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Who’s Celebrating St. Patrick? p.76

$4.99 March 2020

Vol 32 • No 10

6 Ways to Shop Without Plastic Bags

Submission of the Year Revealed


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Hop Onboard! Sign up for our newsletter to learn about special offers, and receive the latest news and updates from Marine Atlantic. Visit our new and improved website to subscribe and get adventure delivered right to your inbox. Sign up today at marineatlantic.ca


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life is better Published monthly in St. John’s by Downhome Publishing Inc. 43 James Lane, St. John’s, NL, A1E 3H3 Tel: 709-726-5113 • Fax: 709-726-2135 • Toll Free: 1-888-588-6353 E-mail: mail@downhomelife.com Website: www.downhomelife.com Editorial Editor-in-Chief Janice Stuckless Assistant Editor Katherine Saunders Art and Production Art Director Vince Marsh Graphic and Web Designer Cory Way Illustrator Mel D’Souza Illustrator Snowden Walters Advertising Sales Senior Account Manager Robert Saunders Account Manager Barbara Young Marketing Director Tiffany Brett Finance and Administration Junior Accountant Marlena Grant Accounting Assistant Sandra Gosse Operations Manager, Twillingate Nicole Mehaney

Warehouse Operations Warehouse / Inventory Manger Carol Howell Warehouse Operator Josephine Collins Distribution Sales & Marketing Amanda Ricks Sr. Customer Service Associate Sharon Muise Inventory Control Clerk Darlene Whiteway Retail Operations Retail Floor Manager, St. John’s Jackie Rice Retail Floor Manager, Twillingate Donna Keefe Retail Sales Associates Crystal Rose, Emma Goodyear, Jonathon Organ, Nicole French, Elizabeth Gleason, Rebecca Ford, Erin McCarthy, Mackenzie Stockley, Marlene Burt, Marissa Little, Hayley Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Gauci, Beth Colbert, Kim Tucker, Heather Stuckless, Katrina Hynes, Tammy Keating

Subscriptions Customer Service Associate Kathleen Murphy Customer Service Associate Nicola Ryan

Founding Editor Ron Young

President & Associate Publisher Todd Goodyear

Chief Executive Officer/Publisher Grant Young

General Manager/Assistant Publisher Tina Bromley

To subscribe, renew or change address use the contact information above. Subscriptions total inc. taxes, postage and handling: for residents in NL $39.99; AB, BC, MB, NU, NT, QC, SK, YT $41.99; ON $45.19; NB, NS, PE $45.99. US and International mailing price for a 1-year term is $49.99.

Canada Post Canadian Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement #40062919 The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to the negligence of the servants or otherwise, and there shall be no liability beyond the amount of such advertisement. The Letters to the Editor section is open to all letter writers providing the letters are in good taste, not libelous, and can be verified as true, correct and written by the person signing the letter. Pen names and anonymous letters will not be published. The publisher reserves the right to edit, revise, classify, or reject any advertisement or letter. © Downhome Publishing Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without permission of the publisher. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada.

Printed in Canada

Official onboard magazine of


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edge of the earth

Contents

MARCH 2020

48 Wax is Back! Vinyl records are making a resurgence and Newfoundland and Labrador artists are taking note. Wendy Rose

72 Hold the Green Beer The St. Patrick’s Day holiday is about more than just drinking. Katherine Saunders

82 Exploring Quirpon Island

48 stacks of wax www.downhomelife.com

Abandoned with a legendary and grim past, yet today, still bursts with life. Jenn Thornhill Verma

94 Everyday Recipes Celebrate St. Paddy’s and local suds by cooking with beer March 2020

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Contents

MARCH 2020

homefront 10 I Dare Say A note from the editor 11 Contributors Meet the people behind the magazine

12 Letters From Our Readers Lamenting another resettlement, a Corner Brook avalanche, and a look back at #Snowmageddon2020.

20 Downhome Tours Downhome readers explore Central America 22 Why is That? Why do we say cold “snap” and heat “wave”? Linda Browne 26 Life’s Funny Check Your Herring Colleen Jones Down

28

playing around

27 Say What A contest that puts words in someone else’s mouth

28 Lil Charmers Hey, baby! 30 Pets of the Month Furry fans 32 Poetic Licence “This Haunting, Yet Beautiful Place” by Seaward Green Higdon 34 Reviewed Denise Flint interviews Carl English and reviews his biography, Chasing a Dream: The Carl English Story.

36 What Odds Paul Warford ponders a change in career.

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68

cheers to beers!

38 Submission of the Year By popular vote and editor’s pick, our 2019 winners are revealed.

features 42 The Great Lakes Lure Kim Ploughman

54 Home Made Surprising products being made and sold by creative people right here in this province Katherine Saunders 60 Leave it to Beavers How these creatures are the heroes and villains of their environment Todd Hollett

explore

54

68 Fill Yer Mugs The Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival returns to Corner Brook. Katherine Saunders

lovin’ local

www.downhomelife.com

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Contents

MARCH 2020

90 all souped up 76 Paddy’s Day Celebrations How St. Patrick is toasted in Ireland and around the world Charles Beckett

78 Monumental Discovery The true story behind the “cannon”ized saints of Bay Bulls Dennis Flynn

food and leisure 90 The Everyday Gourmet Souped up miso Andrea Maunder

102 Todd’s Table Storm Soup Todd Goodyear

106 Down to Earth Growing gracefully into the golden years Kim Thistle 110 Six Ways to Shop Without Plastic Bags 6

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114 high seas encounter

reminiscing 112 Flashbacks Classic photos of people and places

113 This Month in History The Sealers’ Strike of 1902

114 Encounter with German U-27 Two attacks, two ships, one seaman who didn’t come home Lester Green About the cover Quirpon Island is one of the unique travel destinations Newfoundland and Labrador has to offer. Turn to p. 82 to learn why. Cover photo by John Sylvester

Cover Index Who’s Celebrating St. Patrick • 76 Gardening in Your Golden Years • 106 Cooking With Beer • 94 Off the Beaten Path • 82 6 Ways to Shop Without Plastic Bags • 110 Submission of the Year Revealed • 38

119 The Spirit at the Broad of the Brook One man’s spectral encounter in old Conception Bay Dennis Flynn

122 Newfoundlandia The Government House forger Chad Bennett 128 Mail Order 130 Marketplace

132 Puzzles 144 Photo Finish

www.downhomelife.com

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Find out where you can celebrate St. Paddy’s without hoisting a beer. p. 72

8

Find out who is our 2019 Submission of the Year (hint: there are two!). p. 38

Puzzles got you stumped?

Need a recipe?

Get all the answers online at Downhomelife.com/puzzles.

We have hundreds to choose from at EverydayRecipes.ca.

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Submission Guidelines and Prize Rules

You could WIN $100! Every reader whose PHOTO, STORY, JOKE or POEM appears next to this yellow “from our readers” stamp in a current issue receives $10 and a chance at being drawn for the monthly prize: $100 for one photo submission and $100 for one written submission. Prizes are awarded in Downhome Dollars certificates, which can be spent like cash in our retail stores and online at shopDownhome.com.*

Submit Today! Send your photo, story, joke or poem to

Downhome 43 James Lane St. John’s, NL, A1E 3H3 or submit online at:

www.downhomelife.com *Only 1 prize per submitter per month. To receive their prize, submitters must provide with their submission COMPLETE contact information: full name, mailing address, phone number and email address (if you have one). Mailed submissions will only be returned to those who include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Downhome Inc. reserves the right to publish submissions in future print and/or electronic media campaigns. Downhome Inc. is not responsible for unsolicited material. www.downhomelife.com

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i dare say

I s’pose you heard about the bit of snow we had.

Todd Young photo

As you’re reading this, we’ve had weeks to recover; but as I’m writing it, we’re still not over it. On January 17, eastern Newfoundland got walloped by a hurricane wrapped in a winter storm. Winds gusted as high as 171 km/h in Fortune Bay and tore the roof of the fire hall in Spaniard’s Bay. St. John’s smashed its one-day record for snowfall, and depending on where you were on the northeast Avalon, you had 75-93 cm of newly fallen snow to shovel. It was wild! At home in Foxtrap, we rode out Friday’s blizzard playing board games and eating storm chips. The morning after, our power went. We spent the day outside snowshoeing over waist-deep snow, cooking on the Coleman stove in the garage, shovelling and snowblowing. At night, we slept in a tent we’d pitched in the living room. Best decision ever! It got down to 6°C in the house by Sunday, but it was 24°C inside the tent. As always when emergencies happen, we learned a few things: 1) propane doesn’t flow as well in sub-zero temperatures; 2) putting your cellphone in maximum power saving mode adds about three days of battery life; 3) radio is a lifesaver when your internet and TV are out. We were also reminded how much work it is to cook food, stay warm and do anything after dark without electricity. And we’re aware of how lucky we were that this wasn’t much more than an adventure for us. Many people suffered in the cold and dark, and were hungry with no access to supplies. One man perished in the storm. Don’t let the cute hashtags and the feel good stories fool you: this was a monster of an event that no one who experienced it will ever forget. Thanks for reading,

Janice Stuckless, Editor-in-chief janice@downhomelife.com 10

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Contributors

Meet the people behind the magazine

Katherine Saunders

Charles Beckett

Katherine Saunders is the Assistant Editor of Downhome. She holds a bachelor of arts in French and history, and a master of arts in environmental history, both from Memorial University of Newfoundland. A fairly new member to the team, Katherine joined Downhome in September 2019. “I have been a reader and a writer all my life. In school, I loved writing short fiction. Later, I enjoyed writing papers – the research, the outline and the bunkering down to actually get words on the page, are all fun to me. I’m not afraid to dive into a new topic and see what I can pull together. I function with checklists, calendars and coffee.” One of her features this month is about celebrating St. Patrick’s Day (it begins on p. 72). Katherine was born and raised in St. John’s, NL, and now lives in Paradise with her fiancé, Kyle, and their pet rabbit, Lady. She enjoys yoga, reading and doing the puzzles in Downhome.

Charles Beckett was born in Old Perlican, NL. He worked around the province as a teacher for 32 years, at different times in South Brook, Norman’s Cove, Sunnyside, Summerville, Glovertown, Gander and Gambo. Charles began researching and writing when he retired, as a way to keep his mind active and pass time. He writes, “Most of my writings have come from my musings or reminiscing of my younger days. I’m a strong [Newfoundland and Labrador] patriot and interested in our history, culture, and reading biography. I have also written about some trips we’ve made and places we visited, as well as human interest stories.” In this issue, Charles takes us on a world tour of St. Patrick’s Day traditions (see page 76). Today Charles resides in Gambo with his wife, Dora. They have two children and three grandchildren. When he is not researching and writing, Charles enjoys following sports and playing music. He plays guitar, piano-accordion and keyboard, and calls himself an “entertainer.”

www.downhomelife.com

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Paradise Found in Little Bay Islands

Upon learning the news that resettlement of Little Bay Islands had become a reality [as of December 31, 2019], I felt compelled to share my sentiments about this sad turn of events. My wife, Anne, and I travelled to Newfoundland from our home in Ontario in July and August 2018. We enjoyed our long-awaited journey to the island, touring extensively, camping along the way in our house trailer. We knew about Little Bay Islands from a friend living near us in Ontario. Shirley Weicker (nee Rowbottom) was born and raised on Little Bay Islands and returned there over the years for visits with family and friends. She spoke fondly of her birthplace and her early life there. We were intrigued, particularly after seeing her photographs and magazine articles about the island town, and felt compelled to go see it for ourselves. So on July 31, 2018, having left our RV trailer in Springdale, we took our Jeep on the ferry over to Little Bay Islands and spent the day exploring the area. We started with a walk over an old trail called Lighthouse Hill, which provided a beautiful panoramic view of the surrounding islands and open sea. 12

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We stopped by the town dock and met some fellows who were doing repairs and painting, all being volunteer activity. A gentleman kindly offered to take us for a spin in his modified punt, which he had meticulously restored and fitted with an antique small diesel engine. Jules took us out and around Macks Island and back under the Bailey bridge into the town harbour. The long abandoned seafood plant was a reminder of one of the central causes of the population decline that ultimately led to the decision to resettle on the mainland. We know we are outsiders, from away, and would not dare voice an opinion about the circumstances leading to the vote to resettle. We only want to emphasize what a shame that such a beautiful spot is joining the many other remote and now abandoned communities in Newfoundland. This represents paradise to us. Graham Edwards St. Mary’s, ON

Thank you for sharing your experience on Little Bay Islands and your affinity for this beautiful place. Here are some photos you shared from your trip.

Thanks for Sharing Joy

Corner Brook Avalanche

I have just finished reading Helena MacLean’s column on the Contributors page of January’s issue. My heart was touched by how she described her love for her grandparents and how they made her feel she was a source of joy for them. My husband and I are blessed grandparents of four healthy, happy grandchildren. We have shared the same thought with them many, many times. I hope they keep that special feeling in their hearts forever, just like Helena has. Please pass on my thanks to her for sharing such JOY!

The recent avalanche at The Battery during the blizzard and the story in the February issue of “The Battery Avalanche” in 1959 brought back memories. My mom used to tell me of another avalanche, a tragedy that happened in 1935, to my dad’s first cousin in Corner Brook. Leonard Diamond, son of Eli Philip and Sarah (nee Coles) Diamond of Flowers Cove, and his wife, Blanche, and their three children – Alma, 10, Albert, 7, and Blanche, 2 – lived in a flat on the lower floor of a two-storey house on Curling Road. Leonard was an employee of the paper mill in Corner Brook. A woman and her eight children lived in the upper flat of the building. On March 4, 1935, a slide of tons of snow that started about 200 feet above Curling Road crashed into this

Patricia Barnes Via DownhomeLife.com

Children are for parents to raise and grandparents to spoil! It’s what can make relationships between grandchildren and grandparents so precious and special. www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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find corky sly conner Hidden somewhere in this issue is Corky Sly Conner.

Can you find him? Look carefully at all the photographs and in the text of the stories. If you spot Corky, send us your name, address and phone number, along with a note telling us where he’s located. Your name will be entered in a draw and the winner will receive a coupon worth 25 Downhome Dollars redeemable at our store, or through our website.

Send your replies to:

Congratulations to Pat Clement of Milton, ON, who found Corky on page 78 of the January issue.

Corky Contest 43 James Lane St. John’s, NL, A1E 3H3

mail@downhomelife.com www.downhomelife.com *No Phone Calls Please One entry per person

Deadline for replies is the end of each month.

two-storey house and carried it more than 30 feet down a slope. It landed against another house in a mass of tangled wreckage. Blanche Diamond and her daughter, Alma, were killed instantly. Her other two children, Albert and Blanche, were taken to hospital. Two-year-old Blanche passed away the following morning. Miraculously, the family on the upper floor, all nine of them, survived the avalanche. Leonard Diamond was working at the paper mill in Corner Brook and was unaware of the tragedy that had happened to his family until they had been removed from the wreckage and taken to hospital. Karl Janes Newmarket, ON (formerly of Deer Lake) 14

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The Battery avalanche of 1959 The recent avalanche at the Battery during January’s record-breaking blizzard, which drove snow right in through a house, must have been terrifying for the homeowners. Fortunately, no one was injured this time. 1-888-588-6353


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Ride

Newfoundland

Ponies along the Seashore

If you’re planning a visit to Change Islands this summer, how does a stroll along a coastal trail with magnificent ocean views sound? We should mention that Kate Middleton will be along for the ride and that you can even bring your friends! Kate, also known as “Kate of the Cove” (Registration #835) is a 9-year-old Newfoundland Pony who lives at the Change Islands Newfoundland Pony Sanctuary, which is run by Netta LeDrew. Netta is a remarkable protector and promoter of the breed who spent years fundraising to create a refuge that has become a destination for horse lovers from all over the world. This summer, Netta is offering a new experience for pony and nature lovers. Visitors will be able to go on paid trail rides on the stunning Shoreline Trail with some of the 11 Newfoundland Ponies at the sanctuary. There’s Kate, Jigger, Colby, Lily, Charm, Bonnie and others, who will be saddled up and taking visitors on a gentle ride along the coastline with breathtaking views. Over 1,000 people visited the Sanctuary last year from Canada, the U.S., Australia and China. Many of them come to learn more about this endangered breed and to enjoy the quiet beauty of Change Islands. One thing is certain: seeing the magnificent Newfoundland Ponies in their natural habitat where they once numbered in the thousands is an experience that visitors won’t forget. To learn more, you can contact the Sanctuary at (709) 621- 6381 or (709) 884-6953 or email: nlponyrefuge@hotmail.com.

Top: 12-year-old Jigger and Netta LeDrew. Below: 20-year-old Colby and Netta LeDrew.


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With wind speeds topping 171 km/h, the blizzard of January 17, 2020, was actually a hurricane disguised as a snowstorm. Here’s a quick breakdown of this record-breaking event.

Snowmageddon by the Numbers 1984 last time City of St. John’s declared a state of emergency (also due to a severe winter storm) 22,000+ customers without power on Jan. 18

16,000 truckloads of snow removed from streets of St. John’s 171 km/h wind gust recorded at Green Island in Fortune Bay; 164 km/h recorded in Bonavista

76.2 centimetres of snow fell at St. John’s International Airport in one day (Jan. 17), a new record

93 centimetres of snow fell on Mount Pearl 20 snowblowers operated 24/7 to clear St. John’s streets

Bowring Park Nicole Emberley photo

8 days that the capital city was under a state of emergency

6 NE Avalon communities that declared a state of emergency during the storm 1 baby born with the surname Snow 16

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Summer Street, St. John’s Bernice Goudie photo

Dude finds his car

Bringing soup to the neighbours Doris Dober photo

Kim Keiley photo

www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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It inspired this poem, sent to us by a real storm trooper in Paradise:

Winter Storm of the Century By Catherine Rideout • Paradise, NL

They said a big storm was coming, to us that’s no surprise, It wasn’t until it hit that we couldn’t believe our eyes!

Acts of kindness big and small, watching the news, taking it in. Little did we know what this historic blizzard would really bring.

Never in our lifetime have we seen such big snow. The wind and amounts in one day was more than we’d ever know!

With our gratitude arrived the troops, to help lift the heavy load. And thanks to the plow men and women for clearing our many roads!

Stocked up with the essentials, like eggs, milk and some bread, Storm chips was the meal of choice we all wanted instead!

Extended time with our families, more than the average day. This storm brought us together in unusual and awesome ways!

As the fierce storm had ended we awoke to face the day, Our eyes couldn’t believe the amount of snow in the way!

The SOE cooped us up, cabin fever, feeling a tad insane? But “people helping people” is the legacy that will remain!

A massive 10-foot drift, dividing our home from our street, Feeling so trapped, anxiety from my head to my feet.

Us Newfoundlanders are famous as a friendly good bunch, We take the best with the bad, and help each other in a crunch.

Some patience, bit by bit, starting to shovel away the pile, A friendly wave from my neighbour – they’d get to us in a while.

The winter storm of the century, it has brought us stress and some tears. But the love and human kindness will be remembered for years.

A long 48 hours it took us to finally break through, We received great help from our neighbours, whom well I never knew.

May the goodness of others comfort you in the storms you endure. If you’re lucky it will be in Newfoundland, the best place, we assure!

Hats off to our care workers, a strong commitment to those in need. Spending long hours from their families to unselfishly give a good deed. 18

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Fish were blown out of the ocean in Aspen Cove Downhome offices were closed for obvious reasons

Penny Gill photo

Vince Marsh photo

Ballicattered in Bonavista Mark Gray photo

www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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homefront Downhome tours...

Central America

Nicaragua

John Dunham and “the missus” (his words!) visited Nicaragua during their winter break with their copy of Downhome’s Explore, which they used to plan a trip to NL for that summer. The Republic of Nicaragua has a population of about 6.3 million people. The name “Nicaragua” means “here united with the water,” and it is often called “The Land of Lakes and Volcanoes.” Nicaraguans are known for friendliness and for poetry. Local poet Rubén Darío is renowned as the father of the Spanish-American modernism movement. In entertainment, four seasons of the CBS reality TV show “Survivor” have been filmed in Nicaragua. 20

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Panama Canal

Daniel Devin and his wife (pictured) took their copy of Downhome on a cruise to the Panama Canal. The Panama Canal is an artificial waterway that acts as a sort of shortcut for ships, a conduit for maritime trade. It begins west of the city of Colón and traverses the country 82 kilometres southward, ending at Panama City. Construction began in 1881 and was completed in 1914. About 14,000 ships pass through the Panama Canal each year, a journey that takes about 12 hours. The American Society of Civil Engineers named the Panama Canal one of the seven wonders of the modern world.

Belize

Loretta and Bryce Sellars’ cruise included a port visit in Belize. Loretta (pictured) says, “We always take our [Downhome] with us to read on vacation.” Belize was once a British colony known as British Honduras, and only became an independent nation in 1981. Belize is the only Central American country where English is the official language. Tourist activities include caving, zip-lining, scuba diving, hiking, and touring archeological sites and wildlife reserves. www.downhomelife.com

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Expert answers to common life questions. By Linda Browne

Why do we say cold “snap” and heat “wave”? There’s perhaps nothing that Newfoundlanders and Labradorians love discussing more than the weather. And from this winter’s snowpocalypse to our infamous RDF, there’s more than enough wild weather here to keep the conversation going… and going and going. While talking about the weather with your family, friends and neighbours, you’ve likely shared terms like “cold snap” and “heat wave” from time to time. But did you ever stop to think about what these terms actually mean? According to the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER), a cold snap (also known as a cold wave or deep freeze) commonly lasts from three days to three weeks, with temperatures usually falling below -15°C. David Neil, an Environment Canada meteorologist who works out of the Storm Prediction Centre in Gander, NL, says while the origin of this term is a bit murky, the sudden drop in temperature can feel like a sudden cut or bite of cold, hence its association with a “snap.” “Basically, what ends up happening is when you get in the winter months, sometimes you can get some of these colder air masses that come from the Arctic and polar regions that can 22

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sometimes be transported southward…,” he explains. And if the jet stream is weaker than normal, “… sometimes those areas of cold air can become somewhat cut off and won’t move for days at a time. That’s where you get those really extreme cold air events,” he says. “When you feel that drop in temperature, it does feel very sudden and very sharp. So that’s what I believe to be sort of the origin of where that term came from.” Like cold snaps, heat waves generally last from three days to three weeks, according to UN-SPIDER. And while they’re usually characterized by temperatures of 35°C or higher (or “temperatures that hover 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for the region”), lower temperatures with high humidity levels 1-888-588-6353


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can also be considered a heat wave. Neil says the exact origin of “heat wave” is also a bit of a mystery, though there are a couple of theories – one of which lends itself to the cause of the phenomenon. “Usually a heat wave is caused by having an area of higher pressure. So if a nice big area of high pressure settles over an area, it’ll trap the warm air in place for days at a time, and it will compress the air near the surface and it’ll warm it. On top of that, too, usually under areas of high pressure, you don’t get a lot of cloud, so you’re getting a lot of solar heating. And when that sticks around for days and days, because there’s a strong area of high pressure, they’re hard to move out. So once they establish themselves, you can get these very prolonged periods of really warm temperatures,” Neil explains. “And that’s may be one reason why the term heat wave is used... in terms of meteorology, that high pressure is kind of like a wave crest. And so the warm air kind of piles up with the crest of the wave.” Another theory, Neil adds, has to do with the appearance of the air as it rises from a hot surface.

“You have that warmer air moving up into cooler air, and it refracts the light differently, so you get that wavy look on those really hot days, off of hot surfaces,” he says. With climate change being an ever-increasing concern, heat waves and cold snaps are among the things we’ll likely become better acquainted with in the near future. “The general thought is that those types of events could become more common,” Neil says. “The Arctic regions are warming at a higher rate than some of the lower latitude areas. So what that does is it reduces the contrast in temperature between those polar areas and areas further south. The difference between the temperatures in those regions [is] what drives the jet stream and what makes a strong jet stream; and if that weakens, that’s where you start to get a bit of a more meandering jet stream and that’s when you can start to see those areas of colder air coming down further south and becoming somewhat trapped,” he explains. “Same idea with these ridges of high pressure that cause heat waves. Things just aren’t flowing quite as strongly.”

Do you have a burning life question for Linda to investigate? Turn to page 9 for ways to contact us. www.downhomelife.com

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homefront life’s funny

Check Your Herring

I am from the beautiful community of Herring Neck, NL. In the ’90s I was on one of my physiotherapy clinical placements in Mississauga, Ontario. At the time, there was a Newfoundland garden party at a local campground near Mississauga. Of course, a group of my Newfoundland friends and I all decided to go. We were sitting on the field listening to the Irish Descendants play and from behind me I thought I heard someone say “Herring Neck.” Naturally, thinking there was a fellow Herring Necker in the crowd, I whipped my head around with enthusiasm and said, “Did you say you were from Herring Neck?” A not so enthusiastic woman responded, “No... I told my husband he has a hairy neck.” Colleen Jones Down Via email

Do you have any funny or embarrassing true stories? Share them with us. If your story is selected, you’ll win a prize! See page 9 for details. 26

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for a “I could gomeat...” little dikae rHkennessey –M

Say WHAT? Downhome recently posted this photo (sent in by Mark Penney) on our website, Facebook page and Instagram, and asked our members to imagine what the polar bear might be saying. Mike Hennessey’s response made us chuckle the most, so we’re awarding him 20 Downhome Dollars!

Here are the runners-up: “Which way to Alberta? I need a place to chill…” – Sandra Oliver “I wonder if I tip-toe...Would I get me a crow...Before I head back on the ice-floe!” – Paula Burry “Hey! Joe! I just found us an Hors d’oeuvre!” – Tracy Parsons

Want to get in on the action? Go to www.downhomelife.com/saywhat

www.downhomelife.com

“Like” us on Facebook www.facebook.com/downhomelife March 2020

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homefront lil charmers

Hey, Baby! Selfie! Miley is the best “big sister” to baby Peyton, according to their mama. Fallon Loder Little St. Lawrence, NL

A Saltwater Joy Hayden Hoyles took to the guitar early, and his parents can’t wait for him to start playing like his dad. Peter Hoyles & Samantha Fifield Paradise, NL

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Music Man Rory Balsom of Clarenville first picked up an accordion when he was just six months old. Samantha Balsom Clarenville, NL

Snuggle and Snooze Alaïa Whitten got cosy for her first pictures! Lana Stanford St. John’s, NL

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homefront pets of the month

Furry Fans Dreaming of Home Gus the Labradoodle lives in Alberta, but at least a part of him always belongs to Labrador. Candice Earle, AB

I Need My Glasses‌ Annie, 18 and a senior in cat years, squints at the September 2019 issue, trying to make out the words on the cover. Barbara Critch Mississauga, ON

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Pages or Pillows? Cleopatra the Himalayan kitty curled up for a nap atop the September 2018 Downhome. Justine Drover, NL

Is Corky Here? Touton the Cape Shore water dog relaxes with his favourite book, Downhome magazine. Tony Young Norman’s Cove, NL

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homefront poetic licence

This Haunting, Yet Beautiful Place By Seaward Green Higdon

Out here in the West I made my stay A home, a family, along the way Hard times have arrived, I want to leave A heavy mortgage tells me I must grieve My weary body is forever seeking rest For a place my soul has never left Out in Atlantic waters; my Island home Where my heart can never, ever roam Close to my heart, the fog in the bay Gulls on the flakes, punts tied to stay Awe of the waves as they roar ashore Remain in my heart forevermore Thoughts of the past; bakeapples and all As summer soon welcomes the coming fall Fishermen and sealers now take a rest As I remain prisoner here out in the West

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Images of Labrador fresh on my mind God gave it to Cain, as a great sign Far from Lab City now living out here At times it is almost too difficult to bear In my dreams a kitchen party appears Memories that remain these many years Bren on the spoons, John on the fiddle The party is on with me in the middle As Christmas draws near, the tears begin Memories of mummers, music and grins “Hip your partner” and all the rest Cake and syrup, recipes of joy: the best! Christmas songs of old return once again Only adding to my constant lonesome pain I hear Mom’s voice as she holds my hand Dreams of old, my beloved Newfoundland Tears flow freely, knowing I remain here Living in this place year after year Yearning remains; it has from the start Mortgage my house, never my heart

Nancy Malloy photo

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homefront

reviewed by Denise Flint

Chasing a Dream: The Carl English Story Carl English with Blake Murphy Flanker Press $19.95

“I had to do a lot of rebounding to get touches and go Coast to Coast or hunt my own shots.” If that sentence makes any sense to you, then you’re going to enjoy Chasing a Dream: The Carl English Story. However, for people who aren’t basketball fans, Carl English’s biography is going to be a little more difficult to read. That’s not necessarily a problem, but it is a warning. Despite a limited glossary at the back (which I didn’t find until deep into the book), if you’re not familiar with sports terms you’re going to need to bookmark an online dictionary and keep it at your fingertips. However, once you get over that hurdle, English’s book is a very interesting read. Most Newfoundlanders seem to know his story. He lost his parents in a house fire when he was five, casting a shadow across the rest of his life even after he grew up to become a professional basketball player. What people might not know, however, is how often English just couldn’t get a break. Over and over again, just when things seemed to be looking up, something would spoil it. His biggest professional disappointment, of course, was never getting into the NBA despite how good a player he was. The book was coauthored by Blake Murphy, a sports writer who did a good job capturing English’s voice, and there’s a collection of curious testimonials at the back that fans of English will appreciate. It would have been nice to hear more about the good things that happened to English, but perhaps that’s not what sells these kinds of memoirs. 34

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Q&A with the Author Denise Flint: What inspired you to write a book about your life? Carl English: I’ve been approached

about this book since about 2000, when I was at Hawaii and we made it to the finals; and once they found out about my background, NBC came to Newfoundland and met my family and they wanted to write about it, but I wasn’t ready. When I came back to Newfoundland and I saw the impact I was having on our youth, I thought now was the time because if people were dealing with something they could use me as an example. So I wanted to get my story out there.

DF: What do you miss most about playing basketball? CE: Basketball for me was always such a passion and a way of coping with anything, be it stress or things I coped with in my earlier life. I felt like I was free on the court, and I loved the camaraderie and the competitiveness.

DF: Basketball is supposed to be a non-contact sport, so I don’t think people realize how badly hurt athletes get. Is the level of injury you reported normal for this sport? For sports in general? CE: For sports in general, I would say

yes, although a lot of guys can go through their career and only sustain one or two major injuries. Ankle injuries are a big thing in basketball. My ankle and elbow [injuries] were freak accidents from falling the wrong way. The last couple of seasons I had broken ribs and broken bones. Basketball’s got a lot going on there, and once you get to know the game [you see] it’s pretty physical.

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DF: Do you consider yourself a role model? Do you feel you have to be careful about how you act and what you say? CE: One hundred per cent. I can’t live

my life like most people. If I post something on social media that’s not politically correct, I get attacked. I keep a circle of friends and family that’s very close. I keep to myself, and I think that’s because of the society we live in now. You’re judged by everything you do and say. It’s a different culture than it was 20 years ago.

DF: What have you learned from your career about what’s important in life? CE: I don’t know if it’s from my career or just my journey, but first and foremost it’s family – not riches and fame – that’s where I’m most grounded. I’ve had a hell of a career, but in the end I want people to know me as a lovely man, good father, a good role model treating people with respect.

DF: What lies ahead? CE: I am focusing on trying to build a

multi mega sportsplex. I’m trying to rally up a bunch of things. We’re lacking the things we need for our youth and our aging population. Sports brings everybody together, and I’d like to build a facility that can be a focal point to help our population train and work and be healthy. We don’t have a huge population, but let’s see how it goes. That’s with my basketball camps and touring with the book. My focal point is with my family. I’ve been fortunate enough to spend a lot of time with them, but I’m spending more now. March 2020

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homefront what odds

islands in the stream By Paul Warford

Have you ever I once ran into Matt Shea at an exotic animals expo. I couldn’t help but notice Matt’s blue learned about a eyebrows as we stopped for a brief chat among the lizards and snakes. Some might consider the job that didn’t dyed eyebrows a bit extreme, but I understood exist when you immediately. He’s a gamer. Not just any gamer, though. Matt Shea is Newwere young and foundland and Labrador’s most successful, bestknown video game streamer. He has more than thought, “If only one million subscribers on his YouTube channel. never looked at Matt’s finances, but I’m conthey had that I’ve fident that video game streaming is how he back in my day”? makes a living. A video game streamer is someone who plays video games and streams it live for online spectators. Audiences watch the streams on platforms such as YouTube or Twitch. If you were to log in to Twitch, you’d see something that looks like a Netflix menu, but instead of movies and shows, there are games. You click a game to find the list of streams. You pick a streamer, and bang! Their game is being played for you to watch. During their broadcasts, viewers can see two things: 1) the video game the streamer is currently playing, which takes up the majority of the screen; 2) in the corner, the streamer’s face, usually haloed by a headset. Often the streamer’s hair is dyed, I guess to make them stand out and express their personality. Lately, when my mind wanders, I sometimes imagine my curly hair dyed bright pink or pastel blue. I imagine it as a rainbow, like the “clown wig” the school bullies used to accuse me of never taking off. In those days, my friends and I would stuff ourselves into dank basements to play video games for hours on end. Our parents would warn us, “No one’s ever going to pay you to play these old games.” Well today, video gaming has evolved into a legitimate occupation for thousands of people.

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I wouldn’t want to tally the number of hours I’ve spent playing games because I think even a rough estimate would startle me and maybe stop some readers’ hearts. The way it works is that streaming generates income through advertising revenue (if YouTube thinks you deserve it) and viewer donations. I watch Twitch more than ever now, and I’ve grown accustomed to the donations that pop up on the screen: “[So-andso] donated $3.” “[So-and-so] donated £4.” As my dad always used to say, “Every little bit counts.” I’ve been an avid video gamer all my life, beginning at age four with the Atari system. I wouldn’t want to tally the number of hours I’ve spent playing games because I think even a rough estimate would startle me and maybe stop some readers’ hearts. I can safely say that the number isn’t below 10,000 hours, and 40,000 or 50,000 would probably be a closer estimate. I regret none of this spent time. Have you ever learned about a job that didn’t exist when you were young and thought, “If only they had that back in my day”? Streaming makes me feel like that. This is the job for me because I have the experience, I have the passion and I have a performer’s personality. The only things I’m missing are the fancy equipment required and about 10 years of hindsight. www.downhomelife.com

I’m not sure 37 is the ideal streaming age. Video games are constantly evolving, redefining themselves, and the players mimic this trajectory. Won’t I stand out like a bit of a sore thumb? That’s what I used to think, but it’s hardly productive. So, lately, I’ve been thinking of streaming, and that’s why I think of my hair in different colours. I imagine myself playing what I please as viewers drop in and out to say hello, and maybe share some coffee change. I’d be happy enough to do this as a supplement, since building an audience large enough to pay all the bills could take years. Some of you probably can’t believe what I’m telling you right now, and I get that, but the phenomenon is real and what I’m saying is true. If you still don’t believe me, just ask Matt Shea. Paul Warford began writing for Downhome to impress his mom and her friends. He writes and performs comedy in Eastern Canada. Follow him on Twitter @paulwarford March 2020

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homefront

Best Photo After more than 26,000 votes were cast online for all our finalists, this photo of young Joshua Warren landing his first salmon ever came out the winner! (It was published in the June issue.) Congratulations to the submitter, Carolyn Warren of Massey Drive, NL! Carolyn has won a $500 shopping coupon that is redeemable in person at Downhome Shoppe locations and for online purchases at ShopDownhome.com. 38

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Best Story

We received and published many lyrical poems, funny stories and poignant memories throughout 2019. It was enjoyable going back and reading them all again, but ultimately the editorial department had to choose one that really stood out. “The Fire of ’58” by Joy Philpott, published in the August issue, was a gut-wrenching true story of an event that is forever seared into the family’s memories. Miraculously, no one was harmed in this house fire, but it was a devastating setback for the family. Here’s an excerpt: As Lottie was running down the path calling for help, my sister Evelyn was walking home from Edgar Anstey’s store. As the sight of flames and smoke registered in Evelyn’s mind, she dropped the groceries and ran as fast as she could until she got to the burning house. Evelyn and I are both deaf, so you can imagine how frightening this situation was to us. There was no communication with anyone. No one knew sign language, so we were completely in the dark about what was happening, as was often the case. As she grew closer to the house she breathed a sigh of relief to see that all of her family were outside and safe. My family just stood and watched in fear and shock while Mr. Wycliffe Rideout ran inside, grabbed the stove with the fire still burning and brought it clear of the house. He then started to chop down all the trees surrounding our house to lessen the risk of the fire spreading. Other members of the community, seeing the blaze, soon came running with buckets of water from a nearby pond. But despite their efforts our home, with everything we owned, burned to the ground. Mom was left on her own with six www.downhomelife.com

children; no clothes and no toys for them, only the clothes on our backs. We all have memories of favourite things that were lost in that fire: I with my beautiful red coat; Patsy’s special dolly, Lammy Pie, that her Grandmother Elsie gave her for Christmas; Evelyn’s sweet doll that Aunt Marie Philpott gave her. All these items were cherished so much because we had so little… With the generous help of neighbours and relatives, the family was able to eventually rebuild the home and their lives. Thank you, Joy, for sharing this deeply personal, painful memory with Downhome readers. We are pleased to also award you a $500 shopping coupon that is redeemable in person at Downhome Shoppe locations and for online purchases made at ShopDownhome.com.

Don’t miss your chance to be a big winner! Turn to page 9 to find out how you can submit your photos, stories and poems and earn rewards throughout the year! March 2020

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life is better Icebergs outside Quidi Vidi Tracy Sheehan, CBS, NL


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features

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BY KIM PLOUGHMAN

WORKING AWAY, all over the world, is part of the lifestyle

for many Newfoundlanders and Labradorians, and has been for generations. One of the places that have drawn people who are skilled on the water is the Great Lakes, where it is said to be rare to find a carrier without a Newfoundlander on its crew. And many of those Newfoundlanders come from the tiny outport of Burnt Islands.

This small, sheltered harbour on the province’s southwest coast (27 km from Port aux Basques) attracted fishermen from the west coast of England in the mid-1800s. The fishery would become a way of life here throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th century. But as the fishery waned at times, many of these seasoned seamen were forced to travel elsewhere for work. Fishermen and others in this rocky, barren outport had vital skills passed down through generations, skills that were applicable in other parts of the country. www.downhomelife.com

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For its small size, Burnt Islands and area has certainly spawned a mighty crew of captains, mates, skippers and engineers. They were bred for the water, whether it was salt or fresh. And indeed, their mobility very likely strengthened their sense of place and stabilized their hometown, as their earnings supported their families and their homes still in Burnt Islands, where they’d return for part of the year. THE MUNDENS Notwithstanding the opening of a fish plant in 1968 and a causeway connecting the mainland and island sections of the community the following year, many Burnt Islanders, including Kenny Munden, had to make their living away from home. In fact, Kenny spent a decade (197181) working on the Lakes: Huron, Superior, Ontario and Erie, all connected to the Atlantic Ocean through the St. Lawrence Seaway. Now retired back home in Burnt Islands – after also spending decades in the North West Territories and sailing the Arctic Ocean – Kenny reflects on the Great Lakes boat rush. 44

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“Over the years, there was a whole bunch of people on the Great Lakes from here. For a small community with only 700 people, there have been a lot of captains and officers on the Lakes,” he says. The Great Lakes has a thriving boat industry, but the primary vessels are not the fishing type. These boats are carriers, transporting bulk resources such as grain, gypsum, ore, barley and sugar. “You name it, we carried it,” Kenny says, noting that, “Most every boat on the Great Lakes had a Newfoundlander – still does!” Kenny has counted more than 30 skippers and mates from his community, with over 70 per cent of these still working on the Lake boats. Kenny is the second generation in his family to work on the Great Lakes. His father, Kenneth, left Burnt Islands just after the province joined Confederation. “The fishery wasn’t great at that time, and there had been a friend or two of his who had gone up there and the money was half decent, so he left the fishery for the Lakes,” Kenny explains. Kenneth spent months of every year away working in the shipping 1-888-588-6353


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industry in central Canada, providing for his wife and nine children at home who needed to be fed and clothed. But it came with a price. “When he would come home, we would call him ‘the man,’ as he was like a stranger to us young ones,” Kenny says, acknowledging his father’s sacrifice. “It was a hard life, but it was an income.” Kenneth Munden retired at 65, but passed away a few years later. Kenny attributes his father’s ill health to what he had been exposed to on the freighters in those early years, when safety regulations were less than optimal. THE VAUTIERS OF LAPOILE Clarence Vautier was born just down the coast from Burnt Islands, in the community of LaPoile. Clarence is no stranger to ships – not only is he the author of four books on shipwrecks in Newfoundland and Labrador, but he is also a full-time captain of a Great Lakes carrier and has spent more than 25 years on the Lakes. When he’s not on the boats, he’s at home in Paradise, NL, with his family. Clarence was a child when he first began hearing stories about the men of the southwest coast who went off to the Great Lakes. He says his father fished from Burnt Islands in the early 1950s and men were heading west then to work on the Lake boats. Through his research, Clarence says he has found the first local man to do so: Garfield Parsons, circa www.downhomelife.com

Top: The Algoma Innovator, a 198m carrier built in 2017 tied up in Goderich, Ontario Below: Captain Clarence Vautier and three Burnt Islanders playing cards on the Algorail in 2010 Captain Clarence Vautier photos

1938. Ronald Ingram of Grand Bruit joined him the following year, and later others including Cecil Billard, in 1951, and Thomas Vautier from Petites. In 1954, Ronald Leamon of Burnt Islands got the Lake fever, followed by Kenneth Munden. Clarence also notes that Minter Caines of Burnt Islands followed Leamon on his return journey to the Lakes. Clarence reaffirms that it was the thirst for work that led these sailors to uproot for most of the year to work on the Lake carriers. “By the 1950s, March 2020

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[there] wasn’t much to the fisheries, and while Marine Atlantic provided a boost, going on a Lake boat was a pretty big thing,” he says, adding, “As time came on, more and more people decided to go up and give it a try.” Working this winter on the Algoma Innovator transporting road salt, Clarence says he currently has seven men from the southwest coast on his ship, including Robert (Bobby) Keeping, now 60, who has spent more than four decades on the Lakes. “I’ve been on boats where 18-19 of the crew were from the south coast communities,” Clarence says, highlighting that he once had a father and his two sons as shipmates. The culture on the boat has transformed over the years, he remarks, explaining that the change came with the introduction of the internet and TV. “One time, there used to be big ol’ yarns about Ski-dooing, hunting and the weather; and the boys would play darts and cards, but all that has fallen by the wayside.” Now, sparks of such conversation amongst the Newfoundlanders take place during brief coffee breaks and lunch time. Most of the Lake jobs, Clarence points out, are obtained through the Seafaring International

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Union (SIU). “You had to come up, put your name in and then wait before you got the job you wanted.” FRED SCOTT OF ISLE AUX MORTS The union route was how Fred Scott obtained his engineer job on the Lakes in 1965 and worked there for 15 years. Fred, who is originally from Isle aux Morts, says his brother was already up there, as well as a bunch of guys from Burnt Islands, Rose Blanche and his hometown, so he decided to join them. “My God, it was a good experience, even the trip up on the train; and we hung out at the union hall to try and get shipped out.” There was no shortage of Newfoundlanders on the 735-foot Lakers, Fred remarks. “There were a lot of our friends there back in the day, and there’s even more to this day.” He lists off a series of names – Taylors, Keepings, Hardys and others – who were all part of the southwest coast family on these bulk carriers. Like most, Fred says he was lured to the Lakes mainly because of the reliable and decent income. “Most of these little communities were small and [had] no roads; most they did were fishing on longliners. They were all good seamen, but when they went away, they, too, were hooked by the good wages and others just followed.” Fred recalls the many Newfound-

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land “shed parties” on the stern of these carriers. In particular, he says, “George Power had an accordion and he sure could make her talk.” Now living in Twilingate (where his family moved when he was in his teens), Fred also spent close to four decades up North on the Beaufort Sea with his friend, Kenny Munden. “Retired” for six years, he is still part of the mobile workforce, working stints on the Arctic freighters. Fred has an extra reason to head back up north: his son, Stephen, and family live along the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories. TEACHING A GENERATION OF LAKERS Llewelynn Munden lives in Port aux Basques today but is from Burnt Islands. Unlike his cousin Kenny, he didn’t end up on the Great Lakes. Lew, as he is called, was an educator for 34 years – 25 of them teaching in his hometown. Lew estimates he taught more than 750 Burnt Islands students, adding that if he had spent another year in the classroom, he would have taught three generations in his community. He points out that while many grew up to have careers on the Great Lakes, there were many places and in many ways his fellow Burnt Islanders have survived and thrived. “People from here have also ended up on the Newfoundland-Nova

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Scotia ferries, on boats in St. John’s, and on oil tankers all over the world.” He adds, “A number of them also joined the forces, including the army and navy; and other professions, like nursing and university professors.” Says Lew, “For a small place like Burnt Islands, people here have accomplished quite a bit. In comparison, we’ve done well.” Asked if he can take any credit for any share of this worldly success of his townfolk, Lew chuckles and modestly says, “Hopefully, I had some effect on a number of the young people. When I see them I ask, ‘You got your captain’s ticket yet?’ just as a way to encourage them forward.” More significantly, Lew figures it is the culture of the fishery that gave rise to so much talent and success. “Our people came from hardworking and resilient fishing families. It was a great training ground for any soul and seaman.” Now 83, Lew reflects on the Burnt Islands and greater southwest coast phenomenon of sending an unusual number of sailors off to power the marine industry on the Lakes. “When you sit back and think about it, it makes a person pretty proud of being from this place.” Incidentally, Burnt Islands is located near a very special bay – God Bay: a blessed place, indeed, where everything and anything under the heavens is possible.

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features

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In the present digital age,

one would assume streaming is taking over the music industry, especially as CD sales continue to plummet. Yet, there is much controversy regarding artists being paid fairly for their work on platforms like Spotify, Tidal, Apple Music and others. There’s one generally foolproof, albeit unconventional in our technological age, way to directly support musicians and their creations: purchase new music released on a classic medium – the vinyl record. Wondering who in Newfoundland and Labrador has released vinyl recently? Let’s see… Hey Rosetta!, Amelia Curran, The Once, Tim Baker, Fortunate Ones, Janet Cull, Waterfront Fire, Sea Dogs, Domestics, Ouroborous, Sheavy, Sherman Downey, Patrick Boyle, Fog Lake, Terra, David Picco, Long Distance Runners, Dark Era, Damnhait Doyle, Denis Parker, Mick Davis & Thin Love, Derm Kean and An Incredible Woman, Jerry Stamp, and even the Come From Away original cast recordings. And that’s not everyone. Some may question the revival of a music format that was often viewed as inconvenient; vinyl records are heavy, temperamental, and subject to a plethora of issues including damage from heat, improper storage, dirt and dust. But www.downhomelife.com

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there’s just something about a vinyl record that pulls on the heartstrings of the music lover’s soul. “As a bit of a vinyl nerd, I always dreamt about having a release of my own on wax,” admits bassist Greg Newhook of local blues/rock band Beauwater, using the colloquial term for vinyl. The trio released their album Lovers, Fools and Kings on vinyl in 2016. “There’s definitely something special about having a physical product you can hold in your hands. It gives you a greater connection to the artist, and you really get the full experience having the artwork, info and credits in hand to look over while you listen,” he says. “Although vinyl is more expensive to produce, especially for an independent artist like ourselves, there is just something about the format that gives you a sense of accomplishment after spending so much our time and resources producing it,” adds Beauwater drummer Michael Maddox. The costs are significant. There’s only a handful of vinyl pressing plants in Canada, and most require a minimum order that just isn’t feasible for most small indie bands. Fortunately, Beauwater stumbled onto funding. The group’s vinyl release was well received, selling almost equal amounts of records and CDs, with the vinyl being purchased by record collectors around the world. Veteran musician Mark Bragg, with a discography spanning nearly 20 years, released his first vinyl record in 2018. Winter garnered gratitude 50

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from record-collecting fans. “When it came out, people were taking photos of themselves with the record, showing off their purchase along with their turntables and their living room. They were tagging me in photos. We’d have a little love-in on social media, and connect over that. It builds community. Nobody was taking selfies with their Spotify playlists,” Mark jokes. “We are physically engaged,” he adds about our deeper connection to vinyl. “We pull the record off the shelf, carefully lay it on the platter, spin it, dust it, gingerly place the needle into the groove, and then poetry comes out. We’re completely invested in the moment.” Peter Willie Youngtree’s fans also responded positively to the alternative country/folk band Youngtree & the Blooms’ vinyl release. “The fans that like vinyl and collect vinyl were happy with the decision to press it,” he says, adding that many noted that “the audio quality is discernibly better on the vinyl.” Local band Geinus suggests the warm, enveloping sound of vinyl records makes the listener feel like they’re “in the room with the band.” Geinus released their 2018 album, Keeper, on wax through Brokest Records, a local label founded by Shaun McCabe in July 2016. Shaun’s alt-rock band Werewoman released their first vinyl in 2014, having noted that local rock band Monsterbator had put out three vinyl releases by that point. Around the same time, Hey Rosetta! released 1-888-588-6353


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their most recent album, Second Sight, on vinyl, to much fanfare. “It seemed after that, putting local bands on vinyl was happening more and more by bands much smaller than Hey Rosetta!,” Shaun says. Two years later, having finished recording the second Joe Grizzly album (another band Shaun plays in), Shaun was approached by Lightnin’ Mike, a musician friend looking for an outlet to release his music. With plans to release more Werewoman music, Shaun created a label to put out all three releases, on vinyl or cassette – oh yeah, tapes are comin’ back, too! “It becomes more of an art piece and collectable that you can also play on a great system. I’ve seen too many local CDs forgotten about,” Shaun says. Geinus also expressed their excitement over the eye-catching artwork of a 12-inch record: “That vinyl jacket gets your attention and draws you in, in a way other platforms cannot.” Fur Packed Action’s Geoff Younghusband agrees that vinyl reigns supreme. When the local alternative band reunited in 2018, they opted to celebrate the 20th anniversary of their 1998 album on wax. “The Dull Thud of Fur was released on CD back in the day, so we felt that we had done that, that is the past, no one wants to revisit Fur Packed Action in that crappy format,” Geoff says. “Many people had wished, over the years, that it be released on vinyl. And I guess all of us... that’s what we grew up with. That’s where our love www.downhomelife.com

Top to bottom: Bud Davidge, Fortunate Ones and Geinus, local artists who have all produced vinyl records. March 2020

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Top:

Geoff Younghusband shows off his band Fur Packed Action’s special edition vinyl LP.

Above: Author Wendy Rose really loves vinyl records and has more than 800 titles in her own collection. 52

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of music started – lying on our parents’ couches, music blasting from the hi-fi, holding an album cover in our hands,” he recalls fondly. “We thought for our own enjoyment, and in keeping with FPA’s tradition of pulling rabbits out dark places, that a double album would impress, elate, excite and entice people to buy it.” It worked. The Dull Thud of Fur is currently out of print. “I think if fans are buying albums now, then they want something more tangible and representative of their fandom, which streaming services simply cannot provide,” Geoff says. “CDs may have been ‘collected’ by some people, but most were just music fans getting their fix in the only format labels were providing, so I think the resurgence of vinyl is great for music fans and collectors. It’s a terrific format.” This writer agrees wholeheartedly. My personal record collection boasts about 800 titles, and having spent three years working at Fred’s Records, I’ve witnessed firsthand how vinyl connects and excites people in a way that other music formats simply do not. “I love going over to people’s houses and checking out their records and popping one on,” Shaun adds. “There’s something cool about when people start putting on albums you forgot you had… and when you can spin more and more local bands.” 1-888-588-6353


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features

Surprising products being made and sold by creative people right here in this province By Katherine Saunders

Newfoundlanders and Labradorians are inventive people. Centuries of self-reliance have taught us to work with what we have and develop our skills to enable ourselves to survive rough times and prosper in good times. Folks in this province are putting their talents to work to make a living here at home, resulting in some amazing creations. Recently we spoke to three similarly driven people making very different products. Their successes are examples of what can be achieved if you have passion and drive. 54

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Lizard’s Leos Elizabeth Zedel owns Lizard’s Leos, a St. John’s company that makes custom leotards for young athletes across Canada. Elizabeth started the operation out of her home 10 years ago, but now the growing business has its own premises and employs four people making suits for skaters, gymnasts, dancers and swimmers. She is ecstatic about her recent growth and having a new place to work. “It’s divine,” she laughs. “I don’t know how we did it before.” When a club or team approaches Elizabeth for a design, she works with them to determine what they want their leotards to look like. She gives specific instructions for measuring the athletes for their suits to ensure the best fit – essential for optimum athletic performance. www.downhomelife.com

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“We’re not limited to a line of products,” explains Elizabeth. “We can make truly custom suits.” She uses fine fabrics from Montreal and around the world that come in a variety of colours. Using a process called sublimation printing, she can add patterns and ombrés, club logos and other designs to the suit. Elizabeth adds all her own appliqués, using rhinestones from Austria and Korea to make leotards glisten during competitions. She takes pride in her work, and only the best quality products will do for her customers. All of Elizabeth’s suits are designed to last through multiple practices, washing and competitions. “It’s about making [athletes] comfortable,” she stresses. Her suits have been worn at national championships in gymnastics and synchronized swimming. She has also designed apparel for Canadian Paralympians. “I love working with them,” she beams. Elizabeth is proud to make a product here in Newfoundland and Labrador that is worn by athletes across Canada. Photos of her work can be found on her website, www.lizardsleos.ca.

Newfoundland Salt Company Here, salt is symbolic of our heritage. We are surrounded by saltwater, and salt was once vital to the booming cod fishery as the province was settled and grew. Despite that, the salt we use everyday to preserve or flavour our food was always imported from somewhere else. That hole in the market is what Peter Burt and Robin Crane set out to fill when they launched Newfoundland Salt Company in 2012. 56

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Peter is a chef and was working at the award-winning Raymond’s restaurant in downtown St. John’s when he began experimenting with making salt from scratch. Within months, he and Robin had formed a company and their salt was being served at Raymond’s. Then consumers got a taste of it when they began selling at the St. John’s Farmers Market, and they knew they were really in business. In 2017, they took advantage of an opportunity to relocate their operation to Bonavista. There, they were happy to find a supportive environment for their business. “We love the community here,” Robin gushed. The process of harvesting salt and preparing it for market takes 12-13 days. First, they drive to nearby Spillar’s Cove, where they pump water from the ocean into their 2,000-litre water storage rig. They tow the water back to their building, where they have storage for 50,000 L of water. The seawater is then transferred into a fast-boil container, where it is boiled for 48 hours. This increases the salt content of the water from 3.5 per cent to about 80 per cent. They pour the salt into a specially designed pot, where the rest of the water slowly evaporates. They then hang bags of the salt to dry before packaging it and shipping it to market. Today, Newfoundland Salt Company salt is sold in retail stores across Canada. It is served at some of the top restaurants in St. John’s and in some local breweries. Peter and Robin believe there is no salt like Newfoundland salt. They have compared their product with other sea salts from around the world www.downhomelife.com

– they have a collection at home – and have found that their salt is the whitest of the bunch. “It tells us that we’re doing everything right, and that we’re getting our water from the purest and cleanest source,” Peter explains, adding that Bonavista is along an iceberg path, which regularly refreshes the water. They count themselves lucky to be able to make a living at home, using a natural resource that the province has to offer. “The ocean is here,” Robin reflects. “We’re very lucky that we have it.” Newfoundland Salt Company sea salt is sold at retailers across Canada. Learn more about them online at Newfoundlandsaltcompany.com.

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Black Hen Studio Susan Furneaux and Michael Harlick own Black Hen Studio in Conception Harbour. They are fine craft artists who make beautiful pieces out of items foraged from the coastlines and forests of Newfoundland. Susan recently spoke with Downhome about their work. “I specialize in natural dye and hand embroidery, and Michael is a metal smith. He does fine gold and silver jewelry as well as forge work knives.” Susan has 30 years of professional experience working with textiles. Michael started out as an apprentice at a jewelrymaking shop, where he worked for 10 years before branching out on his own to further develop his craft. As a couple, they collaborate on much of their work, while also devoting time to individual creations. They specialize in making handcrafted knives of many varieties. “The knife handles are embellished with local antler, beach stones and semi-precious stones from around the province. I embroider the sheaths with natural dyes and hand embroidery,” Susan explains. “[The knives] are meant to be used and function as they should, as well as be beautiful objects.” In fact, their knives function so well that they are in demand by local chefs. Susan and Michael’s individual work draws from their separate training and experience. “It’s usually based on a theme that we want to explore,” Susan says. Michael has been experimenting with recycled metal from old saws, forging it into new pieces.

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He also dabbles in sculpture and still makes jewelry. Susan makes mostly one-off pieces that are anything and everything to do with textiles, often exploring a particular theme through her designs. “Our work is really grounded in the arts and crafts movement, both in philosophy as well as in the design esthetic,” she says. They work with as much local material as they can, and these can inform the designs. If they find something cool out in the wilderness, like a piece of antler or a neat beach stone, they will create artwork with it. They also take commissions, and some of these start with an item that the customer found and wants to preserve as art. Susan describes their work as being “very much of place.” Because it is made in Newfoundland and Labrador

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out of materials foraged here, it reflects the colours and textures of the local flowers, minerals, trees and wildlife. Susan explains that they are carrying on a cultural tradition of making things out of materials available from the land. “Only until recently, with the internet, was the world opened up to us for materials. There were some mail orders, but you had to deal with catalogues, and it was a racket. Generally, in Newfoundland, people had to make do with what they had… I think we’re just continuing on with that.” Susan offers workshops out of the studio that range from beginner to advanced levels of textile work. Michael provides blacksmith demonstrations. Their schedule and their latest work can be found on their website, www.blackhenstudio.com, or on their Instagram @blackhenstudio.

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features

There is nothing so peaceful

as sitting by a slow-moving stream or a still pond, watching ducks float by, trout breach and a beaver leisurely drift along the surface. You may think how lucky you are to have found this pond with such an array of wildlife, but would you realize that this pond might not exist if not for the beaver? Beavers alter their environment to suit their needs by building dams that maintain constant water levels for lodge construction and easy access to underwater food supplies. They favour slow-moving streams, ponds, lakes and rivers in forested areas, but occasionally 60

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will inhabit tundra or urban areas near a source of deep water. The dam is built of branches, rocks, grass, reeds and mud. Beavers will sometimes incorporate man-made objects such as boards, garbage and other items. The dam creates areas of deep, still water (appropriately called beaver ponds) that are maintained by reacting quickly to the sound of running water and repairing the damage as soon as possible. The dam floods www.downhomelife.com

the surrounding area, providing safe underwater access to important food such as trees, cattails and other pondside vegetation. The largest known dam is in Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta. It measures 850 metres (2,790 feet) – twice the width of Hoover Dam in Nevada. The beaver lodge is constructed of sticks, twigs, rocks and mud. It is generally 4.5 m (14.7 ft.) in diameter March 2020

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and 1.5-2.1 m (4.9-6.8 ft.) high; the walls are 0.6-1 m (1.9-3.3 ft.) thick. The lodge has two or more underwater entrances. It is built in lakes, streams and tidal river deltas, and may be surrounded by water or touch the shoreline; it may include burrows dug into riverbanks. The beaver (Castor canadensis) is not just the largest native rodent in Newfoundland and Labrador – it’s the largest in North America. Beavers are generally nocturnal, although they are sometimes spotted during the day. Their typical diet is bark, leaves, twigs and buds of maple, aspen, birch, poplar and willow trees and alders; and aquatic plants and lily roots. Before the onset of winter, beaver colonies will gather and cache food in deep-water areas near the lodge. They are semiaquatic, are excellent swimmers and can stay underwater for up to 15 minutes at a time.

Beaver benefits The beaver is a keystone species, meaning their activities can affect the entire ecosystem. Beaver ponds provide important habitat for waterfowl, fish and other aquatic life. These ponds increase biodiversity as wetlands are formed and riparian habitats are enlarged. Newly created watery habitats are colonized by aquatic plants; bird, mammal, fish and insect diversities expand in these areas. Stream flow is increased in seasonally dry streams by run-off stored behind beaver dams; some areas may have up to 60 per cent more available water when beavers are present. Beaver ponds also improve stream water quality by removing sediments and pollutants including suspended solids, nitrogen, phosphates, carbon and silicates. Additionally, fecal coliform and streptococci bacteria in the water are reduced. Beaver ponds are typically at or near bank full, so when water levels increase, the banks overflow and spread water and nutrients beyond to a wide zone of streamside vegetation. Waterfowl benefit because beavers create areas of water and help thaw 62

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areas of open water, which allows for an earlier nesting season. The number of ducks in beaver-inhabited areas sometimes increases by 75 per cent over non-beaver influenced areas. Trumpeter swans and Canada geese often depend on lodges for nesting sites. Beavers benefit other birds by removing pondside trees and increasing the height and density of grasses, forbs and shrubs, which enhances nesting cover. Dense willow growth in areas where beavers feed also increases the number of insects, important to many bird diets. As trees drown due to rising water levels, they make ideal nesting sites for woodpeckers. Their work excavating cavities then attracts flycatchers, tree swallows, chickadees, wood ducks, goldeneyes, mergansers, owls and kestrels. Fish eaters such as herons, grebes, cormorants, bitterns, egrets and kingfishers all fish in beaver ponds. Many fish species also benefit from beaver activity, particularly trout and salmon. The presence of dams has shown to increase the number and size of brook, brown and rainbow 1-888-588-6353


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trout in a water body. Migration of adult Atlantic salmon may be somewhat restricted, but the presence of juvenile salmon upstream suggests that dams are penetrated by parr. Downstream movement by smolts also appears relatively unaffected, even in periods of low water flow. Studies have shown that twoyear-old salmon parr in beaver ponds in eastern Canada have accelerated growth rates and were in better condition compared to others. Beavers sometimes create additional channel networks of ponds and marshes that are separated from the main channel, thus playing a role in creating and maintaining fish biodiversity. In human history, particularly in the settlement of Canada by westerners, beavers played an important part. The desire and demand for lush, workable fur in the 17th and 18th centuries lured trappers and settlers farther across the countryside. From 1670 onwards, the Hudson’s Bay Company sent two or three trading ships into Hudson Bay every year to collect furs and take them to England. The fur was used to make many fashion items, most notably hats, which nearly drove the species to extinction. Protection for the beavers was established in the late 19th and 20th centuries, allowing the population to rebound to a current estimated 10-15 www.downhomelife.com

million animals, still a fraction of the 100-200 million beavers in North America before the fur trade. While the demand for wild fur has decreased greatly, beavers are still trapped in Newfoundland and Labrador. In addition to their fur, beavers were and are killed for their meat.

Todd Hollett photo

Many say that beaver meat resembles lean ground beef. The meat is generally slow roasted, braised, stewed or grilled until thoroughly cooked. The internal tail muscle can be slow roasted until tender, then crisped at high heat. The fatty “flapper” part of the tail is best if added to slow cooked beans or greens and served over the meat. When preparing for consumption, great care must be taken to prevent contamination from the caster gland. The beaver was a valuable food source for many Native Americans, and early French Canadian Catholics considered the beaver “four legged fish” (as they did March 2020

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seal) and ate them at Lent, when eating meat is forbidden by their religion.

The bad side to beavers The beavers’ influence is not always favourable for the environment. Beavers cutting down large numbers of trees for food and building materials may result in streambank erosion and increased water temperatures from sun exposure. Increased water temperatures can cause changes in the ecological dynamics of a stream. Beavers will often feed on larger trees by removing all the bark within reach. Loss of bark prevents moisture and nutrients from moving from the roots to the leaves, thereby causing the tree to die. Other trees drown due to high water levels. Sometimes people consider these animals pests because their dams cause flooding or the beavers cut down ornamentals. Culverts under highways often provide an engineering shortcut for beavers, and they build small dams across the culvert opening, turning the road foundation

into a dam. This saves the beaver a lot of time and effort, but the backup of water threatens to collapse the highway. They also sometimes flood large areas, such as athletic fields, walking trails, yards, croplands, timberlands and access roads, thus depriving people of their use. These activities may jeopardize millions of dollars in transportation infrastructure and cause significant land damage. Because they are so persistent in repairing damage to their dams, the beavers usually have to be exterminated or relocated when they become an issue. There has been much research and development in nonlethal methods of mitigating flood damage, such as “beaver deceivers,” or levelers, developed by wildlife biologist Skip Lisle. “Beaver fever” is another concern of many people. The term is a misnomer coined by the press in the 1970s, after the discovery that beavers carry the parasite Giardia lamblia, which causes giardiasis (an infection in the small intestine). Newer research shows that many mammals and birds can harbour this

DID YOU KNOW? • The beaver is the national symbol of Canada. • The beaver was featured on the first Canadian postage stamp, called the three penny beaver. • Giant beavers of the ice age, called Castoroides, greatly resembled their modern counterparts except they did not have a flattened tail, and they grew to be 2.5 m (8 ft.) long and weighed 90 kg (200 lbs). 64

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• In 1948, Idaho residents clashed with the local beaver population, a threatened species in the state. So the Department of Fish and Game relocated the beavers using surplus WWII army parachutes to drop boxes of live beavers from a plane. After some careful planning, 76 beavers skydived into the basin of a protected area; all but one survived. 1-888-588-6353


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These chew markings on a downed tree in the woods are sure signs of a beaver in the neighbourhood. Todd Hollett photo parasite, and, in fact, the major cause of water contamination is humans. The last documented case of beaver fever in drinking water in NL was in the spring of 1992, in Corner Brook, when more than 100 people got sick. One beaver was removed from near the water supply and tested positive for Giardia.

Control and management In Newfoundland and Labrador, beavers are considered a furbearer and the Wildlife Division manages them on a trap line system. Only trappers approved to hold a beaver trap line can legally harvest beaver during a scheduled season. The first step to problem beaver management is often exclusion. Trees and shrubs that sustain beaver damage can be wrapped in hardware cloth or chicken wire to prevent loss. www.downhomelife.com

Various water moving methods can also be employed. The aforementioned “beaver deceivers� move water through the beaver’s dam and out the other side, controlling the water levels. Multiple PVC pipes are pushed through the dam, eliminating the sound of running water that ordinarily sets the beaver in motion to repair the dam. If dam modification or removal efforts fail, often the only option is removal of the beaver. Where legal, the beaver may be taken by kill trap or shot. In Newfoundland and Labrador, the local branch of the Department of Fisheries and Land Resources Forest Services should be contacted before any population control is attempted. Trained conservation officers may be able to assist in live capture and relocation of problem wildlife. If this fails, they will usually request the help of a registered trapper to remove the beaver. March 2020

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life is better Spring ice in Trinity Bernice Goudie, St. John’s, NL


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explore

The Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival returns to Corner Brook for a second year. By Katherine Saunders

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This month, Corner Brook is gearing up for the return of the Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival, an event which sees the province’s craft brewers come together to showcase their products on the east and west coasts of the island.

The west coast event will take place at the Corner Brook Civic Centre on March 21. Each participating brewery will have a stand. Guests will each get a glass, and they can roam around to the various stands and drink samples. Organizers Steve Martin and Craig Farewell recently spoke to Downhome about the festival’s expansion to Corner Brook and what is on tap for this year. “Expect good food, and of course, some amazing craft beer,” declares Steve. Craig has been brewing since 2011, and has served on the board of the Canadian Home Brewers Association as the Atlantic representative. From 2011-2015 he lived in Halifax, and witnessed the boom of the craft beer industry across Nova Scotia. There is a craft beer festival in Halifax, and Craig

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wanted to bring one home to Newfoundland and Labrador, where craft brewing hadn’t really taken off yet. Steve was equally enthusiastic about the opportunity to bring something new and trendy to Newfoundland and Labrador. And he loves craft beer. The two friends paired up to start St. John’s Brew Fest in 2015. At that time, there were only three craft breweries in the province. Since then, the boom that swept Nova Scotia in the early 2010s has made its way to Newfoundland and Labrador, and there are now 18 craft breweries in this province. “I think the festival has helped the craft beer industry gain traction,” Steve remarks. Last year, Steve and Craig brought the festival to the west coast. They rebranded it as the

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Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival and held the event in both St. John’s and Corner Brook. There are seven breweries in the western region of the island, including those on the Northern Peninsula. Bringing the festival to Corner Brook has helped some of those breweries get involved and introduce their brands to a wider market. Craig says that although the breweries in Corner Brook are smaller than the ones in St. John’s, the

val, and according to Craig and Steve, most of them do, despite some of the logistical challenges in shipping products across the province. In addition to local beers, the festival brings in brews from other provinces and even some international brands. This gives festivalgoers the chance to sample beers that are not otherwise available in Newfoundland and Labrador. This year, Steve and Craig are working on bringing in beers

“It’s hip, it’s cool. There’s a little district popping up,” Craig comments about the cluster of breweries that has formed in downtown Corner Brook.

business owners are just as passionate about their industry. “It’s hip, it’s cool. There’s a little district popping up,” Craig comments about the cluster of breweries that has formed in downtown Corner Brook. All the breweries in Newfoundland and Labrador are invited to attend the Newfoundland Craft Beer Festi70

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from British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario, and they are hoping to have some European varieties available. They say that they want the “best of the best” for people to taste. They believe that bringing in top products from around the world encourages local breweries to try new things. “When you try something that’s the best, it raises 1-888-588-6353


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the average,” Craig explains. As organizers, Craig and Steve are happy to see a wide demographic at the festival every year, ranging in age from the newly legal to the most experienced and hardiest of drinkers. “The trend isn’t just for one group of people,” according to Steve. Craig calls craft breweries “a new age version of going to the pub.” This may be why they have become so popular everywhere, but particularly in Newfoundland and Labrador. “I think we’re going through a time right now where everyone just appreciates a good quality, hand crafted product… the neighbourhood pub is coming back,” Steve says. They both appreciate the economic impact of local breweries as well. Craig points to the opening of Port Rexton Brewing as a poignant example of the tourism impact of breweries in small communities. He says there has been a boom in accommodations in the area since the brewery opened. There has been an increase in “staycations,” where Newfoundlanders and Labradorians tour the province to visit the different breweries. Craig suggests that the brewery explosion in Newfoundland and Labrador has been a great benefit to the province, and a long time coming. “Like everything else, [the craft beer industry] took a while to get to Newfoundland,” he says. “But when it got here, people were ready for it.” The Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival will open at the Corner Brook Civic Centre on March 21 at 7:00 p.m., and at the St. John’s Farmers’ Market on March 27 and 28 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are available at www.nlcraftbeerfestival.ca. www.downhomelife.com

Fredericton Craft Beer Festival Fredericton Convention Centre Fredericton, NB March 6 - 7

Nova Scotia Craft Beer Festival Cunard Centre, Halifax, NS March 21

Newfoundland Craft Beer Festival Corner Brook Civic Centre Corner Brook, NL March 21 St. John’s Farmers’ Market St. John’s, NL March 27 and 28

East Coast Craft Beer Festival Halifax Forum Halifax, NS June 20

Big Axe Craft Beer Festival World’s Largest Axe Nackawic, NB July 18

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St. Patrick’s Day,

also called the Feast of St. Patrick, is celebrated annually in much of the world on March 17 to commemorate the saint who brought Christianity to Ireland in the 4th century BCE. During his life, he established schools, churches and monasteries throughout Ireland.

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Yet, the most popular St. Patrick’s Day celebrations have little to do with religion and more to do with wearing funny hats and shamrocks, dancing and drinking green beer. The story of how a religious holiday came to involve drinking and partying is an interesting one. In Newfoundland and Labrador, there is perhaps nobody better to tell that story than the folks at the Benevolent Irish Society (BIS). So Downhome met with Bob Gillard, past president and vice-patron of the BIS, and Marie Raymond, chair of the Culture and Heritage Committee, to get the whole story over coffee (without Bailey’s!). The Benevolent Irish Society has existed in Newfoundland and Labrador since 1806, the oldest non-religious organization in the province. It was originally established as a charitable organization that helped the needy regardless of their religion. In 1823, the BIS built its first school, which existed under various names until 1985. Today, among other charitable endeavours, it supports the School Lunch Association. In 2009, the society added the promotion of Newfoundland Irish Heritage to its constitution and established the Culture and Heritage Committee. Bob says, “Newfoundlanders have a great affinity for Ireland still.” About 50 per cent of Newfoundlanders have some Irish heritage, and the rising popularity of DNA tests and family tree mapping has only strengthened this connection. The BIS has been celebrating St. www.downhomelife.com

Patrick’s Day since 1807. In the early days, the BIS did not have its own building, so members would go to a hotel or a restaurant for dinner. At the feast, they would serve alcohol and toast the various saints, Ireland itself and other important figures. This litany of toasts was a broad St. Patrick’s Day tradition that may explain how the holiday came to be associated with drinking. In the 1850s, as the Catholic presence in Newfoundland grew, the celebrations became more religious in nature and shifted away from the drinking aspect.

The Benevolent Irish Society in St. John’s has been celebrating St. Patrick’s Day since 1807. One event is their annual dinner. The toasting of the saints is likely the oldest connection between St. Patrick’s Day and drinking, but there is a wider drinking culture that has permeated the entire thing. As Bob puts it, “I think the Irish are known for liking to tip their arm.” Marie points out that St. Patrick’s Day falls in the middle of Lent, the period of the year when Catholics March 2020

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sacrifice indulgences. The Catholic Church used to permit people to take a one-day break from Lent for St. Patrick’s Day, she explains. “If you had any sweets, you’d shove them into your face while you could,” she jokes. And as consuming alcohol was not permitted during Lent, folks would go all out on St. Patrick’s Day. The thing that really ties together the celebration of an Irish holiday and the downing of pints is Irish music, which tends to make a lot of references to drinking, parties and going to pubs. Look no further for an example than the 1993 album Irish Drinking Songs, a compilation by the Clancy Brothers, the Dubliners and Tommy Makem – all Irish artists. Here in Newfoundland and Labrador, much of our folk music is Irish in style, performed by artists like Fergus O’Byrne, the Masterless Men and Great Big Sea. As long as it is done safely, drinking on St. Patrick’s Day can be a great time. On March 17, plenty of folks will hit pubs to dance to folk tunes and drink green beer. (In Newfoundland and Labrador, pubs run Paddy’s Day events for up to a week!) The holiday can also be a time to reflect on the Irish heritage that is so influential in this province, and perhaps learn something new about Irish history and culture. The BIS puts off various events, including an afternoon tea, a dinner and dance, and educational lectures. While not everyone’s a drinker, the holiday is for everyone, young and old alike. To that end, here follows a list of St. Patrick’s Day events that do not necessarily involve drinking.

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Ladies Afternoon Tea Benevolent Irish Society

30 Harvey Road, St. John’s Sunday, March 8, 1:30 - 4 p.m.

This Benevolent Irish Society tradition is being revived for everyone. Make no mistake – even though it is dubbed a “ladies” tea, all genders are welcome! There will be refreshments served along with tea and non-alcoholic punch. Come out for an afternoon social that celebrates all things Irish.

Irish Movie Night

Benevolent Irish Society

30 Harvey Road, St. John’s Thursday, March 12, 7 p.m.

Film buffs, check this out! The BIS will be showing Camino Voyage, directed by Dónal O’Ceilleachair. The documentary follows a four-person crew that embarks on a 2,500-km voyage from Ireland to Spain in a boat they built themselves. It stars Irish musicians Glen Hansard and Breanndán Ó Beaglaoich, artist Liam Holden, stonemason BrendanPháid Ó Muircheartaigh and poet Domhnall Mac Síthigh. This multiaward winning film is described as “an epic 2,500-km modern day Celtic Odyssey.”

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Shamrock Run 5K

Why not break out the snowboard or skis and take to the hills to celebrate the weekend?

Turn keg day into leg day with the Shamrock 5K Run around MUN campus. Your participation gets you some cool race swag, including a multipurpose neck warmer and a stone finisher’s medal. There is a post race reception at the Breezeway, but if you’re not feeling it, you can just do the race. Registration is available at www.shamrockrun.ca.

St. Patrick’s Day President’s Brunch

Memorial University St. John’s Campus Saturday, March 14, 5:30 p.m.

Annual BIS Dinner and Dance

Benevolent Irish Society

30 Harvey Road, St. John’s Saturday, March 14, 7 p.m.

If you want to party but aren’t in the bar-hopping mood, check out the annual BIS Dinner and Dance. There will be a hearty meal of cream of mushroom soup, stuffed chicken breast with mashed potatoes and veggies, and cheesecake, with tea and coffee to top it off. Then dance the night away to your favourite Irish tunes.

Marble Mountain’s St. Patrick’s Day Shenanigans

Marble Mountain Ski Resort, Steady Brook Sunday, March 15, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. For St. Patrick’s Day on the West Coast, Marble Mountain is the place to be! The lifts will be operating on their usual schedule, with live entertainment in the Knotty Pine Lounge. www.downhomelife.com

Benevolent Irish Society

30 Harvey Road, St. John’s Sunday, March 15, noon

BIS President Shawn Skinner invites you to come out for a traditional Irish Sunday brunch to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day weekend. All your favourites will be served: homemade fishcakes, bangers, corned beef hash, eggs, cod au gratin and more! Wash it all down with tea and coffee. Have a scoff!

All Ages St. Patrick’s Day Breakfast O’Reilly’s Irish Pub

George Street, St. John’s Brunch: Saturday, March 14, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Breakfast: Tuesday, March 17, 6:30 a.m. – 10 a.m. For many townies, breakfast at O’Reilly’s is a St. Patrick’s Day tradition. This is an all-ages event, so while alcohol will be available, it will not be the primary focus of the festivities. The brunch on Saturday morning will feature a performance by the Masterless Men and a traditional carvery buffet. On St. Patrick’s Day, the fun starts at the crack of dawn! There will be a breakfast buffet, and performances by Fergus O’Byrne and his son, Fergus Brown O’Byrne, and Chris Hennessey. Tickets are on sale at www.oreillyspub.com. March 2020

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explore

How St. Patrick is toasted in Ireland and around the world By Charles Beckett

Until the 20th century, St Patrick’s Day was not a big deal in Ireland. The holiday is popular worldwide because Irish people can be found in every corner of the globe; about one million people fled famine in Ireland in the 19th century, the majority settling in North America and Britain. The pageantry and glitz often associated with Paddy’s Day events were invented by expatriates wanting to celebrate their Irish roots.

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At home in rural Ireland, or “down the country,” St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated with Guinness, music, singing and dancing. There may be smaller parades than those in larger cities like Dublin, Cork, Galway and Limerick. Galway, on the west coast, is noted for having the best atmosphere at its street parties, while Dublin’s city centre is crammed with about a half-million people for the March 17th parade. The Irish don’t say “St. Patty’s” in reference to the holiday; it’s either St. Patrick’s or Paddy’s Day. They generally don’t drink green beer, Irish Car Bombs or the Shamrock Shake, nor do they dye the waters of the Shannon or Liffey river green to mimic suchlike shenanigans in Chicago. In the US, Paddy’s Day is widely celebrated, from San Francisco, California, to Savannah, Georgia. Two of the more famous celebrations are held in New York City and Boston. On Paddy’s Day, New Yorkers and visitors don their green duds for festive events highlighted by the St. Patrick’s Day Parade (first held in 1762). The parade extends more than 30 Manhattan blocks and takes almost six hours to complete. Meanwhile in Boston, colourful floats, music and good cheer abound as the city’s most Irish neighbourhood celebrates the South Boston St. Patrick’s Day parade. It begins at Broadway ‘T’ Station and ends at Andrew Square. It’s tradition to take in one of Celtic punk band Dropkick Murphy’s hometown shows at the House of Blues. Down under, 30 per cent of Australians and 15 per cent of New Zealanders claim some Irish ancestry, leading to widespread Paddy’s www.downhomelife.com

Day celebrations, from familyfriendly affairs to something more rambunctious. Sydney, Australia, celebrations are the largest in the Southern Hemisphere, and the only St. Patrick’s Day events outside Ireland that are funded and organized by the Irish government. Auckland, New Zealand, is farthest away from Ireland and, because of the time zone, is the first to party. Its nearly 335-metre (1,100 ft.) Sky Tower is lit with the Irish tri-colour. There are many unexpected places where Paddy’s Day celebrations are held; two of the more surprising are Tokyo, Japan, and Abuja, Nigeria. The former, with an Irish population of fewer than 2,000, started the I Love Ireland Festival in 1992. In Nigeria, where Catholics number around 20 million, St. Patrick was named patron saint in 1961. Paddy’s Day is not a holiday and there is no parade, but Nigeria is the second largest consumer of Guinness (the UK is first, Ireland is third), so a few pints will be sunk on March 17. In Newfoundland in the 1940s, we attended church garden parties, but I was not aware of any Paddy’s Day celebrations. About 30 years ago we organized a Paddy’s Day concert in the United Church Hall here in Gambo. Someone questioned why we were celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. I replied that I liked the lively Irish music and it was a good way to lift our spirits and purge the winter blues. The Catholic community here usually serves Irish stew on St. Patrick’s Day as a church fundraiser. It’s a fun get-together for the whole community, especially if enhanced with Irish music and song. March 2020

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Rounding a bend in the road,

I suddenly spot them: three men and a woman blocking the barrels of the great guns with their bodies, yet saying not a word in protest, plea or petition. They remain stoic, stonefaced in fact. These weapons have not fired a shot in centuries, and the people atop them are statues of saints. Together they form the unusual gateposts outside Saints Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church in Bay Bulls, on Newfoundland’s Southern Shore. The story of how four holy statues came to be perched upon pedestals that once pulverized ancient enemies with up to 18-pound projectiles is an interesting one. To learn all about it, I contacted John O’Brien, who sits on the finance and administration committee for the Parish of Saints Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church. John has compiled a wonderfully concise history of the parish. “The gates were designed by Father Patrick O’Brien, a native son of Bay Bulls who was appointed parish priest in 1916,” John explains. “The www.downhomelife.com

story goes that in the early 1920s, Father O’Brien had two English cannons and two French cannons upended to form gate posts. These cannons had been abandoned in Bay Bulls from the English-French struggles centuries before. The two [larger] English cannons bearing the Hanoverian seal would have been part of a defence battery on the north side of the harbour, and the [smaller] French cannons would have probably been left behind by the French after burning the community.” The four saints were a gift from March 2020

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local MHA Sir Michael Cashin, a provincial cabinet minister whose responsibilities included retrieving shipwrecks (earning him the nickname “King of the Wrecks”). The saints – Peter, Paul, Patrick and Theresa – were all recovered from a ship sailing from France to Quebec that was wrecked off the Southern Shore. “Around the Bay Bulls area, folks were always very witty and loved a good pun, so Father O’Brien was often credited as the only man who ‘cannon-ized’ saints in North America,” says John, referencing the lengthy formal process by which a person becomes a Roman Catholic saint. It is based on canon law, unlike the Bay Bulls saints mounted on cannon weaponry.

closely examine the markings within the script on the cannon. The initials generally indicate the name of the ruling monarch when the cannon was made. In this case, the two main swirling letters are “G” (for George) and “R” (for Rex, the Latin word for king; also Regina for queen). If there were more than one monarch with the same name, the first one would have no number, but all subsequent

The order of the saints So how does a visitor identify the saints and the cannons? Approach from the south and stand on the shoulder of the main road directly in front of and facing the church and the gates (with the ocean roughly to your back). Moving left to right, the statue and cannon information is approximately as follows: At the far left is Saint Patrick (holding what appears to be a shamrock) atop a smaller, possibly French, cannon with few obvious markings. It is described as a cast-iron, smoothbore muzzleloading gun that may have been used to fire a 9-lb cannon ball. Next is Saint Peter (holding what appears to be two keys) atop a larger English cannon said to be an 18pounder cast-iron Blomefield smoothbore muzzleloading gun from the era of English King George III (1760-1820). One tip for identifying English cannons of that era is to very 80

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monarchs with the same name would. This cannon bears a tiny number “3” atop the “G,” indicating King George III. This particular gun also has markings on the trunnions (cannon mounts) indicating it was made by the Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland, in what is presumed to be the year 1805. Second from right is the statue of 1-888-588-6353


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Saint Paul (holding a sword and a book) atop another large English cannon said to be an 18-pounder from the era of King George III. To put a global historical framework around the age of the cannons, King George III was the British monarch famously in charge of the losing side during the American War of Independence (1775-1783). Finally, the last statue on the right is that of St. Theresa, mounted atop a smaller, possibly French, ninepounder cannon with few markings. When I visited in July 2019, this unfortunate statue was missing the head. “We are not exactly sure what happened to Saint Theresa,” says John, “but as near as we can figure, during a huge wind storm in March 2017, the statue was damaged and St. Theresa lost her head.” Despite an extensive headhunt (yes, I said it), it was not found. Fortunately there are photos of Saint Theresa (who lived 1873-1897) and numerous statues of her around the world, so her likeness www.downhomelife.com

can be accurately recreated and her head reattached once a suitable artisan is found. I could find no specific reason for Father O’Brien’s positioning of the four saints atop the bores of these former weapons of war, but then it dawned on me: a dim memory of a verse often cited at Remembrance Day ceremonies. At home, I checked bookcases and finally found it in a dusty family Bible handed down from a long-departed relative. Isaiah, Chapter 2, Verse 4: “And he shall judge among the nations, and shall rebuke many people: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.” Perhaps this idea of transforming the technologies of war into an eternally peaceful purpose was what Father O’Brien hoped for with his visually striking iron gates facing the waters of his beloved hometown. March 2020

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Abandoned with a legendary and grim past, yet today, still bursts with life Story and photos by Jenn Thornhill Verma

We stumble out of the car

at the harbourfront like dominoes, nudging one another out of our seats and slapping our heels on the pavement. We take a deep breath of the brisk sea air, gathering ourselves after a nearly 500kilometre drive north for the final leg of our journey across the water. It’s July, but we continue adding layers to our layers of clothing. The damp and cold is the small price one pays to spot an iceberg this late in the season, but the chill I’m feeling runs deeper than temperature. Today, we’re heading to an abandoned, remote island with a storied past – and I haven’t told my travel companions (my sister and our three small children) exactly what awaits. 82

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A vessel fishes for capelin in the harbour while an iceberg drifts by Quirpon Island in the summer of 2019. Past the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland is Quirpon (pronounced kar-poon) Island. It first appears on maps as Île des Démons (French for “Isle of Demons”) in the early 1500s. Those foolish enough to disembark or cross the island would risk torment by evil spirits and ferocious beasts – or so legend would have us believe. French sailors supposedly dared going ashore only when clutching crucifixes, wrote 19thcentury American author, Charles Montgomery Skinner, in his 1899 book, Myths and Legends Beyond Our Borders. Although remote, migratory fishers frequented these waters in the early to mid-1500s. Across the harbour, on the island portion of the province, is Quirpon, Newfoundland’s most northerly sheltered fishing village. Quirpon was a natural waypoint for fishing schooners travelling to Battle Harbour, Labrador. Today, there are no permanent residents in Battle Harbour or on Quirpon Island. But 84

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thanks to a restoration program in Battle Harbour and a tour company operating on Quirpon Island, visitors can step into history. Linkum Tours – a company started by Ed English of Steady Brook, NL, in 1998 – manages Quirpon Lighthouse Inn. It’s the only accommodation on the island apart from a couple of private cabins, including one owned by local author Earl Pilgrim. The Cape Bauld Light Tower, operated by the Canadian Coast Guard, stands at the headland at the northern end of the island, delineating the eastern stretch of the Strait of Belle Isle. Constructed in 1884, the lighthouse was replaced in 1960-61 and remains in service today. It was designated a Recognized Federal Heritage Building in 2007 and underwent extensive repairs in summer 2018 (the summer my family visited). The portion comprising the 10room inn includes the lightkeeper’s residence, which is a Registered Heritage Structure (built in 1922), and 1-888-588-6353


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the assistant lightkeeper’s house, built in the 1960s. (Ed tells me a new “iceberg nest” accommodation will be open in time for the 2020 season.) All the structures on the island are painted a prim and proper white with bright red trim. The buildings appear even more shipshape against the rugged terrain, a mostly muted blend

The author (left) takes a selfie with her sister and their children on Quirpon Island. of soot, sage, mustard and burnt orange colours. Approaching the north side of the island, this roughly 7-km long by 1.5-km wide landmass appears as one giant boulder, towering over the surrounding sea: the perfect perch for a lighthouse. On land, shards of quartz crystal dot and freshwater pools rest amidst the www.downhomelife.com

rocks, offering eye-pleasing glimmers of reflecting light. The same nor’easters that create perilous ocean conditions prevent trees from growing here. As a result, vegetation comes in hanging-on-for-dear-life forms: spongy mosses and lichens thrive alongside low-lying wildflowers punctuated by barren spots of jagged rock. You may be lucky enough to see a creeping perennial called alpine milkvetch (scientific name Astragalus alpinus) that flowers in white and purple. Typically found farther north in circumpolar parts, this legume is rare in Newfoundland. Because of its location along Iceberg Alley, Quirpon Island experiences the earliest and latest iceberg season. Even in mid-July, we spotted a few icebergs during the 20-minute voyage across the harbour. From Cape Bauld, just outside the lightkeeper’s residence, I saw an iceberg quietly drift by as the harbour became a frenzy of whales, seagulls and an inshore fishing vessel – all after the capelin. The annual capelin roll is a sure-fire signal that summer has officially arrived and bodes well for other groundfish like cod, which feed on capelin. Cod is the topic that transcends time here. A mid-1500s map identifying the Isola De Demoni (Italian for “Isle of Demons”) features a fishing vessel hauling nets of what one March 2020

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can only suspect was codfish. After all, it was the late 15th century when explorer John Cabot (who some believe landed here back in 1497) famously referenced these waters as teeming with cod to the extent, he surmised, one could walk across their backs on the Atlantic.

Boys, She’s Gone,” that became the anthem of a province in misery after the cod moratorium in 1992. Bartlett wrote the lyrics while overlooking this harbour and Quirpon Island – a vantage point others can appreciate today from the veranda of The Big Blow, a bed and breakfast run by

As one hikes this terrain today, it’s impossible not to think of those who roamed first. To walk here, is to pay respects with every step. Bill Lloyd, an American airforce meteorologist, recalls a fondness for cod-jigging in these parts while stationed on Quirpon Island during the Second World War. The US military had an overseas base here. In an interview for Canadian Military Biography, Lloyd recalls this was “one of the more severely isolated stations.” He was banished to the island for a minor infraction: carrying his rifle while riding his bicycle, although it didn’t help his case that he’d knocked into a higher ranking official while doing it. Lloyd describes the terrain on Quirpon Island as “unnerving,” not least because after 18 months of plotting weather information on maps, Lloyd thought he was familiar with every weather station, yet he’d never heard of Quirpon Island until stationed here. Lloyd’s account of heading to the “Jiggin” grounds, with help from locals on how to catch a cod using hook and line, was the silver lining of his stay. The history of this place is still being written, sometimes penned in lyrics. Quirpon resident Wayne Bartlett wrote a song, “She’s Gone, 86

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Bartlett and his partner, Cheryl McCarron. While The Big Blow offers luxury (check out their custom suites and bathrooms, for example), the Quirpon Lighthouse Inn offers adventure (I’ve stayed at both). Still, Quirpon Lighthouse Inn oozes charm. Its quaint rooms offer handmade quilts, for example: fabric swatches stitched into new form giving instant warmth to the space. You also won’t go hungry: baked goods, coffee, tea and juices are restocked in the kitchen daily, and meals (think pot roasts or salt-fish cakes and root vegetables) are served family-style in the lightkeeper’s residence dining room. Standing atop this island overlooking the Atlantic, the weight of history is easily felt. Besides the legendary beasts said to torment seafarers of the 16th and 17th centuries, there’s a place called Dead Sailor’s Pit (also called Dead Sailors Point), where the remains of a half-dozen sailors lie (since when is unclear). One account has the men succumbing to winter elements after a shipwreck, while another says their bodies were dumped by a passing vessel, the men 1-888-588-6353


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having died drinking bad beer. There’s also a tombstone from 1861 marking the grave of a French sea captain. That’s near the burial grounds of four children who died between 1852 and 1858, from a local Manuels family.

Then there’s the story of French noblewoman, Marguerite de la Rocque de Roberval, exiled in the mid-16th century on Quirpon Island by her uncle, the Lieutenant-Governor of New France. The uncle, infuriated and disapproving of his niece’s romantic relationship with an officer, abandoned Marguerite, her lover and maid servant on the Île des Démons. All but Marguerite died, including a www.downhomelife.com

baby Marguerite gave birth to while stranded. A rescue by some Basque fishermen serendipitously returned Marguerite to her native France. Five centuries before, Norse sailors (better known as Vikings) set up an encampment about 9 km from Cape Bauld, as part of Icelandic explorer Leif Erikson’s pursuit of Vinland (the Viking name for coastal North America). Now known as L’Anse aux Meadows, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, this is the only confirmed Viking settlement in North America. (There are sod huts on Quirpon Island that predate the Vikings by 1,000-2,000 years, but these are not confirmed Viking sites). In any case, when the Vikings arrived here, the ancestors of the Beothuk, the earliest Indigenous populations in the area, were already here. Rather than pay them respect, the Norse supposedly referred to Indigenous people as “barbarians.” This marked the beginning of centuries of settlers forcing the Beothuk inland, away from their traditional lands, food sources and ways of life, and contributing to their demise. As one hikes this terrain today, it’s impossible not to think of those who roamed first. To walk here is to pay respects with every step. Here, lives were taken and lost, spirits awakened and angered. And yet, amidst death, life somehow thrives, from the largest marine mammals to the tiniest of plants. The whole wide world has traversed here, and you can, too. March 2020

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We’re wasting no time preparing for the next Downhome Calendar, . . . and neither should you! Submit your favourite photos of scenery, activities and icons that best illustrate the down-home lifestyle. We’re looking for a variety of colourful subjects – outports, wildlife, laundry lines, historic sites, seascapes, hilltop views, and so much more – and photos from all four seasons. In addition to free calendars and a one-year subscription to Downhome for all those chosen for the calendar, one lucky winner will receive a free trip for four aboard O’Brien’s famous whale and bird boat tours!

What are you waiting for? Submit today, using one of these ways:

by mail: Downhome Calendar Contest 43 James Lane St. John’s, NL A1E 3H3 online: www.downhomelife.com/calendar Must be original photos or high quality copies. Digital photos must be at least 300 dpi, files sizes of about 1MB. We can’t accept photocopies or photos that are blurry, too dark or washed out. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope if you want your photos returned.


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food & leisure the everyday gourmet

Souped Up Miso

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the everyday gourmet By Andrea Maunder

Andrea Maunder is the owner and creative force behind Saucy & Sweet – Homemade Specialty Foods & Catering.

www.downhomelife.com

If you have enjoyed a bowl of miso soup

at a sushi restaurant but haven’t thought of using miso at home, I have a recipe that’s a great introduction for you. Miso is a delicious, versatile ingredient that’s not only a natural in soup, but also a great way add that gorgeous umami flavour in salad dressings, marinades, sauces, stews, stir-fry and more. You will be surprised at how often you’ll reach for the miso when cooking once you’ve tried it making miso soup! I love the deep savoury flavour of miso, and this soup is a big, warm bowl of comfort. It’s particularly lovely to me this time of year, when I am yearning for spring. Miso is a fermented paste made from soybeans, rice, usually some kind of grain (wheat or barley), salt and koji, which is a kind of fungus that aids the fermentation (used to make sake rice wine and soy sauce, too). As a fermented food, it’s great for gut health. There are several types of miso. All miso has a salty, savoury flavour. White miso, which is called shira or sweet miso, is actually a yellowy-beige colour; it’s the mildest and a little nutty. Red miso, called aka miso, is a brownish colour and can be a little chunky; it is deepest in flavour, more toasty and earthy. Awase miso is a combination of the two. I prefer white or Awase miso, but if all I could find was red miso, I would make the soup anyway but just use 9 tbsp, or to taste. You’ll definitely find miso paste at Asian grocery stores, but you’ll very likely find it in the imported or organic food section of any supermarket. It’s stocked regularly at the Coleman’s and Dominion stores close to me in St. John’s. Miso paste is added closer to the end of the cooking – it’s best not to bring it to a strong boil because it separates. Miso soup is classically made with Dashi, a stock made from seaweed (wakame) and bonito (shaved smoked dried tuna). But those

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ingredients may be a little hard for you to find, and you will likely not find as many uses for them in your everyday cooking, so I have left them out of this recipe and added other flavour notes. Another ingredient you’ll need is nori – toasted 7-inch square flat sheets of seaweed that are used to wrap sushi and are delicious on their own for snacking. You’ll find these where you buy the miso paste. I have seen snacking nori at Costco, in little serving packs of 2"x3" sheets. Either is fine, because you’ll be snipping it into thin slivers with scissors to garnish the miso. Edamame are steamed fresh soybeans. In the shell, they look like large green beans and out of the shell, like small lima beans. They have a gorgeous bright colour and delicious flavour, and are packed with protein. You can get them in the frozen section of the supermarket. For this recipe, I used the already-

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shelled edamame. If you can’t find them, either leave them out or substitute tinned or frozen small lima beans or green peas. And a word on tofu. I like medium firm tofu for this because it holds shape better but still has a silky texture. If all you can find is soft or firm, go with the soft and add it toward the end of the cooking time. Traditional miso has a few simple additions: tofu, nori and a few green onions. I have created a heartier soup, perfect for the cold weather, that is a meal in itself. You can add your favourite veggies or other proteins; sliced mushrooms and shredded carrots are nice. And you can use water or stock made from vegetables, chicken, beef or seafood, as you prefer. I use water because the miso and other ingredients already provide so much flavour. I love udon noodles – those fat, kinda chewy wheat noodles – so I have added them to my soup

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recipe. You’ll need to soak them in boiling water in advance and then add them to the bowls of soup as you serve (rather than letting them soak up all your stock if added to the pot). But you can use any noodle you have, just precook them. I also used those tiny, fresh red Thai chili peppers

(also called bird chilis), but you can use jalapeño or other fresh chili, as you like, or dried chili flakes – or omit them all if you don’t like the heat. This recipe is medium spicy as is. You can always pass the hot sauce around the table and let those who like it spicy add their own kick.

Hearty Miso Soup 6 generous servings 3 L water or stock of choice 5 fresh thai chili peppers, thinly sliced (or 1 jalapeño, diced, or 1/2 tsp dried chili flakes) 6 tbsp finely sliced ginger 2 tbsp chopped garlic 1/4 tsp salt 1 medium sweet potato, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch dice 1 red pepper, diced 1/2 lb snow or snap peas, sliced on the diagonal (about 1 1/2 cups sliced) 2 cups thinly sliced Chinese cabbage 2 cups frozen shelled edamame beans

12 tbsp yellow miso, more or less, to your taste 1 lb medium-firm tofu, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1 lb raw med.-sized shrimp (not jumbo), shelled – optional 4 green onions, sliced thinly on the diagonal 1 lb precooked/presoaked udon or rice noodles – optional 1/2 cup nori, cut into thin strips

Snip the nori with scissors into thin strips, about 1/6" wide by 1 1/2" long and set aside. If serving with noodles, prep them according to package directions and set them aside to keep warm. In a large pot, combine the water, chilis, ginger, garlic and salt; bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato and let it come back to the boil; this gives the sweet potato a head start to cook. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and add red pepper, peas, cabbage and edamame beans. Simmer a few minutes until veggies are just beginning to get tender, then add the miso. Simmer a minute or two, then taste. Add more miso if the flavour is not strong enough for you, or more water if too salty. Slide in the tofu and shrimp, and raise heat to medium to warm them through. Taste again and adjust seasonings if necessary. Add green onions and ladle immediately over the noodles in warmed bowls. Garnish with a sprinkling of nori strips and serve.

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everyday recipes.ca

This being the month of St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, and when there is a Craft Beer Festival on the west and east coasts of Newfoundland, it’s the perfect time to try your hand at cooking with beer. You’ll be amazed at the results!

Cheesy Beer Dip/Spread 1 1/4 tsp dry chives 1 1/4 tsp dry parsley 1 1/4 tsp dry dill weed 3/4 tsp garlic powder 3/4 tsp onion powder 1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp black pepper 1 lb cream cheese 3/4 cup beer 1 1/2 cups cheddar, grated 1/2 cup Parmesan, grated

Mix everything together in a mixer using a paddle attachment until it’s thoroughly combined. Chill for at least an hour before serving to allow the flavours to fully meld. Serve at room temperature for a dip, or chilled for a spread. Yield: approx. 3 cups

All of our recipes are brought to you by the fantastic foodies in Academy Canada’s Culinary Arts program, led by instructor Bernie-Ann Ezekiel.

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Light Rye Bread (30% rye) 1 lb whole rye flour 2 lbs all-purpose flour 3/4 cup white sugar 1 tbsp instant yeast 2 tbsp salt

6 oz lard 1 tbsp caraway seeds, toasted and cooled 2 cans beer, room temperature 1/4 cup warm water (if needed)

In a mixer fitted with a dough hook, add the flours, sugar, yeast, salt and lard. Allow it to mix on the low setting until the lard is broken up and looks like coarse cornmeal. Stir in caraway seeds. With the mixer running, pour in the beer all at once. Allow the dough to come together fully, and only add the water if it appears dry and crumbly. If the dough has come away clean from the sides of the bowl, is only a little tacky and not sticky, it’s ready. Place in a warm area, and allow it to proof until double in size (this may take up to a couple of hours depending on the temperature of your house). Punch down the dough and divide into two equal pieces. Form them into oval loaves and place on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Cover and place in a warm area to rise again. It should be nearly doubled in size (again, it might take a couple of hours depending on your room temperature). Preheat oven to 350°F. Slash the tops of the loaves about 1/2" deep with a sharp paring knife before placing loaves in the oven to bake for 3545 minutes. When you remove them from the oven, flip one over and knock on the bottom. If it sounds hollow, it’s likely cooked through. This bread goes great with soup or stew, or our Cheesy Beer Dip (see first recipe). Yield: 2 loaves

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Mussels For Two 2 lbs mussels, washed and debearded 2 tbsp butter 1 cup leeks, sliced 1 tbsp fresh garlic, minced

3/4 tsp chili flakes 1 can beer 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp black pepper

In a large saucepan, melt butter over high heat; add leeks, garlic and chili flakes. When leeks start to sizzle, add the mussels; cover and shake the pan to mix everything up. When you hear the pan start to sizzle again, pour in the beer and add the salt and pepper. Cover and shake the pan to ensure the mussels are all making contact with the liquid. Allow them to cook undisturbed for about a minute. Shake again. Repeat this for about 5-7 minutes, or until the mussels have fully opened. Place the mussels in a serving dish and pour the pot liquor over the top. Serve hot. Yield: 2 servings

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Apple Fritters 4 Granny Smith apples (peeled, cored, sliced into 1/4"-1/2" rings) 1 can beer 1 egg yolk 1/3 cup brown sugar 2 cups flour

1/4 tsp baking powder 1/4 tsp baking soda 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp cardamom 1 egg white, whipped to soft peaks

Preheat the deep fryer to 350°F. Whisk beer, egg yolk and sugar together, and set aside. Sift dry ingredients together. Dredge all apple rings in the dry mixture, shake off excess and set aside on a rack. Add the beer mixture to the dry ingredients, and whisk to combine. Using a rubber spatula, fold in the egg white until it’s evenly mixed, but still a little airy. Using a fork/skewer, dip the apple rings in the batter, turning them over a few times to ensure they are thoroughly covered. Let the excess drip off and slowly dip them in the hot fat halfway. Once the batter starts to bubble, let them fall in entirely. Cook for 3-5 minutes on each side (deep golden is the colour you’re looking for). Remove and set on a rack or brown paper to drain. Dust with icing sugar and serve warm. Yield: 4 servings

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Battered Chicken 4 chicken breasts, cut into strips and dredged in flour 1 can beer 1 egg 1 cup flour 1/2 cup cornmeal

1/4 cup cornstarch 1 tsp salt 1/2 tsp garlic powder 1/2 tsp pepper 1/2 tsp chili flakes

Preheat the deep fryer to 350°F. Whisk dry ingredients together. In a separate bowl, whisk beer and egg together, then add it to the dry mixture. Dip the coated chicken strips in the batter and turn them over a few times to ensure they are thoroughly covered. Let the excess drip off and slowly dip them in the fat halfway. Once the batter starts to bubble, let them fall in entirely. Cook for about 7-8 minutes, turning them often to promote even browning (deep golden is the colour you’re looking for). Check to ensure the internal temperature of the meat is at least 165°F. Remove and allow to drain on a rack. Serve hot with your favourite condiments. Yield: 4 servings

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Stout Cake 3/4 cup butter 1/4 cup cream cheese 1 cup icing sugar, sifted 3/4 cup demerara sugar 3/4 cup sour cream, full fat 1 tbsp pure vanilla

2 eggs 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 2/3 cup dark cocoa powder, sifted 2 1/2 tsp baking soda 1 (440ml) can stout

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour an 8"-10" round cake pan. Cream butter and cheese together using the paddle attachment. Add both sugars and cream until smooth, scraping the bowl often. Add eggs, sour cream and vanilla; mix, scraping the bowl as necessary to ensure a very smooth mixture. Sift flour, cocoa and baking soda together; add to the mixer. Once the mixture is smooth, gradually add the beer, scraping the bowl to make sure it all mixes evenly. Pour mixture into prepared pan and bake for about 40 minutes (be sure to check for doneness with a cake tester before removing it from the oven). Allow to cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool entirely. Top with your favourite frosting. Yield: 1 cake

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Beer Poached Cod 4 pieces cod fish 2 cans beer 1 2/3 cups vegetable stock 2 tbsp carrot, minced 2 tbsp celery, minced 1/4 cup shallots, minced

1 1 1 1 1

bay leaf lime, sliced tsp peppercorns, cracked 1/2 tsp kosher salt tsp fresh garlic, minced

Place all ingredients, except cod, in a pan or pot that will allow the liquid to sit at about 1 1/2" deep. Bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and place the cod in the liquid. Allow it to simmer for about 5 minutes on each side (or adjust the timing to your preference for doneness). Serve hot with some of the veggies on top. Yield: 2 servings

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Beef Stew 3 lbs beef, medium dice 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 cup carrot, medium dice 1 cup celery, medium dice 2 cups onion, medium dice 1/4 cup fresh garlic, minced 1 bay leaf

1 tsp dry rosemary 2 tsp dry thyme 1/4 cup flour 2 cups canned, diced tomatoes 2-3 cups beef stock 1 can beer

Heat the oil in a braiser over medium-high heat. Brown the meat in stages, so as not to overfill and cool down the pan. Return all meat to the pan and add the carrot, celery and onion. Reduce the heat to medium and sweat the veggies until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and herbs. Cook for about 1 minute. Add the flour and stir to fully combine. Add the tomatoes and mix well. Add 2 cups of stock and 1 can of beer gradually, while stirring to avoid lumps. Simmer gently over low heat (about an hour) until the liquid has reduced to a gravy-like consistency. If too thick, stir in up to 1 cup more of stock. Be sure to stir as often as necessary to avoid the bottom sticking. Remove bay leaf and serve hot with bread and roasted potatoes. Yield: 4 servings

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food and leisure Todd’s table

Storm oup S Todd’s Table By Todd Goodyear

When he’s not dreaming up or cooking up great food, Todd Goodyear is president and associate publisher of Downhome. 102

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Between Christmas Eve and January 16, 2020, 170 cm of snow fell on the Northeast Avalon. And then, we were walloped with 93 cm in Paradise on January 17 in that #Snowmageddon followed by another 18 cm for good measure a couple days later. Add in a week-long state of emergency and this January was quite the month to remember. So what do you do when you are stuck inside, mostly, for days on end? First you clear the snow. Once you get your own driveway done, you go help the neighbours. On my cul de sac, the spirit of helping each other was very much alive and well. I met people for the first time from nearby streets, as we all came together and cleaned up the driveways and walkways while waiting for the plow to open the street. 1-888-588-6353


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Of course, all that work and comradery eventually turned into a gathering in the closest shed – the heat, the football game, a few tunes and an induction cooktop might have had something to do with it as well. What a time we had! Slow cooked rabbit in the shed with friends, old and new, after a full day of snow clean up is also something about this storm that will not soon be forgotten. You know what else is really good on storm days? Soup. There is just something soothing about soup. It gets right down deep inside your gut and makes you feel warm all over, regardless of the weather. I made this pot of “storm soup” on the very day of the record breaking blizzard.

I love cooking beef barley soup. It’s a staple – very tasty, hearty and easy to make. I was out early the morning of the storm to buy batteries for flashlights, so I popped into a grocery store before they shut it down to grab a few things I needed for soup. They were all out of stewing beef, so I bought the cheapest roast they had and cut it in cubes myself. I also found a roast of moose in my freezer. It was vacuum sealed, so I just put it in a bowl in the sink and ran cold water continuously over it while I got everything else prepared. Here’s what you will need for my storm soup (feel free to play with ingredients and seasonings to suit your taste).

Storm Soup 1 small piece of salt beef 1 – 1 1/2 lbs stewing beef (or a small roast, cubed) 1 small roast of moose 3 tbsp olive oil 1 med turnip 3 – 4 carrots 4 – 5 celery sticks (adjust for your taste) 2 medium to large onions several garlic cloves, crushed and minced

2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 1 tsp soy sauce 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp steak spice salt and pepper to taste (always coarse kosher salt and fresh ground pepper in my kitchen) 8 or so cups beef broth 1 lg can diced or stewed tomatoes 3/4 cup barley

Start by cutting the salt beef into really small pieces and slow boiling it in a small saucepan for about 30 minutes. Remove from heat and set it aside; do not drain off that delicious salty water. This will help flavour your soup. 1-888-588-6353

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Peel and cube the turnip and carrots in a bowl with enough water to cover them. Chop the onion and celery, and set aside. Cube up the moose and beef in 1 – 1 1/2-inch pieces and toss into a bowl with Worcestershire sauce and soy sauce. Season the meat with paprika, steak spice, salt and pepper, and half the garlic cloves. Make sure you toss the meat to cover it all over with the flavourings. Arrange meat on a cooking sheet and roast in a 425°F oven for 30 min. or until nice and browned. Remove from oven and set aside. While the meat is roasting, heat up the soup pot and add the olive oil. A minute later, add the remaining garlic, and onion and celery. Cook for 10 minutes. Drain carrots and turnip, and add veggies to the pot. Cook and stir often on medium-high heat. Take the meat out of the oven and add to the pot, with all the juices (this will add rich flavour). Add the salt meat and the water it was boiled in, and stir everything together. Add enough beef broth and water to cover at least a couple inches over the top of the ingredients. Bring to a boil, then turn the pot back to low; cover and simmer. After about 45 minutes, add the tomatoes and barley. Cook until vegetables and barley are tender. I always bottle some soup while it’s hot and keep the leftovers in the fridge to get me through the week. It makes a great appetizer or a quick snack when you’re on the run. 104

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food & leisure down to earth

Growing Gracefully into the Golden Years By Kim Thistle

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about ageing; specifically, how I want to age and where I want to be in my “golden years.” I know one thing: gardening has been a major part of my life in both my leisure time and my work, and I cannot imagine a life without it. I have two elderly parents who no longer live in their own home and gardening, their passion, is no longer an option for them. So I find myself thinking about seniors homes, hospitals and other institutions and what I see as being ideal – the link between lifestyle and necessity. It has long been known that gardening is a healthy activity that increases longevity. Its moderate physical activity keeps the body young and reduces stress, which in turn helps reduce blood pressure and anxiety. Gardening helps to build and maintain strength, flexibility and endurance. It provides a connection to nature that improves one’s mental health. Some studies have shown that people suffering from dementia benefit from this sort of therapy, and it helps to ease their discomfort. So, let’s create institutions that encourage the enjoyment of the outdoors and living things. Sit for a few moments and think about what lifestyle you would desire if you were institutionalized for any reason. Perhaps you’ve downsized from your life-long home to a seniors apartment or cottage. Perhaps you are in protective care with dementia or in long-term care with mobility issues. What would make this experience tolerable or even pleasurable? I would like to share my vision with you. If mobility were an issue, I envision a sunroom with a view. It would be a quiet, peaceful place filled with lush plants, a few old cats and a therapy dog… cats can’t be labelled. There would be cages with songbirds to soothe the soul. When I look out my imaginary window, I see trees and beautiful gardens. In those trees, I see bird feeders and bird houses, and I imagine watching a family of swallows swoop in and out of the birdhouse with food

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for their young. Perhaps I would be lucky enough to be watching when the first young’un peeps its head out, looks down and quickly darts back inside when it realizes there is no zipline. I would be able to see the changing of the seasons: pussy willows in the spring, the hawthorn blooms of summer, the autumn colours and the quiet of winter. I would want to have a greenhouse that could accommodate my walker or wheelchair; a place where I could go to plant or tend some flowers and vegetables. This greenhouse would have wide aisles and smooth surfaces for getting around. There would be

Tools for Easier Gardening • Lightweight hand tools with a cushioned, moulded grip • Hand tools with telescopic handles for reaching to the back of a bed • Padded garden kneeler • Rolling garden cart with a space for tools • Pruners with a rotating handle • Raised garden bed • Wagon with a dump cart benches to accommodate wheelchairs or at a good height for young children so that service groups like Guides or Scouts could spend some time here learning the skills that I have accumulated over my lifetime. There would be benches with grab bars, so that if I am unsteady on my feet, I could still spend unsupervised time puttering. There would be easy108

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grip, ergonomically designed tools for my arthritic hands. All the tools would be brightly coloured to prevent losing them in the bushes. Uncluttered, accessible hoses would be strung overhead with easy shutoff wands. There would be potting benches with all of a grower’s needs: soil, pots, seed and fertilizer. I see a sitting area with an overhanging vine to shade me from the heat of the summer sun. If mobile, I want to access the outdoors on my own schedule. I envision gardens and trees, raised beds for flowers and vegetables, and a fenced area in case I am a flight risk (which I probably will be). The doors between me and these gardens would be unlocked so that I could enjoy them at my leisure. Wide pathways would be constructed from non-slip material. I envision comfortable benches under huge shade trees, and a well-stocked tool shed nearby. There would be plants for all my senses: fragrant plants like lavender and peonies, so that I could still enjoy them if my vision were impaired, and plants that rustle in the wind so I could hear them if I couldn’t see them. For my sense of taste, there would definitely be fruit bushes and trees, and raised beds for vegetables and herbs. Not only would it give me pleasure to tend to them, but it would also provide fresh food for the dining room or cafeteria. Imagine having healthy, nutritious meals with a plate at least half-filled with vegetables that I helped to grow... oh, and fresh strawberries for dessert. I would be a member of the gardening club so that there would be some organization and consensus 1-888-588-6353


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Plants to Please the Senses Scented Plants

Lilac

Creeping Thyme

Honeysuckle

Sweet Pea

Edible Plants

Nasturtium

(leaf, flower and seed)

Lemon Gem Marigolds Herbs such as thyme, (petals are the tastiest) sage and lavender

Pansy

Rustling Plants for Pleasing Sounds

Grasses

Silver Dollar Plant

Oak and Beech trees (keep leaves in winter)

Aspen Trees

(Note: can be invasive)

Plants with a nice touch

Lamb’s Ears

Globe Thistle

Pussy Willow Trees

Bunny Tail Grass

Beautiful Plants

Echinacea

Sunflowers

by the residents. If I were able to plant my seeds and watch them grow, it would give me a reason to get up in the morning. I don’t want to leave paradise and live in a parking lot. Life is too precious to be caged by windows and doors. www.downhomelife.com

Clematis

Burning Bush Kim Thistle owns a garden centre and landscaping business on the west coast of the island. She has also been a recurring guest gardener on CBC’s “Crosstalk” for almost three decades. March 2020

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food & leisure

In 2020,

Newfoundland and Labrador will join many places worldwide that are rejecting certain single-use plastics. On July 1, a province-wide ban on plastic shopping bags will come into effect. With that in mind, here are some ideas that will make going to the shops a little easier as we transition into a greener future.

Purse or backpack

If you only need a couple of items, toss them into your backpack or purse. (But make sure you use a store-provided basket until you reach the checkout, so no one thinks you’re shoplifting!)

Buy in bulk

Many products you use every day are available for purchase in bulk, such as flour, sugar, tea, coffee, nuts and candy. Did you know that many nonconsumables, such as shampoo, laundry detergent and soap, can also be purchased locally in bulk? This saves on a lot of packaging. Most bulk retailers allow customers to bring their own containers for their 110

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purchases. You can use items you already have at home, such as sandwich containers, leftover margarine tubs or empty jam jars.

Cardboard boxes

Do you remember the days of going to Costco and having your purchases packaged in leftover shipping boxes? Let’s bring back that concept! Next time you buy a case of pop, or order something online, keep the box for your groceries. You’d be surprised 1-888-588-6353


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how much you can fit in a box, and you can use it over and over until it falls apart – and then recycle it with other paper products.

Folding shopping cart

Have you ever finished loading your groceries into the car in the pouring rain or freezing cold, then had to dart across the parking lot, dodging traffic, to return your shopping cart? What if you could just pack up your cart and stick it in the trunk with your groceries? Collapsible shopping carts fold up for easy storage in your vehicle and at home. They’re just as easy to tow along if you walk to and from your neighbourhood store.

Mesh produce bags

Often when we shop for fruit and vegetables, we automatically reach for those thin plastic bags that grocery stores provide to keep items together. Nowadays, more people are ditching those bags and purchasing loose produce. If you do need a bag for something, such as grapes, you can buy reusable mesh bags instead. Some grocery stores stock them in the fresh produce section.

Reusable shopping bags

In the last decade, many people made the switch to reusable bags made from cloth or recycled materials for their store purchases. Most stores offer some form of reusable bags, for free or for a small fee. Some sell the bags as a way of fundraising for charity. If you haven’t already, start building your own collection by saying “yes” to reusable bags. Here’s the key – keep your bags in your vehicle so you won’t forget to bring them to the store.

Our Wackier Shopping Ideas

In January, Thailand banned major retailers from offering plastic bags to customers, and by 2021, they will be phased out of society entirely. The internet got a giggle in the aftermath of the new ban as photos surfaced online of customers using silly items to hold their groceries, like wheelbarrows, vases or empty rice bags. Here are our suggestions for items we could use in Newfoundland and Labrador instead of a bag:

• A salt beef bucket – good for more than just slush • A suitcase – pack up your essentials for a trip around the bay • A fishing net – for the big haul • A laundry basket – because for some, shopping is a chore • Rubber boots and a sou’wester – you knows they’re in the trunk anyway

• Your garbage bin – but you might want to hose it down first! www.downhomelife.com

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reminiscing flashbacks

Glynmill Inn c.1924 The submitter identifies the woman in the white dress on the left as Mrs. Martha Herdman, wife of Bill Herdman. The submitter’s father, R.C. Hinds, and A.W. Bentley are at the top right. The other men in the photo are Bowater executives. The submitter suggests the man at the top left is Mr. B. Evans; the little girl with the bow in her hair she believes to be Doris Herdman Cross. Can anyone identify others in this photo? If so, please contact Downhome. Betty Hinds Van Wijlen, Beaconsfield, QC

Earning Her Keep The submitter quips that she “earned her keep” as a four-year-old in 1987, by helping out in the kitchen. In this photo, she is punching dough, getting ready to bake bread. Candice Gaudon, NL 112

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A Girl and Her Pony “This is a picture of my mother when she was about 17 (about 1946) with her special Newfoundland pony, Nell,” the submitter writes. “My mother said that they never worked their pony very hard and that she was more of a pet. She said she loved Nell and the pony loved her back, especially when she fed her lassy bread. My mother is Ida Davis (nee House) from Port Saunders [NL].” Linda S. Smith Innisfil, ON

This Month in History On March 8, 1902, 3,000 sealers in St. John’s left their ships to march on Government House. The strike was set off by a rumour that sealers’ wages were being reduced from $3.40 per quintal (112 lbs) of seal to $2.40. Sealers were also frustrated about the $3 “coaling fee” they had to pay to cover the cost of their ships’ coal and other supplies. The sealers retained A.B. Morine, a lawyer and future politician, to negotiate with the ships’ owners on their behalf. They initially demanded $5 per quintal and the elimination of the coaling fee, but later reduced their ask to $4. After several days of negotiations, the majority of sealers voted to accept a counter offer from the ships’ owners of $3.50 per quintal with the elimination of the coaling fee. The strike, then unprecedented in the fishing industry, ended on March 11, and it laid the grounds for the formation of the Fishermen’s Protective Union later that decade. 1-888-588-6353

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ON MARCH 11, we commemorate an event that happened 105 years ago. We remember how the claws of destiny would place three vessels in dangerously close proximity. The German submarine U-27 would determine the outcome of the two British vessels when it encountered the ships off the coast of Scotland. Families from the Southwest Arm region of Newfoundland would be drawn forever into this story by the outcome at the setting of the sun on that tragic day. Future generations would gather around their kitchen tables and recall the story of this encounter with German submarine U-27.

THE OPPOSING SHIPS

Many Newfoundland Royal Naval Reservists were deployed overseas in the early stages of the First World War. Upon arrival overseas, these young men were assigned to an armed merchant cruiser (AMC). The vessels were used to form blockades against trade to and from Germany. The AMC used signalling to request the merchant ships to stop for inspection. A landing party would be dispatched and board the ship to inspect the cargo. If contraband was found, the ship was seized in the name of the King. The crew would later receive a share in the form of “prize money.� This blockading by the navy was initially known as the Northern Patrol, but during the war it was more commonly referred to as the 10th Cruiser Squadron. The Bayano, a merchant ship launched in 1913, was owned and operated by the company Elders and Fyffes. She was requisitioned and assigned to 10th Cruiser Squadron by the British Admiralty, and became known as HMS Bayano. Crew on deck of German U-27. Source http://www.kuk-kriegsmarine.at 1-888-588-6353

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The Ambrose, built in 1903, was owned and operated by the Booth Line company. The ship was also requisitioned, then commissioned as HMS Ambrose and assigned to the 10th Cruiser Squadron. On May 8, 1914, the Imperial German Navy commissioned the construction of a submarine known as SM U-27. The crew consisted of four officers and 31 sailors under the command of Kapitänleutnant Bernd Wegener. Over the course of the war, U-27 was responsible for sinking 10 merchant ships and two destroyers.

Fates intertwined

Seaman Simeon Whalen

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Among those serving aboard the Bayano was Simeon Whalen. He was born at Caplin Cove, NL, on December 3, 1890, to William Thomas and Martha Mary Whalen. He enlisted on January 2, 1914, with the Newfoundland Royal Naval Reserve. On November 14, 1914, he was deployed overseas and assigned to HMS Excellent, a shore based accommodation, for further training. After 30 days training he got his transfer orders to HMS Bayano. Another Royal Navy seaman from the Southwest Arm area of Newfoundland, Caleb Cooper of Queen’s Cove, was serving aboard HMS Ambrose. He’d enlisted with the Royal Navy in February 1912, at the age of 18. In November 1914, he was deployed overseas and transported to England. He received further training at HMS Vivid, Devonport, England. On December 9, 1914, he was transferred to HMS Ambrose, where he joined two other sailors from the Southwest Arm area. Seaman Josiah Avery, the oldest son of 1-888-588-6353


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William and Myria Avery of Fox Harbour, first enlisted with the Newfoundland Royal Naval Reserve in the spring of 1913. He was recalled to St. John’s at the outbreak of the war and, after training, was sent went overseas on the SS Franconia. He was sent to a Seamanship, Signaling and Telegraphy school at HMS Vivid before being assigned to HMS Ambrose on December 9, 1914. Josiah’s first cousin, Seaman Joseph Edward Smith, was also aboard the Ambrose. The son of Thomas and Mary Ann Smith, he also grew up in Fox Harbour, known today as Southport. Seaman Smith initially enlisted with the Royal Naval Reserve in January 1913 and was ordered to report to HMS Calypso on August 4, 1914. He travelled overseas aboard the SS Franconia in November 1914, along with 33 other seamen from the Southwest Arm area. He was assigned to HMS Vivid at Devonport for further training and then assigned to HMS Ambrose.

Seaman Joseph Edward Smith

Tragedy Awaited

Early on the morning of March 11, 1915, the Bayano was transferring coal from Glasgow to Liverpool, England when it was sighted by the German submarine U-27 off Corsewall Point, Galloway, Scotland. Kapitänleutnant Wegener placed HMS Bayano in the crosshairs of the periscope and gave the order to release U-27’s torpedoes. The torpedoes laid a direct hit on the Bayano. Most of the 220 sailors aboard were asleep and had no warning and no chance to escape. Within minutes the Bayano took 194 of its crew to a watery grave. Among the 1-888-588-6353

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list of sailors lost to the sea was Seaman Simeon Whalen. The destruction caused by U-27 was not yet completed that day because its periscope was soon focused on a new target: HMS Ambrose. The Royal Navy Log Books for HMS Ambrose, published on the Naval History website (www.navalhistory.net), contain a vivid description of the ship’s encounter with U-27. From the log: 1:20 p.m.: Attacked by submarine, torpedo missed bow by 20 yards. Hands to General Quarters. Opened fire at the periscope astern. 1:30 p.m.: Increased to 91 revolutions. 2:05 p.m.: Attacked by another submarine, torpedo passed astern, opened fire on Port quarter. 2:22 p.m.: Attacked by another submarine on Port quarter, opened fire, suspected to have sunk her. The crew of the Ambrose believed that U-27 was sunk because no further attacks were made on their ship. Records would later reveal that U-27 was not finished, but continued to cause havoc for other merchant ships for months. Later Seaman Smith, Seaman Avery and Seaman Cooper would learn about the fate of HMS Bayano and their fallen friend, Seaman Simeon Whalen. On August 19, 1915, U-27 was finally sunk when the decoy ship, HMS Baralong, encountered the submarine on the surface and sprayed it with gunfire. Kapitänleutnant Bernd Wegener and his entire crew were killed. 118

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The October 2019 sunset

bleeds flaming orange droplets down the clifftop landmarks of the Scrapes, the Roost and the Carrick before disappearing into the shaded crevasse of Crow’s Gulch and the still darker abyss of a clock-calm Colliers Harbour in eastern Newfoundland and Labrador. It is an ethereal evening on the Atlantic Ocean as my father, Tony Flynn, and I take a stroll past a particular tree known to locals as “Paddy Burke’s Tree.”

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“Paddy would have enjoyed a day like this,” says my father. “He had a great encounter with a spirit up by the Broad of the Brook that happened coming on what the old people used to call ‘duckish,’ meaning just around this time, near dusk but not quite pitch black yet.” A statement like that can’t be left to hang, so after some gentle prompting to tell the whole story, my dad relents with a smile. “Well, if you are not going to let me away from it, I suppose I don’t have much choice. I can’t tell it like Paddy, but then again he lived through it and I didn’t have to, thanks be to God, so he’d naturally be a better hand at his own story then I would.” Paddy Burke was a famous storyteller in the Colliers area. As my father recalls, “He was so good, with this very deep voice, like he was talking from the bottom of a barrel. Folks would have him do recitations at house parties or even a concert and you could hear a pin drop. Aside from that, though, Paddy was always a big man and wasn’t the type of fellow to scare easy or ever make stuff up. He had this calm way about him, and when he was being serious Paddy would just tell you the truth of whatever he saw firsthand. It was up to you to believe it or not, but he certainly did.” Tony starts in with a laugh, “This particular incident involving Paddy Burke happened sometime during the Great Depression [1929-1941], when all folks were picking berries just to make a few cents to help stay alive. Of course, there wasn’t much money at it, and I remember my own mother telling me that blueberries 120

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used to be 10 cents a gallon and they would walk miles back in the country to get them, pick all day and carry them out. The only other thing for the poorest people was the government relief, or the dole they used to call it, which was six cents per head, per day.” Continuing, he says, “Paddy was a young man at the time, and his family would go into Mahers Siding – where the train used to stop on the old Newfoundland Railway – and they had a temporary camp up there so his mother and father could stay and pick berries all week without having to walk home each day.” Most Saturdays, Paddy would trek back to Colliers to check on the house and get more supplies for the coming week. He might take in a Saturday night dance, and then head back out to the country on Sunday morning. So on this particular Sunday, he left around 10 a.m. from Burkes Cove, near the very bottom of Colliers, carrying the supplies. “He decided on taking a shortcut through Conception Harbour, passing in by the Pinch and up to Witch Hazel Ridge near a spot of water people called the Broad of the Brook. There was a big windfall tree, maybe a foot or so in diameter, across the dirt road on an angle. The main part of the path was blocked, but there was still enough room for a horse and cart to squeak by if they went out on the shoulder near where the river flowed fast between two large ponds,” my father tells. At this point, Paddy was getting pretty tired and it was getting on duckish, so he decided to take a little rest. He sat on a rock by the windfall, 1-888-588-6353


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When Paddy came completely to his senses, the mysterious man disappeared in a flash. “Paddy could vividly remember what the man looked like and the mean scowl on his face, but where he went or how he got away so quickly, Paddy couldn’t say.”

lit a cigarette and closed his eyes. He must have dozed off for a just few seconds – the burning cigarette was still between his fingers and very little ash had fallen off – when he got a rude awakening. Tony continues, “All of a sudden this fellow popped up and had incredibly strong hands on Paddy’s throat and was choking the life out of him. What it was or where it came from, Paddy didn’t see and had no idea. Paddy said he was asleep, but when he came to not being able to breathe, this man was on top of him strangling him. That was a fine how do you do, now wasn’t it?” When Paddy came completely to his senses, the mysterious man disappeared in a flash. “Paddy could vividly remember what the man looked like and the mean scowl on his face, but where he went or how he got away so quickly, Paddy couldn’t say,” says Tony. Paddy wasted no time gathering up his stuff and getting back on the trail. 1-888-588-6353

Paddy eventually got to the berry camp in the woods and relayed what happened to his family. They told him he wasn’t the first to encounter this spirit. That spot was known to be haunted by the ghost of a man named Cole who had fallen in the river there and drowned many years before. Tony adds, “Maybe because he died in such a shocking and violent way the ghost was trying to take someone else with him. Of course, whatever the creature was could just as easily have been giving a hard and fast warning with the strangling for travellers to watch themselves in a deceptively peaceful, but dangerous area. Paddy was a practical man about these things so, after a spell taking other longer routes perhaps, he did go back to travelling that way, and as far as I know he never ever ran into anything strange there again. Of course, for Paddy – and for anybody at all – once was enough to run into the Spirit at the Broad of the Brook.” March 2020

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reminiscing

The Light of Dark Shadows The tale of the Government House forger by Chad Bennett

“Be it known that I, Alexander Pindikowsky, a citizen of the United States, residing at 63 South Lambeth Road, London, S.W., England, have invented a certain new and useful process for the production of stencils of wire-netting, of which the following is a specification...” This was an application for a patent filed in 1911 in England, filed by a man thought to have died in the United States years earlier.

A passenger ship docked at one of the many wooden finger piers clawing the pinched oval of St. John’s Harbour one night in 1879. A stranger emerged, his shoes touching Newfoundland soil for the first time. This 122

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mysterious figure touched Newfoundland’s character, and his hand can be seen to this very day. To live this tale, we must press our toes into the worn coarse leather and wear the shoes of Alexander Pindikowsky. 1-888-588-6353


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Am I young, old, middle age? I won’t correct you if you say I’m young, and I’m not likely to hear you if you say I’m old. Through Alexander’s Eyes

Hello, my name is Alexander, and I will tell you my tale if you will hear it. I suppose you’d like me to begin with my childhood, the small traumas and triumphs that have led me here? I’ll do nothing of the sort. I’ll tell you I’m originally from Poland. That’s all you’ll get of my past. This is the New World and this is where I began, as I strolled down Water Street with the smell of the sea, pine and woodsmoke in my nose, and the sounds of horses, carts and the many different tongues working the exchange of life. This was where I began. What? Am I not who you expected? Well, go on then, have a good look and tell me what you see? A bedroll on my shoulder; a valise in my hand; a tin pot, pan and basin tucked about various bundles; and, of course, instead of a pocket square I have a knife, spoon and fork sticking up from my pocket. I’m wearing the uniform of a transatlantic steerage passenger, complete with threadbare suit and hat. Something I’ll swiftly be getting rid of. Am I young, old, middle age? I 1-888-588-6353

won’t correct you if you say I’m young, and I’m not likely to hear you if you say I’m old. One thing you have a lot of in steerage is time to talk. All my fellow passengers would talk incessantly and, invariably, when my turn came they all wanted to know if I were running to or from something. To save time I’ll give you the same answer I gave them: there is absolutely no difference. I held in my long, precise fingers a bit of magic. It certainly deserved theatrics and a savouring air. This, mark you, was all that mattered. A letter of employment from the Anglo-American Telegraph Company. I was to be employed as an artist, to give art instruction to their employees, wives and children. You know, the beautiful thing about letters is that you can’t argue with them; they just keep saying the same thing. This letter said that I was an artist and a fresco painter, so that’s what I was... Now landed, I needed to find lodgings and shed this very unartist-like costume. Tomorrow I was off to Heart’s Content. I liked that name, March 2020

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don’t you? Heart’s Content, we’ll see. The new day brought a new man. Gone was the steerage passenger from Poland. Here travelling to Heart’s Content was the very picture of the polished successful artist donning the finest clothes bits and bobs St. John’s had to offer – not a tin pan or wobbly piece of cutlery to be seen. How could I possibly afford such a transformation? I do so very much love letters, and especially letters of employment. They speak of a future salary and that entitles even the shabbiest of new arrivals a tiny amount of credit. That small credit improves your appearance a little, which in turn improves your credit at the next shop down the line. Before long, a handful of stops have made you a dashing man about town, whose credit is positively overflowing. A well-worded letter, when properly deployed, is worth your weight in gold. I’m heavier than I look. It is a shame that Heart’s Content wasn’t a bigger place, I could have been happy there, I think. I enjoyed giving art instruction, and quickly became a part of the community; you know, I never expected that. I even painted large-scale theatre backdrops for local productions. The only black cloud was the superintendent of the Heart’s Content telegraph station, a Mr. E. Weedon. I’m convinced he was docking everyone’s wages. Either way, he took an interest in me and had placed enough bugs in enough ears that as the new year rang in, the businesses in St. John’s 124

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all called in their debts at the same time. The year of 1880 saw me before the courts in St. John’s for default of payment for purchases. As I saw it, my hand was forced. Money was needed. It would have worked, and it should have worked; I have certain skills which make it not only possible, but what should have been easy. Who would have thought that a man who advertises his establishment as being “In full blast in the East End!” to be so well connected and on the ball. I underestimated the proprietor, a Mr. Samuel Collier. We all should be proud of our work, don’t you agree? Well these cheques were sublime; the paper, the inks, the signatures, every single authenticating detail an absolute work of art. The first was cashed without issue. For the second, I decided to go to the newly opened East End Coffee Tavern, a temperance coffee house on Water Street, the one directly opposite the mercantile premises of Messrs. L. O’Brien and Company. On March 10, 1880, I handed the beautifully forged cheque over to the proprietor, absolutely certain it would be cashed without issue. Except Mr. Samuel Collier knew Mr. E. Weedon, and more importantly to my mind is that he knew that I wasn’t him. How is that relevant, you may be wondering? Well, I decided that a little poetic justice needed to be exacted, two birds with one stone as it were, and I must admit that I laughed to no end when I thought of the idea. I signed the forged cheques 1-888-588-6353


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I think I finally won Ellen over by secretly painting her likeness into the frescoes of Government House. Only she and I knew. as E. Weedon, Heart’s Content. Mr. Collier immediately seized me and sent for the constables. I was arrested on the spot. I was sentenced on June 15, 1880, to 15 months in H.M. Penitentiary minus time served. However – and here’s where life played dice – they offered me a deal. If I worked for the governor and painted frescoes at Government House, my sentence would be reduced by five weeks and, what’s more, every day I would be taken out of prison to my place of business. Free during the day to paint, a prisoner at night. It really wasn’t a terribly difficult decision. And as chance would have it, this was where I would meet the love of my life, Ellen Dormody. Ellen worked as a chambermaid in Government House, and soon my days were filled with painting frescoes and winning her affections. I think I finally won Ellen over by secretly painting her likeness into the frescoes of Government House. Only she and I knew. Governor John Hawley Glover was so impressed that he convinced Prime Minister William Whiteway to allow me to paint frescoes in the two legislative chambers in the Colonial Building. Soon the 1-888-588-6353

Presentation Sisters were enlisting my services to decorate their chapel at Cathedral Square. I was kept so busy that I spent more time outside of prison than in. I was working as a genuine fresco artist on the grandest buildings available, an opportunity I would never have gotten without prison. I was released from the penitentiary in June 1881 and quickly became the in-demand artist in St. John’s. Ellen and I had our new daughter, Johanna Mary Ellen Pindikowsky, baptized on May 1, 1882. We soon left St. John’s to pursue that grander hill in Boston, me in late 1882 and Ellen shortly after in 1883. And what became of us? Does my disappearance from the public record in Boston and reappearance in London, England spell villainy or triumph? I will not make it easy. I will not give you that answer. But I see you still want more, another clue perhaps as to who I am. Well you’ll get no more from me, save this: go to Government House and look upon my work, see whose hand that you will or may. And please do tell me if you can separate the light from the shadow. March 2020

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2003Mktplace2_0609 Marketplace.qxd 2/3/20 3:30 PM Page 130

BUSINESS FOR SALE

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Operating in Central, NL for over 40 Years. Established repeat customer base with an experienced and loyal team. Owners are open to assisting in transition period.

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Careers EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Eastern Health is largest integrated health authority in Newfoundland and Labrador. We provide health-care services from Port Blandford to St. John’s, including all communities on the Avalon, Burin and Bonavista Peninsulas. We are now accepting applications for Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses, Personal Care Attendants, Clinical Psychologists, Domestic and Laundry workers and many more positions!

To learn more about joining our team please call 1-888-866-1333 or email employment@easternhealth.ca and visit our website www.easternhealth.ca/careers

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puzzles

The Beaten Path

George Tucker photo

By Ron Young

Block out all the letters that are like other letters in every way, including shape and size. The letters that are left over will spell out the name of the above community in letters that get smaller in size.

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Last Month’s Community: Stephenville 132

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2003_Puzzles_1701-puzzles 1/31/20 6:03 PM Page 133

Sudoku

from websudoku.com

Skill level: Medium Last month’s answers

?

Need Help

Visit DownhomeLife.com/puzzles for step-by-step logic for solving this puzzle

www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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Downhomer Detective Needs You After more than two decades on the Urban City Police Force, Downhomer Detective has come home to rid Newfoundland and Labrador of a new threat – cunning thief Ragged Rick. A real braggart, the slimy criminal sends DD a blurry photo of his surroundings plus clues to his whereabouts just to prove he’s always a step ahead. DD needs your help to identify where in Newfoundland and Labrador Ragged Rick is hiding out this month.

Use these 5 clues to identify where Ragged Rick is now: • All major Burin Peninsula highways pass through here • Known for shipbuilding • Home of Cow Head Fabrication Facility • The Shrine of Marymount overlooks the town • Kaetlyn Osmond started skating here

Last Month’s Answer: Fleur de Lys

Picturesque Place NameS of Newfoundland and Labrador

by Mel D’Souza Last Month’s Answer: Farewell 134

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In Other Words Guess the well-known expression written here in other words.

Last Month’s Clue: Passion exists in the atmosphere In Other Words: Love is in the air This Month’s Clue: No male exists to be an atoll In Other Words: ___ ____ ___ __ _______

A Way With Words

Rhyme Time A rhyming word game by Ron Young

Last Month’s Answer: Happiness is underrated

RATED HAPPINESS

1. A high wattage bulb is a ______ _____ 2. A tiny globe is a _____ ____

This Month’s Clue

BABY BOARD

3. A bookworm might be a _____ ____ Last Month’s Answers 1. blame game, 2. sled shed, 3. bake a cake

ANS: _____ ___ ______

Scrambled Sayings

by Ron Young

Place each of the letters in the rectangular box below into one of the white square boxes above them to discover a quotation. Incomplete words that begin on the right side of the diagram continue one line down on the left. The letters may or may not go in the box in the same order that they are in the column. Once a letter is used, cross it off and do not use it again.

G C A E N E A R T E V T H T

.

H E A E L E E D E E E C A I N A A E I N B L L I L H L F O H A N T D C F R G W O R O P O T R E R H E H S P W V V T V

A N D W E E

Last month’s answer: Get up and dance, get up and smile, get up and drink to the days that are gone in the shortest while. www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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Rhymes 5 Times Each answer rhymes with the other four

1. precipitation 2. raven 3. smack 4. concert 5. enlarge

____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________

STUCK? Don’t get your knickers in a knot! Puzzle answers can be found online at DownhomeLife.com/puzzles

Last Month’s Answers: 1. foal, 2. hole, 3. stole, 4. role, 5. goal

Tangled Towns by Lolene Young Condon and Ron Young

Sound out the groups of words below to get a familiar expression. For best results sound the clue words out loud!

Aid Heads Gun Kin Their Owed _ ____ _____ __ ___ ____ Aid Ride Hyper _ ___ ______ Last Month’s 1st Clue: Us Cooled Each Her Answer: A school teacher Last Month’s 2nd Clue: Mice Hay Finger Ace Answer: My saving grace

Unscramble each of the five groups of letters below to get 5 Newfoundland and Labrador place names.

1. NAMI RKOBO 2. IDAGRNOS 3. RUEQOC 4. NCHEOC 5. OKIDORDCTN Last Month’s Answers: 1. Greenspond, 2. Centreville, 3. Gambo, 4. Dover, 5. Hare Bay

A nalogical A nagrams Unscramble the capitalized words to get one word that matches the subtle clue. 1. BEHIND GOO HOUR ~ Clue: where everyone lives and few work 2. BOWEL SWORN ~ Clue: a banks machine 3. RAT AX COVE ~ Clue: when you need to dig deep 4. TAME TON RUN ~ Clue: round and round they go 5. A CHI RERUN ~ Clue: Mother Nature’s blowout Last Month’s Answers: 1. variety, 2. pacifier, 3. parasite, 4. obstetrician, 5. industrial 136

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Four-Way Crossword F o re Wo rd s • B a c k Wo rd s • U p Wo rd s • D o w n Wo rd s By Ron Young

Unlike regular crosswords, in Four-Way Crossword each letter is not necessarily related to the letter in the adjacent row or column, but is part of one or more words in some direction. 1-5: Nile country 2-4: rip off 1-10: archeology 1-91: thrifty 4-34: bucket 5-35: disclose 7-10: lethargic 7-57: foam 9-59: plentiful 11-13: tin 11-31: defraud 16-14 ocean 18-15: urn 18-38: wagon 20-17: molten ash 22-25: post 22-52: note 23-3: each 23-25: become sick 25-27: allow 27-30: story 29-9: fall behind 29-26: tardy 29-59: myth 33-31: write 36-34: sick 37-34: hummock 38-68: undressed 39-59: mine output 40-38: weight measure 42-72: maximum 44-84: flavourless 46-16: fastens 49-47: be sorry for 49-89: raises 54-51: mat frame 55-5: Roy Rogers’ dog 55-25: male bovine 55-51: blossom www.downhomelife.com

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55-60: concern 55-95: fight 62-32: a few 62-65: blemish 63-3: corporation 63-93: keg 65-68: impolite 72-74: cure hide 80-30: limited 80-74: scuba diver 80-77: amphibian 80-100: gave food to 83-81: oasis 85-65: conflict 85-87: wisecrack 85-88: beside 88-58: tilled soil

91-94: admire 91-100: probability 97-100: parka part 100-10: absolutely Last Month’s Answer

F I S H I N G R O D

A B R T E E TAY EMO N I F I GE OR E CA S UNC E T A

I T S R A N C H E R

C H A R D E A D I D

A R T H E A R S A Y

T I N A T T E N D H

March 2020

O C A G O A L I N E

R E R E V O C S I D

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The Bayman’s

Crossword Puzzle 1

3

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by Ron Young

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18 22

23

12

13

M 24 M

19

30

31 35 39

43

36

37 41

45

46

49 52

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40

44 48

51

25

32

34

47

14

28

38

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10

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ACROSS 1. The Ryans ___ the Pittmans 3. section of homemade bread 5. __ de Janeiro 6. “It’s a mauzy old day ___ in Port aux Basques harbour” 7. the two isles north of Pacquet (2 words) 15. “Oh, oh, up ___ rises” 17. Adam’s Cove (abbrev) 18. medical scan (abbrev) 19. Red Island (abbrev) 20. esquire (abbrev) 22. region 24. warning 27. _____ Vidi 28. travelling 29. “We’ll rant and we’ll roar like ____ Newfoundlanders” 31. “Come day, __ day, God send Sunday” 32. ear, nose and throat specialist (abbrev) 33. snooped 35. driveable camper (abbrev) 38. beachcomber’s find 41. “I can’t marry all or in chokey I’d __” 42. “Where you going __?” 44. regarding (abbrev) 45. “He has more in his cheek than he has to ___” 46. Gordon Pinsent’s “The Rowdy___” 47. “I met __ old comrade I’d sailed with before” 48. “Her hair __ ___ ___ ___ her bonnet was blue” (4 words) 51. gaunt and bony (colloq) 52. __ Anthony 53. “Like a cat on hot ____” DOWN 1. “All mops ___ ______” (2 words) 2. “And they don’t give a ____ __ ___ _____ jiggin’ ground” (4 words) 4. Unemployment Insurance (abbrev) 8. Robert’s Arm (abbrev) www.downhomelife.com

9. small bit of precipitation (colloq) 10. ballicatter 11. “The ____ of Logy Bay” 12. home 13. soaked to the skin (colloq) 14. serenade 16. “Nofty was 40 when __ lost the pork” 21. “The maid’s gone all cranky and the cook’s acting _____” 23. starboard direction 25. “You can’t tell the ____ of a squid” 26. “__ a quarter to one and the fun has just begun” 30. Ragged Point (abbrev) 34. stormy (colloq) 35. goes with rant 36. elector 37. fixes 39. several 40. out ____ (Alberta) 41. mound of snow 42. pitch 43. “Lonesome as a gull __ _ rock” (2 words) 46. Fort ___, Alberta 48. “I counted bubbles __ the glass to ease my mind” 49. “__ far as ever a puffin flew” 50. accomplish S H A R E M A N A D D A S P

AW T A S R V E A D A I N N D T E P N T A B H O O V E E

ANSWERS TO LAST MONTH’S CROSSWORD E T Y K B A B U F F S F G A L L R E A A T D V E L E N M L B A

N O T O T H E D O OW S R N Y E R A E R R I

S E A M

A N R B R I I N D V E B E T A O D N G E R K A S W A Y

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2003_Puzzles_1701-puzzles 1/31/20 6:04 PM Page 140

DIAL-A-SMILE © 2020 Ron Young

Pick the right letters from the old style phone to match the numbers grouped below and uncover a quote which will bring a smile to your face. __ 69

______ 668437

___ 843

_ ____ 4 7669

__ 63

_ 2

___ 766

_____ 63837 __ 46 __ 63

___ 729

_______ 2255464 _ 2

_____ 24824

Last Month’s Answer: If evolution really works, how come mothers only have two hands?

©2020 Ron Young

CRACK THE CODE

n

Each symbol represents a letter of the alphabet, for instance =N Try to guess the smaller, more obvious words to come up with the letters for the longer ones. The code changes each month.

N _ _ _ _ N _

n x ; tX n Q _ _ _ _ _ _ _ N _

m z\x m 0X n Q _ _

H7

_ _ _ _ _

x; tz m

N _ _ _ _

nzzB7 _ _

H7

_ _ _ _ 0

Li t

_ _ _ _ _ _’ _

OzxO w z 7

_ _ _ _ _ _

t H EX ; 7 Last Month’s Answer: Confessions may be good for the soul, but they are bad for the reputation. 140

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Food For Thought

© 2020 Ron Young

Each food symbol represents a letter of the alphabet. Find the meanings to the words then match the letters with the food symbols below to get a little “food for thought.”

conflict =

dam =

surround = _

_ _ _

ashes =

_ _ _ _

nv w m

phantom =

]at

vth

s`

_ _ _ _ _

l m[ me

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

shY Y mss _ _ _ _

w cwm _ _ _

}e m

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

Y c lnmes

appraises =

_ _ _ _ _

_ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

mlY ceYw m

k}e

_ _ _ _ _ _

[}whms

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

}Yac m[ m

_ _ _ _ _ _

hlwmss _ _ _ _

ka}`

_ _ _

v th

_ _ _

vth

_ _ _ _ _

ntc l]

Last Month’s Answer: Integrity is doing the right thing even when no one is watching. www.downhomelife.com

March 2020

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2003_Puzzles_1701-puzzles 1/31/20 6:04 PM Page 142

Different Strokes

Our artist’s pen made the two seemingly identical pictures below different in 12 places. See if you can find all 12.

ERN AND COAL BIN SPOT CARIBOU ON THE HIGHWAY

Last Month’s Answers: 1. Shovel, 2. Door, 3. Glove, 4.Window, 5. Hill 6. Shed, 7. Cap, 8. Jacket, 9. Leg, 10. Puck, 11, Steeple 12, Goalie “Differences by the Dozen”- A compilation of Different Strokes from 2002 to 2014 (autographed by Mel) can be ordered by sending $9.95 (postage incl.; $13.98 for U.S. mailing) to Mel D’Souza, 21 Brentwood Dr., Brampton, ON, L6T 1P8.

142

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HIDE & SEEK HOBBIES

The words can be across, up, down, backward or at an angle, but always in a line. ASTRONOMY BAKING BEACHCOMBING BIRDWATCHING BONSAI CALLIGRAPHY CARTOPHILY DANCE FISHING GARDENING GENEALOGY GEOCACHING HIKING MAGIC METEOROLOGY MUSIC NEEDLEPOINT

O S M G E N E A L O G Y T K H E B Y

C A K E B G B G O B G N U Z I I J H

I A A U N G N D N C I N S W R L C P

G M L I C I C P B O O R I D J Q B A

H A K L T B U X P Q B E W H B W Q R

E I R N I Z B E S G R A A O S U V G

H C I D Z G L E E K T D K X I I Z O

www.downhomelife.com

QUILTING READING SCRAPBOOKING WOODWORKING

ORIGAMI PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY POETRY PUZZLES C S Y C N A F E K F L O B A Q L C Y

Last Month’s Answers

G A N L E D R O B C V I D I P K F T

P M E A E N C A H Q Z N B E N T W O

L S D E D A I I P D D G Y O G G J H

G C N F C R N N G H Q T A B N A R P

Y O K E A K T Q S L F P Y N I D I R

K N N H V G G B G L Y C V U I E S H

M W U S Y Y L T R U N X W U N B T T

D O Z R M G L B R N O B I E I J C E

G I I B D F D Z F S F P V P T D H U

B E W Q T E B L T A F P I K I P N O

R C H R B I H H L R C R S Z W E S P

A N S K H B D N N C K M J G L G J N

C F R T R R N Z S P F T P W K U W O

G R Y N R Z I L A R L C V E I L C N

K I R Q O O V G I L N V I O I L G I

R Q M O M R F K R N O A N O W U X C

G N I B M O C H C A E B L G U F H X

C U S T A B T I N T I L S T N U H T

G L N T N S G E I J T E Q X Y X Z E

C I G A M B W M H P E A A F Q X B U

Z W I P C R D M B J A N U J R P R L

V L C H E I E G T X R T F H L B N C

I M A G I R O D U B O S R O N L T L

N O I S S A P N H Z O I Z B E B B A

R L J Q I A K O T F D N S P W A K A

H X U O M W T M O O V T Q B V U V E

O Y C Z Z Y N E D R A E U S E U P J

S P X M L E G A N V A R Z H J C P A

W A D U Y C Y Y Z O B R M M K Q O U

E Z L G Y A S Y I Y S P E T D L P C

H D S Z R G A O H K W O G B D T E P

S T F M I V V M B U C A N V S A Q I

Y F O R D Z S A I W R C T L N E T Z

Y I I X T L B F Y I B N Q Q V V Y T

X O R J N H O T Q T V N O T C V L E

N A J D I N N E R T T T D N Z V Q T

C S F N E N I I R N B O N S A I S H

M C O M M I T M E N T E A H I A B N

D E V O T I O N A V Y I N O R S Q J

M E T E O R O L O G Y M E H R G U K

March 2020

K I S S Q D N E I R F Y O B B C M C

Y L I H P O T R A C T Y L Q F X I B 143


2003photo Finish_0609 Photo Finish 1/31/20 6:14 PM Page 160

photo finish

Pretty Perspective

The Loop in Bannerman Park attracts lots of skaters, but during the St. John’s state of emergency, its closure provided the perfect opportunity for this peaceful aerial shot. Jim Desautels St. John’s, NL

Do you have an amazing or funny photo to share? Turn to page 9 to find out how to submit. 144

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Profile for Downhome Publishing Inc

Downhome March 2020