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D-Day June 6-12, 2011 January 2011 Edition

Volume 8

D-DAY COUTDOWN “While

the event is just over 4 months away, the pace of work at the field is already ramping up. New roads have been cut north and east of Utah Beach. On another front plans are moving ahead to construct even more of the same types of buildings which made Caen a major battle site. Watch the new videos and listen to Dewayne’s latest ‘Special Offer’ by checking out their YouTube page. Just copy and paste this link into your browser; http://www.youtube.com/user/ddayopps

Inside This Issue Page 9. Maj. Dick Winters Story Page 12. 2010 Field Map Page 14. Tactics Pointers

German Bunker overlooks Utah Beach < WW II American Ration Poster

Page 19. 2010 Scoring Timetable

Submit articles about your units, along with suggestions to Stars and Stripes, C/O ADorsai@aol.com or call 407/563-3884


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SALUTE TO THE 101st AIRBORNE DIVISION


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Be part of the “Tip of the Spear” Join the 82nd Airborne for Oklahoma D-day June 6-11, 2011 almost every area of the 700 acre field. The D-day event had over 3000 registered players, but only a fortunate 200 were able to be part of the 82nd Airborne. Registration for this elite unit is always limited. Don‟t get left out! In 2010 the 82nd was used (once again) as the “Point of the Spear” to lead Allied assaults against German strongholds, including: The actual 82nd Airborne has an amazing history, gaining much of it‟s honored reputation in World War Two. The 82nd Airborne was the first Airborne division in the United States Army. During WWII it conducted parachute jumps into Sicily, Salerno, Normandy and Holland. At the battle of Anzio in Italy, a German officer gave the paratroopers one of their many nicknames when he referred to them as “those devils in the baggy pants”. The elite, 82nd Airborne Division at Oklahoma D-day is comprised of 4 regiments for 2010. The regiments are the;

505th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR)

507th Parachute Infantry Regiment

(PIR)

505th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR)

325th Glider Infantry Regiment (GIR)

In 2010 the 82nd Airborne saw action in

House to house fighting in Caen,

Direct assaults against German HQ in Colleville,

Attacks against Pegasus Bridge to open the way for British armor

Numerous assaults though heavily wooded areas to clear the way for Allied infantry.

Those were just a few of our missions. But the 82nd Airborne Division isn‟t for everyone. You need to be at least 16 years old and ready to handle the difficulties of the hills, valleys, woods, heat and humidity of Oklahoma in June. You‟d best be in shape! 2011 looks to be even better for Oklahoma D-day and the 82nd Airborne. The Bunker staff will be adding another 80 acres to the field. Roads are being put in over the winter. While no firm decisions have been announced, it seems obvious that the missions in this new area will fall to the US Airborne, and as always the 82nd will lead the way. Registration is

always limited for the elite 82nd. Don‟t wait and get left behind.

Here is a direct link to register for the 82nd Airborne.

the Division on the 82nd ABN home page 82nd ABD Home Page

82nd Airborne Registration link

You can also find information on the actual 82nd Airborne Division and the Regiments that make up

One of the many concrete buildings in Caen, scene of intense house-to-house fighting


7

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Allied TOC Is Recruiting (Tactical Operations Center) Using a combination of both new and old technologies and equipment, the Allie’s now have a fully operational TOC, thanks to our sponsors as well as to those staff members who donated their time and equipment in order to complete it. Positions are now available in the TOC, and in other supporting roles. 2011 is the perfect opportunity to become an active participant in the Oklahoma DDay event, even if you or a family member can’t take the field as a player. It’s a fun, exciting way to be at the heart of the event. Many different roles and positions, at all levels of experience are available. For more details contact adorsai@aol.com or visit us at the field.

Allied Headquarters and Communications Center, located on campgrounds, just east of CEF Camp


Tribute to Major Dick Winters, January 21, 1918 - January 2, 2011

Dick Winters, the former World War II commander whose war story was told in the book and miniseries “Band of Brothers,” has died. Since then, the former World War II commander of Easy Company had received hundreds of requests for interviews and appearances all over the world. He stood at the podium with President George W. Bush in Hershey during the presidential campaign in 2007. He accepted the “Four Freedoms” award from Tom Brokaw on behalf of the Army. He was on familiar terms with Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, producers of the HBO mini-series, the most expensive television series ever produced. Winters was always gracious about his new-found celebrity, but never really comfortable with it. He never claimed to be a hero and said that he had nothing to do with the national effort to get him the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military honor. When people asked him if he was a hero, he liked to answer the way his World War II buddy, Mike Ranney, did. “No,” Ranney said. “But I served in a company of heroes.” That became the tag line for the miniseries. In an interview shortly before the miniseries Band of Brothers debuted, Winters said the war wasn’t about individual heroics. The men were able to do what they did because they became closer than brothers when faced with overwhelming hardships. They weren’t out to save the world. They hated the blood, carnage, exhaustion and filth of war. But they were horrified at the thought of letting down their buddies. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, Winters and his troops from Easy Company, 506th regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, parachuted behind enemy lines to take on a German artillery nest on Utah Beach. Winters made himself a promise then that if he lived through the war, all he wanted was peace and quiet. His company fought through the Battle of the Bulge, the liberation of a death camp at Dachau and to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest at Berchtesgaden. The war described in “Band of Brothers” is ugly, but the young men developed character under fire, Winters said. He was glad the miniseries showed war realistically, not either glorified or demonized as in so many movies. He wanted people to understand that success in war depends not on heroics but on bonding, character, getting the job done and “hanging tough,” his lifelong motto. In combat, he wrote 50 years after the war, “your reward for a good job done is that you get the next tough mission.” When the war ended, Winters kept his promise to himself. He married Ethel, bought a bucolic farm in Fredericksburg, raised two children and worked in the agricultural feed business. He didn’t talk about the war until the late historian Stephen Ambrose wanted to put Easy Company’s exploits on paper. Following the miniseries, Winters turned down most requests for interviews because he said he didn’t want to appear like he was bragging. But he did feel the story of Easy Company was an important one, especially for young people. He was more likely to accept invitations by local school groups and spent time with students at Cedar Crest High School, among others. A talk he gave at Palmyra Middle School drew hundreds of spectators. (Continued on page 12)


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People who knew Winters during and after the war said he is exactly what he appears to be. He could lead without ever raising his voice or swearing. His friend Bob Hoffman, a Lebanon architect, said Winters’ eyes could “burn a hole right through you.” The men who served under him and people who only met him later in life call him a hero, no matter what he says. According to the book, one wounded member of Easy Company wrote Winters from a hospital bed in 1945, “I would follow you into hell.” When President Bush was in Hershey in April, he called Winters “a fine example ... for those brave souls who now wear our nation’s uniform.” Ambrose, the author of “Band of Brothers,” said in a 2001 BBC interview that he hopes young people say. “I want to be like Dick Winters. Not necessarily as soldiers, but as that kind of leader, that kind of man, with basic honesty and virtue and an understanding of the difference between right and wrong,” Ambrose said.

Your source at D-Day for Engler Paintball Guns Be sure to register your tank before you arrive: Here’s how to register Go to the web site, ddayadventurepark.com Click - Oklahoma D-Day 2011 Click - Rules and regulations Click - Tank & AT ......scroll all the way to the bottom.

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STAY HYDRATED It will be hot and humid. You’ll need a Camelbak or similar hydration system. Don’t take the field without one. It’s the best way to stay hydrated and in the game.


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Unit cohesiveness is the key to success Keep your unit intact. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if you are Airborne, Infantry, or Armor; American, British, Canadian, French, or German. We need all of you on the field at the end of the day. Your units are counting on you. Stay properly hydrated. Avoid drinking soda and alcohol during the week leading up to the event and ALWAYS carry extra water with you.


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TACTICS and MOVEMENTS By Randy Crow British 3rd Infantry

‘inland,’ our next objective is to take Caen. Caen will be the scene of ‘house to house’ fighting. It will be different than how they did it in WW2. It will be different than the military does it today. But it will be unique to paintball!

General: As in all paintball (or military) situations, the clearing teams must move tactically and safely. Individuals who are part of a clearReady Positions: The two weapon ready poing team must move in a standard manner, sitions are low ready and high ready. using practiced techniques known to all.

There’s lots of interest in the new buildings sprouting up all over the field, and with that comes interest in military MOUT (Military On Urban Terrain) tactics. Yet we all know that not everything military applies to paintball. But Individual Movement and Weapons Conyou can take nuggets of information from this trol:

article and apply them to your paintball tactics and techniques. Once we land at Sword Beach and push

there is no need to return to the standing position to engage targets unless the soldier must move to another firing position. Valuable time is saved by resuming target engagement from the kneeling position. When other members of the team see a soldier drop to one knee, they know immediately that he has a malfunction and that they should engage in his sector.

Low ready position: The butt of the weapon is placed firmly in the pocket of the shoulder with the barrel pointed down at a 45 degree angle. This is the safest carry position. It 1. When moving, team members hold their weapons with the muzzle pointed in the direc- should be used in the fire team stack or when tion of travel. They keep the butt of the rifle in preparing to clear "High-Low". the pocket of their shoulder, with the both High ready position: The butt of the weapon eyes open looking through the optic or down is held under the armpit, with the barrel the sights. Soldiers swing the muzzle with pointed slightly up, keeping the front sight astheir head so that the rifle is always aimed sembly under the line of sight but within the where the soldier is looking. gunner’s peripheral vision. To engage a target, 2. Team members avoid "flagging" or leading, the gunner pushes the weapon out When the weapon leaves the armpit, he slides it up into with the weapon when working around windows, doors, corners, or where obstacles must the firing shoulder. This technique is best suited for the lineup outside the door be negotiated. Flagging the weapon gives advance warning to anyone looking in the soldier’s direction. Soldiers must keep their UNIT MOVEMENT weapons under control at all times. General: The preferred technique is to move 3. Team members should keep weapons safe using bounding overwatch. Normally the pla(index finger outside of trigger guard) until toon/squad will move as two elements: a hostile target is movement element and an overwatch eleidentified and ment. When necessary, these elements or engaged. After a parts of them exchange roles. If moving in team member small elements, there may be a designated clears his sector overwatch element. of all targets, he returns his Key Points to Consider: weapon to a position. 1. Elements moving by themselves or infiltrating may not have support elements. 4. If a soldier has a malfunc2. The platoon/squad leader determines when tion with his to rotate elements during movement. weapon during close quarters 3. The platoon/squad will use a covered and combat, he concealed route whenever possible. Moving should immedithrough or behind buildings, along walls, and ately drop to one trees. Avoiding open areas, streets, alleys, and knee and conother danger areas unless necessary. duct immediate action to reduce 4. The platoon/squad makes the best use of the malfunction. (Continued on page 16) Once the weapon is operational,


16 (Continued from page 15)

cover and concealment when moving, moving in the street only when ROE dictates or the situation requires.

Key points to consider while moving through a street:

Movement through a Street:

1. Use smoke, rubble and debris for cover and concealment.

When forced to move in the street the squad/platoon has a few options. Platoon:

with grenade launchers and machine guns a squad is not something to trifle with. The reason a squad has two or more fire-teams is because it gives a squad leader a great deal of flexibility. If one fire-team

2. Clear intersecting streets and alleyways in similar techniques used for the clearing of intersecting hallways.

Move the two squads/teams abreast, having 3. The platoon/squad will cross the urban danger areach squad/team overwatch the buildings for- eas using the greatest cover, concealment, speed, ward and across the street on ground level and and overwatch. An element normally crosses as a dispersed group at the same time but METT-T conditions may cause the element leader to decide to cross in buddy teams or individually. 4. Always stay at least one meter away from buildings. Rounds that strike buildings tend to follow the walls making the one meter closest to buildings and walls a dangerous area. The Squad A squad consist of two to three fire-teams, with two being the average. Some militaries, like the French and British call a squad a section. Not all squads are broken down into fire-teams.

observing the stories above the opposite squad. * One Squad Forward, Fire Teams on Opposite Sides: Use this technique (figure B) when making contact with a small element is important and the number of buildings with more than two floors is low. It also keeps two squads free to maneuver. * Two Squads Forward on Opposite Sides: Use this option when many multi storied buildings are present and the risk from above is high. This technique doubles the number of soldiers that will focus on the 2nd floor and above. Squad: During squad movement the lead buddy team/fire team covers across the street forward of the lead element at ground level. The trail buddy team/fire team covers across and forward from the second story and higher.

makes contact with the enemy and engages in a firefight, the squad leader can send the other fire-team around to flank the enemy. With his squad already divided into teams, the squad leader doesn't have to reorganize or assign a leader, it's already done. Furthermore, the team is well balanced as far as weaponry goes. When rounds are flying a leader doesn't have time to say "You, Jake, Mike, Kevin and Eric go attack their right flank. You might as well take Jason with you because he has a machine gun. . ."

Organizing a squad into fire-teams also dramatically increases the squad leader's ability to control the A squad usually has a massive amount of firepower at squad. Instead of directing six or more people, he its disposal. However, some squads are little more only has to direct two or three, and team leaders in than a bunch of soldiers following their squad leader. turn only have to control two or three men. This inSome militaries discourage squad leaders, or any non- sures more senior soldiers are in charge, more control officer from displaying initiative. is displayed and more initiative is displayed. For the purpose of discussion I will talk about two Breaking down a squad into fire-teams is not always and three fire-team squads. With all fire-teams armed practical. If the troops are temporary breaking them down into fire-teams may not be as effective because they will not gain nearly as much experience to be very effective. Of course there are always exceptions to this rule. Another point to note is that in some formations, like US Army or British, the squad leader might lead the first fire-team and the assistant squad leader might lead the second. Other units, like the US Marine Corps, will usually have a designated team leader for each fire team. When the firing starts one fire-team can lay down a base of fire while the other fire-team gets closer. In(Continued on page 18)


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18 (Continued from page 16)

directions or receiving reports. Of course yelling sometimes works but not always.

stead of having one man cover another man while he rushes, the squad leader can have fire-teams cover each other. With three or more fire-teams, a squad leader can direct one fire-team to assist another, thereby doubling the firepower at any one point.

This is why standard operating procedures are so important to a squad. SOP's cover most situations and help overcome much of the confusion. For example, if the SOP calls for first fire-team to lay down a base of fire when they make contact and for second fire-team Firefight to envelope (flank) then everyone knows what is going to happen when the shooting starts. First team When a firefight erupts it usually escalates as combat will automatically move up so they can fire on the elements make contact with each other along the bat- enemy and Second team will look to the squad leader for directions on which way to flank the enemy. tle line. Only in the desert or other open terrain can two large units suddenly start firing at each other. Overall, the team leaders have a great deal of control and can spell the difference between victory or defeat In the woods, jungle, hills or whatever, usually fireteams start fighting and more units are committed to if they and their team are properly trained. the battle as the commander makes his decisions. Of course there are exceptions to this rule. If a unit is Some squads are organized around medium machine crossing an open area and comes under fire they will guns. For instance, not so long ago British squads have to adjust. A firefight can quickly escalate from were organized with eight men. One had a medium an individual firing at the enemy to a battalion, or machine gun and the other seven had regular assault regiment firing at the enemy if the two face each rifles. other in a line. When the firing began, the machine gunner and his When a squad makes contact with the enemy the assistant would lay down a base of fire while the six squad leader has to make several quick decisions. riflemen advanced. When the squad leader was ready These decisions are based on the mission and the for the machine gun to advance, all six riflemen squad's capabilities. He must evaluate what kind of would fire to cover the gunner's advance. force the squad is facing. Sometimes this can be determined by the how many enemy rifles are being Regardless of organization, poorly trained (or led) heard and how much of an area those weapons are squad would operate as one big mob directed by the occupying. A lot depends on the situation. If the squad leader. The squad might have a great deal of squad has been ambushed and has taken casualties firepower in the form of machine guns and rockets, he can't extract safely, he might order an attack. but there would often be a lack of initiative among What kind of attack varies on the terrain and situathe troops. The Soviets were a prime example of this. tion. Most likely he will order a fire-team to try and Sometimes paintball is a prime flank the enemy, or he might bring up the other fire- example. team to help suppress the enemy while casualties are extracted. All tactics were based on battle Of course he might order everyone to run for their life. As explained above fire-teams are independent units and have a great deal of firepower. It is the squad leader's mission to deploy his fire-teams in an effective manner against the enemy. With all the yelling, screaming, gunfire and confusion, a squad leader has a very difficult job controlling his squad and maneuvering it effectively. A squad leader can't always see his entire squad, or even his team leaders. Squad radios are a god send to a squad leader and allow him to receive reports and give orders. If the squad doesn't have radios the squad leader has to yell or use hand arm signals. Usually yelling is of limited value because of all the noise and hand arm signals down work very well unless people are looking at him or it is night time. What ends up happening is he has to run around from team leader to team leader giving

drills or standard operating procedures. The advantage of this method was that everyone knew what was going on and what was expected of them. Only squad leaders knew how to read a map or a radio. If something unexpected happened then the battle drill could rapidly fall apart. To overcome this the Soviets used waves. When wave one fell apart then wave two would move in, or wave three. Eventually, one wave would succeed and the waves that failed could regroup and reorganize. This method of combat was great for the Soviets who relied on quantity over quality. (sound

like a paintball game youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve attended?) Soviet soldiers were not encouraged to think or act on their own. In a Soviet type military, the squad leader would be nothing more than a fire-team leader with a lot more men and weapons than usual. The platoon commander, an officer, would be the real decision maker and even then he would always defer to a higher authority. A Soviet style squad is heavily armed with automatic weapons. Usual doctrine calls for the squad to deploy on line and while standing or crouching, advance on the enemy. As the squad advances a high volume of fire would be maintained so that the squad would have fire superiority and their enemy would be forced to seek cover. With fire superiority, the Soviet squad would advance on line with their weapon in their shoulder or at their hip. When a soldier fired he would 'walk' his rounds into the target, adjusting his aim according to where his rounds hit. Of course the Soviets did not always do it this way. They would take cover and use finer tactics, but because they didn't trust their soldiers they preferred to keep things as simple as possible and trained their troops accordingly. Most of their soldiers were conscripts and didn't want to be there anyway. This is also a reason nearly all Soviet weapons had the automatic fire capability. Patrol A squad is organized very well for a patrol. It has enough organic firepower to hold its own and is small enough to move with some degree


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The Defense A squad in the defense can be a powerful force. A squad leader, as directed and assisted by the platoon leader is assigned a specific area to cover. In turn, the squad leader assigns his fire-team leaders specific areas to cover and they assign individuals specific areas as described in Fire-team Defense.

echelons to support the squad formation. The lead fire-team may deploy in a team wedge or a skirmishers formation.

Squad Skirmisher/On line: When the squad leader knows his right and left flanks are covered and he knows the enemy is to his front he will deploy his squad on line (also called a skirmish line). This allows him to concentrate firepower to the front The squad leader makes sure the machine but leaves him vulnerable to the guns are properly placed and can fire across flanks. Deploying the squad on line the squad's front. The squad leader also insures all areas of the squad's front are covered is also a good way to search an area. Fire-teams will likely deploy in by one or more weapons. More details on the skirmisher formations, wedges, or Defense will be covered in another section. echelons depending on the perceived threat. The on line formation Formations is usually very hard to control even under the best circumstances and is A squad only uses dedicated formations when used only when contact is imminent it is moving to the attack. During patrols it or searching an area. At night this is may use formations but due to the fact patrols a nightmare because people usually usually cover large amounts of area formations can't see the person to either side very well. are not always practical except in certain situations. The squad uses many of the same Squad V: The squad V is a reverse of the formations as a fire team, with one additional wedge. This is used primarily to protect the one. rear of a larger unit's column. Firepower is concentrated to the rear and flanks. One variaInside the squad formation, the fire-teams are tion of this is to have the two lead fire-teams in their own formations. Sometimes the squad close together. When contact is made, the first leader dictates which formations the fire-teams two fire-teams will lay down a base of fire and will use but not always. For instance in a squad the trailing fire-team flanks the enemy. wedge, the lead fire-team might be in a fireteam wedge and the fire-teams on either side The Column: The column is used when the might be in echelons. squad is more interested in speed. It is always easier to follow the guy in front of you than to Squad Wedge: When the squad leader does make your own trail. At night the column fornot know where the enemy is he will likely demation keeps people from wandering off and ploy the squad in a wedge formation. This getting separated. The column is also more gives him protection to the front and flanks. It quieter since one person is making a path and only works with three fire-teams however. If a everyone else is following instead of making squad leader does not have three fire-team he their own. The disadvantage of a colmay employ an echelon, or have the lead team umn is firepower to the front and form a wedge and the second team follow in a rear is severely limited and the squad column. Like the fire-team wedge, this formais vulnerable to attack. Firepower to tion is easier to control because nearly everythe sides is good however. one can see the lead rifleman and adjust off him. Whenever a squad makes contact with the enemy it usually tries to deSquad Echelon: When the squad leader is exploy in a line facing the enemy. This pecting an attack from the side he will likely way more squad members are able deploy the squad in an echelon facing the posto fire at the enemy and not risk sible enemy location. This concentrates fireshooting another squad member. power in that direction and provides protection When the unit is on line it is very difto the front as well. The squad echelon can be ficult to control and this is where the used when protecting a larger unit's flank. Inteam leaders play a big role. If the dividual fire-teams will most likely deploy in fire-team leaders are incompetent

and not paying attention to the battle they may fail to support another fire-team or be completely ineffective against the enemy.

Working with Armor The ability to conduct combined arms operations can completely change the dynamics of your operation. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works for the military and it works for your paintball team. For Oklahoma D-day, the British-Canadian Commonwealth forces have a very capable armor element. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critical to have our infantry and armor working together. Together they are much more effective and deadly than when used a separate elements. Use your armor support. Communicate with them, fight with them, protect them from AT fire, and move with them. While military tactics donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply 100% I hope this article has given you tactics and ideas you can apply to your paintball skills. Randy Crow


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2011 Points, Objectives and Times Area

Objective

North

South

Brecourt Manor Colleville Church Sword Beach Merderet Bridge Pegasus Bridge

North South

Utah Caen

Center

Omaha Beach WG 1

50

50

50

50

200

Center

Omaha Beach WG 2

50

50

50

50

200

North

Causeway #2

50

50

50

150

Valley

SME

50

50

50

150

Valley

La Fiere Bridge

Valley

Vierville

North

Airfield

50

50

100

200

Center

St. Laurent

50

50

50

150

Center

Cherbourg Bridge

Center

Colleville Center

Center South Valley

Time

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00 100

100

50

50

100

100

100

300 50

100

50

50 50 100

50

150

100 50

50 50

50

50

50

50

50

50

200 100

100

100

50

50

50

50

200

50 100

150 100

100

300

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00 250

450

450

300

350

350

250

200

200

150

200

150

300

150

225

Running total

250

700

1150

1450

1800

2150

2400

2600

2800

2950

3150

3300

3600

3750

3975

0

0

0

0

2

1

2

2

1

1

0

2

2

0

3

Area

400 500

150

Total per time period

Number of objectives with final scoring in time period

175 400

100 100 50

25

50

50 100

Total

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00

3975

Total

North

100

200

200

150

100

50

0

100

0

50

0

100

0

0

0

1050

South

100

150

150

50

100

100

50

0

50

50

100

0

100

0

100

1100

Center

50

50

100

0

100

100

100

50

50

50

50

50

150

150

150

1200

50

0

100

50

100

100

50

100

0

50

0

50

0

0

650

450

450

300

350

350

250

200

200

150

200

150

300

150

250

4000

Valley Total

250


22

June 6,2010 members of the Pathfinder Company, 101st Aviation Regiment, stationed in Afghanistan pay homage to Jake McNiece and to the other members of 10st Division who took part in D-Day Invasion by painting war paint on their faces and cutting their hair in Mohawk fashion.


23

RECRUITING VIDEOS CLICK PHOTOS


24


Oklahoma D-Day Stars and Stripes, Jan 2011