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he Golden Age of Aviation, wedged between the two World Wars, was a pivotal time for military and civilian flight. In the late 1950s, airlines began offering new tiers of efficiency, comfort and speed, much to the detriment of the traveling experience. Flying became more commonplace, and the flames of excitement surrounding flying were snuffed with the advent of jet aircrafts. Leap forward a few decades, and most stopped considering flying an occasion to dress to the nines. Well, it’s our travel issue, and you can be damn sure we’re giving you a reason to pull out all the stops. There is no denying the role planes have had on carving out the landscape of our minds and imaginations; this issue attempts to do the same. We dodge la policía in Madrid. We get to the bottom of astral projection, the idea that you can transport your consciousness to another plane of existence—quite literally, you can be in two places at once. We travel to Himachal Pradesh, India, on a hunt for the most unique of landrace strains, led by the Indian Landrace Exchange—the true OGs of hunting and cataloguing cannabis genomes.

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And we don’t stop there. We hop in a few Ubers and realize that the people behind the wheel are chock-full of stories worthy of making The New York Times Best-Sellers list. We talk alien abduction, astrology and map out America’s most remote spots. We share the story of wartime journalist Lynsey Addario, who has traveled the world and risked her life to capture images of conflict and humanitarian crises in some of the most dangerous places on the globe. In the words of Jason Silva, “Travel is a mind-expanding drug.”

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We would like to note an error in our May 2018 Sustainability Issue. In the Oregon edition, YUP bars, were incorrectly listed as being produced by Oregon’s Finest. They are produced by Gesundheit Foods. We regret the error.

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DOPE MAGAZINE JULY 2018 | THE TRAVEL ISSUE The traditional heartland of cannabis, India, has a story to tell. It is home to a stunning diversity of landrace strains, providing the global cannabis community with the parent stock for some of the most prized varieties available today. In this issue, Seshata travels to Himachal Pradesh, India, on a hunt for the most unique of landrace strains, led by the Indian Landrace Exchange—the true OGs of hunting and cataloguing cannabis genomes. COVER PHOTO: ASHISH SHASHIDHARAN

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EFENDING UR LANT VERYWHERE As a lifestyle publication, DOPE Magazine is dedicated to creating purposeful, relevant conversations. We’ve built a steadfast framework of inclusivity when speaking about gender, race, class, politics, family and culture—with the ethos DEFEND. At DOPE, we don’t just defend our plant, but our people, patients and planet. Our highly curated content continues to focus on those who maintain a relationship with— and advocate on behalf of—cannabis. While cannabis remains the central theme of our brand, it is our belief that creating conversations about real people and relatable experiences is the best way to normalize the role that cannabis plays in society. Our aim is to continue to illuminate issues that deserve our attention and must be addressed if we wish to both promote and create change. We are grateful for your time, we welcome your feedback and are ever appreciative of your participation and dedication in creating positive, lasting change in the cannabis community.

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T H E T R AV E L I S S U E

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ULY

FEATURES 028 TRAVEL

INTO THE NOT-SO-WILD

MAPPING AMERICA’S MOST REMOTE SPOTS 034 PROFILE

RENEW THE SPIRIT, REFRESH THE MIND ASTROLOGER AND MEDIUM JESSICA LANYADOO’S TRAVEL ADVICE 036 FEATURE

LYNSEY ADDARIO

WARTIME PHOTOJOURNALISM THROUGH A WOMAN’S LENS 044 FEATURE

SCOTTY, BEAM ME UP PLEASE! THE PHENOMENON OF ALIEN ABDUCTION 048 CULTURE

THE STRANGERS IN YOUR CITY

BUILDING CONNECTIONS THROUGH RIDESHARE APPS 054 #SCOUTEDBYDOPE

#SCOUTEDBYDOPE 058 CULTURE

THE ART OF ASTRAL PROJECTION TRAVEL ANYWHERE WITH THESE EASY-ISH STEPS 064 EDITOR’S CHOICE

SUN WIZARD CREATIONS 066 CULTURE

DOPE ON THE ROAD MADRID

072 DOPE SHOTS

DOPE PHOTO CONTEST

CONGRATULATIONS, CHRIS NOWAKOWSKI

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020 COVER FEATURE

STRAIN HUNTING IN INDIA’S CANNABIS HEARTLAND

PHOTOGRAPHY ASHISH SHASHIDHARAN


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WRITTEN BY SESHATA PHOTOS BY ASHISH SHASHIDHARAN

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Clockwise from bottom: Irrazin (ILE key member), Shree (ILE key member), Chachaji (village elder), Baba-ji (village elder), Mama-ji (village elder)

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DANK IN DELHI We begin in Delhi, where we are taken to a small, clandestine indoor grow op—one of a small but rising number. The crew, led by Shree and his partner, Deepak, are testing cultivars they hope will make it in the extreme heat of India, using a harsh—but effective—method. To “weed out” the weak plants with insufficient heat resistance, the crew discontinues the ventilation and AC for three straight days during the vegetative period, exposing the young plants to the full force of the Delhi summertime heat. By the end of this period, most of the plants in the room will be dead—but the few survivors will be grown out and used as the basis for breeding more heat-resistant varieties. This brutal effort is a necessary means of futureproofing Shree’s crops, and maybe cannabis worldwide. Many expect Delhi’s already extreme temperatures to increase as climate change continues to exert its already tangible effects. The majority of breeders in the world focus on cannabinoid and terpene content; only a small, farsighted minority, including Shree, recognize the need for heat and drought-resistant varieties that can be grown without vast energy expenditure. Climate change is a present-day reality, not a future fear, one that that makes itself known many times during our expedition. Later that day, our departure for Himachal Pradesh is delayed by the mother of all thunderstorms—“just a little premonsoon rain,” Irrazin says with irony. The early arrival of monsoon weather is yet another sign of the changing climate, and is already affecting crop cycles throughout the region.

WHAT IS THE INDIAN LANDRACE EXCHANGE? Irrazin first conceptualized the Indian Landrace Exchange in 2015, when he began to frequent Internet message boards dedicated to cannabis breeding. He formed relationships with breeders from across the world, although mostly concentrated in the USA, who impressed on him the importance of Indian cannabis stock. “I knew that these Indian landrace seeds were important,” Irrazin shares. “I knew that they were the backbone of some of the world’s most famous cultivars—but at the time, I didn’t quite grasp the full potential . . . How far we could go, how much we could give back to the villagers.” He refers to the denizens of Malana, who cultivate these important plants in extreme isolation from the rest of the world. Irrazin devised an idea to build up an inventory of landrace seeds collected from local farmers, exchange them with breeders throughout the world, and distribute the profits back to those farmers. He then created a Facebook page for the new concept: the Indian Landrace Exchange. “The idea was to create an unbroken chain of resources for both parties,” describes Irrazin. “The breeders get seeds that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to, and the villagers get goods that they don’t have access to.” The Indian Landrace Exchange began to develop a reputation in the industry, mobilizing contacts in Manipur, Rajasthan, South India and Kashmir for the purpose of seed collection and inventory building. By December 2017, the team designed an official logo and started distributing packaged, labeled seeds in an organized manner. “We began to build up a clientele and make some money,” Irrazin explains. “Of course, we keep some for our travel expenses, to make sure everybody’s taken care of. Then, we give back a certain amount to the farmers that supply the seed, either cash or goods that they can’t otherwise get hold of.”

"

I

ndia, traditional heartland of cannabis, has a story to tell. For thousands of years, it’s been home to a stunning diversity of landrace strains, providing the global cannabis community with the parent stock for some of the most prized varieties available today. We’ve come to India to meet with Irrazin and Shree from the Indian Landrace Exchange. The two will lead us from the metropolis of Delhi to the remote mountain village of Malana to explore local cannabis customs and learn about the abundant diversity of landraces in the area, as well as to discuss their long-term plans and ambitions for cannabis in India. Our group comprises myself and my fiancé, Jaco; Irrazin, key member of the Indian Landrace Exchange and holder of deep, abundant cannabis wisdom; Shree, a bright, dynamic young grower, charras enthusiast and all-round hustler; Ashish, photographer, grindcore vocalist and expert imitator of accents; and Krishna, AKA Edwin Dimitri, an accountant with a sparkling wit and a love of all things science.

. . .THE SHEER DIVERSITY AND VARIATION FOUND IN MALANA'S CANNABIS POPULATION MAY BE UNRIVALLED ANYWHERE ELSE ON THE PLANET. 21

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Irrazin in his nat u ra l hab it at , Mama-ji’s fields.

THE CANNABIS PLANTS OF MALANA

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Af ter a rough journey into the Himachal Pradesh region, including a bus, a taxi and a two-hour hike, we reach Malana. Here, lush fields carpet the slopes; a diverse abundance of plants occupy all available s p a c e . I t ’s obvious that cannabis is a real part of the ecosystem— unlike Morocco, where, outside of cultivated fields, cannabis does not grow, save for a few escapees. Cannabis lines the sides of every path and road, vying for space with a profusion of wild mint and oregano, clovers, docks, plantains, thistles and nettles—vegetation that, were it not for the cannabis, would resemble any upland or northern part of Europe. The mountain’s paths shimmer as if sprinkled with silver— schist rocks rich in quartz, mica and graphite, eroded into tiny, glittering particles, one of many ingredients in the soil’s mineral-rich sediment. This sparkling soil is highly prized for making chillums, the ubiquitous, ancient Indian pipe still employed by most charras smokers in India today. For centuries, villagers have augmented the already rich soil with abundant organic matter. Pesticides and chemical fertilizers are not welcome in and around Malana. In this rich, loamy clay soil, cannabis grows unhindered with minimal human intervention, free to reproduce and express whatever traits work best in its environment. Due to this ecosystem, the sheer diversity and variation found in Malana’s cannabis population may be unrivaled anywhere else on the planet. Most of these crops are selfmaintaining—one patch was planted twenty years ago and has been left to its own devices ever since. It is full of lush, deep-green plants already three to four feet in height, with large, medium-wide leaves, gargantuan, hollow stems, long internodes, and already-obvious terpene production. Although clearly leaning more to the sativa side of the cannabis spectrum, these plants also have some indica traits, as evidenced by the width of their leaves. It’s likely that outside genetics have been introduced over the years, so these plants may in fact be hybridized to some extent; however, this region of the planet is part of a continuum of different cannabis biotypes, stretching all the way from Kazakhstan to Thailand. It’s important to make an effort to preserve and catalog these landraces—they are the backbone of many of the world’s best-known and loved cultivars. There are potentially infinite variations to be found here, many of which may contain cannabinoid profiles useful in treating a range of diseases and ailments.

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


WHAT THE ILE CAN DO FOR MALANA “As far as the future is concerned, the first priority is to conduct open-pollination programs on certain good specimens we’ve found, increase the stock, and get the stock to places like the USA, where the gene pool is really just a poly-hybrid circus,” details Irrazin, explaining what the Indian Landrace Exchange has to offer growers worldwide. “Everyone’s getting tired of the same old flavors. They want something new, and I think that’s where we come in. Not just for the funk and the flavor, but also for the potential of cannabinoid combinations that could be useful for some kind of ailment.” “ The next leap is to set up a physical location, at the epicenter of charras, which of course must be Malana. So we’re working directly with the villagers to build a guesthouse in Waychen Valley. The elder Mama-ji will handle the money from the guests, the food and so on; we’ll bring guests every so often, and just maintain a small office space there.” Additionally, the team hopes to help set up a kiosk selling a selection of local landrace seeds as souvenirs. These seeds will come directly from the village, and the money will go straight to the village elders, who will distribute it in the form of social projects. The Indian Landrace Exchange plans to enter Spannabis next year with a sample of top-quality local charras, hoping to put India on the modern global cannabis community map. The sample will no doubt be made by the expert hands of the elder Mama-ji, whose product is revered throughout the Malana area. Mama-ji is one of Malana’s best charras makers, a handsome man in his thirties with tightly-curled hair and an irrepressible smile. He produces cannabis cream of such high quality that it resembles bubble hash, with a clear appearance and smooth, fresh taste.

Natural biodiversity found in Malana.

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The heart of Malana village, looking out towards the peaks of Chandrakhani and Deo Tibba.

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CHACHA−JI, MAKER OF MEDICINAL OILS Later, we are honored to meet another elder of great esteem, Chacha-ji (a name of respect, meaning “ father ’s brother ”; his true name remains a mystery), owner of his own house and fields, and maker of medicinal cannabis oils according to ancient techniques. Chacha-ji subjects fresh cannabis to heat and pressure until the oil separates from the plant matter. It is then further heated and filtered to remove the plant matter, leaving behind a rich, red oil that has little remaining trace of terpenes, but a powerful kick of cannabinoids when tasted. Chacha-ji supplies these oils to medical patients sent to him by Ayurvedic doctors in Delhi. Cannabis is a powerful tool in the Ayurvedic tradition of medicine, although it cannot be officially dispensed. Doctors instead send patients to Chachaji in Malana, where they receive some of the cleanest, most potent cannabis preparations found in the country. These patients include sufferers of cancer, epilepsy and migraines, among other ailments. Records are impossible to maintain, but Chacha-ji has received multiple positive reports from patients and the doctors who sent them. Patients pay for his services, as they would for any other medicine, but if they cannot, he donates to those in need. Chacha-ji continues his legacy by passing on his wisdom to a select handful of initiates from the village who will expand the number of patients he can treat and, in time, hopefully form a thriving network of medicinal oil makers. To facilitate his work, the Indian Landrace Exchange plans to supply him with a rosin press. Malana is still ruled by strict traditional beliefs. Outsiders may not rub the plants that grow there to make charras. Chacha-ji will not pass his learning on to anyone other than his fellow natives of Malana.

A TRIP TO WAYCHEN VALLEY Later we are guided up a steep mountain path by the elder Baba, a gentle, quiet man who exudes an air of wisdom and serenity. As a sadhu, he dresses austerely in a turban and long kirtle, which does not impede his agile, mountainadapted gait. Baba is leading us to a small summer settlement in the Waychen Valley. In summer, a handful of families inhabit the valley, along with their cows, chickens and goats, and decamp back to Malana in winter. In springtime, as soon as the snows melt, the villagers climb these hillsides and plant millions of cannabis seeds along the terraced slopes. In June, these plants are little over twelve inches tall and carpet the hills; between them grow clovers and mosses, which the cows happily eat while studiously avoiding every cannabis plant. I ask Irrazin if cows ever eat cannabis, to which he replies: “No, but the goats and sheep love it—they need to be kept away, or they can eat their way through an entire field in a few minutes!” Little stands in the Waychen Valley settlement, save for a handful of traditional wooden houses and a cluster of tents, one of which is to be our home for the night. As the light fades, we build a fire and wait for dinner, a delicious kidney bean dal with rice and eggs. We pass multiple chillums around the circle in an almost unbroken chain. The heady effect gradually builds up to a sense of otherworldly lightness, a euphoric feeling heightened by the dramatic outlines of the mountains that surround us and the feelings of awe they inspire. That evening, the sounds of psychedelic trance music echoes through the valley, emanating from a dozen different sound systems. This, too, is a relatively recent phenomenon; a reminder that even in the most remote reaches of the Himalayas, the modern world is never far. For an extended version of this article go to dopemagazine.com/strain-hunters/

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ave you ever wanted to get as far away from it all as possible? But how would you do it? And what would “far away from it all” even mean? For the past nine years, Ryan and Rebecca Means have been trying to determine exactly that for every state in the nation. But of course, the couple, both ecologists, weren’t content to simply map America’s most inaccessible places—they wanted to experience them for themselves. “We thought, if we can calculate this location, then we must stand on it and know what it feels like,” explains Ryan, “and we must bring our baby along with us.” With their daughter Skyla in tow, now 10 years old, the Means have successfully calculated and trekked to the remotest spots in 33 states for nearly a decade. They call this midlife crisis-inspired family mission Project Remote, and document their efforts at RemoteFootprints.org. Visitors to the site can click through the family’s bios, plus blog entries about their efforts in mapping each state, photos from their 773 miles of total travel by foot and sometimes boat, peaceful videos taken at the remote spots, rankings of their distance from civilization—from 21.6 miles in Wyoming to 1.1 in Connecticut—and other multimedia tidbits to help you live out your own escapist fantasies.

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VERED O C S I D Y . . . THE QUICKLYVERY G IN BEGINNIN STATE ME THEIR HO DA-THAT I OF FLOR ESS IN REMOTEN RICA IS ME A N R E D O M BY. E M O C O HARD T

To keep their efforts scientifically grounded, they defined “remoteness” as the distance from a road. A “road,” they defined in turn, is any public, private, paved and unpaved motorway, train track, powerline right of way, or other manmade route that leaves a scar on the landscape. Working within these parameters, they discovered very quickly—beginning in their home state of Florida—that remoteness in modern America is hard to come by. “At the Florida [mainland] remote spot, we heard motors and saw trash on the ground,” Ryan recalls. “It just wasn’t as climactic as you’d want it to be.” So they kept going, moving on to other Southeastern states. But even as they moved west, mapping states famed for their rugged wilderness, the problem persisted. “The real idea of Project Remote was born in looking at those other states and realizing roads were so much closer than we ever dreamed was possible,” Rebecca picks up the anecdote. “There was a bigger story to tell than just our family trying to get away from people and have an adventure.” Among their findings, they’ve learned it’s no longer possible to get more than five miles from a road in the vast majority of the contiguous United States, and that the number of roads we have is continually increasing—even in national conservation areas where most “remote” spots are located. “Almost every state has a different type of environmental issue, driven by a different industry,” Rebecca notes. Big Agriculture engulfs vast tracts of the Great Plains. Mining dominates the landscape in Kentucky. Oil and gas roads infiltrate forests in Pennsylvania and deserts in West Texas, while in North Dakota, fracking drills are visible from the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, also known as the Three Affiliated Tribes. The industry is even encroaching on a mainland remote spot in Alaska’s arctic North Slope. “It says a lot about our unchecked development and lack of massive planning,” muses Ryan.

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With so many private industrial roads being developed, determining their locations has proven the most time-consuming part of Project Remote. Rebecca obtains the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) files from different state departments of transportation, but keeps adding to them based on undocumented roads found via satellite imagery, resulting in recalculations of remote spots up to 40 to 50 times per state. The Means family ’s mission gradually evolved into a crusade, and their travel blog into a document of Mother Nature on the run in the 21st century. They now advocate a stop to roadbuilding across the country, but especially within public lands, and that if a new road is built, another of equal mileage be restored to nature. It’s a bold proposal, to be sure, but not without reason, as roads have many negative impacts on their surrounding environment. They contribute to runoff pollution, interrupt migrations, drown out mating calls, fragment habitats, reduce genetic diversity, and are responsible for the deaths of an estimated one million vertebrates in the U.S. each year. Not to mention, having fewer wilderness areas bodes badly for humans, too. Spending time in nature is an essential buffer for our mental well-being, and is associated with reduced levels of stress and anxiety, as well as an increased capacity for learning and social engagement. Speaking of social engagement, citizens can work to protect their at-risk public wildlands by voting for conservationist policies, participating in parks’ public comment periods, or simply getting out and making use of them. “All national forests have sign-in books,” explains Rebecca, “and they actually use those numbers for visitor statistics, which can drive funding and feelings for how important these areas are.” Take the time to appreciate America’s natural areas now, both for your own good and so future generations will still have somewhere to get away.

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REMOTEFOOTPRINTS.ORG

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THE NUM B ER S B EHIND PR OJEC T R EM OTE As ecologists, precise research is important to the Means family. They’ve collected vast amounts of data for Project Remote, as listed on their website, remotefootprints.org.

THIRTY THREE Number of states the Means family has traveled to for Project Remote

773 Miles traveled by foot for Project Remote

6.6 Average distance (in miles) each remote spot lies from a “road,” as defined by the Means family

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Percentage of remote spots reachable by the Means family in one travel day

SIXTY Percentage of remote spots where cell phones still had service

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strologers and Psychic mediums give people an alternate understanding of the world around them, and often even a sense of closure. They help cultivate greater insight for those who seek their talents. Jessica Lanyadoo is one such individual. Her gifts of mediumship and talents as an astrologer have gained her clients all over the world. We reached out to get her insights into travel in the physical sense, travel as a mental state and even the fated travel into the afterlife. Talking to Jessica was almost like reaching out to an old friend—I imagine that’s part of what makes her so good at her job. But for the skeptics out there, how does her gift even work? Jessica put it this way: “To say that I move between worlds sounds very fancy. It’s really not that fancy. I have the ability to perceive it. It’s like if you’re hanging out with somebody who has really good hearing, and they can hear everything the neighbor is saying, but you have really shitty hearing, so you don’t hear it. It’s just that I have excellent hearing.” Jessica explained how energy shifts from one place to another. When she visited Florence, Italy, for instance, she insists, “it was like a living nightmare.” Because of the history of the land, her visit was accompanied by splitting headaches and sickness; the energy there was strong. In contrast, her travels to Fiji were “pure magic.”

I also got the chance to dig a bit deeper and ask a question many of us want to know: What has she learned from those who have traveled to the afterlife? “One thing that I have learned is that if you want to take your bullshit with you, you can take your bullshit with you,” she laughs. “It’s not very romantic or idealistic, but if you die a dick and don’t work on healing, then you’ll be a dead dick.” She continued on, matter-offactly: “People often suffer. Their bodies break down and die. It’s part of the human condition. Part of what I find really comforting is the knowledge that we do not take the pain of the body with us.” *Jessica’s insights are both hysterical and inspiring. If you want to read more about her travel insights, head to dopemagazine. com/jessica-lanyadoo for an extended version of this article. LOVELANYADOO.COM @JESSICA_LANYADOO

FIJI

JESSICA LANYADOO’S TRAVEL TIPS

THE DESERT

If you’re planning a trip this summer and hope to renew the spirit and refresh the mind, here are Jessica’s top five location suggestions for a magical experience:

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NEWFOUNDLAND MONTREAL

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Wartime Photojournalism Through a Woman's Lens WRITTEN BY LUNA REYNA Photos Courtesy of Lynsey Addario

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Addario working in the Gaza strip in 2011 while eight months pregnant.

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"H

e ran his hands over my hair and spoke to me in a low, steady voice, repeating the same phrase over and over. I kept my face down, ignoring his touch, his words. I didn't understand what he was saying. 'What is he saying, Anthony?' Anthony took his time answering. 'He's telling you that you will die tonight.'" - It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War by Lynsey Addario September 11 rocked the nation. Nearly 3,000 people lost their lives in a plan to incite fear and bring our nation to its knees. Headlines screamed, “Act of War,” “Today, Our Nation Saw Evil,” and “War on The World,” which set the tone for the War on Terror. The War on Terror seemed to bring just that, with 17,500 bombs launched on Afghanistan by the end of December of 2001. Millions of lives were affected, and the military has never attempted to record an overall tally of civilian deaths. Still, the word “terrorist” has become synonymous with “Muslim.” Since before the attacks on the World Trade Center Twin Towers to the recent move of the American Embassy, the U.S. has played a critical role in the perception of millions of people in the Middle East—a loose term that encompasses twenty nine countries across multiple continents. It is the “terrorist” narrative, however, that opened the door for the POTUS’ recent attempt to block Muslim immigration with a travel ban against people from predominantly Muslim countries, countries with residents who predominantly follow a religion called Islam. “Muslim” is not a race. “You can’t make that general statement about Christians, for example,” Lynsey Addario told us. “When we see these big mass shootings, they are often white people who are not Muslim, who open fire and kill many, many Americans, and no one ever uses the word ‘terrorist.’ To me, I feel like there needs to be a lot more dialogue about this, and there needs to be an even playing field when we talk about terrorism overall in our country.” Few people understand these conflicts like Addario, a photojournalist who has covered every major conflict and humanitarian crisis of her generation, including crises within the borders of Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, Libya, Syria, Lebanon, South Sudan, Somalia and DR Congo. She has dedicated her life to her job in hopes of educating people: “I was now a photojournalist willing to die for stories that had the potential to educate people,” Lynsey affirms in her breathtaking book, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War. “I wanted to make people think, to open their minds, to give them the full picture of what was happening in Iraq so that they could decide whether they supported our presence there.” Addario came to this pivotal realization after Life magazine told her they would not publish her essay of injured American soldiers, because it was too “real” for the American public. In

her opinion, “The human costs of the war had been carefully concealed,” and the American people deserved to know where many of their own children were fighting. There’s also the glaring fact that Addario risked her own life in the process of this assignment—and Life wanted to censor it. But this was not the first—and definitely not the last—time Addario put her life on the line for a story. “Three weeks into the Libyan uprising-—a revolution that quickly became a war—I was kidnapped,” Addario recounts in her book. “We had been completely at the Libyans’ mercy. But we had lived. I felt lucky. I had interviewed suffering people all over the world, and they never felt like victims. They felt like survivors. I had learned from them.” She was also kidnapped by Sunni insurgents in Iraq, ambushed by the Taliban in Afghanistan and severely injured in a car accident that killed her driver while on assignment in Pakistan. Through it all, Addario credits her belief in free press as the driving force behind her continued pursuit of these wartime stories. “I believe in free press! I believe in journalism. I believe in the role of journalists to show the world what’s happening. I think that policy makers and governments rely, in part, on journalists to get information about what’s happening on the ground, because many times they can’t go to the places we go to,” Addario fiercely asserts. “I am not at all fearless. I get scared like everyone else.” With her passion for honest journalism came the experience and grit to continue her work: “What comes with experience in covering war is, basically, you learn how to deal with that fear. We learn how to tuck it away and manage it, so I can continue doing my work simultaneously . . . It’s not being fearless. It’s just survival. A lot of this ends up being survival.” And survival has become more difficult as the years—and conflicts—continue unabated. “Things have gotten progressively worse for journalists. Journalists are killed routinely. They are targeted by governments,” Addario reveals. “I have been doing this work for a long time, and a lot of this work is sort of like Russian roulette. The more chances you take, the more often I think my number might come up.” On April 30 of this year, nine journalists were killed in Afghanistan, making Addario’s sentiments glaringly clear. “When I hear about what happened in Afghanistan,” she comments, “it devastates me. These are journalists who

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I BELIEVE IN FREE PRESS! I BELIEVE IN JOURNALISM. I BELIEVE IN THE ROLE OF JOURNALISTS TO SHOW THE WORLD WHAT'S HAPPENING.

"

It takes a toll in more ways than one. “I tried to keep up, to love what he loved, to be the complete woman,” Addario solemnly recounts in her book, explaining the effort she put into a relationship with Uxval, a man she loved. In the end, her job came first, and he couldn’t understand. But it wasn’t just the men in her personal relationships that were problematic. “ There is a huge amount of sexism in the industry. Many women face sexism; it is a very real thing,” Addario bluntly replied when I asked about the difficulties of working in a maledominated industry. “I think that editors need to be assigning more women, more people of color. Most of our profession is populated by white males.” Addario later married Paul de Bendern, a journalist with Reuters who understood her dedication to her work. Returning home after being kidnapped, she decided to give her husband what he had wanted for so long: a baby. Reading about her fears of potentially ruining her career or losing work because of her pregnancy was like a page from my own journal. Addario continued to receive assignments after her pregnancy began to show, and she went back to work three months after giving birth. “I started to show in Somalia and Kenya,” she recalls, “and after that I started telling my editors. I was sent to Gaza after I had already spoken to an editor”—a move she received a lot of criticism for. “I do know there are judgements made on women like myself who are now mothers working in war zones. I think people are very quick to judge and say, ‘How could you do that with a child?’ When they don’t make those same judgements on men and my male colleagues. That’s just a very archaic way of looking at women.” A quick look at the comments on a story published in The New York Times Magazine titled, “What Can a Pregnant Photojournalist Cover? Everything,” and the criticisms are clear. One woman wrote, “I found Lynsey Addario’s behavior absolutely reprehensible! How a mother could put her own ambitions and ego above that of her child is beyond belief. After reading her article, I found myself in the state of disbelief accompanied by an unusual amount of anger.” Not everyone is as simple-minded,

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gave their lives trying to tell a story about Afghanistan. It could have been any one of us.” Addario is referring to the two suicide bombers who killed 25 people in Kabul, Afghanistan, including nine journalists. The journalists are thought to have been targeted; the second attacker pretended to be a member of the press and stood within a crowd of reporters covering the scene. This is reported to be the most devastating attack on the media since 2001, during the fall of the Taliban. “Where media are in danger, all other human rights are under greater threat,” the U.S. Embassy in Kabul declared. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said it was an example of “war crimes,” and Addario concurs. “They were trying to show what’s going on and document the war, and we rely on news from those journalists to know what’s going on in that country. It’s not okay to kill journalists. It should be a war crime.” These sentiments have echoed throughout the journalistic community, and although organizations like Human Rights Watch claim that, “Under the laws of war, deliberate attacks on civilians are war crimes. Posing as a journalist to carry out an attack is also perfidious, a war crime in which the attacker assumes civilian status,” there are still some gray areas, especially for war correspondents who accompany armed forces. Many are calling for a special provision for these atrocities. Journalists who cover wartime news see and hear much of the same things our soldiers do; it’s no surprise many of them suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. The risks of Addario’s job don’t end when she’s no longer on assignment. “Definitely. For sure I have PTSD,” Addario told us plainly after we asked about the effects of covering wartime tragedies. After coming home from the Korengal Valley in Afghanistan, for instance, there was a time when she couldn’t stop crying, and loud noises became unbearable. After her colleagues Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros died, she broke down. “I couldn’t stop crying for a week. That has to do with trauma. Residual trauma, trauma from not only the big things that have happened to me over the years, but also just witnessing people dying—people in these very vulnerable moments. It takes a toll.”

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Lebanese people walk through the destruction in Beirut’s southern suburbs on the first day of the ceasefire between Israel and Lebanon, August 14, 2006.

Italian sailors with the Uranium Navy Ship rescue 109 African migrants from Gambia, Mali, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Guinea, and Nigeria, from a rubber boat in the sea between Italy and Libya, October 4, 2014.

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Iraqi Yazidi families camp out near Bahjad Kandal camp close to the Iraqi border with Syria, in Northern Iraq, August 16, 2014.

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Thousands of Syrians cross from Syria into Northern Iraq near the Sahela border point in Dahuk, Northern Iraq, August 21, 2013. The mostly ethnically Kurdish refugees are fleeing increasing insecurity, economic strife, and a shortage of electricity, water, and food in their areas.


however. Another commenter wrote: “This country sends men off to the absolute absurdity called war every day—leaving their pregnant wives alone—and no one makes a peep. They are heroes. A woman goes off to photograph the atrocities created by this government in hopes to educate and she is ridiculed to no end.” None of it seems to bother Addario herself, however: “To me, frankly, people can criticize me all they want. I think there is a lot of ignorance involved in criticizing people, because they are unaware that there are many, many pregnant women in these war zones.” Addario’s work is most often focused on the experience of women—“Looking at women in full picture of where they are,” as she told VICE. It’s no surprise that criticism doesn’t sway her one bit. As a woman, she has been able to obtain access to subjects in a way journalists in the past could not, and highlights the struggles of women from around the world. Women in Darfur, Uganda and South Sudan; violence against women in Afghanistan; women survivors of sexual assault in war; maternal mortality in Sierra Leone; women in police training in Afghanistan; female fighters in Rojava in Northern Syria; and honoring our female veterans and U.S. Marines with her coverage of Female Engagement Teams in southern Afghanistan. “Part of being a good journalist and photographer is to really listen, and to care, and to tr y and understand where people are coming from,” Addario asserts. “I try to go into it to really understand the cultural differences, and the fact that people have different values than myself. I didn’t try to impose my values on others. I try to give people respect and listen to what they have to say.” According to Addario, the women she’s met through her work have become her role models—incredible women across the globe who have survived the most horrible circumstances. What Addario did not expect was for women to see her as a role model. Although she says she does not see herself as such, Addario has paved the way for a more inclusive future in the male-dominated world of photojournalism. She has worked hard to achieve what women have always been told was unachievable, a family and a thriving career, and doesn’t plan on slowing down anytime soon.

Nazer Begam and her pregnant daughter Noor Nisa, 20, wait for transport to a hospital, after their car broke down, November 14, 2009.

“I choose to live in peace and witness war—to experience the worst in people but to remember the beauty,” Addario surmises at the end of her book. “Journalist. It is who I am. It’s what I do.”

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The alien abduc tion exper ience is a compl ex, under studie d and dubiou s pheno meno n. Outsid e of fuzzy photo shoot s, extra terre strial s’ purpo se in visitin g Earth remai ns unkno wn. Reall y, the only peopl e who claim to have insigh t are those who’v e had conta ct throu gh abduc tion. We can only start to inves tigat e alien activi ties on Earth if we accept abduc tion as a real occurr ence— but that’ s total ly bonke rs…ri ght?

TALL SHADOWS

THROWN FROM THE TOWER

Human interest in extraterrestrials rises and subsides. Right now, it’s peaking: Earlier this year, a video showed F-18 jets failing to intercept an Unidentified Flying Object near San Diego. Scientists received odd readings from KIC 8462852, aka Tabby ’s Star, consistent with theoretical specs of an alien megastructure, the Dyson sphere. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI) detected artificially-created radio signals from deep space. A lost satellite? An alien civilization? It’s still all speculation; ridiculous, unbelievable speculation. As Nicholas Eftimiades, former senior officer of the Defense Intelligence Agency, told me, “ There’s no credible evidence to indicate alien life has ever visited the Earth. Given the enormity of the universe, the likelihood is that there is some form of life, somewhere.” The government never gives believers the affirmation they so crave. Not a crumb. Presently, academics have done just the same. A growing force of researchers suggest that alien abductions, a major component of our cultural narrative, are just fantasies. As Richard McNally of Harvard University states, “ To accept the hypothesis that extraterrestrial kidnappings explain reports of alien abduction” is to “reject a tremendous amount of science.” Why would any academic stand behind fantasy over science?

John Mack was a professor at Harvard School of Divinity, a Pulitzer Prize-winning psychologist, and easily the most esteemed academic champion of “experiencers,” self-proclaimed alien abductees. Prior to his publication of “Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens” (1994), Harvard launched a full review into his methods, putting his life under private—and public—scrutiny. The all-seeing eye judged him unworthy. Charged with academic treason by his own kind, Mack persisted, and he went on to carve a place in academia for the study of the paranormal.

le evidence ib d e cr o n ’s e r e Th n life has to indicate alie e Earth. ever visited th rmity of the o n e e h t n e iv G likelihood is universe, the ome form of that there is s e. life, somewher

r officer s, former senio de ia m ti Ef as ol – Nich ency Intelligence Ag of the Defense

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HEIR APPARENT “You may now step through the screen,” a Japanese woman dressed in all white intoned in broken English. “I can what?” “Please, step through the screen,” she motioned, this time less politely. I pressed my hand on the screen, and was surprised when it fell right through. It wasn’t a screen; it was a passageway. James Turrell’s mind-altering art—such as the installation I visited at the Chichu Art Museum—inspires alien pop-culture. His work with light bends perception in such a way that the mind recalls an unremembered truth: that reality and its rules are fragile. Turrell’s art inspired the ship design in “Arrival” (2016) and is featured prominently on the homepage of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit (APRU), researchers out of Goldsmiths College (UK). The APRU and Dr. Richard McNally lead the research on alien abduction in the wake of Dr. Mack’s passing. They who now carry the torch, however, are leading his legacy in the opposite direction.

ARE YOU LIKELY TO BE ABDUCTED?

According to Rich ard and the APRU, thes McNally e shared among “exp are the traits er those who have be iencers”— en abducted by aliens. DISASSOCIATION

La ck integ rat ion be twee n co ns cio us aware ne ss an d me nta l ac tiv ity.

ABSORPTION

Op en to se lf- alteri ng ex pe rie nces .

FANTASY-PRON

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Overa cti ve im ag ina tio n.

NEW AGE BELIEF S

Be lie f in astro log y, psyc hic powe rs, ali en s, etc .

KNOWLEDGE

Fa mi lia r wi th the cu ltu ral na rra tive of ali en ab du cti on .

SLEEP DISORDER S

Have ex pe rie nced sle ep pa ral ys is.

SUPERLA TIVES: MOST LIKELY TO BE ABDUCTE D

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McNally and the APRU claim alien abductio ns are a misinter pretatio n of sleep paralysi s. Basicall y, people awaken during REM sleep, and the mix of dreamin g and conscio usness confuse s experien cers; the mind then creates a convenie nt explana tion from the alien abducti on narrative. Their research is thoroug h. Both McNally and the APRU develop ed psychol ogical profiles to explain who—a nd thus, why—ab duction is a psychol ogy problem . Though they nicely tarp conclus ions over data, a flaw remains : Does the psychol ogical profile create the experien ce, or does the experie nce create the profile? If someon e theoret ically experie nces an alien abducti on, then they will probabl y develop every trait in these psycho logical profiles , with the notable exceptio n of sleep paralys is. Conside r the stereoty pe of a pot smoker, the one used for decade s in fear-mo ngering campai gns against the legaliza tion of pot. How is this psychol ogical profile any differen t? Which came first? We may never know.

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h ey a re t h e re j u s t a b o u t anywhere, anytime. Whatever the reason, many of us spend a good amount of time traveling with strangers that live in our city using rideshare apps—people with dreams, families and goals of their own. Here’s a glimpse into just how incredible the people we travel with can be, culled from my own rideshare experiences in Seattle, Washington.

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Building Conne ctio deshare A i R h g u ns Thro pp Pheth


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1 YEAR

Morning commutes are long and full of traffic, but the weather is nice and Oscar is playing some downtempo Colombian beats. We start talking about music and his driving job. “I like it on the weekends and very early in the morning,” he reveals. “This is my part-time. I do house remodeling.” He tells me I’m his last passenger of the morning, “because people get kinda grumpy in rush hour.” He moved to Seattle 20 years ago from Colombia with his exwife, a teacher, but not before traveling the world and working as a chef on a cruise ship. “That was when I was in my twenties. I went to cooking classes and somebody hired me for five years. I used to travel a lot. I traveled for five years all around the United States. I think traveling is the best gift you can give to yourself. I’ve visited 27 countries.” Reminiscing about his travels, Oscar notes that he still visits home often: “I go to Columbia every year for two months, and I travel from there. All my family is there. Since I got divorced, pretty much I have nobody here.” His tone changes a bit, but not for long. When I ask why, he lights up again: “I like it a lot.” Before I know it, we’re at my stop. I ask if I can tell his story, to which he happily agrees. He seems intrigued by my job title, and excitedly shares his love for poetry, explaining how thick his book of poetry would be if he were to write it. Who knows, maybe Oscar will be your new favorite poet someday. I left with a smile, inspired and hoping to have encouraged this sweet stranger to share something he’s always wanted to do with the world.

I USED TO TRAVEL A LOT. I TRAVELED FOR FIVE YEARS ALL AROUND THE UNITED STATES. I THINK TRAVELING IS THE BEST GIFT YOU CAN GIVE TO YOURSELF. I’VE VISITED 27 COUNTRIES. – OSCAR, PART-TIME UBER DRIVER

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¨SAMIR¨

4.91

1.5 YEARS

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Music holds a special place in my heart, so breaking the ice with that topic is always easy. The driver—we’ll call him Samir—seemed uninterested in my inquiry (which happened to be the soundtrack for the TV show Big Little Lies), but I’m happy I continued to chat with him during my trip. I asked him if he liked driving Uber. “I had to drive Uber,” he told me flatly. “There is a difference between doing it for the sake of love or [having] to do it.” He moved here six years ago from Libya. I asked him what brought him here, which won me a chuckle and a smile. “Another long story,” he began. “I worked for the U.S. State Department. I worked for the American Embassy in Libya as a bodyguard for almost 11 years. The locals [did not like] the fact of us working with ‘the enemy’”—he used air quotes as he spoke—“so before I moved here in 2005, I got kidnapped by a militia there. The situation there is not stable. I got kidnapped because of my former position. I ended up with two bullets in both legs, a broken jaw and a severe concussion. I lost my memory for almost two days and spent six days in a coma. That was another decision that I had to do, not out of sake of…” He trailed off, then continued. “That is why I ended up moving here. It was not safe for me to stay there.” I asked him if he liked it here in Seattle. “It took me awhile to adapt,” he admits. “It’s kind of a big jump. Especially if you’re not prepared for it. I just had to get my things together and leave in like three months. It’s hard. I’m still having culture shock. Trying to adapt.” The ride was too short. I wish I would have had a chance to tell him what an incredibly brave person I think he is, but I wished him the best and thanked him for the ride. On my way out of the car, he smiled and wished me well.

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4.95

KEVIN

2 YEARS

If you live on the West Coast, chances are you’re in the cannabis industry or know someone who is, and sure enough, my driver was both. “I do Uber and Lyft and am part of a licensed marijuana grow and processing company,” Kevin told me. He had a friend who used to work with him in the bar industry who wanted to make his personal grow a legal one, and asked Kevin if he wanted to be a partner. “It’s worked out really well, and we’re expanding right now,” he detailed. “We’re adding 7,200 more square feet, so we’re doubling. We’re looking at about 120 pounds [of flower] a month.” At the end of my trip, Kevin gave me a short wave and told me he’d be reaching out to DOPE Magazine for a feature at some point in the future. Whether you’re traveling to Berlin, India, Japan or just to work, one of the joys of travel is the people you meet along the way. Their experiences are their own, their stories lessons to be taught, their insight unique. Next time you’re using a rideshare app, try looking up from your phone and at the people around you. You may be pleasantly surprised at who you’ll meet.

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ARE ENZYMES LISTED ON THE LABEL AS ACTIVE INGREDIENTS?

If enzymes are not listed on the label as active ingredients, there is no guarantee that the product contains enzymes. 3rd party lab tests validate each active ingredient before it’s claimed on the label.

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ARE CLAIMS TO BENEFIT THE ROOT ZONE ON THE LABEL?

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DOES IT PASS THE TISSUE TEST?

The tissue test is the easiest way to check if the enzyme formula contains enzymes. Pour some product into a jar and add a sheet of tissue paper. If the tissue disintegrates after 24 hours, then it contains at least one enzyme (cellulase) that benefits your root zone.

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C U LT U R E

THE ART OF

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But what is astral projection? The phenomenon is in no way rooted in science, so open your third eyes, dear readers, if you’d like to learn how to transport your consciousness to another plane. Astral projection shouldn’t be confused with out-of-body experiences, although they’re somewhat related— that feeling of floating outside yourself and seeing your body below you, which some p e o p l e re p o r t a f t e r n e a r death experiences. Astral projection is learning to place your consciousness in two places at once: your physical body and your astral body. “[You] must be prepared for this duality of sensation experienced in two different vehicles of consciousness. The astral double possesses its own organs of sensation,” warns Dr. Douglas M. Baker in The Techniques of Astral Projection. Above all, astral projection is an intentional willing of one’s consciousness to another plane; it is a mind exercise one takes on with great design and purpose. So what is the astral plane? Edain McCoy, in Astral Projection for Beginners, describes it as “ . . . a world in which time and space have no meaning and no influence . . . an ethereal realm that is often perceived as being parallel to and interpenetrating our own physical world, but which remains unseen by the eyes of our normal consciousness.” Astral projection, then, is a learned technique to send your consciousness to another realm, and retain all experiences and knowledge gained while in this other world.

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friend of mine once told me her grandmother never asked her how her dreams were the night before; instead, she would ask, “Where did you go last night?” In some cultures, and indeed throughout time, the concept of astral projection has weaved its way through folklore. As American esotericist Sylvan Muldoon notes in his seminal 1951 work, The Phenomena of Astral Projection, “I found that, in ancient Egypt, in China, Tibet, India and throughout the orient generally, this idea was almost universally accepted, and had been for centuries past.”

KATIE CONLEY

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There are five forms of astral projection, according to Dr. Baker. In The Techniques of Astral Projection, he breaks them down thusly. FORM ONE Our normal sleep state.

FORM TWO Projection of the astral self a few feet from the body.

FORM THREE Projection of the astral self to locations miles away, but which are familiar to the projector.

FORM FOUR Depending on how strong your will is, the possibilities are endless. You can journey into the universe with ease.

FORM FIVE Similar to form four, but a Master guides your journey. The most mentally-taxing of all forms.

“ASTRAL PROJECTION IS OFTEN SUGGESTED BY WAY OF THE PSYCHIC CENTER LOCATED NEAR THE SOLAR PLEXUS, A MAJOR NERVE CENTER IN THE HUMAN BODY, BUT FOR MANY THIS CAN BE AN UNNERVING AND UNSETTLING EXPERIENCE. OTHER SOURCES SUGGEST VISUALIZING YOUR SOUL (OR SPIRIT) RISING OUT OF YOUR BODY LIKE A MIST OR APPEARING AS A SECONDARY BODY ‘OF LIGHT’ NEXT TO YOUR PHYSICAL BODY.” Mark Stavish, Between the Gates: Lucid Dreaming, Astral Projection, and the Body of Light in Western Esotericism

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For our purposes, we’ll be focusing on how to astrally project in the second and third forms, as it’s a bit easier to achieve than forms four and five, which could have you zooming around past Jupiter; once you master the art of astral projection, you can travel greater distances and eventually find an astral yogi to guide your travels. Baby steps, people. Astral projection is a wild, rich subject, and we’d need an entire magazine just to scratch the surface of its history, proponents and techniques. But for now, see if you can travel outside yourself without ever leaving the house, even just for a moment—“staycations” are all the rage these days, after all.

P REPA RIN G F OR AST RA L P R OJEC TI ON Before even entertaining the idea of astral travel, there’s some prep work to undertake. You can’t jump into the astral plane all willy-nilly—that would be absurd. C’mon. Turn a notebook into an Astral Journal. You’ll need to note what works and does not. Locate a quiet place where you won’t be disturbed. If you can’t eliminate sound, try earplugs or soothing instrumental music. Purchase candles, incense and essential oils for your astral area. Bay oil, rose, jasmine and gardenia are said to promote intensive meditative states. Have blankets on standby; a cold body can’t retain a meditative state for long. Choose a meditative pose, one where your spine is as straight as possible. You’ll have to hold it for an extended period of time, so make sure it’s something comfortable. Practice daydreaming. If you’re not a creative person and don’t often remember your dreams, you most likely won’t be able to astral project. Get outside your head.

ABOVE ALL, ASTRAL PROJECTION IS AN INTENTIONAL WILLING OF ONE'S CONSCIOUSNESS TO ANOTHER PLANE; IT IS A MIND EXERCISE ONE TAKES ON WITH GREAT DESIGN AND PURPOSE.

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Practice meditating. You need to be able to clear your mind and hold a single, focused thought for at least ten minutes before embarking on an astral quest.

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H OW TO ASTRA L P R OJECT Ready to begin? Good. Note that astral projection is most successful in the morning, particularly after you’ve just woken up. Never attempt to project while under mental duress; the only thing stopping you from astral projection is your own mind.

1. Enter a meditative state. Focus on individual areas of your body and imagine the stress melting away from each point. 2. Breathe. Breathe with your diaphragm, not your chest. Inhale through the nose, exhale through the mouth. 3. Don’t be afraid. Some report uneasy feelings surrounding the separation of your consciousness into two beings. Welcome this separation. 4. Imagine your consciousness as a ball of light, floating up and away from your physical form. Follow this form. Project your will onto this form. 5. When you reach the astral plane, your thoughts should be effortless. If you feel yourself getting sucked back down to your physical body, don’t fight it. Try again later. You’ll know you’re successful when you’re viewing yourself from above. 6. Start small. Practice going to the other room, then outside your home, to the next street, etc. Gradually increase your radius. 7. Make note of physical markers on the astral plane. If you feel yourself getting “lost,” they’ll be your guide home. If you can see your silver cord, a luminous rope that ties your physical body to your astral body (not everyone reports this), follow the cord home.

8. Practice. Once you astrally project for the first time, your body will want to return to this state. It becomes easier to project with each new experience.

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e rose early the next morning, tossing our gear loosely into suitcases and duffle bags before loading the rental car up for the 600-kilometer road trip from Barcelona to Madrid. We were headed to see longtime friend and Oil Hunter Founder Feisal Budderman. At a time when most Spanish kids were still mixing tobacco with their weed, these guys were making diamonds and sauce. I split a Swisher down the middle with my thumbs, letting the tobacco fly out the window as we pulled onto the freeway. Brian frowned. “Are you sure we should be smoking in the car?” he asked nervously, his head on a swivel. “Relaxe, amigo!” I responded. “We are turistas Americanos—what’s the worst that could happen?” As intended, my response did more to distress than to reassure, and I chuckled while puffing the finger-thick blunt to life before passing it to Jessica in the back seat. Despite my assurances, we were headed into enemy territory. While Barcelona’s views towards cannabis are very liberal, the tale of t h e t wo c i t i e s has always been one of stark

juxtaposition. The five-and-a-half-hour drive through the Spanish countryside passed without incident, however. Rolling umber brown hillsides dotted in green dominated the scenery. Three times I saw the bullet train fly by us at nearly 300 kilometers per hour, lapping us again and again in its relentless trek back and forth between the two cities. Pulling off the highway, our progress was stopped by a small automated toll booth. €32 later, we were in Madrid. I punched in the address we’d been given as a meeting spot and followed the directions through the twisting maze of narrow one-way roads. Navigating in Spain is never as simple as it appears; many areas require special permits available only to residents. Simply driving down the wrong street could result in a hefty fine.   We finally arrived at a nondescript building, identifiable only by the street numbers. This was a common tactic in Spain, as the clubs operated in a murky space at best. A smiling Feisal greeted us at the door. “Welcome! Welcome!” he declared in English he’d been polishing just for us. Feisal had been quietly stacking up awards, and his oil was beginning to demand a premium in Spain—as much as €200 for a single gram of his cup winners in the Barcelona clubs. Everywhere we went, people treated him like a rock star. He was the real deal in Spain, and we recognized the ambition in each other right away, becoming fast friends in the years since our meeting.   Brushing past the check-in area, we followed him up the stairs to the second-story VIP lounge. A few dozen Spanish kids were spread around the club playing Fortnite, shooting pool or rolling up at the mini lounges which dotted the floorplan. I watched heads snap

around as Feisal lit up a dab torch, cranking the flame to full blast. Unlike Barcelona, where anyone who knew the location of a club like Terp Army could pay and become a member, here in Madrid you had to be vetted in by another member. No social media, no signage. Even the owner, for the purposes of this article, wished to have no name. We spent the next several hours sampling the local hash and exchanging war stories in bad Spanish and broken English. “Come!” gestured Feisal. “Best seafood in Madrid!” he exclaimed, emphasizing the “i” in Madrid in a way locals often do when speaking with excitement. If there was one thing I’d learned about Feisal over the years, it was that the man knew how to eat. We jumped into the cab behind him, eager for another trip down the rabbit hole. The taxi stopped at Umiko, a Japanese fusion restaurant located in the heart of Madrid. “The best seafood in Spain comes from a Japanese restaurant?” I asked, unable to hide my surprise. Feisal smiled. “Trust me, bro,” he said with a wink. “We smoke a little bit, then we eat. Trust me, you will see,” he promised, beckoning us a few yards down to a gigantic set of double wooden doors. Feisal produced a rolling paper, and I grimaced as he began to spread tobacco across it. “Better in public this way,” he explained, making a waving motion in front of his nose to indicate the smell may be a problem. I could see Brian squirming a bit. Searches in Spain required nothing more than suspicion, and coming out of a known cannabis club was often suspicious enough. Provisions in the law, however, required a warrant issued by a judge before a search of the undergarments, and many locals had taken to hiding their stash in their underwear. Feisal produced a container of full-melt hash from his pocket and began sprinkling it lavishly over the tobacco until only a few strands were

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to the Dr. Feis Grow Shop for a quick sesh before loading up in Feisal’s Audi RS 3. The rebuilt engine was putting out 450 horsepower on the dyno. I saw what the local police were driving, and they weren’t catching this. Akin to the rum runner cars of old, she was built to go fast. A €3,000 radar system ensured there would be no run-ins with police. At speeds that rivaled the bullet train, we turned the hour-long trip to the castle city of Toledo into a brisk 30-minute drive. Encircled by massive stone walls, Toledo was declared a World Heritage site in 1986, and it was easy to see why. Known as Spain’s “Imperial City,” it now serves as a living time capsule, home to some 83,000 Spaniards who reside inside the ancient buildings, some of which date back to as early as 50 BCE. The city was famous for their production of edged weapons, and we spent the day smoking hash-covered spliffs, sampling the local sangria and shopping for bladed souvenirs in the town’s many steel shops. As day turned into dusk we returned to Madrid, bidding farewell to Feisal before ditching the rental car at the airport and heading for the local train station. I’d spent some time living in Chicago and was no stranger to the train, but this was something more akin to an airport than a train station. Securing our tickets for the evening bullet to Barcelona, we headed off for the demarcation point. Rounding the corner, my heart dropped; we were caught in the flow of traffic shuffling directly towards a small security team manning an X-ray machine. My eyes quickly scanned for a trash can, but found none. Partially unzipping my suitcase, I fished for our stash with one hand. We were a few feet from security now and beginning to lose the cover of the

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poking through. I took a deep pull from his creation; the harsh taste of tobacco, obscured by the smoothness of the hash, provided an instant head change. Feisal was rolling a second spliff and passed it around when I felt a tug. “Police!” Jessica exclaimed in a hushed tone. My head jerked around to catch three Spanish police officers in full uniform, 30 yards out, strolling boldly towards us down the middle of the one-way lane. My heart jumped in my throat as I turned to Feisal, who had not heard Jessica’s warning and was still puffing away in idle conversation with Brian. “Polícia!” I all but shouted. We were trapped. A phalanx of abutted buildings ran the length of the narrow lane on both sides, offering no escape but to turn and run further down the corridor. Our smoke had been trapped in a similar fashion and was settled in the still air in front of us. Feisal stiffened at my warning, dropping the spliff behind him and taking a step back to cover it with his foot, his complexion turning pale as we waited for the cops to be upon us. I pulled out my phone. “Selfie!” I exclaimed loudly in my clearest English, doing my best to imitate the excited energy of a 13-year-old girl. Following my lead, the group struck a pose and I extended my arm out, snapping a barrage of pictures as the three cops passed. “Danger, bro,” a smiling Feisal whispered as they moved out of range. As promised, the food at Umiko was unsurpassed; we soon found ourselves in the middle of a 13-course masterpiece prepared and plated by chef Pablo from his tableside station. Our mixed crews ate and drank late into the night. Rising with the sun the next morning, we collected our rental car and shot across town

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crowd ahead of us. Finally, my fingers closed on the small bag and I shoved it quickly into my jacket pocket as our turn came up. The woman operating the machine looked around from her chair, examining me as I hefted the heavy bags one by one. “Jackets, too!” she said sternly, pointing to me. I groaned inside. “Yes, ma’am.” I took the jacket off, laying it over my arm as I loaded the last of the bags. Something on the screen caught her eye and she turned away from me, motioning for the guards. This was my moment. Sidestepping the machine, I placed my jacket on the exit conveyor, collecting it with the first of our bags. “Sir!” My heart jumped for the third time in as many minutes. Turning, I faced the largest of the guards, who was now standing behind the woman at the X-ray machine, beckoning for me to return. This was it, I thought. What a story it would make, written from my Spanish jail cell. The guard seemed puzzled: “You seem to have a large knife in your luggage, sir?” In my hurry to secure our meds, I’d neglected the oversized espada from the steel shop in Toledo, its 12-inch blade now emblazoned clearly on the security monitor. A quick check of our receipts and I was cleared to go. Jessica shook her head as I fell in behind her and Brian. “Cutting it a little close?” she asked. “Viva la Spain!” I replied, raising the bottle of vodka we’d picked up for the train ride. “Viva la Spain,” she echoed, her tone sarcastic but relieved. DABSTARS.COM @JONAH_TACOMA


PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST Photographers, want to see your work in the pages of dope magazine? As a lifestyle publication, DOPE Magazine is committed to cultivating creative expression within the cannabis community. We’re looking to feature your creative work in the next issue of DOPE Magazine! There are no limitations or restrictions—hit us with your best shot! HOW TO ENTER Head to www.dopemagazine.com/dope-contests and submit your favorite capture and win the chance to have your work featured in a beautiful 2-page spread in our National publication. Shoot what inspires you. Ready. Set. GO! WHAT TO ENTER To ensure eligibility for the contest, please submit files of at least 300 dpi in landscape format. Entries may originate in any format - digital files, digital prints, color transparencies, color prints, or black and white prints - so long as they are submitted electronically in a .JPEG .jpg or .png form. Entries should include full name of photographer and a brief caption. ELIGIBILITY Dope Shots (“Photo Contest”) is open to all professional and amateur photographers who have reached 21 years of age at the time of entry. By submitting an entry to the Photo Contest, entrants certify that their submission in the Photo Contest gives DOPE Magazine the right to publish this photo. DOPE will provide artist credits. By entering, you agree to release and hold harmless DOPE and affiliates from and against any claim or cause of action arising out of participation in the Photo Contest. ENTRY PERIOD The Photo Contest is recurring; beginning on the tenth of each month and ending the last day of each month. JUDGING Photos will be judged on the originality, composition, technical excellence as well as overall impact and artistic merit.


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THE PLACE Long Beach is known for its diversity; with musical influences from punk rock to hip-hop, there’s never been a time Long Beachers weren’t fired up. For the city’s half million residents, the best place to pick up their cannabis delights is ShowGrow. The Long Beach location is one of three ShowGrow locations, with additional stores in Santa Ana and Las Vegas. Two new joints are coming soon to downtown Los Angeles and San Diego.

THE PEOPLE CEO David Barakett and his team at the Long Beach location have created a customer-friendly environment in their dispensary, and they take this philosophy to the streets. Since the company’s inception, the ShowGrow team has performed community outreach by feeding and clothing the homeless, donating money and goods to local charities and volunteering their time. “Our employees love to volunteer with the community. We all do. We’ve been doing it from the beginning so it’s a big part of who we are,” Barakett shares with pride.

THE PRODUCT One of the saddest things to see inside a beautifully designed dispensary is a lack of variety, which thankfully isn’t an issue for ShowGrow. Their flower selection is one of the largest I’ve come across, with strains like Lime WiFi and Calm 101. The store boasts a stellar selection of concentrates from Moxie and pre-rolls sourced from high-quality, small-batch farmers like THC Design and Lowell Farms. According to Jess, a highly knowledgeable and longtime ShowGrow budtender, their top-selling vapes—which they have a plethora of—are Select and ROVE. Cases in the center of the room contain a sweet selection of edibles, and there’s a wall of CBD products in every form—even for your animal friends! But one of ShowGrow’s most innovative features is their free, custom-built ShowGrow app, where members can receive updates on new products and events, earn points with each purchase and pre-order items for express pick-up. They also have their own YouTube channel, where they do monthly lifestyle videos. To say the least, ShowGrow’s innovation and commitment to customer service act as a blueprint for the future of Southwest dispensaries.

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OUR EMPLOYEES LOVE TO VOLUNTEER WITH THE COMMUNITY. WE ALL DO. WE’VE BEEN DOING IT FROM THE BEGINNING, SO IT’S A BIG PART OF WHO WE ARE. – SHOWGROW CEO DAVID BARAKETT

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LICENSED BHO CONCENTRATES! SHATTER / WAX / CRUMBLE / SAUCE / DIAMONDS / BUDDER LEGAL BHO PROCESSING SERVICE / DISTILLATION / BULK SALES / PACKAGING F I N D OU T M ORE: www.coa che l l aman u fact u rin g .co m | @co ach ellam an u fa c t u r ing Coachella Manufacturing LLC, License #CDPH-T00000241, License #CDPH-T00000242

STATE LICENSED CANNABIS DISTRIBUTION OF CONCENTRATES & VAPE PENS STAT E WIDE D I STR I BUTI ON AVA ILA BLE. TO CA RRY OUR BRA NDS, VISIT: w w w.coa chel l a di s tr i but o rs.co m | @co ach ellam an u fact u rin g Coachella Distributors LLC, License #M11-18-0000064-TEMP, License #A11-18-0000080-TEMP


GARDEN

IC COLLECTIVE OAKLAND’S CHEM DOG CHAMPIONS CHRISTINA CASSEN KANDID KUSH

THE PEOPLE Founded in California in 2009 by owner Benjamin Brown, IC stands for “Integrity Code.” IC Collective creates contemporary cannabis that riffs off the magical strain Chem Dog. A genuine love for this strain and its surrounding Grateful Dead culture spurred Brown to plant the seeds that would sprout into IC Collective. Brown’s love of Chem Dog started at a Phish concert when he was in his teens: “That Chem Dog terpene, the uniqueness of it . . . this was 1992, ’93,” he recalls, “and, of course, there was nothing like it on the East Coast. It smelled so strong; I had to have it.” Chem Dog is a 27-year-old strain steeped in lore, and is known as the parent of Sour Diesel. “Chem Dog smells like roadkill in the best of ways,” insists Brown. “[It] provides the type of pure high akin to discovering marijuana for the first time. You’ll be blinded by the light.”

CHEM DOG SMELLS LIKE ROADKILL IN THE BEST OF WAYS . . . [IT] PROVIDES THE TYPE OF PURE HIGH AKIN TO DISCOVERING MARIJUANA FOR THE FIRST TIME. YOU’LL BE BLINDED BY THE LIGHT – BENJAMIN BROWN, IC COLLECTIVE OWNER

THE PRODUCT

As part of the Chem family, IC Collective carries on this strain’s torch as the official California cultivator of Chem 91 and Chem D. In fact, all of IC’s plants usually incorporate the verified Chem 91 through crossbreeding projects. These innovative combinations produce IC-exclusive strains, such as: Cali Chem, Chem Scout, Chem Fruit, Bay Berry Chem, Lemon Chem and Cookies N Chem. IC prides itself on doing things a bit differently and sticking to their Chem Dog roots. Brown says his “unique cultivation process is all about being persistent. You cannot slack for even a day on addressing issues with the plants.”

THE PLACE Foreseeing upcoming regulations and trying to remain a step ahead, Brown’s plan in 2014 was to build an effective team and work with the best concentrate makers “to consistently provide the highest quality product at all times, and to be on the top shelves of the world’s leading dispensaries.” The IC team has worked tirelessly in the inner city of Oakland over the past three years, preparing the brand to thrive in California’s new recreationally legal marketplace. ICCOLLECTIVE.NET

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@ICCOLLECTIVE

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REVIEW

MYSTIC JOURNEY SOUND BATHS

HEALING, RESTORATIVE MEDITATION THROUGH SOUND

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MSKINDNESS B.

LEAH LAU

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I

was greeted with a warm smile right before being overtaken by the powerful energies emitting from the Mystic Journey Crystal Gallery. Immediately upon entry, your body and spirit shift, taking guests into a place of remembrance. This space allows for visitors to quickly align with the positive energies of these beautiful crystals; they’re openly exposed for all to explore. Feeling their magical energy was an even more grounding experience. As I made my way around the space, allowing the events of the day to melt away, I became more conscious of the way I was moving and reacting to my surroundings. Friday, April 20, had been a day of back-toback meetings and driving all over town. As I felt my energy take a much needed downshift, I knew I was ready for this experience; I needed to end my day with some self-love and preservation. My guests and I entered the sound room and claimed our space for relaxation. Jenny Deveau’s soothing voice, coupled with Seth Misterka’s strong presence onstage, put us in the perfect state of mind to begin their Dynasty Electrik crystal sound bath. Sound baths are

not a new experience for me; I often use the vibrational powers of sound and tones to cleanse my spirit of any negative frequencies passing through. But the gift Misterka and Deveau gave to me by introducing my ears to crystal sound bowls was unlike anything I’ve experienced with the more commonly used metal bowls. Their crystal bowls took me to a place where I was floating and grounded, all at the same time. My emotions quickly became overwhelming, and I began using internal affirmations to relax. With divine timing, Deveau came in with her balancing voice; my frequencies seemed to perfectly align. Her singing brought equilibrium to the space, and I could feel the 30 or so other guests let out a collective exhale. As the sound bowl tones softened, I took a moment, stood up and looked at my dear friend. We smiled and wordlessly left the space, feeling lighter and more rooted. These sound bath sessions happen every Friday at the Mystic Journey Crystal Gallery in Venice—come and see the healing powers for yourself.

@MYSTICJOURNEYCRYSTALS MYSTICJOURNEYCRYSTALS.COM

SOUND BATHS ARE NOT A NEW EXPERIENCE FOR ME; I OFTEN USE THE VIBRATIONAL POWERS OF SOUND AND TONES TO CLEANSE MY SPIRIT OF ANY NEGATIVE FREQUENCIES PASSING THROUGH.

S O U N D BATHS ...D I D YOU KNOW ? Sounds Baths originated with the Tibetans. The notes played during a Sound Bath correspond with the chakra being focused on.

Research suggests sound waves decrease blood pressure and reduce anxiety. It is very common for attendees to feel the urge to laugh, cry or both.

The bowls are often referred to as Tibetan singing bowls.

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F E AT U R E

DISPENSARY BEING PUSHED OUT DUE TO "SM

ELL ISSUES"

MAT T CRIS CIO NE STEP HAN IE NEIL

S

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omething sure stinks in Portland’s Pearl District! Oregon’s Finest, a boutique dispensary and 2017 DOPE Cup winner for “Best Store Location,” finds themselves in a fight for their turf as real estate developer Killian Pacific attempts to kick them out of their lease over what anonymous complainants have deemed an offensive smell. Killian Pacific has a long rap sheet. The out-of-state developer has been accused of destroying historic Old Portland using back-door methods; half a dozen articles from publications such as Portland Monthly, OregonLive.com and the NW Examiner expressly detail the dirty tricks these folks have employed in the past. It’s no surprise that a vulnerable business like a cannabis retailer would be an easy target. Although the Oregon Supreme Court ruled that cannabis smell cannot be legally declared “offensive,” the battle rages on. We had the chance to sit down with Troy Moore, one of the co-owners of Oregon’s Finest, to hear their side of the story.

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TITLE

DOPE Magazine: Tell us the history of Oregon’s Finest. Troy More: Our Pearl District location was the first licensed medical dispensary in the state. Prior to that, we were a medical cannabis resource center; we started with the intent to showcase the best growers in the state under one roof. Over the years we’ve evolved into much more than that. Now, with two locations, our mission is to simply promote health through the finest cannabis. What has your journey been like? A wild ride! From medical OHA [Office of Health Affairs] rules, to recreational OLCC [Oregon Liquor Control Commission] regulation, and now to this oversaturated market. It’s been a rollercoaster that has made us wanna puke at every turn. So what’s changed? Nothing for the better. Now we have to deal with [a] landlord that wants to dupe us out of our lease, because it’s holding up the rebuild of their property. Can you elaborate on that? It’s actually been going on for quite some time. About a year after we moved in, they realized they couldn’t sell the building because the potential buyer couldn’t get financing with a cannabis business in it—so they offered to “move” us. When they realized you can’t just “move” a dispensary that easily because of zoning laws, then came the first smell compliant. Shortly after that complaint we got an eviction notice. We then decided to hire an attorney, who helped us stop the eviction—which cost us about $25,000 in attorney fees and HVAC upgrades. All was quiet after that until Killian Pacific bought the property, and the news came they were gonna tear down the building . . . first came a massive rent increase—more than double. Clearly being unfair in hopes that we would just leave. We started in with attorneys again, and are currently still negotiating the ridiculous rent increase of 238 percent. Then came new smell complaints . . . and shortly after, a 48-hour eviction notice. So what’s next for the store? We are headed to mediation next month. We’re hopeful we come to an agreement to at least finish out our lease. Are you eyeing another area? We’re always eyeing another spot. We’d love nothing more than to be a great tenant for a fair and honest landlord.

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NO-NONSCENTS NEIGHBORS Oregon’s Finest isn’t the only source of dubious smell complaints. We’ve compiled a list of some of our favorite odor-related mishaps.

SRIRACHA GOTCHA

NOT SO SWEET

OPPOSITE OF A PROBLEM

WHAT A TWIST!

It’s bad enough to have to use a porto-potty—imagine never being able to escape the smell. Pacific, Washington, residents have filed a complaint against Northwest Cascade, a company that stores and cleans Honey Buckets. Yes, those Honey Buckets.

Over 60 odor complaints filed in 2013 regarding the Huy Fong Foods factory— makers of Sriracha, the popular condiment—in Irwindale, California, were found to be coming from only a handful of homes. Maybe they prefer ketchup?

Neighbors of the Bay City Michigan Sugar Company may need a spoonful of something else to help their medicine go down. Noxious odors from the factory have resulted in nearly 800 complaints to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

On January 2, 2013, a complainant told the California Department of Public Health that “the air quality in [my] neighborhood smells like syrup.”

Another gem from the CDPH’s odor complaint records. A caller noted an “air/odor complaint” against a retirement community on April 18, 2013. The CDPH worker notes, however, that “the complainant may be fictitious.”

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DOWN IN THE DUMPS

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


GET

Follow us and stay connected to all things DOPE

@DOPE_Magazine @Dope.Magazine @DOPE Magazine @dopemagazine @DOPE Magazine


T R AV E L

13 PLACES TO VISIT BEFORE THEY DISAPPEAR

F

rom Grecian ruins to the snowcapped peaks of Mount Kilimanjaro, the world is full of wonders— but some of these places are vanishing. Thanks to climate change, tourism and human recklessness, some of the most stunning sites on Earth might not be around much longer. Where do you need to visit before it’s too late?

THE GREAT BARRIER REEF, AUSTRALIA Stretching 1,400 miles, the Great Barrier Reef is one of the seven natural wonders of the world. It’s the only living thing visible from outer space. There’s just one problem: it’s dying. Over the last two years, the reef has lost half of its coral covering thanks to two unprecedented bleaching events, according to coral reef ecologists.

OLYMPIA, GREECE If you’re a history buff, you’ll want to visit Greece soon. In recent years, the ancient city of Olympia—the site of the first Olympic Games in 776 BCE—has experienced unusually hot weather, leading to wildfires. There’s no guarantee the next blaze won’t reach the ancient pillars.

MADAGASCAR 'S FORESTS

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These forests are only predicted to last another 35 years, thanks to fires and mass deforestation. D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


THE SEYCHELLES ISLANDS Made up of more than a hundred islands off the coast of Madagascar, National Geographic rates the beach at Anse Source d’Argent as the best in the world, but it could be lost in the next 50 years. The waters of the Indian Ocean are continually rising, eroding the beaches and degrading the coral reef.

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, MONTANA THE CONGO BASIN, AFRICA The Congo Basin is home to the second-largest rainforest in the world. But thanks to illegal logging, ranching, mining and civil warfare, scientists estimate that two-thirds of this vast wilderness could be gone by 2040.

There are only 25 glaciers left of the national park’s original 150. Experts predict that in just 15 years, there may be no glaciers left.

THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

THE DEAD SEA, ISRAEL The Dead Sea is drying up. Known as the saltiest spot on earth, the sea is shrinking by as much as three feet per year. Scientists give it about 50 more years before it’s gone entirely.

These famous islands have drastically changed since the late 19th century, when they received few visitors. Due to too many tourists, the islands’ ecosystem hangs in a precarious position.

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THE PATAGONIAN ICE FIELDS, ARGENTINA These ice fields comprise the most extensive body of ice in the southern hemisphere, outside of Antarctica. Unfortunately, these glaciers are thinning at a pace of around six feet per year.

THE TAJ MAHAL, INDIA Each year, more than eight million people visit the Taj Mahal by bus, train or air, according to The Guardian. The 17th-century building was not meant to handle that many visitors, and, over time, the site has started to decline. To protect the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Indian government has implemented a cap on daily tourist numbers.

VENICE, ITALY Built on top of an unstable lagoon, Venice is sinking, moving five inches in the last century alone. Flooding is more of a problem than ever, particularly in St. Mark’s Square, which becomes submerged with water a dozen times a year.

SNOW ON MOUNT KILIMANJARO, TANZANIA The towering peaks of Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro are a breathtaking sight; covered in snow and ice, the summit looks like something from another world. Since 1912, however, 85 percent of the ice that covered the mountaintop has disappeared. Scientists predict the legendary glaciers of Kilimanjaro could be completely depleted in just 20 years.

THE "DOOR TO HELL," TURKMENISTAN This active volcano, also known as the Darvaza gas crater, has spent the last 40 years as a bubbling inferno, but scientists predict it won’t stay active for much longer.

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So before it’s too late, book your flights and start traveling the world! Who knows what will be left in another 50 years…


PRODUCT

SPLIFF ARMY KNIFE NUGGY, THE ULTIMATE TOOL FOR CANNASSEURS! CHRISTINA CASSEN COURTESY OF NUGTOOLS

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he Nuggy, also known as “the ultimate Swiss Army Knife for smokers,” comes in four models with four, six or ten tools, respectively, including a roach clip, scoop, pick, scissors, LED light and more! The device fits in the palm of your hand or pocket and comes in multiple colors. Their newer models, Nuggy Dab and Nuggy Hybrid, are housed in a heat-resistant aluminum oxide shell that doubles as a carb cap. How handy! Rob Green, CEO of NugTools, shares that the Nuggy is unique in its prototype design, which was created using 3D printing. They envision using this technology in a bigger way; in ten years, he remarks, “We want people to be able to log on to our website and design their very own custom NugTool, then have it printed and shipped right to their front door.” Welcome to the future of wellequipped, organized smoking!

NUGTOOLS.COM @NUGTOOLS @NUGTOOLS @NUGTOOLS

PRICE NUGGY: $33 NUGGY HYBRID: $46.95 NUGGY UV: $34.99 NUGGY DAB: $38.95

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M


G.I. ALARM


BUSINESS

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hen it comes to marketing anything in Las Vegas, the strip, parties, sex and excessive gambling initially come to mind. And, oh yeah, it’s also in the middle of the desert. Most believe the desert is a sandy wasteland where nothing grows but boredom, and while this may be the case in some places, it’s certainly not the case in Las Vegas and its surrounding areas, which contain some of the most magnificent, timeless landscapes on earth—and some of the dankest cannabis in the world. When I started shooting photography many years ago, it was a passion that stemmed from my love for the planet, fueling me to continue to shoot wherever I traveled. When I found myself in Las Vegas four years ago, I was immediately re-energized by its rugged, pristine landscape; it was greener than I had anticipated, as well. Mountains lie just outside the city, banded with vibrant oranges, pinks and reds formed from ancient shallow seas that gave way to the wild rock formations thousands of tourists come to visit each year at Red Rock Canyon and the Valley of Fire. There’s something about taking a photo of a hearty green bud upon a red sandstone canvas on a clear blue day; it’s cannabis’ primal connection to the earth which brings out our outdoorsy side and makes us want to hike, run and stay active. When I think about cannabis, I think adventure, exploration and the great outdoors. I mean, how many times have you been on a trailhead and smelled some Skunk, or at a campground where you’ve burned with total strangers? Outdoor locations enhance any kind of photoshoot, but particularly ones centered around cannabis; the two go hand in hand. Just 40 minutes off the strip, you can see one of humanity’s greatest achievements, the manmade Lake Mead. Or check out one of Nevada’s many abandoned mining towns, like Nelson, one of the most unique, nostalgic, off-the-grid places you’ll ever visit. And yes, it’s totally worth the extra miles of highway you need to travel to get there—it’s always worth it to get the shot. @DEREKLASVEGAS

. . . IT’S CANNABIS’ PRIMAL CONNECTION TO THE EARTH WHICH BRINGS OUT OUR OUTDOORSY SIDE AND MAKES US WANT TO HIKE, RUN AND STAY ACTIVE.

A PICTURE’S WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

If you need a striking background for a photoshoot, look no further than Nevada’s versatile terrain. We’ve picked our favorite shooting spots, categorized by the mood you seek to capture.

RUGGED Sheep Mountain, Pyramid Lake, Humboldt National Forest, Cathedral Gorge

ANTIQUATED, HAUNTING Nelson, St. Thomas, Unionville, Belmont, Gold Point

BREATHTAKING Lake Mead, Red Rock Canyon, Valley of Fire State Park, Kershaw-Ryan

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GLASS

ROBO RECYCLER PLAYFUL PIECE FROM ARTIST NATHAN BELMONT WIND HOME

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rtist Nathan Belmont created the “Robo Recycler” in late January 2018. He came up with the idea while walking through the toy section of a store, thinking how fun it would be to make a piece evoking that same feeling of excitement as a kid with a new toy. He wanted to make a piece that was playful and showed movement, and added some ultraviolet sections, which glow under black lights. This piece is Belmont’s first sculptural recycler, marking a milestone in his career as a glass artist. It’s a piece that will always be special to him. “Robo Recycler” isn’t currently available—a lucky collector swooped it up already.

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@NATHAN.BELMONT

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RECIPE

MARY’S MUNCHIE MIX EASY, DISCRETE, DELICIOUS! LAURIE AND MARYJANE

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y lovely business par tner (and daughter-in-law) adores this particular snack combination. Trail mix is the perfect (and undetectable!) travel treat, and perfumed with exotic spices, there’s neither a taste or aroma of our favorite herb. Do your own thing here—you can change spices, cereal or anything else. Just keep it sweet, salty and full of love!

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LAURIEANDMARYJANE.COM

INSTRUCTIONS

INGREDIENTS Yield: 10 servings 2-4 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 1 tsp. 1 tsp. 1/2 tsp. 1/2 tsp. ¼ tsp. 2 cups 1 ¼ cup 1 cup 1 cup ½ cup ½ cup

Infused coconut oil Honey, agave or maple syrup Ground cumin Salt Turmeric Ginger Cardamom Cayenne Oh’s or Cheerios cereal Pecans Pretzels, any shape you like Flaked coconut Dried sour cherries Chocolate chunks

D O P E M AGA Z I N E .CO M

1.

Heat oven to 325°F. Place parchment on a baking sheet with sides.

2.

In a large bowl combine the oil, sweetener, cumin, salt, turmeric, ginger, cardamom and cayenne. Mix well.

3.

Add the cereal, pecans, almonds, pretzels and coconut. Mix well to evenly distribute the oil mixture.

4. Place the trail mix on the baking sheet and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring several times. 5.

Allow the mixture to cool at least 30 minutes. Add the cherries and chocolate and hit the road!


DOPE Magazine - Southern California - The Travel Issue - July 2018  
DOPE Magazine - Southern California - The Travel Issue - July 2018