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D-Day June 7-13, 2010

May Edition

Volume 6

D-DAY IN LESS THAN ONE MONTH ―Unit

choice‖ has ended. ―Side choice‖ is ending May 15. Pre-registration is ending around June 1. Rules, dead zones and rally points have been finalized. New boats are being built at Omaha. A new Dead zone is going in at Omaha. The buildings at Caen are done. The game is right around the corner.

Inside Stars and Stripes: Muddy Water Boys win Texas UWL: Page 2 D-day Schedule: Pages 8-9 Allied TOC information: Page 11 Field Map: Page 12 Unit Cohesiveness: Page 14 Tactics and Movements: Pages 15-18 Tactical Radio Procedures: Pages 20-21 Points chart: Page 22

Larger 2010 Field Map on Page 12

82nd Airborne Equipment List: Pages 24-25 Contact Steve Risken for more information about the electronic version of Stars and Stripes. srisken623@aol.com


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The Muddy Water Boys (Nebraska) just returned from a 26 hour trip where they competed in the Ultimate Woodsball League regional in Dallas, Texas. This is a 10 man woodsball competition that spans the country. The format is a flag based game with home base flags at corresponding ends, and swings flags in the middle on opposing sides, thus creating a kite shape. A team can earn points by holding flags, similar to a domination game type. There is also a small canister in the middle of the field worth an additional 10 points that offers a team two player reinserts if found and given to the Captain. Games are 30 minutes long, and have respawns every ten minutes, providing two total in the game. This creates a fast paced, action packed experience that is built upon teamwork and communication, mixed with a heavy dose of stealth and surprise techniques. UWL owner Tom Cole emphasizes these aspects across the country at various UWL regionals, along with high sportsmanship and elite competition. The game style is highly addictive and provides a woodsball player with a tournament that is geared towards his style of play. UWL makes the distinction, this is not a speedball game in the woods….this is a true woodsball tournament. The UWL has drawn in a number of old school “pros” and current ones to the league and its competitive level is second to none in the woods department. If your team is considering taking your game to the next level, be sure to check out the UWL at www.playuwl.com. The league offers three divisions based off of marker restrictions.

Muddy Water Boys Win UWL: Texas! 508th/82nd Airborne MWB went 5-0 at the event and won the Skills Division Championship (mostly mechanical division) for that region. An intriguing element of the UWL is that it draws a lot of woodsball teams from the DDay community, and teams get a chance to spend some time both off and on the field together. The Muddy Water Boys are 6 year vets in the 82nd Airborne brotherhood and are looking to bring more high character woodsball teams into the 82nd fold. If the All Americans are your choice for a division, please don‟t hesitate to contact myself or General Steve Risken. Our next regional will be at Oklahoma DDay on June 10-11th-Thursday and Friday during the week. I have been told that Desert Edge of the Commonwealth will be participating, along with the Roughnecks of the

101st and representatives of just about every unit on the D-Day field. Come on out and support your units during the tournament! Last year the games were held at the Old Pond. If interested in playing, give us a shout and we will help get you squad rolling. MWB Scores below from Texas: Game1: MWB (150) vs. Team Cobra -Texas (34) Game2: MWB (71) vs. Texas Roughnecks -Texas (59) Game3: MWB (130) vs. Texas Roughnecks Tactical –Texas (31) Game4: MWB (108) vs. Rita's Aftermath –Louisiana (56) Game5 (Championship): MWB (105) vs. Afflicted –Texas (103)

Jake "Hoot" Hansen Muddy Water Boys Team Captain www.muddywaterboys.com


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Thank you Oklahoma University, College of Engineering, School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering for your enthusiast support. Best of luck with your research and thesis.


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JOIN THE BRITISH AND CANADIAN

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British History Quiz Remember these dates? Looking back on the war down the darker years, how many dates of events – that are so often talked about – can you remember? Try out this quiz….

1. On what date was war declared? 2. On what date was the first air raid warning sounded? 3. Which was first invaded by Germany? Poland or Czechoslovakia? And on what date?

4. What date of Germany‘s invasion of the Netherlands? 5. On what date did France collapse? 6. What was the date of the Japanese assault on Pearl Harbor?

7. What was the date did German resistance cease in Tunisia?

8. When did the Anglo-American force land in French North Africa?

9. What was the date of the Salerno landing? 10. What was the date of the German attack on Russia?

Be sure to register your tank before you arrive: Here‟s the registration form Tank Registration Form And here‟s how to get there. Go to the web site Click - Oklahoma D-Day 2010 Click - Rules and regulations Click - Tank & AT ......scroll all the way to the bottom.


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QUIZ Answers

1. September 3, 1939. 2. September 3, 1939 3. Czechoslovakia, March 15, 1938 4. May 10, 1940 5. June 25, 1940 6. December 7, 1941 7. May 12, 1943 8. November 8, 1942 9. September 8, 1943 10. June 22, 1941

BAN ON CANNED VEGETABLES __________ __ _________

FRESH IN PLENTY As there is an ample supply of fresh grown green vegetables the Ministry of Food has decided to postpone the release of canned vegetables. The quantity of canned vegetables, when released, will be considerably less than that available a year ago And the public are urged to conserve any canned vegetables they may now have in their larders. Lord Woolton yesterday appealed to housewives to use an extra cabbage a week, while the supplies last. For the next four weeks fresh cabbages and savoys will be in ample quantity and at reasonable prices. Other food news today was; Potatoes: The increase in consumption was very considerable. Victory Dishes: Marked ―V‖ on the menu, will soon be available in restaurants.


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2010 Allied TOC (Tactical Operations Center) Using a combination of new and old technologies, and equipment, the Allies TOC is nearing completion for 2010. Big thank you‘s are in order for the J6 members, sponsors and staff who have devoted time and equipment. Positions are still available in the TOC, and in supporting roles. It‘s the perfect opportunity to be an active participant in the Oklahoma D-day event even if you or a family member can‘t take the field as a player. It‘s a fun, exciting way to be at the heart of the event. Many different roles and positions are available. There are positions for all levels of experience, and it‘s a great way to get involved. Contact us at srisken623@aol.com or adosai@aol.com or come visit us at the field.


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STAY HYDRATED It will be hot and humid. You’ll need a Camelbak or similar hydration system. Don’t take the field without one. It’s the best way to stay hydrated and in the game.


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Unit cohesiveness is our key to success Keep your unit intact. It doesnâ€&#x;t matter if you are Airborne, Infantry, or Armor; American, British, Canadian or French . Itâ€&#x;s almost more important how many Allied players are on the field at 5 PM versus how many are there at 9 AM. We need you on the field at the end of the day. Your unit is counting on you.


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TACTICS and MOVEMENTS By Randy Crow British 3rd Infantry

„inland‟ our next objective is to take Caen. Caen will be the scene of „house to house‟ fighting. It will be different than how they did it in WW2. It will be different than the military does it today. But it will be unique to paintball!

General: As in all paintball (or military) situations, the clearing teams must move tactically and safely. Individuals who are part of a clearReady Positions: The two weapon ready poing team must move in a standard manner, sitions are low ready and high ready. using practiced techniques known to all.

There‟s lots of interest in the new buildings sprouting up all over the field, and with that comes interest in military MOUT (Military On Urban Terrain) tactics. Yet we all know that not everything military applies to paintball. But Individual Movement and Weapons Conyou can take nuggets of information from this trol:

article and apply them to your paintball tactics and techniques. Once we land at Sword Beach and push

there is no need to return to the standing position to engage targets unless the soldier must move to another firing position. Valuable time is saved by resuming target engagement from the kneeling position. When other members of the team see a soldier drop to one knee, they know immediately that he has a malfunction and that they should engage in his sector.

Low ready position: The butt of the weapon is placed firmly in the pocket of the shoulder with the barrel pointed down at a 45 degree angle. This is the safest carry position. It 1. When moving, team members hold their weapons with the muzzle pointed in the direc- should be used in the fire team stack or when tion of travel. They keep the butt of the rifle in preparing to clear "High-Low". the pocket of their shoulder, with the both High ready position: The butt of the weapon eyes open looking through the optic or down is held under the armpit, with the barrel the sights. Soldiers swing the muzzle with pointed slightly up, keeping the front sight astheir head so that the rifle is always aimed sembly under the line of sight but within the where the soldier is looking. gunner‟s peripheral vision. To engage a target, 2. Team members avoid "flagging" or leading, the gunner pushes the weapon out When the weapon leaves the armpit, he slides it up into with the weapon when working around windows, doors, corners, or where obstacles must the firing shoulder. This technique is best suited for the lineup outside the door be negotiated. Flagging the weapon gives advance warning to anyone looking in the soldier‟s direction. Soldiers must keep their UNIT MOVEMENT weapons under control at all times. General: The preferred technique is to move 3. Team members should keep weapons safe using bounding overwatch. Normally the pla(index finger outside of trigger guard) until toon/squad will move as two elements: a hostile target is movement element and an overwatch eleidentified and ment. When necessary, these elements or engaged. After a parts of them exchange roles. If moving in team member small elements, there may be a designated clears his sector overwatch element. of all targets, he returns his Key Points to Consider: weapon to a position. 1. Elements moving by themselves or infiltrating may not have support elements. 4. If a soldier has a malfunc2. The platoon/squad leader determines when tion with his to rotate elements during movement. weapon during close quarters 3. The platoon/squad will use a covered and combat, he concealed route whenever possible. Moving should immedithrough or behind buildings, along walls, and ately drop to one trees. Avoiding open areas, streets, alleys, and knee and conother danger areas unless necessary. duct immediate action to reduce 4. The platoon/squad makes the best use of the malfunction. (Continued on page 16) Once the weapon is operational,


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cover and concealment when moving, moving in the street only when ROE dictates or the situation requires.

Key points to consider while moving through a street:

Movement through a Street:

1. Use smoke, rubble and debris for cover and concealment.

When forced to move in the street the squad/platoon has a few options. Platoon:

with grenade launchers and machine guns a squad is not something to trifle with. The reason a squad has two or more fire-teams is because it gives a squad leader a great deal of flexibility. If one fire-team

2. Clear intersecting streets and alleyways in similar techniques used for the clearing of intersecting hallways.

Move the two squads/teams abreast, having 3. The platoon/squad will cross the urban danger areach squad/team overwatch the buildings for- eas using the greatest cover, concealment, speed, ward and across the street on ground level and and overwatch. An element normally crosses as a dispersed group at the same time but METT-T conditions may cause the element leader to decide to cross in buddy teams or individually. 4. Always stay at least one meter away from buildings. Rounds that strike buildings tend to follow the walls making the one meter closest to buildings and walls a dangerous area. The Squad A squad consist of two to three fire-teams, with two being the average. Some militaries, like the French and British call a squad a section. Not all squads are broken down into fire-teams.

observing the stories above the opposite squad. * One Squad Forward, Fire Teams on Opposite Sides: Use this technique (figure B) when making contact with a small element is important and the number of buildings with more than two floors is low. It also keeps two squads free to maneuver. * Two Squads Forward on Opposite Sides: Use this option when many multi storied buildings are present and the risk from above is high. This technique doubles the number of soldiers that will focus on the 2nd floor and above. Squad: During squad movement the lead buddy team/fire team covers across the street forward of the lead element at ground level. The trail buddy team/fire team covers across and forward from the second story and higher.

makes contact with the enemy and engages in a firefight, the squad leader can send the other fire-team around to flank the enemy. With his squad already divided into teams, the squad leader doesn't have to reorganize or assign a leader, it's already done. Furthermore, the team is well balanced as far as weaponry goes. When rounds are flying a leader doesn't have time to say "You, Jake, Mike, Kevin and Eric go attack their right flank. You might as well take Jason with you because he has a machine gun. . ."

Organizing a squad into fire-teams also dramatically increases the squad leader's ability to control the A squad usually has a massive amount of firepower at squad. Instead of directing six or more people, he its disposal. However, some squads are little more only has to direct two or three, and team leaders in than a bunch of soldiers following their squad leader. turn only have to control two or three men. This inSome militaries discourage squad leaders, or any non- sures more senior soldiers are in charge, more control officer from displaying initiative. is displayed and more initiative is displayed. For the purpose of discussion I will talk about two Breaking down a squad into fire-teams is not always and three fire-team squads. With all fire-teams armed practical. If the troops are temporary breaking them down into fire-teams may not be as effective because they will not gain nearly as much experience to be very effective. Of course there are always exceptions to this rule. Another point to note is that in some formations, like US Army or British, the squad leader might lead the first fire-team and the assistant squad leader might lead the second. Other units, like the US Marine Corps, will usually have a designated team leader for each fire team. When the firing starts one fire-team can lay down a base of fire while the other fire-team gets closer. In(Continued on page 17)


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directions or receiving reports. Of course yelling sometimes works but not always.

stead of having one man cover another man while he rushes, the squad leader can have fire-teams cover each other. With three or more fire-teams, a squad leader can direct one fire-team to assist another, thereby doubling the firepower at any one point.

This is why standard operating procedures are so important to a squad. SOP's cover most situations and help overcome much of the confusion. For example, if the SOP calls for first fire-team to lay down a base of fire when they make contact and for second fire-team Firefight to envelope (flank) then everyone knows what is going to happen when the shooting starts. First team When a firefight erupts it usually escalates as combat will automatically move up so they can fire on the elements make contact with each other along the bat- enemy and Second team will look to the squad leader for directions on which way to flank the enemy. tle line. Only in the desert or other open terrain can two large units suddenly start firing at each other. Overall, the team leaders have a great deal of control and can spell the difference between victory or defeat In the woods, jungle, hills or whatever, usually fireteams start fighting and more units are committed to if they and their team are properly trained. the battle as the commander makes his decisions. Of course there are exceptions to this rule. If a unit is Some squads are organized around medium machine crossing an open area and comes under fire they will guns. For instance, not so long ago British squads have to adjust. A firefight can quickly escalate from were organized with eight men. One had a medium an individual firing at the enemy to a battalion, or machine gun and the other seven had regular assault regiment firing at the enemy if the two face each rifles. other in a line. When the firing began, the machine gunner and his When a squad makes contact with the enemy the assistant would lay down a base of fire while the six squad leader has to make several quick decisions. riflemen advanced. When the squad leader was ready These decisions are based on the mission and the for the machine gun to advance, all six riflemen squad's capabilities. He must evaluate what kind of would fire to cover the gunner's advance. force the squad is facing. Sometimes this can be determined by the how many enemy rifles are being Regardless of organization, poorly trained (or led) heard and how much of an area those weapons are squad would operate as one big mob directed by the occupying. A lot depends on the situation. If the squad leader. The squad might have a great deal of squad has been ambushed and has taken casualties firepower in the form of machine guns and rockets, he can't extract safely, he might order an attack. but there would often be a lack of initiative among What kind of attack varies on the terrain and situathe troops. The Soviets were a prime example of this. tion. Most likely he will order a fire-team to try and Sometimes paintball is a prime flank the enemy, or he might bring up the other fire- example. team to help suppress the enemy while casualties are extracted. All tactics were based on battle Of course he might order everyone to run for their life. As explained above fire-teams are independent units and have a great deal of firepower. It is the squad leader's mission to deploy his fire-teams in an effective manner against the enemy. With all the yelling, screaming, gunfire and confusion, a squad leader has a very difficult job controlling his squad and maneuvering it effectively. A squad leader can't always see his entire squad, or even his team leaders. Squad radios are a god send to a squad leader and allow him to receive reports and give orders. If the squad doesn't have radios the squad leader has to yell or use hand arm signals. Usually yelling is of limited value because of all the noise and hand arm signals down work very well unless people are looking at him or it is night time. What ends up happening is he has to run around from team leader to team leader giving

drills or standard operating procedures. The advantage of this method was that everyone knew what was going on and what was expected of them. Only squad leaders knew how to read a map or a radio. If something unexpected happened then the battle drill could rapidly fall apart. To overcome this the Soviets used waves. When wave one fell apart then wave two would move in, or wave three. Eventually, one wave would succeed and the waves that failed could regroup and reorganize. This method of combat was great for the Soviets who relied on quantity over quality. (sound

like a paintball game you‘ve attended?) Soviet soldiers were not encouraged to think or act on their own. In a Soviet type military, the squad leader would be nothing more than a fire-team leader with a lot more men and weapons than usual. The platoon commander, an officer, would be the real decision maker and even then he would always defer to a higher authority. A Soviet style squad is heavily armed with automatic weapons. Usual doctrine calls for the squad to deploy on line and while standing or crouching, advance on the enemy. As the squad advances a high volume of fire would be maintained so that the squad would have fire superiority and their enemy would be forced to seek cover. With fire superiority, the Soviet squad would advance on line with their weapon in their shoulder or at their hip. When a soldier fired he would 'walk' his rounds into the target, adjusting his aim according to where his rounds hit. Of course the Soviets did not always do it this way. They would take cover and use finer tactics, but because they didn't trust their soldiers they preferred to keep things as simple as possible and trained their troops accordingly. Most of their soldiers were conscripts and didn't want to be there anyway. This is also a reason nearly all Soviet weapons had the automatic fire capability. Patrol A squad is organized very well for a patrol. It has enough organic firepower to hold its own and is small enough to move with some degree


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The Defense A squad in the defense can be a powerful force. A squad leader, as directed and assisted by the platoon leader is assigned a specific area to cover. In turn, the squad leader assigns his fire-team leaders specific areas to cover and they assign individuals specific areas as described in Fire-team Defense.

echelons to support the squad formation. The lead fire-team may deploy in a team wedge or a skirmishers formation.

Squad Skirmisher/On line: When the squad leader knows his right and left flanks are covered and he knows the enemy is to his front he will deploy his squad on line (also called a skirmish line). This allows him to concentrate firepower to the front The squad leader makes sure the machine but leaves him vulnerable to the guns are properly placed and can fire across flanks. Deploying the squad on line the squad's front. The squad leader also insures all areas of the squad's front are covered is also a good way to search an area. Fire-teams will likely deploy in by one or more weapons. More details on the skirmisher formations, wedges, or Defense will be covered in another section. echelons depending on the perceived threat. The on line formation Formations is usually very hard to control even under the best circumstances and is A squad only uses dedicated formations when used only when contact is imminent it is moving to the attack. During patrols it or searching an area. At night this is may use formations but due to the fact patrols a nightmare because people usually usually cover large amounts of area formations can't see the person to either side very well. are not always practical except in certain situations. The squad uses many of the same Squad V: The squad V is a reverse of the formations as a fire team, with one additional wedge. This is used primarily to protect the one. rear of a larger unit's column. Firepower is concentrated to the rear and flanks. One variaInside the squad formation, the fire-teams are tion of this is to have the two lead fire-teams in their own formations. Sometimes the squad close together. When contact is made, the first leader dictates which formations the fire-teams two fire-teams will lay down a base of fire and will use but not always. For instance in a squad the trailing fire-team flanks the enemy. wedge, the lead fire-team might be in a fireteam wedge and the fire-teams on either side The Column: The column is used when the might be in echelons. squad is more interested in speed. It is always easier to follow the guy in front of you than to Squad Wedge: When the squad leader does make your own trail. At night the column fornot know where the enemy is he will likely demation keeps people from wandering off and ploy the squad in a wedge formation. This getting separated. The column is also more gives him protection to the front and flanks. It quieter since one person is making a path and only works with three fire-teams however. If a everyone else is following instead of making squad leader does not have three fire-team he their own. The disadvantage of a colmay employ an echelon, or have the lead team umn is firepower to the front and form a wedge and the second team follow in a rear is severely limited and the squad column. Like the fire-team wedge, this formais vulnerable to attack. Firepower to tion is easier to control because nearly everythe sides is good however. one can see the lead rifleman and adjust off him. Whenever a squad makes contact with the enemy it usually tries to deSquad Echelon: When the squad leader is exploy in a line facing the enemy. This pecting an attack from the side he will likely way more squad members are able deploy the squad in an echelon facing the posto fire at the enemy and not risk sible enemy location. This concentrates fireshooting another squad member. power in that direction and provides protection When the unit is on line it is very difto the front as well. The squad echelon can be ficult to control and this is where the used when protecting a larger unit's flank. Inteam leaders play a big role. If the dividual fire-teams will most likely deploy in fire-team leaders are incompetent

and not paying attention to the battle they may fail to support another fire-team or be completely ineffective against the enemy.

Working with Armor The ability to conduct combined arms operations can completely change the dynamics of your operation. Itâ€&#x;s works for the military and it works for your paintball team. For Oklahoma D-day, the British-Canadian Commonwealth forces have a very capable armor element. But itâ€&#x;s critical to have our infantry and armor working together. Together they are much more effective and deadly than when used a separate elements. Use your armor support. Communicate with them, fight with them, protect them from AT fire, and move with them. While military tactics donâ€&#x;t apply 100% I hope this article has given you tactics and ideas you can apply to your paintball skills. Randy Crow


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Women, World War Two and D-day During the home front war effort of WW2, more women were working outside of the home than ever before. Propaganda posters with images like "Rosie the Riveter" promoted the idea that it was patriotic -- and not unfeminine -- for women to work in non-traditional jobs. The 1940‘s were a time of change, growth and adjustment. While WW2 may be two generations removed for some of the players at Wyandotte, it‘s been less than 70 years ago. Still fresh enough in the minds of those who fought both the war and the stereotype: http:// www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123773525 Barely 60 days ago, a long overlooked group of WWII female pilots were finally honored with the Congressional Gold Medal. Just as the contributions of women were instrumental to the success of World War II, the contributions made by the women of D-Day are rapidly changing the face of the D-Day experience It‘s never the intent to single women out and make them feel as if under magnified scrutiny. We know how hard they work to be considered a team mate, an equal. Rather, it‘s simply to let them know that they are appreciated and welcomed to participate at many different levels in The World‘s Largest Paintball event. There truly is a need for more involvement in the D-Day experience and it‘s not just limited to playing in the game. If women don‘t want to play that‘s certainly their choice and as we all know, there‘s more to the week of DDay than The Big Game. Join in the annual costume contest! Work your way up the promotion ladder to become the first female Staff member – Field Marshal, SAC, or COS. It can be done! Ever at the forefront of what people want in a game, the family atmosphere found at D-Day Adventure Park is what continues to bring thousands of people from around the globe together in friendly rivalry. I personally would like to encourage more females to take an active role in whatever venue they feel most comfortable in. Everything from learning how to play the game to dressing up in costumes of the 1940‘s era, you‘re welcomed, appreciated and definitely needed. The Allies would like to take this time to thank each and every female who attends D-Day. Regardless of your responsibilities, your physical presence is raising the bar for generations to come. We thank you and salute you. Want to help but don‘t know where to start? Just email: TheBondChick@Yahoo.com In 1942, the United States was faced with a severe shortage of pilots, and leaders gambled on an experimental program to help fill the void: Train women to fly military aircraft so male pilots could be released for combat duty overseas.

WASP program. They ferried new planes long distances from factories to military bases and departure points across the country. They tested newly overhauled planes. And they towed targets to give ground and air gunners training shooting — with live ammunition. The WASP exThe Original Fly Girls pected to become part of the military during their service. Instead, the program was canceled after just two years.

The group of female pilots was called the Women Airforce Service Pilots — WASP. Female WWII Pilots: In 1944, during the graduation ceremony for the last WASP training class, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Air Forces, Henry "Hap" They weren't granted military status until the 1970s. Arnold, said, "Now in 1944, it is on the record that And now, 65 years after their service, they will receive women can fly as well as men," Arnold said. the highest civilian honor given by the U.S. Congress. A few more than 1,100 young women, all civilian volLast July, President Obama signed a bill awarding the unteers, flew almost every type of military aircraft — WASP the Congressional Gold Medal. The ceremony will including the B-26 and B-29 bombers — as part of the take place on May 12 on Capitol Hill.

USO Show Wednesday 7 PM Vendor area A little history; The USO was formed in response to a 1941 request from President Roosevelt. FDR determined that it would be best if private organizations handled the on-leave entertainment for the rapidly expanding Armed Services. By 1944, the USO ran over 3,000 clubs. Hollywood stars took to serving and entertaining service men at these clubs, an activity which became the focus of many films (Hollywood Canteen, Stage Door Canteen). The USO truly made history with its campaign to entertain the troops on the front, with their traveling camp shows. Between 1941 and 1947, the USO put on 428,521 shows for the members of the armed forces.

Pin-Up Girl Costume Contest If researching the different uniforms women wore during WWII, one will note that there just isn‘t much to emulate as the role of women in the war itself was minimal at best. In fact, while the Allies did have more women involved in their forces than ever before, German females were not allowed to serve at all. Why then, can‘t we have a Pin-Up Girl costume contest? Before you run around yelling ‗sexual objectification‘ let‘s take a look at the definition of the term Pin-Up Girl:

A pin-up girl or pin-up model is a model whose mass-produced pictures see wide appeal as pop culture. Pin-up girls are glamour models, fashion models, and actresses. Pin-up may also refer to drawings, paintings and other illustrations done in emulation of these photos. So there you have it. Pin-up Girls are the pop culture of the 1940‘s. Search for pictures of any pin-up girl and you‘ll see hundreds of photos that are tasteful with much less shown than what you‘d see on the beach this summer. A Pin-Up Girl costume contest = Family friendly. Should this be held at the same time as the other costume contest? More importantly, who wants to help judge?


20

Tactical Radio Procedures Armies have struggled with coordinating their actions, particularly with units not in direct sight, ever since military elements were organized from the club wielding mobs of our distant ancestors. The invention of man portable radio sets introduced in the middle of the 20th century began to allow some of the larger elements (brigade or company and above) to communicate. This allowed coordinated action across large areas, even across continents. Quickly it became apparent that, in the crucible of combat, unless careful protocols were followed communication would rapidly deteriorate into a series of misunderstandings and garbled messages. This problem became even more critical when radios became small, simple and inexpensive enough to provide communication capability to every soldier. The personal nature of coordinating movement at the squad and fire team level, combined with the frenetic pace and stress of action and combat, makes the very act of sending and receiving communication problematic by causing sensory overload. Over time a protocol has evolved that allows even individual soldiers to effectively communicate over the radio, even during the worst firefight. While the specifics of radio protocol do vary from country to country and even unit to unit, there are some general principles that ubiquitous. THINK THEN SPEAK: Knowing what you want to say before you key the microphone is important. KISS: Keep It Simple and Short: Complex communication via radio are to be avoided. Messages should be simple and concise. USE PERIODS: You need to remember to tell others when you are done speaking to avoid interruptions and prompt responses Basic Concepts 1) 2) 3) 4)

Is your TX necessary? Does it add to our intel or help complete the mission? Brevity – to the point, succinct Clarity – avoid contractions, use phonetic alphabet when necessary, Calmness – don‘t over react or add to confusion

The standing "rule of thumb" for net communications is if you can leave a word out without changing the meaning, leave it out. If a description of an item will not add to the understanding of the subject of the message, leave it out. Listen before you call. The channel may be in use. Garbles or lost TX may result If more than one station is TX. Speak clearly – Use your normal voice and do not speak too fast. Hold the microphone close to your mouth but at right angles and talk across the face of the microphone. This reduces distortion and wind noise. Handheld radios are designed with vertical antennas. Hold your radio with the antenna pointing straight up. Holding your radio with the antenna horizontal will decrease it‘s range for both transmitting and receiving. Think before you speak – Know what you are going to say before you press the PPT switch. Divide your message into natural phrases instead of individual words so that it flows smoothly. Wait a fraction of a second after pressing the mic button before speaking, to make sure you don't clip off the first syllable. When the "battery save" is on, your radio goes into a reduced power mode after several minutes of standby and needs a signal to be present for a second before it "wakes up" to pass any audio Don't talk louder in noisy environment. It's natural to talk louder when it is noisy around you, but don't do that on the radio. If you speak louder, the radio clips your voice to avoid over modulating the transmitter, distorting the audio, reducing voice intelligibility. NEVER use VOX or locking PPT switches because they lead to jammed channels and inadvertent TX. Be careful what you say on the air. Remember that anyone could be listening. Do not editorialize. Do not use profanity. Stay on topic Do not exaggerate or embellish. Only TX facts - numbers of troops, resupply needs, situation, etc. Do not use ―10 codes‖ or Ham radio ―Q‖ codes. LE ―10 codes‖ vary across the county. Not everyone is in law enforcement or Ham radio. Relinquish channel (stop TX) for urgent or emergency traffic Numbers: 310 is ―three - one – zero‖, not ―three ten‖ nor ―three one oh‖ Shield your microphone from the wind. Wind blowing across the microphone makes it more difficult to understand. Use only the power necessary for your location. Low power will extend battery life. Fewer TX will extend battery life (Continued on page 21)


21 (Continued from page 20)

Your radio won‘t work as well attached to your waist. Close to your body will block a significant portion of the signal. Try to get the antenna as high as possible for the best reception and range when transmitting. Fully charge / discharge battery is best way to maintain rechargeable, non Li-Ion, batteries. VHF and UHF radios are FM, which is LOS (line-of-sight). LOS is severely affected by ravines and hills. If your TX is not getting through try a new, higher position, if possible. Line of Site (LOS) at 5 feet elevation, over flat ground is about 2.7 miles. This is approximately the maximum range of a signal from a person standing to another person lying on the ground. If both people are standing the LOS would be doubled to 5.4 miles. LOS from a 26‘ tower is approximately 9 miles. This is assuming flat ground. Hills, ravines, mountains can drastically affect this. If you have trouble receiving or sending a signal try a new, higher location. . Voice Procedures

Radio communications carries an established language. These phrases have a distinct meaning, and the use of these phrases shortens transmissions times, reduces confusion and improves clarity. Everyone should become familiar with these procedural phrases starting with the phonetic alphabet. There is no need to make radio communications difficult or complex. Keep TX short and to the point. Do not ―talk around‖ the subject or use improvised code. This only confuses matters.

Alpha

Echo

India

Mike

Quebec

Uniform

Yankee

Bravo

Fox

Juliet

November

Romeo

Victor

Zulu

Charlie

Golf

Kilo

Oscar

Sierra

Whiskey

Delta

Hotel

Lima

Papa

Tango

X-Ray

Due to any number of variables, including radio static, noise, guns firing, or similarity in the phonetics of different words, a critical piece of information can be misheard or misunderstood. For instance, a unit being ordered to grid location C11 might misunderstand as D7. To reduce ambiguity, critical information may be broken down and read as separate letters and numbers. The grid location number reads visually as C eleven. When read over a radio it becomes Charlie One One. Basic procedure for contacting the TOC or another person. - “You, this is me, over” ―November One, this is Charlie One, over‖ This example contains all the required elements of a transmission. A, this is B. Over. Generally this particular example is used to initiate a series of transmissions. When Charlie One needs to talk to November One he needs to make sure that November One is listening. This short phrase also tells other people on the same frequency they may not need to pay attention to this transmission, allowing them to continue doing what they were doing. When November One hears this transmission he replies in kind, indicating that he has heard Charlie One and is prepared to converse. ―This is November One, over‖ Now, Charlie One knows that November One can hear him and he can begin his conversation. Standardized Phrases Over — I have finished talking and I am listening for your reply. Short for "Over to you." Out — I have finished talking to you and do not expect a reply. Roger – ―I understand‖ Wilco – I received your transmission, I understand and I will comply I Copy — ―I received the following message….‖ Be advised – ―You should be aware the…‖ Say Again - repeat your last message (Repeat is not used. It is a specific artillery command) Break – announcing a brief pause in your TX; completion of sentence. Wait one – I will take a pause and TX in one minute Correction – An error was made and the correct message is… Last station calling – I am addressing the last TX of unknown identity Negative – cannot comply or answering no to a question Communications are a critical part of our success at D-day. Regardless of what type of radio you use; (FRS, GMRS, VHF, UHF, 800 MHz, etc) using proper procedures and techniques will help insure your transmission is received, and you hear the reply. The techniques you use will impact the range of your radio. Get to know your radio, make sure you understand it‘s functions and controls. And follow these guides lines.


22

2010 Points, Objectives and Times Area

Objective

North

South

Brecourt Manor Colleville Church Sword Beach Merderet Bridge Pegasus Bridge

North South

Utah Caen

Center

Omaha Beach WG 1

50

50

50

50

200

Center

Omaha Beach WG 2

50

50

50

50

200

North

Causeway #2

50

50

50

150

Valley

SME

50

50

50

150

Valley

La Fiere Bridge

Valley

Vierville

North

Airfield

50

50

100

200

Center

St. Laurent

50

50

50

150

Center

Cherbourg Bridge

Center

Colleville Center

Center South Valley

Time

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00 100

100

50

50

100

100

100

300 50

100

50

50 50 100

50

150

100 50

50 50

50

50

50

50

50

50

200 100

100

100

50

50

50

50

200

50 100

150 100

100

300

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00 250

450

450

300

350

350

250

200

200

150

200

150

300

150

225

Running total

250

700

1150

1450

1800

2150

2400

2600

2800

2950

3150

3300

3600

3750

3975

0

0

0

0

2

1

2

2

1

1

0

2

2

0

3

Area

400 500

150

Total per time period

Number of objectives with final scoring in time period

175 400

100 100 50

25

50

50 100

Total

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 13:30 14:00 14:30 15:00 15:30 16:00 16:30 17:00

3975

Total

North

100

200

200

150

100

50

0

100

0

50

0

100

0

0

0

1050

South

100

150

150

50

100

100

50

0

50

50

100

0

100

0

100

1100

Center

50

50

100

0

100

100

100

50

50

50

50

50

150

150

150

1200

50

0

100

50

100

100

50

100

0

50

0

50

0

0

650

450

450

300

350

350

250

200

200

150

200

150

300

150

250

4000

Valley Total

250


23

82nd Airborne Recommended Equipment There are pieces of gear that every member of the 82nd Airborne / 82nd Pathfinders will need to be successful on the D -Day battlefield. Some things are obvious, like a functioning paintball gun. Others are less so, like a watch or map. This list is intended to outline the key pieces of equipment that every member of the 82nd Airborne / 82nd Pathfinders should carry with them onto the field. 82nd Uniform – One of the key aspects of the game is to maintain unit integrity throughout the game. We need to maintain unit mass to maintain effectiveness. The 82nd takes the field as a unit (0630/6:30 AM) and leaves the field as a unit (1700/5:00 PM). Your 82nd uniform helps make that happen, helps maintain unit cohesiveness and identify friend from foe. The 82nd uniform consists of recommended pants, t-shirt and armband. The 82nd Airborne‟s recommended uniform is Woodland MARPAT BDU pants and the 82nd t-shirt. Woodland MARPAT is easily found and works great in the woods and hills of Oklahoma. It‟s not required but it is strongly recommended. Armbands are available from the 82nd HQ at the field. Shirt, pants and arm band; It will help you stay with your unit and help maintain unit integrity within the 82nd. It also lets our opponents know exactly who they are facing. Treat or spray your uniform to keep ticks off you. There are plenty of ticks at the field. Remember. We fight as a unit. We take the field as a unit and we leave the field as a unit. It also lets our opponents know exactly who they are facing. Properly working paintball gun and hopper – Make sure your gun is working 100%. Replace “O” rings, lube if required. Understand your weapon completely, make sure every screw it tight. If your gun uses batteries make sure it has new batteries and they are properly installed. Make sure your hopper has new batteries and is properly secured to your gun. If your gun goes down you let down your unit. A backup gun and hopper, ready to go, back at camp is a nice option. HPA or CO2 Air Tanks – The 82nd is often tasked with missions and objectives that are far from reliable resupply for long periods of time. A large air tank is recommended. Many people carry a back-up air tank, especially if using CO2. It is usually easier to find HPA refills versus CO2 on

the field, so a backup bottle for CO2 is more critical. Carry back-up “O” rings as well. Ammunition – You‟ll need enough paint to take the battle to our opponents with speed and violence. You‟ll need to balance the amount of paint you carry versus the weight. Carry a couple more pods than you have air to shot. You can resupply on the field with previously bought paintball tickets. The heat and humidity of Oklahoma causes plenty of fatigue and dehydration without overloading yourself. Camelbak or other hydration bladder – This is a required piece of gear for all members of the 82nd Airborne when deployed to the field. A 3-liter bladder is recommended. The heat and humidity of Oklahoma will kick your ass. Dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke are all very real possibilities. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate! Make sure your bladder and drinking tube are clean. Sports drinks will foul your bladder if not properly cleaned. Watch – The D-day game is scored on points for securing or controlling specific objectives at specific times. You need to know the time in order to know where you should be and what you should be doing. It‟s a key piece of gear to help you rally, and coordinate movement and attacks. Synchronize your watch before taking the field Compass – The D-day field is large, rugged and dense. That makes it easy to get lost or confused, even for veterans. We may very well be mis-dropped in small groups or with other units in 2010. The 82nd is often required to be deep in the woods, and moving where there are few trails or roads. A small compass can make it much easier for you to link back up with your unit, direct your troops to the proper locations, or communicate information. Boots - not tennis shoes. The D-day field is rugged and littered with sharp, loose rocks. You need a good pair of comfortable, broken-in boots. You do not need, or want, insulated boots. You want boots with good ankle support. Smoke Grenades - 1 or 2 are recommended. They‟re big and you‟ll need to figure out where and how to carry them, but they are extremely useful. The 82nd uses lots of them. Rags or towels – You‟ll need something to cleanup and wipe off when you‟re in the DZ. Remember you‟ll be out there all day, you may need more than one. Continued page 25


24

Continued from page 24 D-day Map – The field is large. You need to know where you are, where you need to be, and how you are going to get there. It will help you locate dead zones and resupply points. The field will see big changes in 2010 of objective locations, points and times. You‟ll need your map to link back up with the 82 nd or lead your teammates to the next objective. Laminate it, print it on waterproof paper, or keep it in a plastic bag. The humidity will destroy it otherwise. Points/objectives/times card – Points, objectives and times will all have major changes in 2010. You‟ll need this to understand the game flow and know where to be and at what time. This is a critical tool when combined with your Op order. Laminate it, print it on waterproof paper, or keep it in a plastic bag. The humidity will destroy it otherwise. Squeegee – Your choice, there are many styles. But have a secure, easy access location for it. Paint tickets - This is your only means of resupplying ammunition (paint) on the field. You must buy these beforehand (Friday or earlier). A plastic bag will help keep them secure and dry. You can‟t carry enough paint for the entire day. Most members of the 82nd stay on the field all day. A few bucks - Some dead zones have food or drink for sale. A few dollars are easy to carry and a quick snack or drink just might be what it takes to keep you hydrated and on the field. Bulk water, to refill your hydration bladder, is available at many locations on the field at no charge. Radio w/headset – FRS radios are great to keep you in touch with your squad, regiment and our division. Most are 22 channels with 38 sub tones. A good headset will greatly enhance the usefulness of your radio. Make sure it has fresh batteries. Figure out how and where you will carry the radio. Practice with it before Saturday‟s game. Some leaders within the 82nd will also be using VHF radios and will also need a good method to mount them to your gear. Goggles - Make sure your goggles are in good shape with good lens. Anti-fog spray, new battery for the fan, might be appropriate for your goggles. Snacks – nuts, granola bars, beef jerky, dried fruit or power bars. Whatever will help you stay on the field.


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