years and is in dangerously dilapidated condition.

ground.” Indeed, the building at the southwest corner of Canal and Greenwich Sts. has been uninhabited and in deteriorating condition for years. One local resident from around the corner on West St. who was passing by and stopped to speak briefly to the contractor said the building had been ringed by a protective sidewalk shed for, she figured, at least eight years. The contractor said another local woman told him the corner building used to house a liquor store long ago. The contractor, who declined to give his name, said the renovation work was

being done for the “new owner who has leased the property,” and said that referred to all three of the buildings. As for the buildings’ future use, he said, “It’ll be residential, it’ll have to be residential.” He said the renovation job on the corner building would take about a year, while the next-door buildings won’t need as much work. “It’s the one building,” he said. “It’s a minor renovation next door — they’re in good shape.” David Reck, president of Friends of Hudson Square, lives up the block on Greenwich St. from the cluster of small Ponte buildings. He said the three historic houses were individually landmarked sometime around 2000. He said the contractor’s stating that the buildings had been “leased” to a “new owner” actually made sense, given how the Pontes — major property owners in Tribeca and Hudson Square — do business. “The Pontes tend not to sell,” Reck explained. “They retain ownership of the land. Which presents issues: The buildings can be co-oped but not condoed.” Reck said that after Hurricane Sandy, pieces of 502 Canal St.’s exterior were strewn about, and that the Department of Buildings noted that it was one of the buildings that was seriously damaged by the superstorm. Reck expressed relief to hear that the

The contractor overseeing the renovation work was supervising his crew as they put up a plywood fence around 502 Canal St. last Thursday.

trio of low-rise houses — especially the one on the corner — will be fixed up. “Oh, absolutely,” he said. “Why do you want an eyesore in the neighborhood?” The sidewalk shed around 502 Canal St. seems like “it’s been around for an eternity,” he said, adding, “The buildings have been slowly rotting into the ground.” In general, right now there’s a renewed surge of activity in Tribeca and Hudson Square, he noted. Three stalled projects on Renwick St. recently got back underway, he said. According to a construction worker at one of the sites, one of the projects reportedly may have had “Madoff” financing problems. A hotel project is under construction just north of Reck, and a block east on Hudson St. a rooftop extension has been added onto a huge old manufacturing building in preparation for Pearson publishing to move in. “All of this area is going to blossom in the next five to 10 years,” he said. Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, said his group had been working for the past several months to try to get 502 Canal St. saved and restored. Apparently, it may have taken last week’s bad P.R. of the roll-down gate partially falling off the building — possibly combined with some inaccurate reports in other media that an interior wall had collapsed — to finally get the ball rolling.


January 24 - 30, 2013

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Police BLOTTER Bitter words…then bit her   Police said that after an argument got out of hand, a cantankerous woman allegedly bit her antagonist’s hand and wrist inside the 14th St. PATH station on the night of Sun., Jan. 20. The victim, a 43-year-old woman, told cops that Hassanah Drew, 24, first tried hitting her with a hammer while the two were in the station at W. 14th St. and Sixth Ave. around 10:30 p.m. When that failed, Drew sank her teeth into the woman’s left hand and right wrist, according to testimony given in the police report. Drew was apprehended at the scene and charged with assault.  

Purse thieves pinched

Photos by Jefferson Siegel

Beating suspects in court Sharif Rizk, 22, top, and Hatem Farsakh, 24, above, appeared in Manhattan Criminal Court on Fri., Jan. 18, after being arrested in the brutal beating of Kevin McCarron, 24, as he was leaving Artichoke pizzeria on MacDougal St. early Sunday morning Jan. 13. McCarron, from Andover, Mass., was visiting the city and was out with friends when they bumped into another group of young men. A quarrel erupted and members of the second group reportedly fetched a baseball bat and other weapons from the trunk of a nearby parked car that were used in the vicious assault. At their Criminal Court appearances both men, who are out on bail, learned they had not yet been indicted for the crime, possibly because McCarron, who was beaten into a coma, has not been able to tell police what happened. Both men are due back in court in April.

  Last weekend wasn’t a very successful one for local purse thieves, as two were arrested in poor attempts to sneak away with the loot. Early on Sun., Jan. 20, police arrested Aboubakar Bakayoko, 23, after he snatched a bag belonging to a 20-yearold woman while she was getting a drink at the eponymous 49 Grove St. bar. The woman told cops she’d left the purse — which contained debit and credit cards, an iPhone and an iPod, among other things — unattended for just a few minutes, but that it was gone when she returned. Fortunately for her, bar employees spotted Bakayoko attempting to hide the bag under his jacket, and stopped him before he could slink out. And around 2 a.m. on the previous day, police arrested Samuel Blackstone after he tried making off with a purse filled with $650 in cash at the Tenjune nightclub, at 26 Little W. 12th St. The bag’s owner, a 22-year-old woman, told cops she’d also left it unattended for several minutes while getting a drink. As with the other incident, helpful club employees spotted the crime as it took place, reported it, and held the perpetrator until officers arrived on the scene. Both Bakayoko and Blackstone were charged with grand larceny.  

Not a pretty picture   Cops nabbed two men who, after a flurry of attempted break-ins, succeeded in lifting a pricey painting from a West Village art gallery. Jamal Clark, 22, and Matthew Rosado, 21, tried to enter about a dozen commercial establishments and residential buildings early on Jan. 18, according to officers who were able to covertly observe them in the act. After all those failed attempts, the thieving duo was successful in their strike at the Paint Box gallery, at 498 Hudson St., around 4 a.m.

Once inside, Clark and Rosado stole a $700 oil painting, cops said. But their success was short-lived, as the watchful officers were ready to apprehend the crooks once they exited the building. Clark and Rosado were both charged with burglary.  

Meatpack snatcher   Nearby officers were able to stop a fleet-footed thief who snatched a woman’s cell phone outside a Meatpacking District nightclub early on Thurs., Jan. 17. The phone’s owner, 31, told cops she’d walked out of Kiss and Fly, at 409 W. 13th St., around 3:15 when the suspect grabbed the iPhone out of her back pocket and started running. Abdelhamid Ouhnayen, 23, was apprehended farther down the street and was charged with grand larceny.  

Union Square beating   A street argument near Union Square on Tues., Jan. 15, ended in a vicious beating, when one man allegedly smacked another with a metal rod.

Police arrested Theodore Matthias, 56, around 9 p.m. after witnesses said he bashed the 36-year-old victim near the corner of E. 13th St. and Fifth Ave. It was unclear how the dispute arose, but the witnesses told officers Matthias grabbed the makeshift weapon and hit the other man several times on the arms and torso. The victim was taken to Beth Israel Hospital with swelling on his elbow and back, police said, and Matthias was charged with assault.  

Was Loko to carry knife   Police arrested a man for carrying a knife while walking through the West Village early on Thurs., Jan. 17. Anwar Olivas, 32, was stopped around 1:30 a.m. on Bleecker St., between Thompson St. and Laguardia Place, by officers who saw him drinking a can of Four Loko, an alcoholic beverage. But they were less worried about a public drinking ticket when they noticed a gravity knife clipped to Olivas’s pants pocket. He was charged with criminal possession of a weapon.

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January 24 - 30, 2013

editoRiAl

Open space needs On Tuesday the City Planning Commission approved a major rezoning for an 18-block area of Hudson Square. Propelling the rezoning is Trinity Real Estate, which feels legalizing residential use in the currently manufacturingzoned former “Printing District” will create a better, more balanced neighborhood. Trinity projects the rezoning — creating a 25 percent residential enclave — would add 6,000 to 8,000 new residents within the next 10 years. In general, as we’ve previously stated, we support a residential rezoning for Hudson Square. It will create more of a 24/7 neighborhood in an area now desolate at night and on weekends. It will attract much-needed retail amenities, particularly, a supermarket, which the neighborhood’s current residents — who constitute only 4 percent of the area’s occupancy — desperately want. Also, critically, the rezoning caps building heights in a district currently with no height limits at all — which resulted in the 450-foot-tall Trump Soho condo-hotel. However, as we’ve said from the start, we think the heights Trinity seeks are too high. Its recommended height of 320 feet on wide avenues is, basically, Midtown zoning. Borough President Scott Stringer, in his part of the ULURP (uniform land use review procedure) got Trinity to lower this height to 290 feet, which is the height City Planning approved Tuesday. However, that’s still taller than Community Board 2’s recommendations — 250 feet with affordable housing included, and 210 feet without. We agree with C.B. 2. The board also urged that the rezoning address the issue of open space. Specifically, a new population of 8,000 residents, under city standards, requires a certain amount of open space, both passive and active. The proposed rezoning district currently meets standards for passive — but not active — recreational space, the latter which is 1.71 acres per 1,000 residents. In a district where there really isn’t anywhere to “go horizontal” for open space, the community board hit upon the idea of “going vertical,” recommending that Trinity create a 50,000-square-foot community recreation center on three floors of the extra-tall (originally designed at 430 feet) residential tower it plans at Duarte Square, at Canal St. and Sixth Ave. One acre is 43,000 square feet, so this rec center would help partially address the open space imbalance. Trinity, admirably, already has committed to including space for a 444-seat public elementary school in this building’s base, but it needs to go a step further now toward helping solve the area’s open space problem. In the end, what City Planning voted to approve was that — once building permits have been issued for 1,000 new units of housing — Trinity will pay $5.6 million to be used for the Tony Dapolito Recreation Center, at Clarkson St. and Seventh Ave. South or, at the Parks Department’s discretion, for other recreation centers in the vicinity. Dapolito, however, isn’t in the actual rezoning area, though it is in the so-called affected “study area.” Needless to say, David Gruber, C.B. 2 chairperson, said he was “not happy” about this development. Gruber assures that Trinity could still construct a tower at Duarte Square with a 9 F.A.R. (floor area ratio) if both a school and rec center are included — just that Trinity would have to rejigger the building’s massing a bit. And, frankly, as terrific as the venerable Clarkson St. rec center is, it’s heavily used already. Some might argue that Pier 40, with its large sports field, is nearby. Yet that facility is extremely heavily used by local youth and adult leagues and schools. In short, we need more active recreation facilities in this neck of the woods as it is today, right now. And, after all, wouldn’t that only be in keeping with Mayor Bloomberg’s health initiatives? The City Council now has 50 days to vote on the rezoning, before which there will be a required public hearing. The open space issue must be addressed.

letteRS to the editoR i don’t hear politicians on Sphere To The Editor: Re “Some 9/11 tiles come home, but others set to go on tour?” (news article, Jan. 17): I have been familiar with this memorial since shortly after 9/11 and always appreciated it. I have taken tourists to it, including a visiting group of Danish college students doing research on 9/11 memorials in New York City. I find it ironic, however, that so many officials, including city councilmembers and congressional representatives, show so much concern about these tiles when the iconic Koenig Sphere, the last remaining intact artifact of the World Trade Center, sits down at Battery Park forgotten and neglected. It has become a home for park pigeons and is covered in bird crap. Soon it will have to be moved — to make way for a bicycle path. No one knows where it will go and no one seems to care. The only thing blocking its return to the World Trade Center is the memorial foundation’s intransigence. They refuse to return it because it would infringe upon the design’s “artistic integrity” — by telling us what to think. What if the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial disposes of the U.S.S. Arizona? Please see Facebook under “causes, save the sphere.” Michael Burke

gimme shelter (not a restaurant) To The Editor: Re “Bistro build-out blocked for Union Square’s pavilion” (news article, Jan. 17): The pavilion offers the only sheltered area of the park. It is perfect for activities for park users of all ages. There are so many eateries surrounding Union Square Park, as well as Greenmarket produce being sold there most days. Recreational areas are lacking. Face up to the facts! Diana Carulli

We can argue, but let’s be civil To The Editor: Re “Good guys getting bounced by liquor license politics” (talking point, by Clayton Patterson, Jan. 17): I wish there was this much uproar and support for the mothers, fathers, young people and youth organizations that met last Thursday night to find a way to end

the child-on-child violence in our community. The most recent incident happened just a few blocks from this proposed venue. I understand that the applicants grew up here and know the issues here. People have reasons for their positions. People raising children in the neighborhood have reasons to want to halt the bar scene. And people want to make money, run businesses and stay in their community. Can we make common cause with efforts to make this place good for all of our children? We will disagree, but how we conduct our disagreements matters. The young people of our community — who we say need our guidance on ending violence — watch what we say and do. How do we conduct our disputes? By the way, I don’t think a community ever wants to make its neighbors feel that they either must adjust to living in an “entertainment zone” or leave. K Webster

Why is this such a big thing? To The Editor: Re “Good guys getting bounced by liquor license politics” (talking point, by Clayton Patterson, Jan. 17): I’m in support of this application. There should be no reason why a restaurant closing at 2 a.m. should be a problem to anyone. Why is this such a big thing? The applicant is a person who gives back to his community, helps out his church, and donates to charity groups and a Little League team from this neighborhood. Why would people do this? He’s a good man and we should stand behind a neighbor like this. Ruben Garcia

give the man a chance To The Editor: Re “Good guys getting bounced by liquor license politics” (talking point, by Clayton Patterson, Jan. 17): People, this applicant is bringing a star chef, John DeLucie, to our neighborhood, and also a menu of his family’s culture, with drinks that go with this menu. Why try to destroy him before he even opens? Jorge Medina

Continued on page 16

iRA blutReich

Lance Armstrong admits to Oprah that he was a dope ― as in, blood doping.


January 24 - 30, 2013

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Obama vs. guns: This may prove to be his finest hour tAlkinG point BY JERRY TALLMER When Hitler completed the murder of Europe with the April 1941 invasion of Greece and Yugoslavia, a Dartmouth College senior named Charles Guy Bolté wrote an open letter to F.D.R. that began: “Dear Mr. President… Now we have waited long enough… .” It was a cry for F.D.R. to step free of the half-measure upon half-measure delaying tactics of what Auden characterized as “a low, dishonest decade” — an umbrella at Munich, a sellout of Spain, those Bundles for Britain, destroyers for bases, etc., etc. — to put all that in limbo and actually put the United States into battle against the Nazi conquest of civilization. I printed Bolté’s letter on the front page of The Dartmouth — the oldest daily college newspaper in America — thereby thrusting an 80 percent rock-ribbed Republican campus into turmoil between its very many hard-core isolationists and far fewer stop-Hitler interventionists. (In those days, however, Republican did not yet mean lunatic.) In any event, Roosevelt — all too well aware of the Coughlinite fury and anti-Semitism of the America Firsters — kept on cautiously piecing together this country’s guarded, bit-by-bit backing of democracy for another aching eight months until the Japanese at Pearl Harbor rendered all that pussyfooting background academic. Five weeks ago in these pages, in the immediate wake of the slaughter by automatic rifle of 20 little kids at Connecticut’s Sandy Hook Elementary School, I declared it “distressing… infuriating…that every person of authority in this country, up to and including an otherwise pitch-perfect president, is playing dodgeball with this question” — this mortal question — of guns and gun control. I wrote of course too quickly, and in anger, and too soon. On Wednesday of last week, five days before his reinstallation in the Oval Office, that pitchperfect president, Barack Hussein Obama — with Vice President Joe Biden running interference for him — carried the battle right into the face of the National Rifle Association in tough, quiet, unhysterical,

Obama-style, solid-based, self-controlled terms built around 23 specific and sensible executive orders over and above anything the prodded Congress may or may not now choose to do.

‘This president is a longrange thinker. He doesn’t scare.’ Joe Madison

“When I finish talking here,” the president said, “I’m going to go to that desk over there” — nod of head — “and start

Scene

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gotten, timeless poem by Rudyard Kipling: If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too: If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies, Or being hated don’t give way to hating, And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise… …and the next day after Gun Sense Day — no, before that first day was out — the Obama-haters were targeting his and Mrs. Obama’s two young daughters with explicit implicit threats of the most odious sort. Abraham Lincoln, another thoughtful man, was at least spared that.

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signing them.” Which is exactly what he did. At that point, watching it on the tube, I shivered and allowed a long-forgotten line of poetry to wander back into my brain: “If you can keep your head when all about you / Are losing theirs and blaming it on you… .” “This president is a long-range thinker. He doesn’t scare,” said radio’s acerbic Joe Madison (“The Black Eagle”) on Al Sharpton’s “Politics Nation” that same night. Indeed Barack Obama doesn’t scare. He slows down and regroups sometimes. His strangely diffident first debate versus Willard Mitt Romney demonstrated that. But I think last Wednesday’s quietly coming to grips with gun control may prove, in the long haul, to be his finest hour. The president closed it by saying: “Let’s do the right thing.” Here is the full first stanza of that half-for-

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January 24 - 30, 2013

L.E.S. confronts youth violence; ‘Unity Rally’ planned Continued from page 6 sage — some kind of mission statement against violence, gangs and drugs that would be promoted by all community stakeholders. During the meeting, Victor Papa, president of the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, put forth that concept in a brief but passionate speech that drew applause from most of those in attendance. It also mirrored some of the very points being made by youths in the P.S.A. 4 Explorers program. “What we need right now, as opposed to more services, is a common message that kids can hear, because that’s the core — and if we’re not doing that, then we’re not doing much,” Papa said. “In the case of [Ward’s] murder, there was a clear lack of understanding about what violence truly is. We need to focus on sending these kids a clear message if we want to change that.” But John Wenk, principal of Lower Manhattan Arts Academy, a high school at Grand and Essex Sts., said in a later interview that he believes the neighborhood’s diverse stakeholders’ points of view should not all be confined within a single message. “The truth is, everybody’s for peace, so the idea of a unified message might not be as meaningful as one would think,” Wenk said. “The strength of this community is in its diversity, and so there should be a symphony of messages rather than a single one. My message is about working hard, doing your homework, and getting into college. Then the church has its message, and the community organizations have theirs, and so on.” Wenk, who was also at the forum, went on to say that, while he doesn’t favor a unified message, he does think there should be more collaboration between schools and other youth programming. He said he hopes representatives of organizations like the Grand Street, Henry Street or University settlements, as well as others, will come to his school in the near future and set up lunchtime presentations to expose students to the recreational and training programs available at their centers. “It depends on how many responses I can get, but we’ll be here waiting for them,” Wenk said.  See something, do something   Some community members’ remain skeptical about the current calls to action regarding youth violence, saying that they have seen plenty of discussion, but no concrete solutions, after past Lower East Side teen murders. Several locals at the forum explained that they’ve started a grassroots group called See Something, Do Something, in order to further pressure elected officials, police and community organizations to take real action. “We’ve been having shootouts in the

Photo by Sam Spokony

Melissa Aase, executive director of University Settlement, introduced the forum on youth outreach and community collaboration, which was held at Grand Street Settlement.

neighborhood for a long time, and I always saw that people always talk about what needs to be done, but nobody was doing anything,” said group founder Lisah Ellison, 40, a Baruch Houses resident who has lived in the complex for eight years. “The situation of Raphael Ward’s death is near and dear to my heart, because I know his dad, and I really saw how it touched the community. So I formed an alliance, since we need to get our kids off the street and have all these meetings and reach a real solution.” Ellison added that, since starting See Something, Do Something shortly after Ward’s murder, there are currently seven residents involved in the effort. After attending the Jan. 17 meeting, she said she was in wholehearted agreement with ideas about expanding youth center programming and keeping the centers open later at night. In particular, she said she wants to see more evening space available for 18-, 19- and 20-year-olds, asserting that such a change would have an immediate impact on keeping crime rates down. Ellison also highlighted the problem of “turf wars” between youths in different housing developments. At the Jan. 17 meeting, another member of the group said that kids are often scared to enter other developments, and that many parents are hesitant to send their children to youth centers in other developments because of the perceived danger involved in violating a particular gang’s territory. So Ellison’s group expressed particular excitement about one particular announcement at the forum, which was that Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, in association with other local state and city elected officials and numerous other community stakeholders, will

lead a “Unity Rally” to highlight and address the problem of youth violence. A spokesperson for Stringer said the march will take place on Thurs., Jan. 31, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the corner of E. Sixth St. and Avenue D. “Peace rallies will help to break down the turf wars, and this is something we need because it shows we’re all serious,” Ellison said, adding that she hopes that similar community walks will take place more frequently after that, perhaps even once each week. But she stressed that, even with all the good intentions she’s seen so far, she won’t be satisfied until productive plans are actually implemented. “We liked the ideas at that meeting, but now we want to see them put into action,” she said. “It doesn’t stop here, and we all need to keep showing up to other forums, stay focused, and remember that we’re all in this together.”  Another l.e.s. gun buyback?   Notably, a representative of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office was also present at the Jan. 17 meeting, and told this reporter that the D.A.’s Office is thinking about planning another gun buyback event as a response to Ward’s shooting. Last October, the Lower East Side’s first such event — which allows gun owners to anonymously turn in their firearms in exchange for cash — took 50 weapons off the street, including 14 semiautomatics. Since that buyback occurred at the Rutgers Houses Community Center, at Madison and Rutgers Sts., it could be likely that a second event would be placed closer to Baruch Houses, where Ward lived and

was murdered, though the D.A.’s Office didn’t provide further information. Police said after the October buyback that four of the guns they received had been altered, indicating they even more likely had been used — or would have been used in the future — to commit crimes.  

Next steps

  In addition to the Jan. 31 rally, another community forum has been planned to continue this discussion. Melissa Aase, executive director of University Settlement, who led last week’s forum, said that the next meeting — which will focus specifically on the issue of coordinating all of the area’s youth-service organizations — is currently scheduled for Mon., Feb. 4. She added that “many more” next steps will be worked out as well, and said she was “truly heartened” by the diverse turnout at the initial forum. “The issues of violence, economic justice, housing and community safety are intertwined and complicated,” Aase said, following the meeting. “We want to take small, thoughtful steps that include all these voices, and coordinate what we already have that is so strong in this community. We have parents that care deeply, youth with big dreams and potential, and a strong range of youth-serving organizations and adult supports. “Like President Obama said in his inaugural address, all citizens’ voices are needed to solve social problems — not just our votes, but our voices and engaged action,” Aase said. “That’s what I saw on Thursday evening. That is what is strong and hopeful about our community, even when we are hurting.”


January 24 - 30, 2013

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Punk party brings back ’70 scenesters and memories BY PAUL DERIENzO The book-signing party for “The Best of Punk Magazine” brought together an allstar cabal of artists and writers who were present at the beginning of punk rock in New York in the early and mid-1970s. Their platform at the time was Punk Magazine, which was started by three high school friends, John Holmstrom, Ged Dunn and Legs McNeil, in 1975 and published 17 issues in a short but influential run that came to an end in 1979. A few more issues came out in 2007 and the magazine is available on the Web. The new book collects the covers, articles, cartoons and artwork that defined the age of black-clad punks who turned the music world and American culture on its head, as the hope and promise of the 1960s faded into the jaded conformity of Reaganism. The book is the second attempt by Holmstrom, who did the back cover of the Ramones’ “Rocket to Russia” LP, his first book effort failing to attract its market. This time the “Best of Punk Magazine” sits at the top of the Amazon charts, and hundreds came to the Powerhouse Arena in DUMBO to meet former staff members, many of whom haven’t been together in a decade or more. Among the book signers were writer Mary Harron, who interviewed Sex Pistols front man Johnny Rotten in London in 1976 and returned to New York with a newfound appreciation for the English band’s combination of rebellion and jaded cool. Harron went on from Punk Magazine to direct “I Shot Andy Warhol,” “American Psycho” and “The Notorious Bettie Page.” “We started the movement” claimed Holmstrom. “There was something before punk rock but it was undefined,” he added. “By giving it a visual definition, we brought it to life.” Harron was in the news again as Wayne LaPierre, the National Rifle Association vice president, told followers that “corrupt” video game, movie and music video creators “portray life as a joke, portray murder as a way of life, and then have the nerve to call it entertainment.” “We have blood-soaked films like ‘American Psycho,’ ‘Natural Born Killers,’ they’re aired on propaganda loops called Splatterdays, and every single day.” Editor Holmstrom seemed ecstatic as he recounted LaPierre’s slings at Harron’s work. Punk, he said, has been “attacked by the left and right,” recounting how Jesse Jackson “censored punk rock” by claiming it was “racist, sexist, fascist.” The charges are untrue said Holmstrom, who added that punk’s critics have often suffered from a lack of a “sense of humor.” In a recent conversation, Holmstrom opened up a copy of his book to a 1970sera flier by a leftist group in Madison, Wisconsin, that was demanding a “Boycott of Fascist Culture” claiming that the Sex Pistols “wear swastikas” and that the Ramones had “instigated racial violence in New York City.” The flier went on to

Photo by Paul DeRienzo

From left, Tish and Snooky Bellomo and a friend at the recent book-signing party in DUMBO for “The Best of Punk Magazine.”

accuse punk of reducing women to “sex objects,” offering as proof that “one female group calls itself The Slits.” Holmstrom and Punk artist Bruce Carleton did work for Al Goldstein’s porn mag Screw, which tempered its arrogant sexism with biting comedy. But Holmstrom also worked for kid-friendly MAD magazine, and with Will Eisner, award-winning creator of The Spirit comic character and many other innovative cartoons. Despite the sexism slag, Punk did feature its share of female groups and leads. Debbie Harry, whose music started as punk but soon crossed over to pop and even disco, wrote the forward to “The Best of Punk Magazine.” Blondie was also the cover of Punk issue No. 10 in 1977, with Debbie Harry’s cartoon figure performing live on the cover. A cartoon bust of Lou Reed graced the cover of the new magazine’s inaugural issue. Patti Smith was on the cover of the second edition, with Joey Ramone on the third. The Ramones lead singer, who died in 2001, was a co-editor of Punk Magazine. He was involved in naming the magazine’s “Punk of the Month” and in creating the magazine’s signature photo comics. Gathered in Brooklyn at the Powerhouse Arena party were the artists and performers who came to sign copies of “The Best of Punk Magazine.” Sisters Tish and Snooky Bellomo, who sang backup for Blondie and still perform with their group the Sic F----, posed for photos, while cover artists Bruce Carleton and Steve Taylor signed books. Tish and Snooky also opened the first punk rock boutique on St. Mark’s Place, called Manic Panic, and market their own line of cosmetics. Rock photographer Bob Gruen, who documented punk personalities, was there,

as were visual artists Curt Hoppe, Thom Holaday, Roberta Bayley and Robert Romagnoli. Bayley worked together with Holmstrom

editing a fumetti by Legs McNeil called “The Legend of Nick Detroit.” A fumetti, Italian for “little puffs of smoke,” is a comic strip made with photos instead of drawings and with speech balloons. The story is of a former top international agent and superkiller named Nick Detroit battling the Nazi Dykes and their schemes for world domination. The story appeared in issue No. 6 of Punk and featured Debbie Harry, Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye, and starred punk rocker Richard Hell in the title role. Does punk have a political agenda? Bands like MDC, a.k.a Millions of Dead Cops — later changed to Millions of Dead Chickens because band members were vegan — Dead Kennedys, Tom Robinson Band with their torch song “Glad To Be Gay,” and The Clash among others had a decidedly antiestablishment bent. But Holmstrom adamantly said, “No.” He also denied that the U.S. ever harbored a movement of fascist skinheads like some punks in England. He said instead punk started with a band called The Dictators. Their 1975 debut album was “Go Girl Crazy,” which included two songs, “Master Race Rock” and “Back to Africa” that generated controversy at the time, although most of the band members are Jewish. Holmstrom said that punks actually “were Jews making fun of Nazis.” “Go Girl Crazy” was a parody influenced

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January 24 - 30, 2013

Nice guys don’t finish last: Brad Hoylman sworn Continued from page 1

Duane steps aside He was facing a race for City Council in the Third District coming up this year — against at least two tough candidates, Corey Johnson and Yetta Kurland — when, in June, state Senator Tom Duane suddenly announced he wouldn’t seek re-election. Shifting his sights to the state Senate, Hoylman was well positioned for a run and, facing only token opposition, won easily. In another connection with Obama’s speech, it was noteworthy, among other things, for being the first time a president has ever mentioned the word “gay” in an inaugural address. Referring to the journey “through Seneca Falls and Selma and Stonewall,” the president linked the struggles of women, blacks and gays and lesbians for equality. Hoylman joins a strong contingent of openly gay and lesbian politicians — with one among their ranks, Council Speaker Christine Quinn, standing a good chance of being elected the city’s next mayor this year.

AN L.G.B.T. continuum Hoylman is the latest link in a chain of gay and lesbian political trailblazers coming out of Downtown Manhattan. In addition to Duane and Quinn, these include Assemblymember Deborah Glick, as well as Councilmember Rosie Mendez, and before her, Margarita Lopez and, to a certain extent, Antonio Pagan, who was more publicly ambiguous about his sexuality. Fittingly, it was Glick — New York’s first openly gay or lesbian elected official — who emceed Hoylman’s swearing-in ceremony. Hoylman was given the oath by New York’s J. Paul Oetken, the first openly gay judge appointed to the federal bench. Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum of Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, a gay and lesbian synagogue, gave the invocation. “Brad Hoylman, you stand on the shoulders of many, many great people who preceded you,” she said. She exhorted him to work “to move things forward when so much has conspired to keep us back. … We pray to whomever, whatever to give you strength.” Seated to Hoylman’s side during the ceremony was his fiancé, filmmaker David Sigal. Together since 1992, they plan to marry later this year. They have a daughter, Silvia, 2, born via a surrogate mother in California. Glick noted that the event was actually a twofer — “a goodbye to a very good friend, Tom Duane, and a big hello to Brad Hoylman.”

Photo by John Winkleman

Hoylman took the oath of office, administered by Judge J. Paul Oetken, as his fiancé, David Sigal, held his bar mitzvah Bible for Hoylman to put his left hand on and they both cradled their daughter, Silvia, 2.

Packed with politicians Among the many other elected officials seated on the stage were Senator Chuck Schumer, Congressmembers Jerrold Nadler and Jose Serrano, state Senators Liz Kreuger and Dan Squadron, Assemblymembers Richard Gottfried, Linda Rosenthal, Keith Wright and Brian Kavanagh, Councilmembers Margaret Chin, Dan Garodnick, Robert Jackson, Jessica Lappin, Gale Brewer and Jimmy Van Bramer, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, state Comptroller Tom DiNapoli and city Comptroller John Liu. Also on hand was Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the new leader of the Democratic State Senate Conference. She said she’ll be counting on Hoylman’s help in “fighting the good fight for everyone — making sure we do minimum wage, campaign finance reform, making sure we stand up for the L.G.B.T. community... especially for transgender people. “From the first day I met Brad...he was so ready,” she said. “He knows where we’re going.” She praised Hoylman as “obviously, so well-educated, an activist, an attorney.” Hoylman, originally from West Virginia, was a Rhodes scholar. When not wearing his C.B. 2 hat, he worked as the counsel for the New York Partnership, stepping down from that job when he launched his campaign for City Council last year.

Quinn: ‘Just good people’ Quinn, in her remarks, said politics needs more individuals like the freshman state senator. “There are people you meet who desperately want to be elected officials,” she said, “and there are people who should be, because their compass points true north and they’re just really good, loving people. That’s Brad Hoylman.”

Quinn praised Hoylman, in his tenure as C.B. 2 chairperson, for working “thoughtfully and deliberately” to create a forum “where everyone gets a chance to be heard.” Acknowledging the work over the years of her early political mentor, Duane, Quinn quipped, “There are enormously huge pumps to fill — enormously high stilettos,” eliciting laughter from the audience.

‘When Brad became chairperson of C.B. 2, we were able to navigate some rocky waters, accomplish so much.’ Scott Stringer

Noting, “We don’t inaugurate new state officials very often,” Nadler said, it’s important to install good ones. Hoylman, he said, has the right stuff, and is someone “who knows that the aim of good government is not to balance the budget, but to protect civil liberties and empower communities.” Stringer, who oversees the Manhattan community boards and appoints their members, relied on Hoylman to help get C.B. 2 back on track after a leading chairperson candidate had hidden from the board a conflict-of-interest ruling about his restaurant and his relationship to the board. After serving two years, Hoylman stepped down, following C.B. 2’s self-imposed term limit for chairpersons, only to run for chairperson two years later and win again, only to have to face dealing with the review of New York University’s enormous and hotly debated 2031 development plan. The board voted an “absolute no” on the mega-plan.

Stringer: ‘Smart, strategic’ “He’s so smart, so strategic,” Stringer said of Hoylman. “When he became chairperson of C.B. 2, we were able to navigate some rocky waters, accomplish so much. … Then, with N.Y.U. coming in, all the issues coming, he re-enlists and does it again.” In a novel twist for a swearing-in ceremony, author Maureen McLane, one of Hoylman’s best friends from their days together in Oxford as Rhodes scholars and an N.Y.U. English professor, read a lengthy poem, written for the occasion, including lines the likes of: He’s not from Texas, he’s no oilman He’s state Senator Brad Hoylman Yes, it’s true, it’s no rumor He’s heralded today by Chuck Schumer See him head for Albany His Empire State of Mind’s like Jay-Z’s And if you heard just one faint boo It might be from expansionist N.Y.U. But I’m from there and say, Yahoo!

Schumer in Sunday form Schumer earlier in the day had given one of his famous Sunday press conferences, in this case, calling on Walmart and Sports Authority to stop selling assault weapons. He noted he’s the “N.R.A.’s Public Enemy No. 1.” The pro-gun group puts out a photo of Schumer with a bull’s-eye on his forehead, and he noted he gets 20 to 30 of them back each year with a bullet hole through them. That’s a symbol of what’s wrong with America, he said. On the other hand, he said, “Brad is a symbol of what’s so good about this country, because he works so hard, and always believed in community.” Unlike in New York City, there are no term limits in the state Legislature.

Glick called the moment “bittersweet,” as it also represented the retirement from Albany politics of her longtime comrade Duane, who was elected to the City Council just one year after she won her seat in the Assembly. “Can it really be 30 years?” she asked, “I’m gonna plotz.” Pointing to the close friendships between the Downtown L.G.B.T. officials, she recalled how she met her partner while out petitioning for ballot signatures with Duane.

Duane passes the torch Yes, it was a political love fest, to be sure,

Continued on page 15


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into office as new state senator, following Duane Continued from page 14 but the sentiment was genuine. “I love Brad,” Duane said. He recalled sitting down to meet the aspiring politician in 2000 and thinking, “ ‘Wow, this guy is the real deal,’ ” Duane said. Again, pointing to the friendships between the tight-knit group of politicos, Duane said Hoylman had really supported him during one of the “most difficult times of his life,” though he didn’t elaborate. As it was finally time for Hoylman to take the oath of office, his daughter, Silvia, came running up to the stage from the audience and he lifted her up with him. Silvia helped hold Sigal’s bar mitzvah Bible as Hoylman prepared to be sworn in, and he and Sigal both held Silvia. “This will be interesting,” Hoylman remarked, to the audience’s laughter. They finally managed to get everyone in position, after going through a sort of “political Twister.”

The making of a senator In his remarks, Hoylman thanked his parents, who couldn’t attend, for instilling in him at an early age the belief “that politics could be an honorable profession — even as President Nixon was resigning [on TV] in our living room.” He thanked his allies for encouraging him to stay in politics after he lost the Council race in 2001, and to run for district leader. “And you said, ‘Don’t worry, a seat will open up very soon.’ And I waited...and waited — 11 years,” he quipped. But that waiting period only seasoned Hoylman for becoming a state senator. “I’m a better public servant today because you thought that political office should be earned the old-fashioned way, through hard work,” he told the crowd at F.I.T. Saying the 27th District includes “really the best neighborhoods in New York State,” he pledged to represent all its diverse areas, including the Village, its public housing complexes — like the Riis Houses, Campos Plaza and Chelsea-Elliot Houses — along with Penn South, the Westbeth artists’ complex and Manhattan Plaza, and Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village — the latter which, he noted, “is more than 10 times the size of my hometown in West Virginia.” He promised to work to keep Stuy Town and Peter Cooper Village affordable.

Will fight for the 99% He vowed to work, as he put it, “to reverse the growing chasm between the rich and the poor, to fight for New York City’s fair share of education money and for parent involvement [in public schools], to ensure passage of GENDA [the Gender Non-Discrimination Act] and to keep our water safe from hydrofracking.” His comments on fracking elicited the loud-

Photos by Tequila Minsky

From left, in the front row onstage at Brad Hoylman’s swearing-in ceremony, former state Senator Tom Duane; Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the new state Senate Democratic Conference leader; U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer; and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

Helps pass gun laws

Writer and N.Y.U. professor Maureen McLane read a poem she penned about her good friend Hoylman as Assemblymember Deborah Glick, the event’s emcee, enjoyed the clever verse.

est cheers of his bucket list of stated goals. He also said he’ll push for surrogate pregnancy to become legal in New York, one of the few states where it’s still banned. Hoylman indicated Albany’s infamously dysfunctional politics will be a challenge, but that he’s got hope. “It’s gotten to the point where, some of our members, during roll call, don’t know whether to say, ‘Present’ or ‘Not guilty,’ ” he said. “But it’s getting better under new leadership.”

‘East Village is important’ Asked afterward if he’ll face a learning curve in representing the East Village,

since C.B. 2’s eastern border is the Bowery/ Fourth Ave., Hoylman said, “It’s an important new part of the district. I have knowledge of East Village issues as a Village activist and former community board chairperson, where many issues have overlapped, such as N.Y.U., public schools, nightlife, tenants’ rights and historic preservation. Plus, I’m fortunate in having pre-existing strong alliances with C.B. 3, community members and local elected officials in the East Village, including Rosie Mendez, [Congressmember] Nydia Velazquez and Brian Kavanagh. But there’s a lot of work to do in this neighborhood and every part of the district!” Mendez missed Hoylman’s swearing-in because she was at Velazquez’s.

Just days after Hoylman’s swearingin at F.I.T., the state Legislature passed Governor Cuomo’s N.Y. Safe Act of 2013, implementing the toughest assault weapons ban in the country. Hoylman called the package of gun laws “an urgent necessity” and “long overdue.” Still, he said there is more work to do, including pushing for microstamping to link bullet cartridges to criminals who fired them. “Voting on the gun bill was an exciting and momentous way to begin my legislative career in the Senate, demonstrating that we as legislators are no longer under the thumb of the gun lobby,” Hoylman told The Villager. As for how things are going so far, he said, “Everyone — senators and staff of both parties — has been incredibly welcoming and helpful. And I’m lucky to be sitting next to my colleague to the south, Senator Squadron, on the Senate floor, who has been generous in showing me the ropes.”

‘It’s nice to have hope’ Meanwhile, his supporters who helped him get there are pulling for him with a renewed sense of hope in Albany politics. Said Jo Hamilton, a former C.B. 2 chairperson and a close friend of Hoylman’s, “Brad has, deservedly, earned the respect of the community and elected officials. He is trusted and it seems that so many consider him a friend. It’s a great combination in a political world where it is too easy to be cynical. It’s nice to have hope.” Hope — in the form of a nice, highly intelligent, handsome guy with progressive politics elected to office. Hey, where have we seen that before?


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January 24 - 30, 2013

Creative pioneers under assault on the new L.E.S. CLAYTON By Clayton Patterson The old Lower East Side produced a long list of creative individuals whose output and contributions were instrumental in altering the consciousness of America and the world, in so many fields: music, art, poetry, writing, theater, film, photography and video, political thought, religious philosophy and on and on. If I had to give a quick answer as to what was the most important ingredient which made all of this genius possible, it would be cheap rent and the possibility of living an inexpensive lifestyle. To create, one must be able to eat, live and have the time to work at one’s obsessions and passions. Gentrification has changed the possibilities. I believe the muse has left the building. I’m not saying nothing can be produced here again. But what was before will never be again. Most of the players of change had what it took, just not the money. For most of the new power players money is the new G-d. Greed is the new passion. I have slowly come to accept the change. What is — is. It is do or die. I, along with a solid core of radical, hard-core, streetfighting activists, put in our years fighting against gentrification. We lost and gentrification won. What depresses me is the continual purging of the longtime community residents and creative souls. Over the years, I have witnessed many different tactics to evict people. Fires, hired thugs, moving in criminal activity, damaging the structural stability of a building’s foundation, cutting off heat and power, noise, using the police and courts, lies, money, eliminating building security, and so on. Recently Lincoln Anderson wrote about the stressful and precarious situation MM Serra, Taylor Mead and what is left of the remaining tenants in their separate buildings are dealing with. Same landlord, different buildings. Both on Ludlow St. Tenants in both having to deal with a landlord famous for being a by-any-means-possible evictor. Lincoln covered some of what the tenants have had to endure, but the situation has gotten worse. MM Serra’s building recently had a nonsuspicious, electrical fire. Mostly smoke damage and an increase in psychological warfare. In Taylor’s building, Harry Antonopoulos is being forced out by some strange change in tenant law. Harry, like MM and Taylor, is a much-loved and respected, active, creative member of our community. Harry is a fireman stationed at “Fort Pitt.” MM Serra, a filmmaker, runs the Film Makers’ Co-op. Taylor is 87 and lives on the fifth floor. As often as possible, Harry carries Taylor’s groceries and packages up the five flights. Besides, the neighborhood loves having a friendly fireman living among us. Over the years I have helped Taylor deal with eviction and other problems. He has lived through and survived multiple brutal eviction campaigns. This time it is different. Again, Taylor is 87 years old. He is a

Photos by Clayton Patterson

Taylor Mead, 87, displaying one of his paintings, hung above his bathtub in his cluttered Ludlow St. apartment.

living legend with a long list of creative achievements. No question he is still an active, vital, contributing, creative artist. Until the Bowery Poetry Cafe closed, he performed onstage his weekly Taylor Mead multimedia extravaganza. He has been shown in the Whitney Biennial. Documentaries have been made on his life and struggle. He has acted in movies and onstage. Been written about in the Paris Review. In public he is treated with love and respect, and given the celebrity status he has earned. He is one of the few remaining tenants in his building. The whole place is a construction site with all the expected noise, dust, obstacles, worker traffic, open doors, coldness and activities that come with construction. There is pounding on his walls, floors and hallways from early morning till late Saturday evening. Then there is the intrusion of the holes drilled through his walls. The dust. To have to live with this would be enough to send a young person over the edge. His home life has become unbearable. But what can he do? It’s true his apartment is a mess. A real mess. At his age, he can hardly bend over. He needs a cleaning person to come in weekly. Lucien, the proprietor of Lucien’s restaurant and the Pink Pony, provides Taylor’s meals. He does not want to live in an assisted-living space, because he could not have cats. Besides, by nature he is an independent, make-it-on-his-own, kind of guy. To stuff him in a sanitized box, with dying people, would kill him. It is not like the landlord, Ben Shaoul of Magnum Real Estate, is broke. He just paid millions of dollars for a number of properties on Ludlow St. Yes, I have to adapt to this Bloomberg New World Order where money, the bottom line and political power are what determine a citizen’s worth and value. But have we

completely lost all of our humanity, sense of decency, respect for one another, appreciation and compassion for the elderly and those who have less or are sick? It is not just guns that kill people.

Mead pointing to a hole that construction workers punched through one of his walls.

Can’t we find a way for Taylor to live out his “golden years” with some kind of respect, love, appreciation and sense of peace and security? Is that really asking too much?

letters to the editor Continued from page 10

Sometimes right ain’t wrong To The Editor: The conservative right has been talking a lot lately about cutting back on government programs. And I couldn’t agree more. A good place to start would be to eliminate the drone program. And do we really need a military base in Australia with missiles pointed at China? Speaking as someone who served in the Army in Germany from September 1967 to December 1968, the only reason we left our troops in Europe after World War II was because the Soviet Union left their troops there. Well, not only does the Soviet Union not have its troops in Europe, it hasn’t even existed for almost a quarter of a century. Bringing those troops home would save billions, if not trillions, in tax dollars. Moving on to social programs: William Buckley once said, “It is time to take drugs out of the black market and put them on the free market.” Another conservative position that I agree with. This would not only take the burden off the

prison system, but would eliminate many police and F.B.I. task forces, and would also do away with the D.E.A., once again saving taxpayers billions of their hardearned dollars that would otherwise be spent on an unwinnable drug war. The list of programs that could be done away with could go on and on before touching even one penny that goes toward the comfort and well-being of the taxpayer. So, let me wrap this up with a final conservative opinion I agree with: Ronald Raygun once put his opinion on illegal immigration in the form of a Q & A. Q: “What do you call an illegal immigrant?” A: “A wiling worker.” Peace. Jerry The Peddler E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to lincoln@thevillager. com or fax to 212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.


January 24 - 30, 2013

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villager arts & entertainment Just Do Art!

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

DANCE NEW AMSTERDAM: RAW DIRECTIONS

Dance New Amsterdam’s “Raw Directions” showcases the work of five post-emerging and mid-career choreographers. In the world premiere of “Charles” (by Netherlands native Pascal Rekoert), the Flexicurve company performs a fast-paced piece set to Beethoven and Mozart, inspired by Charlie Chaplin. David Appel’s untitled piece employs a series of short dances (and five dancers) to explore the way we structure our lives and how we engage with our environment. A live, original score by Galen Bremer accompanies “Light House” — Anne Zuerner’s work drawing from her years spent on the Rhode Island coast. In “This Is No Waltz,” by Megan Bascom (with a score by Cal Hawkins), the interplay of reciprocal and mutual action is seen in fleeting partnerships, both tender and reckless. In the New York premiere of Lane Gifford’s “land·scape,” the maddeningly intense pace of our lives is explored through consumption, convolution, sensory overload, selfimage and accumulation — in an animated setting, through a dynamic dance narrative. Wed., Jan. 30 through Sat., Feb. 2 (Wed., Thurs., Fri at 7:30pm, Sat. at 3pm & 7:30pm). At 280 Broadway (entrance at 53 Chambers St.). For tickets ($17 general admission, $12 in advance), call 212-2279856 or visit dnadance.org.

Pascal Rekoert’s Chaplin-inspired “Charles” has its world premiere, as part of Dance New Amsterdam's “Raw Directions.”

THE FIRE THIS TIME FESTIVAL

Horse Trade Management Group’s fourth annual presentation of the Fire This Time Festival gives early-career playwrights of African and African-American descent the chance to explore new voices, styles, and challenging new directions — in a 10-minute format. That core element of the festival is supplemented by a panel discussion (“Submitting, Self-producing and Other Survival Skills for Artists”) and fully staged readings of new plays in development. Among the (very) short plays: Cynthia G. Robinson’s “Nightfall” follows a Sudanese couple forced to confront the mayhem that haunts their village and threatens to destroy their family. In “Always,” by Danielle T. Davenport, a man looks up his childhood friend for the first time in two decades — during a reading of her celebrated novel (whose plot borrows liberally from their shared history). In “Orchids and Polka Dots,” by Nathan Yungerberg, a 1950s housewife meets up with a fledgling young research scientist and a tall glass of water infused with 100 gamma of LSD. J. Holtham’s “Favored Nations” takes place in an upscale office, where two brothers meet to settle their father’s will. Through Feb. 2, at The Kraine Theater &

Photo by Nathan Yungerberg

Collective talent: The playwrights from Horse Trade’s Fire This Time Festival.

The Red Room (both located at 85 E. Fourth St., btw. Second Ave. & Bowery). For tickets ($15), visit horsetrade.info or call 212-8684444. Admission to panel discussions and readings is Pay-What-You-Will. For a full schedule of events, visit firethistimefestival. com and horsetrade.info.

THE LIVING THEATRE’S “HERE WE ARE”

True to the promise of its name, The Living Theatre will, we hope, live forever. But their current production is your last chance to see them in their current space. After the final curtain comes down, it’ll be

curtains for their longtime 21 Clinton Street space (they’ll soon be found elsewhere, we’re assured). For now, though, the oldest experimental theatre group still producing in the United States continues its 66th year with the world premiere of Judith Malina’s “Here We Are” — in which the 86-year-old Artistic Director uses the inadequacy of the voting process (“the core of our own poorly organized society,” she asserts) to ask the big questions. Where are we? How did we get here? What have we tried in the past that has mislead us? What are the new ideas for the new world? How can we achieve them together and put

Photo by Letizia Mariotti

Tom Walker (foreground) with company members, in “Here We Are.”

aside violence, without the fear of retribution? How can the theatre help us do this? The audience and the ensemble will work together to come up with some “creative possibilities for a post-revolutionary world of beauty and non-violence.” Through Feb. 23. Wed.-Sat. at 8pm. At The Living Theatre (21 Clinton St., just below Houston St. at Avenue B). Wed. tickets are “Pay What You Can.” Otherwise, tickets are $20 ($25 for students/seniors). For reservations, call 212-352-0255 or visit livingtheatre.org.

Continued on page 21


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Which way from here? The failure of “Dead Accounts” prompts thinking about Broadway, the business BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE The crash and burn of Theresa Rebeck’s “Dead Accounts” after 27 previews and 44 regular performances, playing to houses filled to as little as a quarter of capacity and seven weeks shy of its promoted “limited engagement,” raises questions not about the fate of Broadway — so often referred to as the “fabulous invalid” — but to its current business models. Despite the recent spate of plays starring TV or movie stars that have received tepid reviews and either closed or are limping along, that approach continues to flourish. Even as Broadway raked in a record-breaking $1.14 billion in the 2011/ 2012 season, more than one-third of that went to established shows that are big hits with tourists and presumably, like “The Book of Mormon,” have not exhausted their broad New York-region audience. It’s called show “business,” so someone hopes to make money at it. In another industry, an algorithm might have been developed to quantify the appeal of a star before committing to a production. But Broadway is a business that deals in gut feelings and emotion and so, as in Hollywood, the potential to misread an audience and a venture’s viability leads to many shows that never recoup their investments. When intuition rules, there can, of course, be spectacular surprises — and that’s a big part of what gives Broadway its popular appeal — but the situation is also ripe for disaster. The only reason people keep investing is that the occasional runaway hit can make producers very rich. Broadway is more analogous to gambling than virtually any other business, except that on the Great White Way the house plays with its own money — something, you’ll remember, that Max Bialystock in “The Producers” always warned against. I had intended to review “Dead Accounts” before its demise, but now I’m left with the opportunity to examine the show as emblematic of the larger challenges facing Broadway in 2013. Theresa Rebeck’s work is at best facile and shallow, though it can be entertaining. “Seminar,” while not much of a play, was at least funny. The TV series “Smash” is a model of improbable characters and situations that are downright laughable to anyone with a working

Photo by Joan Marcus

Photo by Richard Termine

Katie Holmes in the ill-fated production of Theresa Rebeck’s “Dead Accounts.”

Ricky Martin in the revival of “Evita,” which closes on January 26.

knowledge of theater. Still as train-wreck TV, it has its campy appeal — and it’s free. “Dead Accounts,” on the other hand, was a largely undeveloped play that asked whether or not a banker who stole $27 million should get away with it. It wasn’t just badly written, it was a bore. Evidently, producers thought they could score a success drawing only on the one percent, the only crowd who could warm to such a character. Katie Holmes, the show’s marquee-value star, had recently gathered some curiosity points through her divorce from Tom Cruise, but is that enough to get anyone to plop down a top ticket price of $147 to see her live rather than on a magazine cover or “TMZ”? (That, by the way, is the premise of “Chicago,” in which an acquitted murderess ends up in vaudeville to titillate the hoi polloi. That show has been a revolving door of stars — and it has the heft to pull it off.) Celebrity scandal is now so commonplace and so widely broadcast that showcasing a star at the center of it hardly seems like a viable business strategy. One certainly didn’t go see Holmes for

her acting. She has come a long way from her bland performance in “All My Sons,” but Rebeck’s play makes such light demands on her as an actress that a furrowed brow and a concerned tone were all that were required of her. Surrounding her with such theatrical stalwarts as Norbert Leo Butz, Jayne Houdyshell, and Josh Hamilton helped, but under Jack O’Brien’s disengaged direction, they were left to doing familiar performances we’ve seen from each of them. The only reason to cast TV actress Judy Greer must have been to make Holmes look marginally more competent. Greer’s was a completely unanimated performance. Like many TV and film actors, she just went dead when it wasn’t her turn to speak. Once the excitement of seeing Holmes wore off — about five minutes in — there was nothing to keep audiences engaged. A good product will attract an audience. But a good product is built from a winning array of attributes. Based on her roles in “The Help” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” Jessica Chastain is a hot film star. Does that mean that enough people want to see her in an old adaptation of

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a Henry James novel, “The Heiress,” to make it profitable? When the revival of “Evita,” powered by a magnetic but miscast Ricky Martin, closes on January 26, it may barely make back its investment, and if it does it will be because his star power trumped the weakness in the production. Whatever you think of them, “War Horse,” “Once.” “Annie,” “Newsies,” “Wicked,” “Spider-Man,” “The Lion King,” and “Book of Mormon” continue to play at or near capacity with no stars. A viable product finds its audience. The challenge for Broadway is marrying product and audience. The brand identity of a star is just one element in making a hit show. People buy brands again and again because they know what they’re getting and they have an emotional connection to them. It may seem callous to talk of living, breathing actors in that way, but producers must — and do — if they are serious about making money. The object lesson of not doing that is only too obvious. A weak brand and a faltering concept result in horrid product, which is why “Dead Accounts” was DOA.

it takes a Villager and an east Villager Your local news source


January 24 - 30, 2013

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A queerly engaging novel Drawing out the dynamics of gender-bending relationships ing — in every sense of the word — in both its critical exploration of gender identity and its display of those personal tensions within real life relationships. And although it lacks exceptional prose, Sam Rosenthal’s second RYE book raises plenty of provocative questions about sexuality and polyamory, while telling a pretty good story (and, I guess, helping you By Sam Rosenthal get off, depending on your inclinations). We follow Matt, a 40-year-old divorced Published by Projekt father, who’s romantically involved with Rye, November 15, 2012 a 31-year-old biological female who identifies as male — and whom Rosenthal refers to 268 pages with male pronouns throughout the novel. Their relationship is equal parts passionate and tumultuous, as both struggle at times to understand their own needs and desires, from both physical and emotional perspectives. BY SAM SPOKONY But the most complicated thing about the While I want to believe what “Star Trek” taught me, I think space might not really be interactions between Matt and Rye might be the final frontier. Sure, there’s this unfath- the battles with binary oppositions — clashes omable depth of infinity to be investigated and ironies seemingly more associated with outside us, but what might be even more the heteronormative world — that surface complex is the stuff inside — the farthest throughout their seemingly “free” gender reaches of our own human identity, and all neutral lifestyles. Both are forced to confront the psychological twists that go along with questions about their personal quests for hedonistic happiness in a world that largely deciphering that. ignores3:36 or PM simply doesn’t understand them Or at DDF leastDTEx thisadis 3how I feel, as a typically Jan 2013.pdf 1 2013-01-16 vanilla heterosexual male, after reading my (although Rosenthal himself largely ignores first genderqueer erotic novel. “Rye” is prob- actual depictions of the world of hetero “val-

Books

Photo courtesy of the author

ues”). And the reader, alongside the fictional lovers, is asked to further dissect traditional notions such as marriage, monogamy and its related intimacy issues, and the masculine/female power dynamics within sexually unpredictable relationships. On top of all that, we later find Matt engaged in a simultaneous relationship with Rain, a queer 23-year-old hermaphrodite who tends to switch between male and female pronouns, and whose distinctly different personality and sexual attitude forces Matt to further struggle to understand his feelings for Rye. It’s difficult for me to describe all the gritty details in a G-rated setting, so I’ll just say that you’re going to be very, very close to all three of these characters by the end of the novel. So, yes, there’s a lot of sex in this book. A lot. And for people who don’t share these particular inclinations, the underlying themes might seem too cryptically embedded within nonstop images of sheer kinkiness. But I think there are theories worth digging for in Rosenthal’s jumble of words and bodies — ideas that will probably mean different things to different people, and will probably also leave most readers with some previously hidden sense of curiosity, a new insight into queer lifestyles, or at least a more intellectual way to get off.

155 1st Avenue at East 10th St. Reservations/Info 254-1109

Tickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net www.facebook.com/theaterforthenewcity

A "BURN THE MORTGAGE" CELEBRATION! Saturday, January 26th 5:00 to 7:00pm REJOYCE! THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY Has Paid Its Mortgage! $717,000 to $0!

Eats! Drinks! And Lots of Love! We want to Thank our Supporters! Champagne for everyone! And a Swinging Opening of a 40-year Retrospectacle: Theater for the New City, 40 Years of Struggle and Triumph! Help us to put a Match to a 25-year old Mortgage, as we unveil our Donor Plaque.

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THEATER FOR THE NEW CITY Celebrates its 40th Year, and celebrates its future as The Cultural Center for the East Village and the Lower East Side— serving its neighborhood with Free and Low-Cost Theater, Art, Music, Poetry, Puppetry, Multimedia & Street Theater.

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BEST OF NEW YORK

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register now! hip hop boys program ballet birthday parties

tap jazz lyrical year-end recital adult cardio/dance classes

broadway @ reade

212.962.1800

downtowndancefactory.com

Performers and Speakers will include: F. MURRAY ABRAHAM CHARLES BUSCH DAVID AMRAM VINIE BURROWS NYC COUNCIL MEMBER ROSIE MENDEZ LOUIS MOFSIE of the THUNDERBIRD AMERICAN INDIAN DANCERS And Surprises!

We want You to be there with us! Come Celebrate the New Year and the New Life this gives the Theater.

Seating is Limited! RSVP at crystalfield@theaterforthenewcity.net TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts


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January 24 - 30, 2013

PURIM FUN!

This Jewish holiday creates a festive vibe through the wearing of masks and costumes, giving gifts of food and drink, reading the Book of Ester (aka The Megillah)

and participating in a celebratory meal. Thank Queen Ester and Mordechai for the good times (they’re the ones who helped save the Jewish people from a plot by the wicked Haman).

BY KAITLYN MEADE & SCOTT STIFFLER P O E T S H O U S E T h e P o e t s H o u s e C h i l d r e n ’s R o o m gives children and their parents a gateway to enter the world of rhyme through readings, group activi ties and interactive performances. For children a g e s 1 - 3 , t h e C h i l d r e n ’s R o o m o f f e r s “ Ti n y P o e t s Ti m e ” r e a d i n g s o n T h u r s d a y s a t 1 0 a m ; f o r t h o s e ages 4-10, weekly poetry readings take place every Sat. at 11am. Filled with poetry books, old-fashioned typewriters and a card catalogue packed with poetic objects to trigger inspiration, the Children’s Room is open Thurs.- Sat., 11am-5pm. Free admission. At 10 River Terrace. Call 212-431-7920 or visit poetshouse.org. S AT U R D AY F A M I LY P R O G R A M S AT T H E S K YSCRAPER MUSEUM Dinosaurs aren’t the only big and tall creations to fascinate the very young and v e r y s h o r t . To w e r i n g s k y s c r a p e r s a l s o h a v e a p u l l on the 7+ set — and there’s no better place to see them than right here, in the world’s foremost vertical metropolis. But why crane your neck looking upwards? Explore tall buildings as objects of design, p r o d u c t s o f t e c h n o l o g y, s i t e s o f c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d places of work and residence (and build one of your own!) at The Skyscraper Museum. Their winter/ spring “Saturday Family Program” series features workshops designed to introduce children and their families to the principles of architecture and engineering through hands-on activities.On Feb. 9, the “Valentine’s Day Card Creations” workshop lets you c l i m b t o t h e t o p o f a l o v e d o n e ’s h e a r t b y m a k i n g them a homemade skyscraper card. All workshops ($5 per family) are for ages 7+ and take place at 10:30am. Registration is required. Call 212-945-6324 or email education@skyscraper.org. At 39 Battery Place (btw. First Place & Little West St.). Regular museum hours are Wed.-Sun., 12-6pm. Admission is $5 ($2.50 for students/seniors). THE SCHOLASTIC STORE Held every Saturday at 3pm, Scholastic’s in-store activities are designed to get kids reading, thinking, talking, creating and moving. At 11am every Tues., Wed. and Thurs., the Scholastic Storyteller brings tales to life at Daily Storytime. At 557 Broadway (btw. Prince & Spring Sts.). Store hours: Mon.-Sat., 10am-7pm and Sun., 11am-6pm. For info, call 212-343-6166 or visit scholastic.com/sohostore.

THE PICCOLINI TRIO: “CIRCUS IN A TRUNK” After a two-month hiatus and extensive renovations due to Hurricane Sandy damage, Canal Park Playhouse is back — and so is The Piccolini Trio, whose third annual run at the theater combines contemporary big top hijinks with classic European style clowning. When the three mischievous friends arrive at the Playhouse and realize the circus they came to see isn’t going to show up, they decide to put on a show — by using all the fun and fantastic things they find in a huge antique trunk. Music, acrobatics, physical comedy, juggling and pantomime are all performed at a breathless pace by the Trio, who cut their clown teeth (and earned their big red noses) while studying with Circus Smirkus, the award-winning international youth circus. Brunch at the theater’s Waffle Iron Café is available before and after the show. The menu includes hot-off-the-waffle-iron frittatas, French toast, traditional Belgian Waffles and two famous house specialties: The Playhouse Pink Waffle (a pink waffle with strawberries and whipped cream) and the Decadent Dark Chocolate Waffle. Don’t have a sweet tooth? Really? Well, then, entree salads are also available! Through Jan. 27, 1pm & 4pm, Sat. & Sun. At Canal P a r k P l a y h o u s e ( 5 0 8 C a n a l S t . , b t w. G r e e n w i c h & West Sts.). For tickets ($20), call 866-811-4111 or visit canalparkplayhouse.com. FANCY NANCY THE MUSICAL The Vital Theatre Company’s tuneful adaptation of the beloved book series finds the girl with a flair for fancy words, clothes and décor in the middle of a serious personal crisis. Along with good friends Bree, Rhonda, Wanda and Lionel, Nancy has landed a role in the school play (“Deep Sea Dances”). That’s the good news. The bad news: Nancy won’t be a glamorous mermaid, just a dreary and dull tree. After the initial disappointment, our heroine resolves to use her trademark flair to make the small part into something as entertaining and unique as she is. Through July 13. Sat. at 1:30pm and Sun. at noon. At Culture Project, 45 Bleecker St. (btw. Mulberry & Mott Sts.) For tickets ($30), visit vitaltheatre.org, call 212-579-0528 or visit the Vital Theatre box office (2162 Broadway) Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm (or the Culture Project box office one hour prior to show time). On Feb. 2, performances resume, every Sat. & Sun., at 3:30pm, at the McGinn/Cazale Theatre (2162 Broadway, at 76th St.).

Photo by Jennifer Weisbord Photography

Having fun at JCP’s Purim Carnival & Shipel is easy as pie.

PURIM CARNIVAL & SHPIEL

The Jewish Community Project Downtown’s family-focused Purim celebration features carnival games, prizes, crafts and a special musical performance of “Harry Potter and the Shpiel of Secrets.” Come dressed in your favorite Purim costume, and be ready to make and shake your grogger, feast on Hamantaschen and

play the day away! Sun., Feb. 10, from 11am-2pm. At the Citigroup building (388 Greenwich St., btw. Beach & N. Moore Sts.). Tickets are $18 per person, $65 for 4 or more. Advanced reservations not required, tickets and registration at the door. For info, call the Jewish Community Project Downtown, at 212-334-3522 or visit jcpdowntown.org.

They did the bash: The Mama Doni band headlines the MJH Purim celebration.

PURIM BASH WITH THE MAMA DONI BAND

Created with children of all ages in mind (but specifically for those ages 3-10), The Museum of Jewish Heritage’s Purim Bash offers you the chance to design holidaythemed crafts, march in a costume parade and enjoy the music of the Mama Doni Band — who’ve been described as “a zany musical chicken soup of reggae, rock, disco, Latin, klezmer and other styles.” If you dig their Purim tunes, check out their 2008

debut album, “I Love Herring” or visit them at mamdoni.com. Sun., Feb. 10. The concert takes place at 2pm, with holiday craft activities from 1-4pm. At the Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust (Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place). $10 for adults, $7 for children 10 and under; Museum members: $7, $5 for children 10 and under. The craft activities are free with a concert ticket. For ticket purchase and more info, call 646437-4202 or visit mjhnyc.org.


January 24 - 30, 2013

21

Just Do Art!

Three concerts, from different drummers: The “Monk in Motion” series begins Feb. 2, with Jamison Ross.

Continued from page 17

“AMERICAN SCRAPBOOKS” AUTHOR EVENT

Move over, Pinterest — there’s an old school way to cut, paste and share the things that strike your fancy. “Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance” is the latest by Ellen Gruber Garvey. Previously, the New Jersey City University Professor of English authored the award-winning “The Adman in the Parlor: Magazines and the Gendering of Consumer Culture.” For this new cultural chronicle, Gruber Garvey sets her sights on how, as she describes it, “men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks — the ancestors of Google and blogging.” Scrapbooking wasn’t just for marquee names such as Abraham Lincoln and Susan B. Anthony. Abolitionists and Confederates, janitors and farmworkers all used the technique to chronicle the high and low points of their lives, and every mundane event in-between. What they chose to collect, the author tells us, “opens a new window into the feelings and thoughts of ordinary and extraordinary Americans. Like us, nineteenth-century readers spoke back to the media, and treasured what mattered to them.” Gruber Garvey’s in-store appearance includes a slideshow and a meet and greet. Bring your camera, snap a photo with her, and you’ll have made a very good start on your own scrapbook. Free. Tues., Jan. 29, at 7pm. At St. Mark’s Bookshop (31 Third Ave., at Ninth St.). For more info, call 212260-7853 or visit stmarksbookshop.com.

MONK IN MOTION: THE NEXT FACE OF JAZZ

There will never be another Monk — but this concert series serves as a showcase for the best of those young artists who are building on his legacy of precision and innovation. A partnership between BMCC

Image courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York, © The Estate of Nancy Spero

Nancy Spero’s “The Goddess Nut II” (1990. Handprinting and printed collage on paper; 5 parts: 84 x 110 inches; 213.4 x 279.4 cm, overall).

Tribeca Performing Arts Center and the Thelonious Monk Institute, “Monk in Motion: The Next Face of Jazz” pays tribute to the three winners of the annual Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition by giving them a stage to perform on and a chance to show New York audiences the breadth and depth of their talents. First up, it’s first place winner Jamison Ross — a 24-year-old drummer from Jacksonville, FL. Before the concert, Willard Jenkins moderates the panel discussion, “21st Century Drummer’s Roundtable” (with Carl Allen, Allison Miller and more). The series continues Feb. 16 with second runner-up Colin Stranahan (a 26-year-drummer from Denver, CO), and concludes March 2 with the runnerup: 28-year-old Richmond, CA native Justin Brown (another drummer!). The concerts begin at 8:30pm on Sat., Feb. 2 & 16 and March 2 — preceded by the free panel or film screening at 7pm. In Theatre 2, at the BMCC Tribeca Performing Arts Center (on the Borough of Manhattan Community College campus; 199 Chambers St., btw. Greenwich & West Sts.).Concert tickets are $25 ($15 for students/seniors). For more info, visit tribecapac. org and monkinstitute.org.

Nancy Spero: From Victimage to Liberation: Works from the 1980s & 1990s

The career of Nancy Spero (1926-2009) spanned five decades. Renowned for her serious engagement with contemporary political, social and cultural concerns, Spero chronicled wars and apocalyptic destruction in her work, as well as the cycle of life. The role and identity of women in prehistoric times and the present remained a key focus of Spero’s oeuvre — and her paper collages and large-scale paintings continue to radiate a keen sense of timeless importance. Through Feb. 16, at Galerie Lelong (528 W. 26th St., btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.-Sat., 10am6pm. Call 212-315-0470 or visit galerielelong.com.

Image courtesy of Oxford University Press

Take that, Pinterest. Ellen Gruber Garvey’s new tome chronicles the great American scrapbook. Meet the author at St. Mark’s Bookstore, on Jan. 29.


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January 24 - 30, 2013

Publ ic Notice s Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by The Lobster Place Inc. d/b/a The Lobster Place The Cull & Pistol to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 75 9th Ave New York NY 10011. Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013 Notice is hereby given that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by H K Second Ave Restaurant Inc. d/b/a Bait & Hook to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 249-51 Est 14th Street New York NY 10011. Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013 Notice is hereby given that license #1268352 has been applied by the undersigned to sell alcoholic beverages at retail in a cafe under the alcoholic beverage control law at 1744 2nd Avenue, New York, NY 10128 for on-premises consumption. DTUT CAFÉ INC d/b/a DTUT CAFE Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of CawsVideo LLC Articles of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 116 Pinehurst Ave., Suite J23, NewYork, NY 10033. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013 MANHATTAN COGNITIVE – BEHAVIORAL THERAPY / PSYCHOLOGY, PLLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 12/10/2012. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC 276 Fifth Avenue, STE # 905, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ARAVO HOLDINGS LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/9/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 118 Baxter St Ste 402 New York, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 TJD 21 LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/21/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 245 Park Ave., NY, NY 10167. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013

LENOIR LAW FIRM, PLLC, a domestic PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: New York. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: S. John Lenoir, 2753 Broadway, Ste. 251, NY, NY 10025. Purpose: Law Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 COMGROUP GLOBAL HOLDINGS LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/18/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Trief & Olk, Esqs., 150 E. 58th St., 34th Flr., NY, NY 10155. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN LLC, a domestic LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/10/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Street.com, c/o James Cramer, 14 Wall St., 15th Flr., NY, NY 10005. General Purposes. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of LINCOLN PLAINS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to M. Nader Ahari, 524 Broadway, Ste. 405, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of SASHA WOLF GALLERY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/20/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 70 Orchard St., NY, NY 10002. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of METLANG LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/08/10. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24- 02/28/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Battery Park Holdings Subsidiary LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 12/21/2012. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Brookfield Properties W 33rd Co. L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/11/13. LP formed in DE on 04/15/1986. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, NewYork, NY 10281. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. avail. from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of BOP West 31st Street LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 200 Vesey St., 11th Fl., 3 WFC, New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 01/15/1999. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of SN Compliance LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/4/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: USPO Village Station, P.O. Box 132, NY, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013

Notice of Qualification of Foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: Global Tax Network Northeast, LLC. Application for Authority was filed by the Department of State of New York on: 01/02/2013. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Organized on: 01/30/2008. Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to principal business address: 7950 Main Street N., Suite 200, Minneapolis, MN 55369. Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware: One Commerce Center, 1201 Orange Street, Suite 600, Wilmington, DE 19899. Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building, 401 Federal Street, Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice of Formation of Philal LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/6/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice of Qualification of Potenza Capital (GP), LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/28/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 12/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/24 - 02/28/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #1268218 has been applied for by R & G Spring LLC d/b/a Piccola Cucina to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 196 Spring Street NewYork NY 10012. Vil: 01/17- 01/24/2013 Notice is hereby given that a restaurant wine license, #1268207 has been applied for by La Meridiana I, Ltd. d/b/a Numero 28 to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 176 2nd Avenue New York NY 10003. Vil: 01/17- 01/24/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DONG & GU REALTY LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 82 Rutgers Slip Apt 18G New York, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of EEGO West 44 Owner, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jonathon K. Yormak, c/o East End Capital, 600 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Address to be maintained in DE: 27111 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808, c/o Corporation Service Company. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of MARGULIES FAMILY PLAN, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Savanna Circle, Mt. Sinai, NY 11766. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Steven Margulies at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of THREADSTONE RETAIL TRACKER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Treadstone Advisors, 477 Madison Ave., 24th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 JONATHAN RAIBLE ARCHITECT, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/24/12. Office in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 370 Riverside Dr., #8B, NY, NY 10025. Purpose: To practice the profession of Architecture. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of 50HT LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/7/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Corporate Filing Solutions, LLC, 425 Boylston St., 3rd Flr., Boston, MA 02116. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: PARKER ROSE LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 39 Broadway, Suite 3300, New York, New York 10006. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION of New Ballon Holdings, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/14/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to:The LLC, 105 East 29th Street, Suite 5, New York, New York 10016. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of Charles Realty Associates, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/07. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of 57 Reade 20A LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/11/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o David Chen, 57 Reade St., #20A, NY, NY 10007, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Formation of 9 Gramercy Park South LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 9 Gramercy Park So., NY, NY 10003. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Bleakley Platt & Schmidt, LLP, 1 N. Lexington Ave., White Plains, NY 10601. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of Catamaran LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in TX on 12/4/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office address: 2441 Warrenville Rd., Ste. 610, Lisle, IL 60532. Cert. of Org. filed with TX Sec. of State, PO Box 13697, Austin, TX 78711. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013

Notice of Qualification of Guard Control PMD, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/13/12. Office location: NY County. LP formed in Cayman Islands (CI) on 12/6/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: 200 West St., NY, NY 10282-2198. CI addr. of LP: c/o Maples Corporate Services Ltd., P.O. Box 309, Ugland House, Grand Cayman, KY1-1104, CI. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with Registrar of Exempted LPs, Elizabethan Sq., 4th Fl., Phase Four, George Town, Grand Cayman, CI. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 Notice of Qualification of FEC08 LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/21/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in OH on 12/6/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the OH and principal business addr.: c/o David A. Lightner, FSM Capital Management, LLC, 2000 Auburn Dr., Ste. 330, Cleveland, OH 44114. Regd. agent upon whom process may be served: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NEGBA LLC Arts. of Org filed NY Secy of State(SSNY)10/10/12. OFC in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 109-23 71st Rd NY NY 11375. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Formation of VE LAIGHT MEMBER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o VE Equities LLC, 12 Mercer St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10013. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Formation of 136 W44TH ST MIRROR LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: One Bryant Park, NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rosenberg & Estis, P.C., Attn: Gary M. Rosenberg, Esq., 733 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013

Notice of Formation of 87 Baxter Street Realty LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/6/03. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 87 Baxter St., NY, NY. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 56-38 218th St., Bayside, NY 11364. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of Lennon, Murphy, Caulfield & Phillips, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/18/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CT on 4/12/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.:The LLC, 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 300, NY, NY 10170. CT addr. of LLC: 2425 Post Rd., Ste. 302, Southport, CT 06890. Cert. of Org. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06106. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/10 - 02/14/2013 Notice of Qualification of RGN-NEW YORK XVI, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/2012. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/4/2012. Princ. office of LLC: 15305 Dallas Pkwy., Ste. 400, Addison, TX 75001. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St.-Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of SAL88 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Charissa Chang, 175 E. 96th St., Apt. 23M, NY, NY 10128. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of RAVID MIDDLE NECK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Cohen Equities, 675 Third Ave., Ste. 2400, NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013


January 24 - 30, 2013

23

Publ ic Notice s Notice of Qualification of 95 THAYER STREET, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/04/12. Princ. office of LLC: 1065 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 1801, NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corportion Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Lookerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of 4848 BWAY, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/04/12. Princ. office of LLC: 1065 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 1801, NY, NY 10018. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Lookerman & Federal Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of 72 Poplar Owner, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o The Daten Group Inc., Attn: David Ennis, 444 Madison Ave., Ste. 510, NY, NY 10022, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Qualification of LD Acquisition Company 6 LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/3/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 1700 E. Walnut Ave., Ste. 400, El Segundo, CA 90245. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of KB 320 East 110 LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 167 E. 65th St., NY, NY 10065. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Formation of 12 West 45th Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, One Union Square West, NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Formation of 99 JOHN DECO, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 387 Park Ave. South, 7th Fl., NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013

Notice of Formation of Sunny Smiles I LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/25/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 557 W. 148th St., Unit 3E, NY, NY 10031. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

Notice of Qual. of 267 East 10th Street Realty LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/5/12. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013

Notice of Formation of R&M HORSFORD LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Robert Horsford, 75 W. 126 St., Ground Fl., NY, NY 10027. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of CA 5-15 West 125th LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/18/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 1412 Broadway, 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of A & J Hoffman Realty Enterprises LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/7/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Alter Mantel, LLP, 90 Park Ave., NY, NY 10016, Attn: Irving D. Alter, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of DIESSEBI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/3/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o DeGaetano & Carr, 488 Madison Ave., 17th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013 Notice of Formation of Mark Tavern Management, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/25/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 130 E. 18th St., Apt. 16D, NY, NY 10003, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 01/03 - 02/07/2013

77 JANE STREET, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 04/24/2012. Off. Loc.:NewYork Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 127 West 11th Street, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KAIRIS LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/25/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 57 W. 38th St. Ste 1201 New York, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ISITE REAL ESTATE LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/12. Office location: New York County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal address: 109 Lafayette St. Ste 301 New York, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Skylaunch Advisors, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/15/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United State Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of 13-15 West 54th Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/14/2012. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Reid A. Rosen, Esq., 15 Wilputte Place, New Rochelle, NY 10804, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013

Notice of Formation of Sweet Spot Fashions, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Office of Steven M. Gerber, 666 Fifth Ave., 26th Fl., NY, NY 10103. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Wolk Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/19/03. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Anne Fried, 740 West End Ave., NY, NY 10025, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Name of LLC: Ronmark Capital LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 11/26/12. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of Trident Placement Group, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/6/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 392 Central Park West, Unit 12N, NY, NY 10025, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Qualification of Tracer Construction LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5500 Wayzata Blvd., Ste. 800, Golden Valley, MN 55416. LLC formed in DE on 6/29/98. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 PLOOSH LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/24/12. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 156 W 15th St Apt 4AB New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013

1152 SECOND AVENUE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/21/12. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 1152 2nd Ave New York, NY 10021. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of J&L GRANDCHILDREN’S LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/03/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Joshua Levin, 205 W. 95th St., NY, NY 10025. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 P.A. COLLINS P.E. CONSULTING ENGINEERING, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/17/12. Office NY Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 15 W. 26th St., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10010. Purpose: To practice professional engineering. Vil: 12/27 - 01/31/2013 Notice of Formation of foreign Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: HSP PARTNERS LLC. Application for Authority was filed by the Department of State of New York on: 10/24/2012. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Organized on: 10/17/2011. Office location: County of New York. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 325 Canal Street, #2, New York, NY 10013. Address of office required to be maintained in Delaware National Corporate Research, Ltd. 615 South DuPont Highway, Dover, DE 19901. Authorized officer in its Jurisdiction is: Secretary of State of Delaware John G. Townsend Building, 401 Federal Street, Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of Acision LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/17/07. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. Principal office: 6404 International Pkwy, #2048, Plano, TX 75093. Address to be maintained in DE: 1679 S. DuPont Hwy, Ste. 100, Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Aspire Channel, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/31/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Aspire Channel, LLC, 2077 Convention Center Concourse, Ste 300, Atlanta, GA 30337, ATTN: Paul Butler. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of HORIZON 6F LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 244 Madison Ave., Unit 724, NY, NY 10016. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 CENTRAL PARK FINANCIAL LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 10/10/2012. Off. Loc.:NewYork Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 551 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor, Suite 612, New York, NY 10176. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of Park View 54C LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Jacob & Co., Attn: Angela Arabo, 48 E. 57th St., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of WLZ 43-45 East 60th Street Manager, LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kane Kessler, P.C., 1350 Ave. of the Americas, 26th Fl., NY, NY 10019, Attn: Robert L. Lawrence, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of 119 Chambers Retail Owners LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Centurion Realty, LLC, 512 7th Ave., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013

Notice of Formation of 75 & 81 Orchard Associates LLC Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 417 Fifth Ave., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of GUSTUS MANAGEMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/29/2012. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Poles, Tublin, Stratakis & Gonzalez, LLP, 46 Trinity Pl., NY, NY 10006. Term: until 12/31/2099. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Formation of S & J Gates Avenue LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/29/12. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Jusuf Zlatanic, 201 E. 80th St., Apt. 16A, NY, NY 10075, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of Executive Advantage, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/4/12. NYS fictitious name: New York Executive Advantage, LLC. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CT on 5/10/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. CT and principal business addr.: 22 Randolph Farm Rd., Milford, CT 06461. Cert. of Org. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30 Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06115. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of Green Acres 666 Fifth Retail EAT TIC Owner LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/16/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 210 Route 4 East, Paramus, NJ 07652. LLC formed in DE on 11/5/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice is hereby given that a license, no. 1268260 has been applied for by BF NY 82 LLC to sell beer and wine at retail under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, at a fast casual restaurant located at 240 E 82nd Street, New York, NY 10028, for onpremises consumption. Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013

Notice of Qualification of Green Acres 666 Fifth Retail EAT TIC Parent LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/16/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 210 Route 4 East, Paramus, NJ 07652. LLC formed in DE on 11/5/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of S&P/Dow Jones Indices LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/24/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 6/28/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., Attn: General Counsel, 1221 Ave. of the Americas, 48th Fl., NY, NY 10020, principal business address. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice of Qualification of PRIORITY SENIOR SECURED INCOME MANAGEMENT, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/07/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 01/17- 02/21/2013 NYLLCCO, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 03/02/2012. Off. Loc.:NewYork Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 305 Broadway, Suite 200, New York, NY 10007. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 12/20 - 01/24/2013 Notice is hereby given that a license, no. 1266694 has been applied for by Alder Restaurant LLC to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, at a Restaurant located at 157 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10003, for on-premises consumption. Vil: 01/24 - 01/31/2013


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January 24 - 30, 2013

PROBATE CITATION

File No. 2012-1293B SURROGATE'S COURT – NEW YORK COUNTY CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent

TO: Anne Marie Grasso, David Tortelli, Michael Conniff;, Richard Conniff, Christine ‘Conniff’, Karen ‘Conniff’, Dina ‘Conniff’, Diane “Conniff”, each if living, and if dead, to his/her heirs at law, next of kin and distributes whose names and places of residence are unknown and if he/she died subsequent to the decedent herein, to his/her executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose name and places of residence are unknown and to all other heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr., the decedent herein, whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained. A petition having been duly filed by John R. Mirvish, who is domiciled at 9113 Volunteer Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22309. YOU ARE HEREBY CITEDTO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, NewYork County, at 31 Chambers Street, New York, New York, on March 1 st, 2013, at 9:30 o'clock in the forenoon of that day in Room 509 why a decree should not be made in the estate of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr, lately domiciled at 11 West 8th Street, Apt. 6-E, New York. New York 10011, admitting to probate a Will dated October 9.1978 and a Codicil dated May 21, 1991, copies of which are attached, as the Will of Anthony A. DeGiglio a/k/a Anthony A. DeGiglio, Jr., deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that Letters Testamentary issue to John R. Mirvish. Dated, Attested and Sealed January 10, 2013 Dana L. Mark, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner

HON. NORA S. ANDERSON, Surrogate Diane Sanabria, Chief Clerk 212-609-6838 Telephone Number

McCarter & English, LLP, 245 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10167 Address of Attorney [NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you Vil: 01/17 – 02/07/2013

Photo by Sam Spokony

From left, District 2 Community Education Council members Eric Goldberg, Shino Tanikawa, the council’s president, and Michael Markowitz during a C.E.C. meeting last month about the school zone split.

Zone split O.k.’d for Village schools; reaction also split Continued from page 1 tion of approval in order to request the inclusion of the Westbeth Artists Housing complex in the catchment zone that will now belong to P.S. 3. Westbeth residents had argued previously — as well as on the night of the vote — that the alternative, arts-based curriculum at P.S. 3 is better suited to the needs of their children and families. The amendment calls for D.O.E. to shift a portion of the new dividing line up three blocks. In the small notch west of Washington St., the line would move north from Perry St. to Bethune St. A D.O.E. representative who was present at Wednesday’s meeting said that the change is acceptable to the department, and said further that D.O.E. will return to the next C.E.C. meeting with a new map to take the amendment into account. The three-block change will not become part of the approved zone split until the council officially votes on it at that later meeting. Members of the P.S. 41 community lauded the council’s decision to approve the split, say-

ing that a continued shared zone would have worsened the disastrous overcrowding problem that has forced the W. 11th St. school to deal with huge class sizes and sacrifice classroom space for art, science, music and drama in recent years. But P.S. 3 parents and teachers were groaning as they left the meeting, since they’d continuously — and often emotionally — argued that, among other things, the council would be wrong to take away the benefit of choice offered by a shared zone. P.S. 3 was, in fact, founded in 1971 on the principle of choice, as a neighborhood alternative to P.S. 41. Moments before the members voted, C.E.C. President Shino Tanikawa addressed the crowd to acknowledge that the process leading up to the decision had been an extraordinarily difficult one, for the council members as well as the communities of both schools. “Regardless of how the vote turns out, I just want you all to know that we have done our best,” Tanikawa said. “I know it hasn’t been perfect. But we’ve thought about this very deeply, and we’re all coming to this decision from a very personal place. We have done our best.”


January 24 - 30, 2013

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Punk party brings back ’70 scenesters and memories

Also making her mark at the book signing was Mary Harron, who interviewed Johnny Rotten in London in 1976, and went on to direct the films “I Shot Andy Warhol” and “American Psycho.”

Continued from page 13 by the progressive heavy metal band Blue Oyster Cult, according to Holmstrom, who calls it the first true punk album. He recounted an early conflict when Handsome Dick Manitoba of the Dictators and Wayne County, rock’s first transsexual singer, now known as Jayne County, got into an altercation at CBGB that started as a staged fight but got out of hand with Manitoba hit by a mic stand. Since that incident, Jayne and Handsome Dick Manitoba have recorded together and are friends. But allegations that punk is violent or incites violence have dogged punk musicians from its earliest days. Is punk music violent? “Only when necessary,” Holmstrom said, adding that, “We live in a dog-eat-dog world.” But he doesn’t believe the N.R.A.’s allegation that punk is responsible “for murders in America.” “Look at the first punk band,” chided Holmstrom, referring to The Stooges. They’re “named after the Three Stooges,” known for their violent skits, he said, adding that “the most dangerous people in our society have no sense of humor.” But the controversy hasn’t made punk’s acceptance any easier. Holmstrom laughed as he recounted how “Maus” creator Art Spiegelman called him an “a--hole” at a party where a discussion of punk music came up. Holmstrom is often credited with helping launch punk as an artistic style. He credits

Photos by Paul DeRienzo

From right, photographer Roberta Bayley, cover artist Steve Taylor and another Punk Magazine fan at the book-signing party.

as a major influence the mysterious magazine promoter, cultural bomb-thrower and marijuana smuggler known by several names including Tom Forcade, who in 1978 took his own life with a pearl-handled revolver in his West Village apartment. Forcade credits include High Times, the venerable pro-pot monthly he started in 1974. “Forcade was the biggest fan of punk rock I ever met in any life” said Holmstrom. “He paid for me to go on tour with the Sex Pistols.” The band and the Pistols’ U.S. tour were the brainchild of Malcolm McLaren, who operated the London boutique Sex, where he sold punk-style clothing while plotting his takeover of pop culture. After being repeatedly rebuffed by McLaren, the determined Forcade had his film crew follow the Pistols’ tour, filming the seven performances across the Southeast and Texas, while interviewing the musicians and fans. “Malcolm didn’t want to play the usual venues,” said Holmstrom. “He wanted to cause problems.” “D.O.A.: A Rite of Passage” reportedly cost Forcade $400,000 to produce, and he died before it was released. The tour dates were mostly in the southern part of the country and were packed with fans that included rednecks, alienated teens and folks who were just curious. The band’s notoriety ensured a big police presence at every show and fans inside and outside the concert halls fought, drank and did drugs. In the film it appears that everyone had a great time, although the budding relationship between bassist Sid Vicious in

his swastika T-shirt and Philadelphia-born superfan Nancy Spungen, who was Jewish, would end with both their deaths at the Chelsea Hotel within a few months. At the San Antonio show Sid Vicious uses his guitar like an ax to take out a heckler in the audience. Holmstrom recalled the incident but claimed that shortly before the band’s el kabong moment, he saw “Sid take a beer can in the face” thrown from the audience, adding Sid glared back at the perpetrator with a look of “like hit me again mother------.” Holmstrom said at that moment “the lights and sound went off and it got scary.” Outside a man who said he was hit by the bass asserted, “I don’t like what they are doing, as far as I’m concerned they’re not worth killing.” Holmstrom is credited in the film with “titles and graphic design” along with Punk Magazine artists Taylor and Carleton. In the years after the breakup of the Sex Pistols punk separated into subgenres from commercial New Wave to skinhead, grunge and alternative rock, eventually penetrating into every corner of the world. Politically conscious punk, like its hip hop counterpart, confronted racist statements by some musicians and countered the growth of white nationalist groups in England. Activists were prompted to organize a concert with an antiracist theme, and what started as one concert soon spread across the Atlantic to New York where it caught the imagination of punk fans, politicos and members of the Yippies, based at 9 Bleecker St. The coalition put on concerts in Central Park’s band shell annually each May until

they were forced out by the city after a legal battle that went to the Supreme Court in 1989. Civil rights lawyer William Kunstler defended the concert’s use of its own sound system as integral to the musicians’ and activists’ artistic and free speech rights. But City Hall claimed the concerts were too loud, eliciting complaints from neighbors in tony neighborhoods blocks away. The court ruled against the organizers, in the end allowing the city to force Rock Against Racism to use a city-supplied sound engineer, effectively ending the use of the band shell for independent rock shows. Is punk dead? “It’s very much alive,” asserted Holmstrom. “It’s a worldwide phenomenon. It’s big in Japan and all throughout Europe.” Recently members of the Russian all-girl punk band Pussy Riot were sentenced to prison for singing on the altar of a Moscow cathedral. “People said it would be a fad and it would die after a few years,” recalled Holmstrom, “but it was just starting.” According to him, the naysayers often repeated the opinion of others, but the lesson of punk music is just the opposite: “You have to think for yourself. You can’t let other people tell you what to think.” Whatever the criticism of punk, it’s definitely a movement of folks who think for themselves. DeRienzo is cohost of “Let Them Talk,” every Tuesday at 8 p.m. on MNN’s Lifestyle channel. Thanks to Joan Moossy for her contribution to this article.


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January 24 - 30, 2013

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January 24 - 30, 2013

With Mets pitching in, Silver notches save for Little League

Photo by Terese Loeb Kreuzer

The Battery Park City Authority has sped up its timetable for reopening the neighborhood fields after getting some help from the Mets.

By Josh Rogers Play ball! The Downtown Little League will be able to play this season on the storm-damaged fields in Battery Park City, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver announced in a statement to Downtown Express, The Villager’s sister paper, on Fri., Jan. 18. He said after getting help from the New York Mets, the Battery Park City Authority has expedited its schedule to allow about 1,000 Downtowners to play this season. League president Bill Martino was “very excited” to hear the news. “I’m elated that Battery Park City changed course,” he said this week, adding that Silver is “our hero.” The season has been in jeopardy since Superstorm Sandy flooded the turf fields in October. A Silver aide said the speaker called Jeff Wilpon, the Mets’ chief operating officer, merely to ask for advice on how to reopen the neighborhood fields more quickly, and was surprised and grateful when Wilpon sent an adviser who worked on restoring the team’s storm-damaged minor league stadium in Coney Island, now known as MCU Park. Matthew Monahan, the authority’s spokesperson, said the authority was “very appreciative and encouraged by the advice and insights of the Mets’ top turf people.” He said Dennis Mehiel, the authority’s chairperson, has directed the staff to remove the artificial turf and inspect the drainage system before a contract is awarded to replace the fields. The authority is expecting bids to repair the fields by Feb. 4 and had originally asked the contractor to do these first two

steps after winning the job. It’s not yet clear exactly how many days or weeks this will save, and the authority is not yet saying the fields will be open for the season. Silver said he has been working “to ensure that the Little League fields are open in time for the upcoming season. The B.P.C.A. has assured me that it has expedited the process of replacing the fields, which will be open sooner than initially estimated. “I am also extremely pleased that… Jeff Wilpon and the ownership of the New York Mets have graciously offered to provide valuable technical advice to help move this process forward as quickly as possible. I want to thank the Wilpon and New York Mets family for their commitment to the children of Lower Manhattan.” It’s not yet clear if the fields will be ready to play on Opening Day, Sun., April 7. But whenever the season starts, the opening ceremony now seems likely to be on a Sunday rather than the traditional Saturday to allow the first pitch to go to Silver, who observes the Jewish Sabbath. Martino said if the season is delayed, 7-year-old players will be able to play for eight hours in Columbus Park, but even with the restoration of the fields in Battery Park City, the oldest division, teens from13 to 16, will still be scrambling for space, since they need a larger diamond. The Murry Bergtraum field near the Manhattan Bridge will not be restored in time for the season. The league has asked the Hudson River Park Trust to try and find field time on Pier 40, and is also hoping for another high-demand area, Central Park.

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January 24 - 30, 2013

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THE VILLAGER, JAN. 24, 2013