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THE FOUR TWENTY ISSUE

APRIL 2016

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I N S TAG R A M

TWITTER

DAV I D T R A N CEO E VA N C A RT E R President J A M E S Z AC H O D N I @james_zachodni Editor-in-Chief / CBO DAV I D PA L E S C H U C K VP, Licensing & Brand Partnerships B R A N D O N PA L M A @ b ra n d o n p a l m a Art Director J A N D O M AC E N A @ t h i rd o p t i c Graphic Designer A B I GA I L RO S S @ a b i g a i l e ro s s National Content Manager M A K E N N A O’ M E A R A @ m a ke n n a o m e a ra Managing Editor L AU R E N K R Z Y Z O S TA N I A K @ e d i to r l a u re n National Editor G L AC E B O N D E S O N @latirlatir Web Director MEGHAN RIDLEY @miss_ridley Online Editor DA L L A S K E E F E @ d a l l a s ke efe Social Media Director JA K E W E B S T E R Motion Graphics ZAK HUGHES Web Ad Coordinator JESUS DIAZ National State Director K AT E K E L LY @ k 8 m i n d s et Distribution Manager JAS O N RU S S E L L National Sales Executive

N AT H A N C H R Y S L E R Business Development

APRIL 2016 HAPPY 420!

T R E K H O L L N AG E L Strategic Advisor STEVE DELIMA Financial Controller SANDRA SEMLING Events Director J E N I K A M AO Administrative Event Coordinator CHRISTINA HEINTZELMAN Executive Assistant K I N S E Y L I T TO N @kinseymaei Corporate Office Manager Contributing Writers S H A RO N L E T TS DAV I D PA L E S C H U C K MEGHAN RIDLEY R.Z. HUGHES DAV I D BA I L E Y @dmb0227 H E AT H E R C O O N S K E L LY VO @ kevowr i t i ng L I N D S E Y R I N E H A RT JOHNNY HALFHAND B I A N C A F OX MEGAN RUBIO A B I GA I L RO S S J O H N C AC C I TO L O PAU L M U C H OW S K I JESSICA ZIMMER J E N I K A M AO B L A Z E ROB I N S O N S E S H ATA Contributing Photographers MARK COFFIN T I N A BA L L E W KRISTEN ANGELO B R I E S AV E Y

Once again, we prepare for the biggest cannabis holiday of the year! Our third National issue is dedicated to 4/20 in its entirety. The holiday represents a moment where many of us can step back, take a deep breath, and celebrate how far we have come as a united cannabis community. The connection felt during this celebration is a reminder of the authentic roots we planted that allowed our entire movement to begin in the first place. We chose Willie Nelson for our April cover because he radiates authenticity. He has Defended Our Plant Everywhere for more than half a century and and has connected with millions of people through his music. In this issue, we explore the life and story of the man, and the creation of his brand: Willie’s Reserve. Willie stands for fierce independence and personal freedom, and this is a message we can rally behind. We believe this type of attitude has played a major role in cannabis becoming more accessible across the nation. Join us in exploring the variety of what the cannabis industry has to offer this 4/20. From Essence, Las Vegas’ only cannabis dispensary on the strip, to sustainable ways to store your stash - we’ve got you covered! Do you plan on staying home but need 10,000 joints for 4/20? Take a look at our technology piece on Futurola’s knockbox. Browse through our “products we love” page and see what canna-businesses we find dope! This holiday, some will make a point to gather with like-minded people. Others will make space in their busy schedules to celebrate solo. Yet most will find themselves in places where access to cannabis is restricted, and will have to partake discreetly – if at all. 4/20 is a time to commemorate how far we’ve come, while greeting the journey that lies ahead. Regardless of your state’s political landscape, we strive to embolden our readers in their stance on cannabis. If a copy of DOPE Magazine lands in your hands, we hope it inspires you. Thank you for being a part of an authentic community of strong, united and courageous people. May your 4/20 be dope! D O P E M AG A Z I N E i s a f r e e m o n t h l y p u b l i c a t i o n d e d i c a t e d t o p ro v i d i n g a n i n fo r m a t i v e a n d w e l l n e s s - m i n d e d v o i c e t o t h e c a n n a b i s m o v e m e n t. W h i l e o u r fo u n d a t i o n i s t h e m e d i c a l c a n n a b i s i n d u s t r y, i t i s o u r i n t e n t t o p ro v i d e et h i c a l a n d re s e a rc h - b a s e d a r t i c l e s t h a t a d d re s s t h e m a n y fa c ets o f t h e w a r o n d r u g s , f ro m p o l i t i c s t o l i f e s t y l e a n d b e y o n d . We b e l i e v e t h a t t h ro u g h e d u c a t i o n a n d h o n e s t d i s c o u r s e , a c c u r a t e p o l i c y a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g c a n e m e rg e . D O P E M AG A Z I N E i s fo c u s e d o n d e f e n d i n g b o t h o u r p a t i e n t s a n d o u r p l a n t, a n d t o b e i n g a n u n c e a s i n g fo r c e fo r r e v o l u t i o n a r y c h a n g e.

Contributing Artist MALINA LOPEZ Graphic Design Intern NARISSA-CAMILLE PHETHEAN

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TA BA L ER TO I CF L C EO TN I TTLEEN T S APRIL 2016

THE FOUR TWENTY ISSUE 14

CANNA-NEWS 411 on 420

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y Woodstalk

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DOPE NEWS

THE FOUR TWENTY ISSUE

APRIL 2016

20-21 B R A N D I N G B U D

What’s In A (Cannabis) Brand Name

22 24-25

DOPE EVENTS April - May

36-37 C A N N A - N E W S

The 2016 Cannabis March

WILLIE NELSON

AN AMERICAN ORIGINAL

30-34

HEALING THE CITY OF ANGELS

CANNA-NEWS Cannabis and Hemp Products For Cats and Dogs

30-31 W I L L I E ’ S R E S E R V E

42-43

AN AMERICAN ORIGINAL

ROAD TRIP LOS ANGELES

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A P R I L C OV E R Photo by: James Minchin Design by: Brandon Palma

G R OW Playing It Safe

46-47 B U S I N E S S

The Mainstreaming of Cannabis Hits the Drug Industry

52-53

LIFESTYLE Products We Love

54-55

MUSIC Beats Antique

58-59

#END420SHAME Stories From Our Readers

6 0 - 6 1 T R AV E L

Cannabis In the Canary Islands

6 4 - 6 5 I N T E RV I E W WRITER & PHOTOS / SHARON LETTS

38-40

Ed Rosenthal

44-45

48-50

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I was very excited to try the Pain Relief Salve from Mary Jane’s Medicinals, as I have lingering pain due to injuries caused by a car accident. Mary Jane’s focus is on cannabis-infused topical products that provide an alternative to ingesting cannabis, ensuring relief without psychoactive effects. My neck and shoulders were feeling tight and I had been dealing with a headache all day, so I used the salve on my temples and neck. I immediately noticed that it didn’t take much of the salve to get the job done, and it took effect within 10 minutes. My headache was barely noticeable the rest of the evening, and it was the first time that day that I wasn’t focused on my pain. When I used the salve on my neck and shoulders, the results were similar, with the added bonus of helping release tension and tightness. I’ll be keeping this salve handy from now on! Consumer feedback consistently highlights the quality and fast-acting relief of Mary Jane’s Medicinals products. I also tried the Lip Bong and was very impressed. It is the longest-lasting lip balm that I have ever used. It was cool to the touch with a great consistency—not too glossy, not too waxy—and my lips were moisturized for at least an hour.

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A WRITER R T I C /LR.Z. E HUGHES TITLE

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PHOTO / RICK DAHMS

UNE IN TO KLAY 1180 AM every Saturday morning at noon for exclusive interviews and discussions with industry and local leaders. The brainchild of Darrel Bowman with Amy Ansel as co-host, 411 on 420 is the first radio program of its kind on the AM airwaves. It is a show that focuses on cannabis knowledge and information rather than simply promoting the use or extolling the virtues of the plant. Well connected in the Puget Sound business community, Bowman was a business consultant for years before hosting the long-running BizTech Talk, also on KLAY 1180, while Ansel has roots in Microsoft. 411 on 420 launched this past November and since then, the hosts have already welcomed a bevy of local luminaries, including John Davis, constitutional lawyer Scott Stafne, the Mayor of Tacoma, and the founders of CannaCon. When they first started out, aside from the obvious risk of talking about cannabis on federally regulated airwaves, the station manager asked Bowman a question: “Do you think you really have enough to talk about?” To this Bowman chuckled, knowing that education is imperative, and got to work producing content that brings understanding and awareness to the industry and business community. “Everywhere we go, Amy is in the know,” Bowman said. The duo’s intimate knowledge of the cannabis network, as well as many other sectors, is vital to their goal to normalize cannabis and bring it into the mainstream. Ansel said they want to put cannabis on the same level as any other industry. “With conversation comes commerce, and

GRAPHICS / JAN DOMACENA

commerce can bring normalcy.” The medium of radio is unique as a place to hold conversations about pressing topics. The Internet is great for information, but there are so many diversions and distractions that it is hard to hold a meaningful discussion without being entirely sidetracked. On the radio, people can tune in for long periods of time and feel compelled to define their own opinions. The team at 411 on 420 is bringing news and information to the masses in the hopes that they will make their own educated decisions. “We don’t promote getting high,” Bowman said. “Cannabis touches virtually every industry, including sustainability, textiles, oil and natural gas, disease management, and agriculture,” said Ansel, as Bowman started to explain a nefarious plastics plant being built in the south of Puget Sound. The Port of Tacoma is currently allowing a foreign-owned company to build a potentially dangerous natural gas and plastics plant that will put thousands of lives at risk and poison the ecosystem. It is a truly shocking tale that is bringing people out in droves to emergency town hall meetings. However, it could all be solved with one perfectly green solution. Hemp could be used to produce the plastics without the natural gas, all while positively contributing to local environmental health. This could be done with American businesses without ruining the waterways and would actually help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere; all without the risk of an exploding power plant. To learn more, tune in each week. Listeners can live stream the show globally and listen to past episodes at 411on420.biz.

L O C AT I O N : C E R E S I N B E L L E V U E

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A RT I C L E T I T L E

S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

WOO D S TAL K CHRONIC CONSCIOUSNESS

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HERE IS A WIDE WORLD OF WEED CONTAINERS available for cannabis users to store their herb in these days, from the old school sandwich baggie to the latest in UV-protected jars and vacuum sealing. We’re also stepping into an era in which cannabis can be on display on a coffee table or desk. Combine these two notions together and you find products like the bamboo gems being crafted by WoodStalk. The product line at WoodStalk speaks for itself. With thoughtful design and soulful integration, the range of jars here is especially wide. For those interested in a complete collection, The Full House features a total of eight jars in four different sizes, half in a natural tone and half in black. The WoodStalk vision is one of consciousness and sustainability. As the website so eloquently states: “If the bamboo containers are the body of WoodStalk, the very soul is the hope to inspire a new level of selection that binds personal action with global consequences.” A truly rare quality of these containers lies in the fact that they are individually hand-crafted, each one composed of a different combination of colors and grains and indentations on the bottom. These one-of-a-kind storage options can be customized— WoodStalk crafted DOPE jars and they’re nothing short of gorgeous—or you can go with a choice from the wide variety of WoodStalk designs, including the Flower of Life, Tunnel Vision, and Octopus Crop Circle. WoodStalk is also in the rolling accessories game, where their blunt tubes are a definite standout product. They are also airtight and smell-proof, so discretion isn’t sacrificed in the name of environmentally friendly accessorizing—which is undoubtedly at the core of this chronically conscious company..

WRITER / MEGHAN RIDLEY

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PHOTO / KRISTEN ANGELO

ART DIRECTION / MALINA LOPEZ


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WRITER / ALEX HALPERIN OF WEED WEEK

GRAPHICS / JAN DOMACENA

After Super Tuesday, Bernie Sanders, Hilary Clinton, and Donald Trump each emerged as frontrunners for official party nominations. Last year, Clinton, a longtime skeptic of legal cannabis, took on opponent Bernie Sanders' view that cannabis should no longer be a Schedule I drug (a category that does not allow for medical use). Trump has not made cannabis a focus issue but says states should be able to decide for themselves.

Vermont’s State Senate approved recreational use for adults with support from Governor Peter Shumlin (D). If the bill passes, the Green Mountain State could be the fifth to legalize and the first to do so through the legislature rather than the ballot. It’s speculated that another New England state, Rhode Island, could be next. In Maine, an initiative for voters to decide on legalization in November failed to make the ballot after 17,000 signatures were disqualified on a “handwriting technicality.” An appeal is expected.

The legal cannabis industry could be worth $100 billion by 2029. San Francisco firm Ackrell Capital wrote in a report “a cultural and generational shift in public attitude is occurring.” The report estimates a market of 50 million adult users with comparable sales of recreational products and cannabinoid-based pharmaceuticals. If accurate, this would make legal cannabis as big as tobacco or the anti-depressant and coffee markets combined.

Legalization activists plan to protest federal prohibition by sparking up in front of the White House on April 2, a date they call a “rescheduling” of 4/20. While adult use is legal in D.C., the protest will be on federal land so anyone who consumes will risk arrest. The protest was inspired, among other things, by late night comedian Bill Maher who recently lit a joint on his show Politically Incorrect. Despite Internet rumors, Maher was not fined $1.7 million by the FCC.

A federal judge in Canada ruled that medical users have the right to grow their own plants. The decision forces lawmakers to revise the country’s medical rules at the same time that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau works toward his campaign promise of legalizing nationwide. It has caused some confusion as enforcement varies widely across the country. On the other side of the world, Australia legalized medical cannabis.

Since 1998, a past drug conviction has been grounds to refuse a student federal financial aid, a policy that disproportionately affects minorities. New legislation introduced by a bipartisan group of senators could end the practice. “Statistics and common sense tell us it is bad policy to deny students education if we want to reduce drug abuse and encourage young people to become successful,” said Utah Republican Orrin Hatch.

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B R A N D I N G B U D A RT I C L E T I T L E

W H AT’S I N A ( CA N NA B I S ) B R A N D NAM E ? WRITER / DAVID PALESCHUCK, CLS, MBA

I

T’S A CURIOUS THING that a mere brand name can persuade us to engage emotionally with a product or company. Sometimes, we even develop an unwitting loyalty or long-lasting aversion to a brand, though we might know little about it. How is this possible? The old Shakespearian adage would have us believe that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but how does this really play out in the world of brand names? Naming is a complex blend of science and art, a fusion of unstructured creativity and meticulous logic. The idea phase is elaborate: inspiration comes from abstract concepts, relevant themes, sounds, and different languages. Literally hundreds of names can be generated for each project, but if creating names can be challenging, selecting one is even more so.

DOES A BRAND NAME MATTER? Choosing a brand name is an important and intensive exercise. The name should last, it should fit the company’s personality, have the right connotation, and be remembered.

Since most companies start small with the emphasis on the idea for the product or service rather than the brand, the name arises as an afterthought. There is a strong likelihood that the name will be chosen on emotive grounds rather than on solid scientific research. Since every company needs a name and because one name is just as good as another, why not just pluck one out of the air? Often, that is exactly how names are decided.

HOW TO CHOOSE A BRAND NAME Brand names should be easy to understand, pronounce, and spell. Two words in the name should be considered the maximum. A name should be familiar so that the information it relates to is already stored in the mind. They should also be distinctive, attracting attention and standing out from other brands.

These guidelines are not necessarily mutually compatible. It may be difficult to find names that are simple, vivid, familiar, and distinctive. Evidence suggests that consumers are more likely to remember a name if the mind has to work harder to understand and recognize it. Familiar words may facilitate brand recall, but distinctive words work better at building brand recognition. An example of this in the cannabis space is the brand Avitas. Strangely familiar, it’s sativa spelled backward. Linguists are often consulted to brainstorm appropriate names for brands, products, and companies. Indeed, there are a number of popular linguistic devices that can be used to form effective brand names, such as the phonetic alliteration in Coca-Cola, the morphological elements in Craftmatic, or semantic allusions in Nike. Semantic metaphors that convey visible, clear meanings ensure that iconic brand names like Apple and Jaguar continue to be popular, but even brand names built on solid naming principles can fail. It turns out that the mere letters and sounds used in a brand name can have a curious impact on its reception by the public, persuading

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us to develop an emotional bond with the product. Based on studies of popular brand names and experiments involving made up brand names, linguists and psychologists have found some interesting patterns that may have an impact on future trends in branding. A 2007 study by Tina M. Lowrey and L. J. Shrum on phonetic symbolism and brand names suggests that consonants and vowels can convey symbolic meaning. Certain sounds can positively or negatively emphasize certain properties of a product.

OTHER VARIABLES IN BRANDING A reality of today’s digital world also means that domain availability can be a crucial deciding factor. There are over 220 million domain names registered worldwide, and some experts believe that over 99.9% of the dictionary is registered as a domain name. The process is especially challenging because there are more than 24 million businesses in the United States. U.S. trademark law protects business names, so when you find one you like, make sure you can use it. Infringing on a copyright could force you to abandon your new business name after investing a lot of time and money in it.

PROTECT THE BRAND NAME It’s important to protect your name to the appropriate degree. If a name infringes on another company’s copyright, the company could receive a cease-anddesist letter and have to go to court or change its name after months or even years of use. Some experts believe that the best names are abstract, a blank slate upon which to create an image. Others think that names should be informative so customers know immediately what the business is. Some believe that coined names (made-up words) are more memorable than names that use real words. Others think they’re forgettable. In reality, any name can be effective if it’s backed by the appropriate marketing strategy.


BARRATNI CDLI N EG TIB TU L ED

DESCRIPTIVE

EVOCATIVE NEOLOGISMS FOREIGN WORD PERSONIFICATION PUNNY COMBINATION

From both a marketing and legal standpoint, it’s important to develop brand names that are both distinctive and protectable. Incorporating overused terms can lead to brand confusion, and it certainly won’t make the brand stand out. The industry is riddled with “canna” brands such as Canna Care, Cannabis Culture, Cannabis Now, and Cannabis Times. Similarly, brands with “420” or “green” as the dominant component are prevalent—and hard to protect. Keep in mind that U.S. trademark and copyright law protects names for the benefit of consumers. A trademark, therefore, is not necessarily owned by the first person to use it. The legal standard for a protectable name is something that distinguishes the product from its competitors by communicating to a relevant consumer. It could be a word, symbol, slogan, design element, logo, color, texture, sound, or motion—with the brand name itself acting as the foundation.

CONCLUSION As momentum for cannabis legalization grows nationally, the commercialization of cannabis is no longer a pipe dream. In fact, it could become a reality sooner rather than later, providing companies with the opportunity to build enduring brands. Brand owners must give considerable thought to the names they choose for their businesses and products. From a marketing perspective, new brands should incorporate a name that a customer can remember and that distinguishes the brand from competitors. Consider the name as shorthand for brand identity in the marketplace. If the brand name sounds too much like another company’s, the goodwill it builds up diffuses to anybody with a similar name.

“THERE IS EVIDENCE TO SUGGEST THAT IF THE MIND HAS TO WORK HARDER TO UNDERSTAND AND RECOGNIZE THE NAME, IT WILL BE MORE LIKELY TO BE RETAINED IN THE LONGER LASTING MEMORY THAN A FAMILIAR NAME THAT FAILS TO BECOME LODGED.” L.J. SHRUM, RESEARCHER: PHONETIC SYMBOLISM

David Paleschuck, a Seattle-based entrepreneur and marketing expert, has had a long career in marketing, branding, licensing, and partnership development. He has worked for world-class consumer brands including American Express, MasterCard, PepsiCo, and Microsoft. He is currently writing a book called “Branding Bud: The Commercialization of Cannabis” and is releasing it in early 2016. Contact him at david@newleaflicensing.com.

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A R T EI C V LE EN TTSI T L E

APRIL

PHOTO / MARK COFFIN

THC FAIR A PRIL 2– 3, A P R I L 1 6 –1 7

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HC Fair is coming to Bend-Redmond on April 2 and to Salem on April 16. This fair is where attendees will learn more about growing and harvesting cannabis, the medicinal uses of cannabis, and legislation about hemp and cannabis. Vendors will feature new smoking and vaping accessories, horticulture and grow shops will be represented, and information will be presented on recreational laws, medicinal dispensaries, medicinal uses for patients, edibles, and hemp products. Many locals come together to collaborate with small business owners, making this a one-of-a-kind networking event.

DOPE CUP SEATTLE

PHOTO / TOM HOEFFT

APRI L 1 7

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he 5th Annual Washington DOPE Cup is amongst us! It is the biggest cannabis competition in the Northwest, where contestants compete for the best cannabis products in Washington state. Join DOPE for a day of music and community engagement and celebrate the greatest plant in the world. For more info on entering and tickets go to dopecup.dopemagazine.com

MARIJUANA BUSINESS CONFRENCE & EXPO M AY 9 –1 1

M

ore than 3,000 industry executives, experts, and major investors come together to make partnerships and combine markets at this conference. Many vendors will be ready to show off their latest products and services. Expert speakers with all new presentations and Q & A sessions will be available, with a keynote presentation on Generational Engagement Strategies from Chuck Underwood. “This show kills it, to put it simply,” said Brent LaBranche from Aptus Plant Tech. “This is beneficial for everyone: the dispensaries, the patients, and the investors.” This event will take place in Orlando, Florida and is known for its tremendous impact on large and small businesses alike, so don’t miss out!

WRITER / JENIKA MAO

PHOTO / MARIJUANA BUSINESS DAILY

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THE RAPID GROWTH OF THE CANNABIS INDUSTRY HAS MADE IT THE FASTEST GROWING SECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES ECONOMY, SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTING NEARLY EVERY INDUSTRY.

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ACRATNI C N LAE- NT EI TWLSE

CA N NA B I S A N D H E M P P ROD U CTS F OR CATS A N D DOGS

DO TH EY WORK AND ARE TH EY SAFE? WRITER / JESSICA ZIMMER

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new group of companies is providing cannabis and hemp products for pets that are said to treat issues ranging from anxiety to cancer. The primary ingredient in the products is cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical compound that can repress the transmission of chemicals between nerve cells. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has not approved cannabis or hemp for use in animals, has issued warning letters to several of the companies. “Often [non-FDA approved drugs do not even contain the ingredients found on the label,” said Michael Felberbaum, press officer for the FDA. “Consumers should beware when purchasing and using any such products.” The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals does not support using cannabis or hemp to treat pets. “There have been no scientifically accepted studies comparing marijuana products to known pain control medications,” said Dr. Tina Wismer, a veterinarian and the medical director of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. “In addition, research has not been able to adequately define what a safe and effective dose of marijuana would

PHOTO / COURTESY OF VETCBD

be, due to the wide variety in product available.” Dr. Wismer made correlated statements concerning hemp. Similarly, Dr. Steve Hansen, a veterinarian and president and CEO of the Arizona Humane Society, said he is concerned about cannabis and hempbased products for pets because they are not FDA-approved or registered. “I would ask what research has been done and try a product very cautiously,” Hansen said. Dr. Sarah Brandon, Executive Director of Washington based Canna Companion believes that scientific studies will eventually prove CBD is safe and effective for pets. Brandon is a veterinarian who, along with husband and veterinarian Dr. Greg Copas, are widely considered the world leaders in the research and development of cannabis as a compliment to pet healthcare regimens. Their company currently creates and produces hempbased products for dogs and cats. Canna Companion collected data during informal tests of its product between February 2014 and December 2015 and plans to present its findings in June 2016 at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum in Denver. Dr. Greg Copas, the chief

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scientific officer of Canna Companion, added that he and Brandon have talked to several universities about beginning clinical trials. “Right now, we’re looking at Tennessee State University, the University of Kentucky, and the University of California, Davis,” Copas said. Copas became interested in treating pets with hemp about 15 years ago when he began using oral cannabis sativa supplements. Brandon and Copas first treated their own pets, then pets of friends and family, and lastly, pets of their voluntary and informed private practice clients. Canna Companion is composed solely of ground hemp in vegetarian capsules and offers product specific to animal body weight ranging from 205 mg for small dogs and cats and up to 550 mg for extra large dogs. By summer of 2016, Canna Companion also plans to offer an equine formulation and flavored chews for cats and dogs. “We use several different strains [of hemp],” Brandon said. “We want to make sure the THC ratios are low.” Copas said Canna Companion helps with arthritis and joint pain but is not a cure-all. “We recommend using it in conjunction with other therapy and


ACRATNI C N LAE- NTEI TWLSE medications” Brandon said. Canna Companion’s products are getting some serious support from both the academic veterinary community like Professor Peter Cowen of North Carolina State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine who has stated: “There is something of extreme value here. Not only from a therapeutic perspective but also from a psychological one”. Cannabis culture icon Tommy Chong has also lent his full support to the brand, stating: “The decision to work with Canna Companion was obvious for me. I’ve had pets throughout my entire life, and I still do. If we can do anything to improve their quality of life, I’m all for it.” Like Brandon and Copas, there are many other veterinary leaders looking to cannabis to treat animal ailments. Dr. Stephen M. Katz, a veterinarian and founder of Therabis, a New York City company that created a hempbased powder for dogs, said his product assists with joint mobility, anxiety, allergies, and pathological scratching. By the second quarter of 2016, Therabis will offer a product for cats. “It’s a formula that I’ve been working on and refined for the better part of 10 years,” Katz said. “I’ve used the three different formulations [for small, medium, and large dogs] on approximately 100 dogs each.” The sachet for dogs up to 20 pounds contains three mg of CBD, the sachet for dogs between 21 and 50 pounds contains five mg of CBD, and the sachet for dogs 81 to 100 pounds contains seven mg of CBD. Katz has witnessed Therabis relieve separation anxiety and pain related to the hip joint. “Many dogs suffer from separation anxiety,” Katz said. As a result, they chew or bite the walls in their homes while their owners are away. “I can’t tell you how much drywall I’ve removed from intestines. Also, [New York] is one of the epicenters in the country for dog allergies.” Katz said. Therabis has partnered with Dixie Elixirs, a Denver company that creates a variety of human-grade products containing cannabis extract. In 2016, Therabis will partner with the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine to start clinical trials on its product. Marjorie Fischer, director of Treatibles, a company that creates hemp-based products for animals,

said her company has benefited from the knowledge and experience of a cannabis-based company. Treatibles started in 2013 as a sister company of Auntie Dolores, a California business that makes gourmet human edibles. Fischer said Treatibles’ baked products come in two flavors: pumpkin and blueberry. They contain one mg of CBD in a small treat for animals up to 50 pounds and two and a half mg of CBD in a large treat for animals 50 pounds and over. Treatibles is working to create a grain-free version of the product for dogs and a cat-specific product as well. “Our customers report that Treatibles can be helpful with decreasing

“THERABIS CREATED A HEMP-BASED POWDER FOR DOGS THAT ASSISTS WITH JOINT MOBILITY, ANXIETY, ALLERGIES, AND PATHOLOGICAL SCRATCHING.” nausea and increasing appetite… [as well as] relieving anxiety, joint pain, seizures, aggression, and behavioral issues,” Fischer said. The company has received positive feedback from thousands of customers. Alison Etwell, founder of TreatWell, said her company creates a variety of cannabis products for people and animals alike. “We’ve been treating dogs for the past decade for seizures and serious illnesses like cancer,” Etwell said. “We use cannabis because we think hemp is not safe for animals. You need the THC in order for the CBD to bind well to the brain’s [neuron] receptors.” Etwell said TreatWell’s pet tinctures are made with the extract of

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flower that comes from two different strains of cannabis, one with a 20to-1 CBD to THC ratio and the other with a 1-to-1 CBD to THC ratio. The first tincture is used to treat anxiety, arthritis, and mild pain; the second for cancer, severe pain, and topical skin conditions. Both tinctures come in two sizes, a small pet size that contains 75 mg of cannabinoids total and a large pet size that contains 300 mg of cannabinoids total. TreatWell works with veterinarians and animal experts to design a treatment plan for each pet patient. “It’s easy to dose up or dose down with a tincture because you can put [the liquid] on the side of their mouth or in their food,” Etwell said. Dr. Tim Shu, a veterinarian and founder of VetCBD, also prefers to use cannabis over hemp. Shu, who is a medical cannabis patient, said cannabis has been bred to produce resinous flower, while hemp has been bred to produce fiber. Shu designed an olive oil-based tincture that’s easy to measure and give. Each bottle of VetCBD contains 115 mg of CBD and is administered based on the animal’s weight. Shu said VetCBD has received positive feedback from thousands of pet owners in California. “It works amazingly well for pain, arthritis, nausea, separation anxiety, and noise anxiety,” Shu said. “We have some cancer patients who take a dosage roughly four to five times the regular dose. We haven’t seen any issues.” All companies stated an overdose of their product would not be lethal and added that use of their product would not cause an animal to experience a euphoric high. An overdose could result in nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sleepiness, or dizziness: basically, the animal might “act drunk,” as Etwell said, but the symptoms would subside within a few hours. All in all, those backing cannabis-based products are confident in their safety. The companies added pet owners should talk to a vet before beginning treatment with products containing CBD. “We really have to find out the underlying issue and address it,” Shu said. If a pet owner notices that their pet is experiencing negative effects from exposure to cannabis or hemp, they should call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-4264435 or visit the organization’s website to learn more.


CANNA-NEWS

W H Y I U S E M E D I CA L CA N NA B I S WRITER / JOHNNY HALFHAND

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HE ARTHRITIS STARTED SOFTLY, like a whimper. My knees twinged from time to time as a kid. I started taking methotrexate and a range of other prescription medications intended to halt deformation, inflammation, and so on. But the ravages of the disease push on relentlessly. As it invades each moving part, from the jaw to the toes, you realize this is a war waged within. It’s chronic. In other words, it’s not going anywhere any time soon. Doctors offer treatment, but it is not guaranteed to work, and the best meds cost more than what disability insurance covers per month. Rent, food, utilities: who needs that? Alas, this is the situation many of our most vulnerable citizens are facing in the United States right now. Anyone who has fallen ill or has had the misfortune of inheriting faulty genes is pretty much

destined for a life of poverty as the government and healthcare industries double-team our wallets. Throughout all this, we’ve all been active participants in the crazy social experiment of state-led cannabis legalization in the United States. Most certainly a welcome breach in the long prohibition of cannabis, and a true lesson in taking the good with the bad. And still, there is common incredulity directed at medical cannabis users. We are often suspected of using illness as a cover for getting high. We are suspected of giving up on diet and exercise, but in my experience, using cannabis on an asneeded basis can effectively be a part of that holistic regimen: cannabis can help suppress nausea and let you overcome your vertigo long enough to get a good breakfast. For some people, cannabis gets them up and out, eager to explore

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“THE ISSUE IS THAT DOCTORS HAVE ALMOST NO PROBLEM AT ALL PRESCRIBING OPIOIDS, BUT IT WOULD BE A RISK TO THEIR PROFESSIONAL CAREERS IF THEY WERE TO WRITE A CANNABIS PRESCRIPTION UNDER THEIR NAME." 27

their city. It can break you out of a depression to enjoy a game or hobby which has fallen to the wayside. It can help some people sleep at night or calm down from a stressful episode. Cannabis also acts as a safe replacement for opioid painkillers like hydrocodone or oxycodone, which bring with them a notorious potential for abuse and overdose. This is a real concern for patients with chronic pain, who risk falling down a slippery slope. The ideal for many patient is avoiding opioids whenever possible. The issue is that doctors have almost no problem with prescribing these painkillers, but it would be a risk to their professional careers if they were to write a cannabis prescription under their name. Despite state-by-state legalization, without national consensus, this will be the awkward state of things for patients. The unique medicinal nature of cannabis is reflected in how it impacts people very differently. It takes a little bit of experimentation to see if it works for you, and in what measure. People without illness often struggle to fathom the world of chronic pain. It’s a deeply personal experience that is hard to translate, and empathy is partially dependent on understanding. There is a vast array of types of pain, and there are some who suffer greatly who don’t even have a diagnosis to explain their ailments. We all must remember that it is real humans who are experiencing these pains. Sick people and the permanently disabled aren’t people to throw behavioral proscriptions at, but people who need our collective compassion and care. For me, cannabis helps me sink into the couch and enjoy the simple things: a nice vape session will chill me out, and a big chunk of a chocolate medible will get my muscle spasms relaxed away long enough to unwind. I never get a vacation from my illness, but a spot of pot puts things in their right place for a few moments. Everyone deserves a break from their reality, and that is especially true for those who struggle through daily life and have finally found respite through medical cannabis.


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A RT PR I COLDE UTCI T L E

I C O N I C C H RO N I C TH E PASSION AND PU RITY OF WILLIE’S RESERVE WRITER / BIANCA FOX

PHOTO / DANNY CLINCH

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MAGINE A WORLD WHERE true cannabis connoisseurs can light up like Willie. Authentic style. Pure premium product. The timeless toke. This spring season, the cannabis community will welcome the arrival of potent flowers found within the new brand, Willie’s Reserve. The icon of cannabis has been plotting and planning in strategic steps, assuring the invention of a brand that promises to deliver what dreams are made of. Willie Nelson is a trusted source. Throughout history, we have watched the country star fight for our right to party. One can tell that he truly cares for the cannabis community. From his consistent dedication to Farm Aid to leading the movement of personal toking freedom, his brand carries the elements that stand true to his nature. We can expect nothing less than the best. Elizabeth Hogan, who has worked with Willie for two years on building the brand, explained his humble beginning to the business. “It is something he took very seriously, whether and how to get involved in the business of cannabis when it began to be branded in California,” Hogan said. “When people started putting their names on pot as branding, Willie personally knew where he stood on the issue, which was fully supportive. He wanted to lend his voice to the effort and he wanted to have an influence.” For the following years, the brand was carefully crafted to suit and portray Willie’s authentic self. The singer met with established partners in Colorado and Washington to grow the most premium plants possible. He created relationships with growers and producers, who in turn provided input on strains and products— products that met with Willie’s goals:

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A R PT RI COLDE UTCI T L E

pure, clean, pesticide-free strains that are available in a variety aimed to please a range of customers. With a product in mind, Willie set out to build his brand. “He worked very closely with producers and processors in the first states to go recreational, Colorado and Washington, and develop a high-quality supply chain that reflects the issues that he wanted to have a positive impact on,” Hogan said. “Willie chose to release his products in those two states because they were the first to go recreational. It made the most sense for the brand for a couple of reasons.” Hogan explained Willie’s choice for distributing in Colorado and Washington. “Willie has always stood for that personal freedom, that sort of libertarian point of view. As adults, we have the right to this plant that exists on the Earth. It made sense for him to go where voters also said that made sense to them.” Conducting thorough nationwide research led to analysis on where the brand should primarily be launched. Thankfully, they found that the industry and its customers believe in proper regulation, which includes Willie’s ideals of a clean and premium product. The group is confident that these trends will continue, from what they see in the results of their work in public opinion. Building good business was also a top priority of Willie’s. Another top goal for him was to help the cannabis industry look at itself “through a lens of sustainability.” “With Willie’s Reserve, everyone can expect variety in terms of proper pesticide-free cultivation methods and strains,” Hogan said. “What people will find is a very high standard level

of quality in terms of what went into it and how the plant was treated and processed coming out.” Private equity funding for Willie’s Reserve arrived in waves from Tuatara Capital and the final stages were completed during the fall of 2015. The company will begin distribution of products on shelves within dispensaries across Colorado and Washington in May or June, Hogan said. The goal of the products’ packaging is to represent Willie’s relationship with cannabis. His extensive travels allowed for some mighty fine sampling of the nation’s best pot, grown by top producers. “His stash has always been made up of the best,” Hogan said, speaking on what Willie promises to deliver. “He’s so funny when you ask him about his favorite strain. He says, ‘I claim them all. There are ways to become an expert on something. You can study a lot or practice a lot, and his expertise comes from practice!” In the first launch of Willie’s Reserve line, consumers can expect beautiful flower and beautiful flower products like Ready Rolls. Willie is also a big fan of vape pens and cartridges, so that is part of the focus as well. In the end, the consumer will be able to toke through the eyes of Willie, appreciating his chosen chronics. Throughout the next year, the company will be focusing on establishing proper operational methods with partners. Hopes are high for the brand’s growth potential. “We really believe that with Willie’s involvement, we have some advantages that his fans will really appreciate,” Hogan said.

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“AS ADULTS, WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO THIS PLANT THAT EXISTS ON THE EARTH. IT MADE SENSE FOR WILLIE TO GO WHERE VOTERS ALSO SAID THAT MADE SENSE TO THEM.”


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AN AMERICAN ORIGINAL WRITER / SHARON LETTS

PHOTO / JAMES MINCHIN

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ithin the cannabis community, our life stories and lessons learned make up who we are. Our differences through struggles come together for the greater good when the artists of a community tell our stories through personal and creative expression. American musician, singer-songwriter, and activist Willie Nelson has told a thousand stories from his own life that began when he was just a child. Born in rural Texas in 1933 during the Great Depression and raised by his grandparents, he and his family picked cotton beside immigrants and offspring hailing from Mexico and Africa.

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“IN SHORT, I FELL IN LOVE WITH THIS LOVELY, LEAFY PLANT,”

When discussing his fellow laborers, Willie quickly commented, “They were Mexican-American and African-American,” putting emphasis on the soil on which they worked together as equals. From his autobiography It’s a Long Story: My Life, Willie writes of a tenacity learned in the fields. “Even though I’d get into fights now and then, I got along with everyone,” he wrote. “It felt natural, for instance, to be living across the street from a Mexican family. We accepted them and they accepted us. Our Mexican neighbors worked out in the field right alongside us.” Willie never learned discrimination. Instead, the experience founded the basis for his musical and philanthropic endeavors. “I loved listening to the black workers making music of their own,” Willie said. “They weren’t singing songs of complaint. They were singing songs of hope driven by a steady beat and flavored with thick harmonies made up on the spot. I couldn’t help but sing along.” He penned his first song at the age of nine and played in a polka band for money at the age of 12, much to his Bible-loving grandmother’s disappointment. Mama Nelson believed that the smoking and drinking associated with life in the barroom would send her grandson straight to hell. But in the end, she surrendered to the music, as the $8 made from one night of playing polka equaled one week’s worth of hard labor in the fields. Her love of the Lord couldn’t compete with practicality. In 1954, fellow musician Fred Lockwood handed Willie a joint while sitting in a bar slamming whiskey and watching Senator McCarthy grill suspected communists within the entertainment industry. “We’d probably get happier faster if we blew some tea,” Fred said. But Willie wasn’t yet ready and downed another whiskey. Drinking, smoking cigarettes, and chasing women were his vices, until lung issues and a bad case of pneumonia put the brakes on his two to three packs a day.

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“It’d take years before I’d understand the beneficial properties,” he wrote. “In the meantime I stuck to my two habits: cigarettes and booze. I was too young and dumb to see the harm they were doing.” The songs he wrote during that time reflected his state of mind. I Gotta Get Drunk needs no CliffsNotes, and Bloody Mary Morning was written as he played two women, admittedly changing the facts to suit the rhyme. “The song had me running fast,” he said. “The song had me looking for a way to deal with a hangover. I was hung over from too much liquor and too much running. It all made sense to give up booze. I was a lousy drunk, a foolish drunk, a fighting drunk, a drunk who did himself much damage.” During the 1960s, his own kids convinced him to take a look at Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, and Creedence Clearwater Revival. Pop laced with folk sensibilities was giving people another way to express their frustrations with the powers that be. “I liked what I heard on the radio,” he said. “Most of it came out of the blues. I heard Led Zeppelin as a blues band. Janis Joplin sure as hell was singing the blues.” With this new mentality also came the drug culture, but Willie wasn’t interested. He was, however, inspired to do away with his vices. “About the same time I adopted the song Whiskey River, I threw whiskey out of my life,” he said. “Any fool could see that booze was bad for me. Booze made me say shit I shouldn’t say and fight guys I shouldn’t fight. Booze made me headstrong, violent, and dumb as dirt. Booze jacked up my ego and drowned out my humanity. On top of that, I still had a two-to-three-packa-day cigarette habit. The combination of liquor and tobacco was slowly killing me.” Willie began smoking cannabis during the ’60s, but said he used it only as a supplement, initially. “As I moved closer to the Woodstock Nation, I bore witness to their


A RT I C L E T I T L E music-loving, life-loving, peace-loving ways, I saw the key role played by pot,” he wrote. “Pot was a communal experience. Unlike cigarettes, you didn’t smoke a joint alone. You shared it. You passed it around. Pot was a plant, a natural substance whose positive uses, I would soon learn, were varied.” Realizing that our country’s very constitution was written on hemp paper had this former cotton-picking Texan thinking. “In short, I fell in love with this lovely, leafy plant,” he wrote. “As time went on I quit tobacco and booze entirely. As the years went by, as the growers of the crop learned to cultivate an increasingly satisfying product, my appreciation increased.” Willie said just as he loved robust coffee beans and the strong buzz felt by the brew, he felt the same way about cannabis. “It pushed me in the right direction,” he wrote. “It pushed me in a positive direction. It kept my head in my music. It kept my head filled with poetry.” Today, he’s becoming more entrenched in the healing world of cannabis by creating, creating his own brand. Willie’s Reserve was inspired from the many post-concert hangouts by his bus, Honeysuckle Rose. “Cannabis has been a positive thing in my life for a very long time,” he said, speaking from his home in Hawaii. “I finally replaced alcohol and cigarettes with smoking weed.” Recently Willie was lambasted, then redeemed, as he shrugged off detailed questions of the plant in an article in New York Magazine. But the surprise that he didn’t know the differences between indica and sativa was ultimately judged as refreshing in the age of snooty cannabis connoisseurs. “As long as the bowl is full, I’m happy,” he joked. But, the larger question remained: did he medicate or get stoned while burning a few on the rooftop of friend and former President Jimmy Carter’s White House prior to giving concerts? Even the most ardent stoners insisting there is no medicinal value to cannabis may find comfort and relaxation in medicating before or after a stressful event.

An artist’s third eye could be opened up before a performance, making the experience more meaningful for all. And then there’s the spiritual connection to consider. “We do it for a lot of reasons,” he said, in true Willie form. “I don’t know if you are aware, but cannabis is mentioned in the Bible. It’s been used in spiritual ceremonies for centuries. It’s been around for a very long time.” Willie’s longevity may be credited to his belief in staying positive, but his legacy is heavily laden with lessons learned, lessons “born out of experience and genuine grief,” he wrote. Lessons shared with us through his music.

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CANNA-NEWS

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HE GLOBAL CANNABIS MARCH, a march to celebrate cannabis and raise awareness about its prohibition, is getting ready for its 17th year in a row! As the next big celebration of cannabis after 4/20, this annual march will take place internationally on Saturday, May 7, 2016. The Global Cannabis March has been raising awareness about the benefits of cannabis and downsides of prohibition since 1999. It is known by many names around the world, including the Global Marijuana March and the Million Marijuana March. The event is often free to participants and is a loud protest, a celebration of cannabis, and a gathering of the diverse cannabis community. Over 800 cities in over 75 countries have participated since its inception, and many locations host a celebration of the cannabis plant in ways that are unique to each area. About 250 cities participate each year, and sponsors local to those areas help make the event happen. The events vary in size depending on location. Toronto has what many perceive as the largest march in the world. It is estimated that their march draws out about 20,000 participants annually. Many sponsors of individual events are local chapters of activist groups and businesses, including NORML, Parents 4 Pot, THCF/Empower Clinics, and other cannabis advocacy groups. Advocates looking for

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“THE EVENTS ARE A MIX OF LOUD PROTESTS, A CELEBRATION OF CANNABIS, AND A GATHERING OF THE DIVERSE CANNABIS COMMUNITY."

like-minded individuals who are focused on ending cannabis prohibition are certain to make a few new friends by attending. Parents 4 Pot founder Anna Diaz is a longtime organizer of the Portland, Oregon march. “The Global Cannabis March is a chance for us all to stand up for the end of cannabis prohibition,” she said. “It is a family-friendly event that encourages us to dress up and have some fun while we shed light on this important issue.” The events are lively and festive. Organizers and participants bond with one another over their love for the cannabis plant. The day typically begins with an expansive march throughout the city, followed by a rally with speakers from various activist and criminal justice groups. Some events complete the day with festivals that focus on providing networking space for vendors and stages for bands. In most cases, the march holds a permit to close roads so that participants have the right of way in traffic. The march then ends at a rallying point such as a capitol building, courthouse, or park. Participants are encouraged to play musical instruments as they march, chant and sing, dress in silly cannabis attire or costumes, bring signs about cannabis and hemp, and advocate

to change cannabis laws. Often, marches even encourage public consumption of cannabis as a form of protest, but it is a good idea to check with local organizers prior to sparking up in case the event is family-friendly. In legal states, dispensaries often participate by handing out coupons for great deals on cannabis flowers and items, and local medical clinics have booths to help people sign up for appointments to see doctors for their cannabis recommendation. In states still facing cannabis prohibition, there is often a large group of activists armed with petitions to change the law. They highlight legislative concepts to support, distribute flyers about jury nullification, and hand out voter registration cards. These events provide a great opportunity for everyone attending to get more involved in positive change. The marches happen every year on the first Saturday of May. To stay up to date on local events, check the event’s Facebook page. Anyone can organize a Global Cannabis March, and submit their march’s information to the organization’s Facebook page to begin recruiting attendees.

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WRITER & PHOTOS / SHARON LETTS

R OA D T R I P

LOS ANGELES HEALING THE CITY OF ANGELS

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OS ANGELES IS THE SECOND-LARGEST CITY in the country after New York City. It is a melting pot rich in ethnic diversity and the epicenter of the entertainment industry—the third richest industry in the world. California was the first state in the union to legalize cannabis as medicine in 1996 and has been grappling with ordinances within its cities and counties ever since. In 2012, the Los Angeles City Council voted to ban all dispensaries, but the rule was never enforced. In 2013, Measure D was voted in by 62.2%, allowing the 135 dispensaries that opened prior to 2007 to keep operating, while raising taxes to $60 for every $1,000 made. At the time, it was said that more than 400 shops were operating within the city, many of them questionable in terms of their knowledge of medicine as dictated by the Compassionate Care Act. That said, with a population of 138 million, many believe 400 shops still aren’t enough to meet supply and demand for safe access.

#GLACASTRONG Fifth-generation Angelino Yamileth Bolanos created the Greater Los Angeles Collective Alliance in 2006 in an effort to bring solidarity and order to what was an unorganized industry. “We founded GLACA to help create ordinances on how dispensaries should behave, because the city said they would not instate ordinances until 2010,” Bolanos said. “Those who were operating safely and were respectful of their neighbors needed a way to differentiate from profiteers who did not care about patient safety, or were otherwise problematic in their behavior.” Since its inception, GLACA has presented its mission in front of the Los Angeles City Council, the California State Legislature, and the United States Congress. Invitations to join GLACA come with guidelines: dispensaries are required to operate within local and state laws. The long overdue ordinances promised for 2010 were enacted in 2016, causing Measure D’s safety net to split wide open. “GLACA has commissioned a poll to see where the voters are in terms of safe access,” Bolanos said. “We’ll share the results as we continue to work with the city and other interested groups to find the right solution for Los Angeles.” Bolanos’ fight doesn’t stop with safe access and the implementation of ordinances. As a liver transplant patient, she fought hard in California this past year to grant patients on the organ donor list the right to medicate with cannabis.

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YAMILETH BOLANOS, FOUNDER & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE GREATER LOS ANGELES AREA COLLECTIVE ALLIANCE (GLAACA), PICKING UP HER MEDS AT THE VENICE BEACH CARE CENTER


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STOPPING TO SMELL THE ROSES Aaron Justis is president of one of LA’s top dispensaries, Buds & Roses. He has sat on the Board of Directors of GLACA and lobbied relentlessly to help the masses understand the challenges of getting medicine to patients safely. Opened in 2006, Buds & Roses is modern and organized. Its shelves are stocked with many varieties of award-winning flower to smoke, including its coveted “Veganic” strains, which are void of animal derivatives. General manager Brett Hartmann ensures Buds confirmed that the staff is educated and ready to offer alternatives to smoking if a patient is suffering from serious ailments. Alternatives include CBD-only caps, salves, and tinctures as well as THC-activated oils, lotions, and salves. “Testing is important,” Hartmann said. “We also carry healthier medibles than most.” BUDS & ROSES AARON JUSTIS, PRESIDENT

SEX, MEDS, AND ROCK ’N’ ROLL Drag queen extraordinaire Laganja Estranja may be a Texan at heart, but she calls LA home. Buds & Roses is her neighborhood shop, and her favorite items are Hashbury extracts and Veganic Gorilla Glue #4. Laganja’s latest favorite, The Deluxe, is made by Allie Butler of The Hepburns and is a large, top-shelf flower. Strong enough for several sessions, it is packaged in a reusable glass snuffing tube with a natural cork top. Laganja usually performs at Micky’s West Hollywood, but she was scheduled in San Diego during this trip. With cannabis sex educator Ashley Manta in tow, we made the trek to San Diego together, focusing our conversation on sex and cannabis, of course. The next day, Manta had a photo shoot at Hustler on Sunset Boulevard, which has hired her to give demonstrations in its shops. She gave an impromptu mini-demo of how a clitoris is stimulated, using a vulva made of fabric. The self-proclaimed “sex geek” was in her element as all eyes were on her vulva, so to speak. “Using cannabis as an intimacy tool can add ease and pleasure to love-making,” she said. “Did you know the clitoris has legs?” Manta said to Hustler employees, moving her fingers slowly over the outer edges of the vulva. There are many cannabis products on the market now geared toward intimacy. One of Manta’s favorites is Foria’s topical stimulating oil. The next stop was Manta’s favorite playground, the Fun Factory, where the colorful state-of-the-art sex toys and stimulators found at Hustler are made. Director of marketing Kristen Tribby said she welcomed the additional education from Manta on further stimulation with cannabis. “It’s given our work a whole new meaning and depth,” she said.

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OPHELIA CHONG PICKING UP HER MEDS

ASHLEY MANTA: CANNABIS SEX EDUCATOR & OWNER OF CANNASEXUAL


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INFUSED FUN IN HOLLYWOOD

The Herbal Chef, Chris Sayegh, is breaking new ground in the world of food infusions with micro-infused servings that leave diners feeling more relaxed than stoned. Business partner and Mixology Flaired owner Shea Lewis worked alongside Sayegh, making magic with micro-infused alcohol with the same theory—a little dab will do you. At Lewis’ apartment—overlooking Hollywood Boulevard and Vine in the shadow of the old Schwab’s sign—a small gathering of friends enjoyed a traditional boil of shrimp, sausages, corn, and potatoes with a twist: everything was infused in some way with cannabis and fresh herbs. “For the boil, I poached the shrimp separately so I could medicate it,” Sayegh said. “I had to weigh the shrimp, then weigh the fats and liquid in the pan to get the correct dosing— around one milligram per shrimp. And I had to make sure it was homogenized by thoroughly mixing the fats.” This type of measured dosing is not typical. Infused food at recreational gatherings often results in people ingesting several times more highly activated THC than they should, and it’s usually served with unhealthy portions of alcohol that can send someone to the emergency room or make them hug a toilet bowl while they watch shadow people. Lewis’ infused cocktails were imaginative, delicious, and beneficial. An infused mocktail was created especially for Stock Pot Images owner Ophelia Chong. “Shea made me a strawberry lemonade with basil,” she said. “It was made with fresh berries with a lemon twist and a spicy basil finish. It went perfect with the spicy shrimp.” Chong said she enjoyed and appreciated the micro-dosed offering. “I felt a really nice mellow,” she said. “Finally, infused food that is responsible, and the dosing is about flavor—not getting wasted.” As ordinances are ironed out and patients look to a possible future of recreation in Los Angeles, those who are already delving into the many beneficial and fun properties of the plant are ready for the change. “If we legalize cannabis for recreation in California, I have no issues with that,” Bolanos said. “But we need to make sure we take care of the patients who desperately need this plant for medicine. Too many have suffered for too long. Legalizing it will only help spread the word faster on its benefits.”

SHEA LEWIS, MIXOLOGY FLAIRED

CHRIS SAYEGH, THE HERBAL CHEF

THE HERBAL CHEF AND MIXOLOGY FLAIRED MICRO-INFUSED DINNER IN HOLLYWOOD.

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AD NATIONAL


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PLAYING IT SAFE KEEPING PESTICIDES OUT OF MEDICINE WRITER / DAVID BAILEY

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HE DOMINOES ARE FALLING FAST, and both medical and recreational cannabis are sweeping the nation. While we’ve all seen the crazy news of Colorado, Washington, and Oregon, what the media may not show are the thousands of locals fighting for legalization in their area. Of course there is Ignorant Fear Mongering is always present, but have we truly considered the safety or quality of the cannabis we’re buying? Looking at the states that have some sort of medical or recreational system, there’s an obvious difference from the black market. Being able to shop in a retail venue with real employees, security cameras, and a selection of products sets the stage for a safe and enjoyable experience. Needless to say, it is quite a bit different than buying weed from a street dealer who sells a lot more than just cannabis. The quality of cannabis that was given to me in Texas left me wondering if it was actually even a plant. In illegal states, many growers do whatever it takes to ensure a successful harvest. Having already risked growing illegally, most don’t pay heed to what they’re putting into or onto their

plants. As a health conscious person, that makes me nervous. Switching from illegal growing to legal is a crash course of laws and volume. While all the news attention goes to seed-to-sale tracking, the real quality is in understanding nutrients and pesticides. Colorado and Washington both have a thorough list of pesticides: those that are clearly outlawed, and those that can be used until certain points in harvest. 'Of course, each state tests the strains to verify growers' claims. Things like Botaniguard and Floramite are forbidden, but some feel that isn't good enough. The lists the states had compiled were for organic vegetable production. Last I checked, we don’t smoke any vegetables. Being a new market, the learning curve has been steep for everyone. Going from 30 plants in a garage to 3,000 in a warehouse is a tough battle for a lot of producers. Where growers could previously spot any and every bug on a daily basis, now infestations can ravish a room before warehouse employees even recognize the warning signs.

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IMAGINE GETTING A BATCH OF CONCENTRATES FROM A PESTICIDECOVERED GARDEN. THE PESTICIDES ARE CONCENTRATED TOO! Pesticides are just one way to control bugs. While I definitely support using neem-based products for spot problems, growers can actually keep their gardens pest-free with beneficial insects. With different bugs for different pests, the right balance can fight off spider mites and kill root aphids better than any chemical.

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How do growers decide what to spray and when? Luckily, acceptable pesticides are listed for every medical and recreational system, so the choices are already limited. Most importantly, nothing should ever be sprayed once flowering has begun. Imagine getting a batch of concentrates from a pesticide-covered garden. The pesticides are then concentrated too! Filling the refrigerator with non-GMO and organic food but smoking pesticide-covered cannabis flower doesn’t really make much sense. The medical and recreational markets across the U.S. are finally beginning to recognize the importance of this. With both Colorado and Washington recently cracking down on pesticide use, we’re seeing some of the long-term benefits of legalized cannabis in only the first few years. It leaves me optimistic about what’s to come!


TECHNOLOGY

WRITER / HEATHER COONS

KNOCK IT OUT WITH THE KNOCKBOX F U T U R O L A’ S N E W E S T R O L L I N G S Y S T E M U N V E I L E D

UTUROLA, A LIFESTYLE SMOKING company, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. The family-run business got its start in an Amsterdam coffee shop back in 1996 and prides itself on developing high-quality products in-house with the latest in technology. Two years ago, Futurola crossed the Atlantic and began their American adventure. They were on a roll: it only took a few short months for Futurola USA to find its products on the shelves of top stores in the western U.S. Now, Futurola is expanding once more as they introduce the latest in rolling system technology, the knockbox. Aptly named, this device can knock out 100 pre-rolled cones in just two minutes. The knockbox comes in two separate wood carrying cases. One case houses the knockbox unit, which looks fairly similar to a computer printer. The other wood case houses the attach-

ments. The whole knockbox unit is easy to assemble and even easier to use. “In four to six hours of labor, only about 100 rolls can be produced by an individual,” said Toby Skard, one of two partners of Futurola USA. “The advantage of the knockbox is that in the same amount of time, up to 10 thousand rolls can be produced: all perfect rolls that burn evenly. There are no weak spots with the knockbox.” Futurola’s newest technology is taking the cannabis industry by storm. “We started taking pre-orders three months ago, and we’ve already sold to some of the biggest names out there. I can’t keep them in stock. I got 10 in this morning, and they’re already gone.” What makes the knockbox so incredible, besides the amount of rolled cones it can produce in minutes? For one, it works

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well and it works consistently. Although there have been other mass-rollers out on the market, none really performed the way they were hoped to. They broke repeatedly, they jammed, and they did not produce a perfect roll every time. “We knew that something sturdy and dependable was needed for the market. We also knew that the roller needed to produce a perfect cone every time, one with no weak spots. That’s important. The knockbox is the result of years of developmental testing. Six years, actually.” The knockbox doesn’t use mechanical energy to create the vibration needed to pack perfect cones. It uses sound technology at an extremely low vibration. And, according to Skard, the knockbox is already evolving so that different sized cones and filters can be used. Cone sizes range from slim, pre-rolled cones that are 98 mm in length, to the king size pre-rolled cones that are 109 mm in length. If a business wants to offer different sizes, there is no need to purchase another machine. They just swap out the knockbox’s attachments. “The knockbox could be used with another brand of paper cone, but we highly recommend that only Futurola paper cones be used. We do make the best cones in the industry. Our papers are a unique product, and that’s important for the finished rolled cone to meet our guarantee.” The cones Skard is referring to are made with Futurola’s signature paper. They are the thinnest 100% natural papers available on the market that are made with organic acacia gum. Futurola’s signature papers, cones, and the knockbox rolling system aren’t the company’s only innovative products. Six years ago, Futurola patented a personal hand roller with more than a million sold around the world. Last year, Futurola developed an exclusive Tommy Chong line as part of their U.S. expansion. The Chong collection includes cones and papers, pre-rolls, accessories, and gift boxes—all with Chong’s face stamped on the product. Skard, whose background includes the music and fashion industries, said that Futurola doesn’t just make all their products in-house, but all their advertising too. With the help of Skard's business connections, high-profile celebrities are now working with Futurola on multiple marketing campaigns. EMAIL: INFO@FUTUROLAUSA.COM CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1-800-651-9598 HOURS: MON–FRI 10AM–6PM PST FUTUROLAUSA.COM

WORTH A CLOSER LOOK!

• The vibration of Futurola’s knockbox is created without the use of mechanical energy. Designers utilized low-frequency sound waves emitted through the knockbox’s speaker, which in turn makes the knockbox less susceptible to breakdowns • Futurola currently has 8 different pre-rolled cones that can be used with the Knockbox, including 3 different “reefer style” cones and the option to custom order • Futurola’s design team is actively developing new attachments for the knockbox so that their product will evolve and improve with market demands

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BUSINESS

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T H E M A I N S T R E AM I N G O F CA N NA B I S H I T S T H E D RU G I N D U S T R Y

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WRITER / PAUL MUCHOWSKI

annabis has been used for medical purposes throughout history. However, in the U.S., its utility as a bona fide drug to treat human ailments has only recently started to regain acceptance in the mainstream medical community. As we continue to speed down the slope that is the green revolution, we bear witness to one area that is often overlooked: the important role being played by cannabis-based drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Although the U.S. has only two cannabis-based drugs that are currently being sold, the likelihood that the FDA will approve several new drugs made up of cannabis or its components within the next two years is extremely high, and the number of diseases for which these drugs will be approved is growing. Studies in the 1960s demonstrated that THC was the major psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. In the 1980s, two of the molecular targets for THC were identified, named cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. CB1 is found predominantly in the brain on neurons (the cells that help us move and think), while CB2 is found mainly on immune cells (the cells that help us fight infections). Soon after these receptors were found, scientists made the exciting discovery that our body also makes THC-like molecules called endocannabinoids, which bind to CB1 and CB2. One simple way to grasp how the system works is that THC and endocannabinoids are like keys, while CB1 and CB2 are the locks on cells that can be opened, resulting in different physiological changes to the nervous, immune, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and cardio-vascular systems.

The first cannabis-based drugs were approved for use in the U.S. in the 1980s. Marinol (dronabinol) is a synthetic form of THC in a gel capsule that was approved in 1985 to treat nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy, and in 1992 to increase appetite in HIV patients. A synthetic analog of THC called Cesamet (nabilone) was also approved in 1985 for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. These drugs have only enjoyed limited success for a variety of reasons, including the fact that they require one hour to take effect and cause a number of psychoactive effects that some patients find undesirable. Cannabis has at least 70 cannabinoid molecules related to THC, including the anti-inflammatory compound cannabidiol (CBD), and a large number of molecules called terpenes that give the plant its distinctive smell. Published research studies suggest that the maximum biological effects of cannabis are exhibited only by combinations of these molecules:⎯the so-called entourage effect. As such, perhaps it is not that surprising that the use of drugs based on THC alone has not grown to a larger extent. GW Pharmaceuticals was the first company to commercialize an extract of cannabis as a drug. This extract, which is sold as Sativex (nabiximols), contains equal amounts of THC and CBD and lower concentrations of other molecules found in cannabis. Sativex is delivered as a mouth spray and is approved for spasticity due to multiple sclerosis in 27 countries, including Canada and much of Europe. In the U.S., Sativex recently completed multiple Phase III clinical trials for spasticity in MS and cancer pain.

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A RT B IUCS LI N E ETSIST L E Although Sativex did not meet its primary clinical endpoint of relieving pain in the cancer trial, it did appear to have some beneficial effects, and the company is now negotiating with the FDA to discuss the clinical relevance of the data and potential paths forward. Results from the spasticity in MS trial are expected to be released in 2017. GW Pharmaceuticals is also testing Epidiolex, a cannabis extract that is 99.9% CBD, in two Phase III clinical trials in children with Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes, which are severe infantile-onset drug-resistant types of epilepsy. The company is now initiating clinical trials in other types of epilepsy. They also have a number of compounds in early clinical development that have shown promise for glioma, ulcerative colitis, type 2 diabetes, and schizophrenia. Close on the heels of GW Pharmaceuticals is INSYS Therapeutics. Their leading drug candidate is an oral version of CBD that is also in Phase III clinical trials for Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes. The only major difference between the CBD from INSYS Therapeutics and GW Pharmaceuticals is simply that the former is made synthetically, while the latter is isolated directly from cannabis. GW Pharmaceuticals and INSYS Therapeutics are in a race to see which company will have the first CBD-based drug approved in the U.S. This begs the question, why wait for a THC- or CBD-based drug to be approved in the first place? In states where it cannabis is legal, individu-

als can easily obtain the aforementioned compounds by ingesting medical cannabis via concentrates, edibles, or supplements available in their local dispensary. The main issue is that, unlike drugs that are sold by regulated pharmaceutical companies, patients buying from dispensaries can’t yet fully trust the chemical profiles or doses listed on the labels of the cannabis products that they are purchasing. However, all of this is rapidly changing as new regulations come into place in states that have medical and recreational cannabis sales, with requirements being established for standardized laboratory testing. It is also important to note, insurance companies will only reimburse the cost of a medicine if it is an FDAapproved drug. A completely novel way to trigger the beneficial pathways that cannabinoid receptors regulate is to target the enzymes that determine the fate of endocannabinoids themselves. A number of pharmaceutical companies (Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Merck) are in clinical development to test inhibitors of an enzyme called fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) for a wide variety of clinical indications, including social anxiety disorder, osteoarthritis pain, insomnia, and Tourette’s. When FAAH is blocked with a small molecule inhibitor, levels of endocannabinoids rise, causing CB1 and CB2 regulated pathways to turn on. Unfortunately, one clinical trial with an FAAH inhibitor developed by Bial was recently halted because all six patients who took the drug had to be hospitalized. One patient

became brain-dead, while four others have neurological symptoms of varying severity. Other pharmaceutical companies have also tested FAAH inhibitors in fairly large numbers of patients in clinical trials without any serious adverse events reported, which is causing many researchers to speculate that something specific to Bial’s FAAH inhibitor might have been responsible for this tragedy. Nevertheless, in the wake of this catastrophe, Janssen Pharmaceuticals voluntarily chose to shut down two Phase II clinical trials with their FAAH inhibitor that was in clinical development for treating psychiatric diseases. It will likely take months, if not years, to understand what went wrong in the Bial trial, and whether or not FAAH inhibitors will again be tested on humans. Overall, there is good reason to be optimistic about the future of cannabis-based drugs in the United States. Success in diversifying clinical indications to include cancer pain and MS will almost certainly spawn new clinical trials for other diseases. Despite the fact that most of us in the green community accept that the medical benefits of cannabis are real, we often forget that many other individuals, including the majority of doctors and politicians, are not yet fully convinced. If the FDA approves these new cannabis-based drugs, the ramifications may help the cannabis industry as a whole, including increasing the likelihood that the government will have to reclassify cannabis as a drug that has medical benefits.

“DESPITE THE FACT THAT MOST OF US IN THE GREEN COMMUNITY ACCEPT THAT THE MEDICAL BENEFITS OF CANNABIS ARE REAL, WE OFTEN FORGET THAT MANY OTHER INDIVIDUALS, INCLUDING THE MAJORITY OF DOCTORS AND POLITICIANS, ARE NOT YET FULLY CONVINCED.” 47


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E S S E N C E L AS V E GAS MEDICINE ON TH E STRIP WRITER / JOHN CACCITOLO

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he Las Vegas Strip is usually known for adding casinos to its iconic stretch, but this March it became the new home of Essence, the first and only cannabis dispensary with a location on Las Vegas Boulevard. This is a huge deal for patients in the city, and for anyone traveling to the desert who doesn’t want to risk taking their medication with them. Needless to say, the store opening was a moment co-owner and CEO Armen Yemenidjian has been anxiously awaiting. Essence could have opened its doors several months ago, but the team decided to wait until they had the information needed to do it right. That information came in droves when Yemenidjian held focus groups in which participants told him everything they liked and didn’t like about the experiences they’ve had when purchasing their medicine. Using the feedback to shape the dispensary’s business model, the end result has been described as Apple store meets jewelry store, with the obvious focus on medical cannabis in all of its forms.

PHOTO / BRIE SEAVEY

Located between a Walgreens and one of Las Vegas’s most well-known wedding chapels, Essence has carved out a truly beautiful space to begin its mission of serving patients. The moment you walk through the door, a calming feeling of knowing you’re in the right place for medicine washes over you. The rooms feel clean, inviting, and professional thanks to the bright white walls, marble floors, and modern furniture. Most doctors’ offices and pharmacies lack the style and comfort that can be found here. Through a clear glass window, you are promptly and politely greeted by the staff, who have you sign in with an iPad and let you know that a patient consultant will be with you shortly. A patient consultant is different than a budtender, as everyone who works for Essence must undergo a rigorous three-week training course to become a patient consultant. It was described to me as attending “marijuana school.” There isn’t a ceremony when the training is complete, but with the amount of knowledge that each new patient consultant has about cannabis

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as medicine, you would think they held a degree in the field. Patient consultants ensure that customers are not just picking a product off a list and hoping it has the effect they need. Instead, they are given numerous options to help create their own personal “essence.” And if patients have concerns regarding their health conditions or other medications, they can always consult first with the on-site registered nurse, who is on stand-by daily. Having a founding member of the American Cannabis Nurses Association on hand is just another feature that Essence has to offer to Las Vegas. This is a perfect example of how Essence actualizes their core beliefs. “It’s not about us, it’s about the patient,” Yemenidjian says. That sentiment comes to life when you experience just how friendly, caring, and knowledgeable all the patient consultants really are. Essence boasts an impressive line of products. The flower has three levels, including premium strains, top shelf strains, and a third tier that is high quality at a lower price ($35 per


A R T ISCTLOE R TE I T L E

eighth). No eighth is over $50, even for the premium flower. That’s one of the lowest price points in all of Las Vegas currently. They also have many select varieties of kief and pre-rolls for $10 a piece. Moving down the row of display cases, customers will come across concentrates, waxes, and liquids of all shapes and sizes. For dabbers and vapers, there are several different strains of Moxie shatters, O.penVAPE oil cartridges, and Holy Grail CBD e-liquids, as well as other flavored vape oils and disposable CO2 cannabis oil cartridges. If tinctures are more your preference, then you can go for the vanilla, peppermint, or unflavored sprays from Holy Grail, or go the drip route with Mary’s Nutritionals Elite CBD Remedy Oil, which comes in a 500-mg bottle. Of course, there are also the edibles. From Evergreen Organix’s Coconut Chocolate Macaroon Bites and Double Chocolate Chunk Brownie Bites, to cannabis-infused Honey Bears, Peanut Butter, Chewy Bears, and Happy Ranchers from NevadaPURE, there is no shortage of delicious medicated treats. One of the most interesting lines of medical cannabis products that Essence has to offer has to be the variety of different topicals from Mary’s Nutritionals. Muscle Freeze uses the combination of CBD and natural plant extracts to create an infused 2307 S LAS VEGAS BLVD, LAS VEGAS NV (702) 570-8472 @ESSENCEVEGAS

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version of the popular cold-andhot pack customers are used to. The beauty of topicals is that they can be used anytime without worrying about it having a psychological effect. They also carry CBD pens, patches, and lotions. For customers who just want to pop a pill to feel the benefits of CBD, they could try capsules from either Holy Grail or Mary’s Nutritionals. Pretty soon they’ll add even more products, a majority of which will come from their very own cultivation facility just a few miles away. I was lucky enough to take a tour of the

facility, and to call it state-of-the-art would be underselling it’s beautifully complex science. At over 54,000 square feet, the space looks like what you would imagine a cultivation facility put together by Google would be like. Except it’s even better. Until its up and running, customers can still stop by Essence Las Vegas right on The Strip near the Stratosphere tower to get the high quality, affordable medicine they need.

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"LOCATED BETWEEN A WALGREENS AND ONE OF LAS VEGAS’ MOST WELLKNOWN WEDDING CHAPELS, ESSENCE HAS CARVED OUT A TRULY BEAUTIFUL SPACE TO BEGIN ITS MISSION OF SERVING PATIENTS.”


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P RO D U C T S

CANNABIS LIFESTYLE COMPANIES A

THE HIGHEST CULTURE CLOTHING CO.

Creating graphic tees and hoodies since 2007, The Highest Culture is a homegrown company, founded in Connecticut. The brand combines classic graphic art with cannabis culture and can be purchased for a reasonable price.

$17–$32 thehighestcultureclothing.com @thehighestcultureclothing

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STAY IRIE EYEWEAR

“Fueled by THC” is this company’s motto. Stay Irie was founded in California in 2012. Their eyewear is heavily influenced by skate and cannabis culture. These shades are high quality and look great too!

$20–$60 stayirie.com @_alwaysirie_

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MAGIC FLIGHT

Navigating through Magic Flight’s website feels somewhat like reading a book on metaphysics, but don’t be intimidated! Their unique spin on cannabis vaporizing feels ancient and new at the same time. All products are crafted in the U.S. $5–$130 magic-flight.com @magicflight

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W E LOV E

CANNABIS PRODUCTS WORTH A SECOND LOOK! D WRITER / ABIGAIL ROSS PHOTO STYLIST / MALINA LOPEZ PHOTO / KRISTEN ANGELO

WOODSTALK BAMBOO

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THREE A LIGHT

WoodStalk bamboo creates sustainable ways to hold your goods. The company was founded in 2007 as the result of two friends exploring solutions to man-made problems. Check out more about the company on page 62!

This coffee table book is one of the highest quality grow books we have received. From the novice to lifelong grower, Three A Light is sure to impress any reader who opens it. Look for our feature on author Joshua Haupt next month.

$15–$140 woodstalkbamboo.com @woodstalk_bamboo

$500 threealight.com @thr33alight

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MUSIC

WRITER / BLAZE ROBINSON

PHOTO / ASHLEIGH CASTRO

BEATS ANTIQUE C A N N A B E AT S

BEATS ANTIQUE’S RECORDING STUDIO and pop-up store in Berkeley, California, David Satori, Zoe Jakes, and Tommy Cappel chat with us about their influential fourth bandmate, Mary Jane. The talented electronic and world fusion dance trio are back in the studio working on new music.

DELUXE JOINT COURTESY OF HEPBURNS


H OW CA N NA B I S H AS I N F L U E N C E D T H E I R M U S I C “Our band wouldn’t exist without marijuana,” Zoe says. Zoe and David met while trimming in northern California. David and Tommy were introduced through a mutual bud-trimming friend. They say that cannabis has always supported the band. In the beginning, trimming provided Beats Antique with the finances and flexible schedules to create their music. It also gave them supportive fans who were just as eclectic. Mary Jane is the base for much of the creative playful energy that is found throughout their music and performances.

T H E RO L E CA N NA B I S P L AYS I N T H E I R L I V E S Zoe does not use cannabis, but she says she is a huge supporter of the plant because of the beneficial impact it has on her friends and community. David realized the medicinal aspects of cannabis when recovering from a car crash. He used cannabis to heal and to get off the prescribed painkillers that left him dependent and groggy. David says cannabis now helps him unlock his artistic creativity and playfulness in new ways. Tommy, who has epilepsy, struggled for much of his life from a reliance on prescription drugs. Increasing his cannabis consumption, particularly by vaping CBD, allowed him to go off the meds and even start driving again: a thing he had not been able to do in 21 years. He says smoking helps him let go of all the electrical chaos in his brain, relaxing and opening his mind to the musical inspiration around him.

T H E CA N NA B I S S T R A I N T H AT B E S T COMPLEMENTS THEIR MUSIC “All of it,” the band emphatically answers. “Just get high and listen to all of our albums,” says Tommy. “I’ve smoked tons of weed on all of our recordings. It’s all over it—literally.”

W H AT’S N E X T F OR B E AT S A N T I QU E David says his dream is to tour with Willie Nelson in biodiesel vans. Until that call comes, the band will be working on their next album. In May, they will travel to New Orleans for a musical collaboration with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Keep an eye out for Beats Antique at summer festivals like Red Rocks in Colorado and the Electric Forest Festival in Rothbury, Michigan. If that's too long of a wait, find their music on their website (beatsantique.com), or swing by their pop-up store, Shadowbox, on Alcatraz Avenue in Oakland every Tuesday.

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“EVERY CULTURE AROUND THE WORLD HAS IT. IT’S ON THIS PLANET FOR A REASON.” —DAVID SATORI


TOMMY CHONG EXCLUSIVE COLLECTION BY FUTUROLA

For wholesale inquiries: info@futurolausa.com

Tel: 1.800.651.9598


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WRITER / KELLY VO

CANNA-NEWS

When Sara was young, she smoked cannabis occasionally. It was just something she did—at least until she turned 37 and started getting sick. For weeks, she couldn’t keep food down, but the doctors had no answers and incorrectly diagnosed her with IBS. That’s when cannabis came back into her life. A friend recommended it, and it worked so much better than the medicine her doctor prescribed. Unfortunately, that was just the start of her journey. A few months later, she was diagnosed with Stage III colon cancer. “My mom was a cancer researcher, so I knew that cannabis was good for pain and nausea, and I started using it during chemo,” Sara said. “It replaced several different drugs and cut down on my side effects and expenses, but I wish I would have known more.” As Sara started to get her life back together a year after chemo, she realized she couldn’t return to her old job. Instead, she found employment at the dispensary that supplied her medication, and started working with other cancer patients and survivors. It was then that she discovered how much cannabis was helping those who truly needed it. “After chemo, I had neuropathy in my hands and feet,” Sara said. “Now, we’re finding that patients who take CBD during treatment experience less neuropathy, and some people don’t get it at all. The more I learn about cannabis, the more fascinating I think it is.” That was just the tip of the iceberg. Sara started studying and working with various professionals within the cannabis industry to discover how else it could help people. It’s the best part of her job as an educator and consultant for critically ill patients, she said. “So many amazing people helped me when I was sick, and now I get to do that every day,” Sara said. “I get to support people through their sickness, giving them a shoulder to cry on and a place to feel safe. I also get to help patients who are using cannabis for the first time. It can be intimidating and scary, so to be able to walk them through my own experience and provide resources and education is an amazing job.”

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very one of our readers has a cannabis experience that’s worth sharing, including Sara Payan and Kayla Arielle. Though they are from different walks of life and have different tales to tell, they’re united in their desire to #end420shame. This hashtag campaign is dedicated to bringing to light the truth about cannabis and its users.

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SARA PAYAN

Sara Payan is a cancer survivor and the director of education for The Apothecarium in San Francisco. She’s also a senior cannabis consultant for critically ill patients and serves on the San Francisco Medical Cannabis Task Force, working with supervisors in the city on legalization. PHOTO / BARRETT THAYER, @SYNANTHROPE

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“I GET TO SUPPORT PEOPLE THROUGH THEIR SICKNESS, GIVING THEM A SHOULDER TO CRY ON AND A PLACE TO FEEL SAFE. I ALSO GET TO HELP PATIENTS WHO Kayla Arielle is an artist and cannabis advocate. ARE USING CANNABIS She’s been a budtender in Colorado and is a patient FOR THE FIRST TIME. IT of HoneyBear Farms. Cannabis helped her conquer her pharmaceutically induced “steroid psychosis” CAN BE INTIMIDATING and taper safely from harmful prescription drugs. AND SCARY, SO TO BE ABLE TO WALK Kayla’s entry into the world of cannabis was quite unique. It wasn’t until she was on high-dose steroids for over six THEM THROUGH MY months that she decided that something had to change. ADOWN EXPERIENCE AND The Prednisone barely controlled her severe inflammation and swelling, and it had only worsened her depresPROVIDE RESOURCES sion and increased her anxiety. Thankfully, she was a research guru. Everything she found on medical cannabis AND EDUCATION IS AN said that it could help her, so she decided to give it a try. AD “One night, I decided to shun the wool that had been AMAZING JOB.” KAYLA ARIELLE

pulled over my eyes, and I sat down to a two-foot water bong,” Kayla said. “My nervousness faded to excitement as I inhaled deeply. What followed was one of the most free-from-chronic-pain-and-worry nights of my life! I felt my mind expand and my joints sigh in relief as cannabis saturated my aching body.” It wasn’t until 2012 that Kayla officially got her medical card and was able to legally use cannabis for her health. After that, doors seemed to just open. She ended up joining the industry. “[I wanted to] lend another legitimate voice to the movement and to help others find the relief that I found,” Kayla said. “It only seems fair. Why should I live in comfortable silence while others suffer?” But it hasn’t always been a smooth road. Some of Kayla’s friends and family are still stuck on the gateway drug propaganda and refuse to see how cannabis can be a prescription medication, but that’s why she won’t back down. “I’ve learned you will never change some minds, and that it is more important to focus on the people who may truly need the knowledge you share,” she said. “They are the ones who will learn and benefit the most.” For both Kayla and Sara, their journey into cannabis has been filled with incredible discoveries. “If you spent an afternoon sitting in my patient waiting area, you’d be amazed by how many people of all different walks of life are medicating,” Sara said. “How normal

it really, truly is. One thing that really surprised me about cannabis was when I met my first patient who had gone into remission with the help of cannabis oils. It was amazing to meet someone who was told they wouldn’t survive, and then they did much more than that.” “What I find most surprising is the heart within this industry,” Kayla said. “D.A.R.E. painted pictures of hardened, cruel criminals out for cash with no regard for their fellow man, yet I find the exact opposite with every interaction. I am constantly confronted by compassionate caregivers, people who are willing to spare an extra dollar to give away what someone needs! There is a sense of community, driven by a common focus and backed by bravery.” At the end of the day, there’s only one thing that they would want everyone to know about cannabis. “The key to successfully having cannabis in our country is safe access,” Sara said. “That means we need to educate both patients and consumers about the adult-use market.” “If I could share one thing, it would be only to take the time to give yourself a true education on cannabis,” Kayla said. “No one else is going to do it for you, and your health and humankind’s livelihood depends on it.”

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A R T ITCRLAV E ET LI T L E

CA N NA B I S IN THE CA NA R Y ISLANDS WRITER / SESHATA

THE THRIVING CULTURE OF SPAIN’S SUBTROPICAL ISLANDS

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Photo by Seshata

HE CANARY ISLANDS ARE A small group of volcanic islands that lie just 62 miles west of Morocco and enjoy a subtropical climate with year-round mild temperatures. The people here have grown cannabis for decades, long before the central government of Spain decided to relax its laws to allow for the existence of cannabis social clubs. Now that they have a chance to legitimize the community, there are plenty of people keen to participate. Here, rainfall is scarce and the wind can prove to be an outdoor grower’s worst nightmare, but the temperatures are so favorable that outdoor growing can occur year-round, and many growers state that January is their favorite month to crop! In the wetter, more sheltered parts of the islands, some of the biggest plants seen in Europe happily thrive. It’s Carnaval (the second-biggest in the world after Rio) when we arrive in

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the Canaries, and Santa Cruz de Tenerife is crowded with locals and visitors from all over the world. We watch as miles upon miles of lavishly decorated locals of all ages, shapes, colors, and sizes parade down Santa Cruz’s main beachfront thoroughfare, their bright colors contrasting somewhat with the overcast February sky. We’re looking out for signs of people smoking cannabis, but apart from the odd gaggle of teenagers sharing furtive joints, it appears that it’s not yet a widespread social activity—at least not one that’s out in the open. An hour later, we’re headed to the small city of San Cristobal de la Laguna to check out the first cannabis social club, a small venue known as Entropia. Its proprietor Francesco (who hails from Italy, along with half of Tenerife’s cannabis community) greets us with a broad smile and ushers us into his club. It’s functional and sparsely decorated, populated by a small throng of local


T R AV E L Canarians who are friendly, welcoming, and eager to tell us all about life on the Canary Islands. Francesco tells us that the cannabis community really became established in the 1960s as the first waves of hippies came to settle on the islands and mentions that at first, there were issues with locals destroying or stealing entire crops. Even now, foreign growers based on the island may pay a little baksheesh here and there to grease the wheels and keep everyone on the island happy. Tourists should also be careful smoking openly here—it is unlikely to result in serious repercussions, but police may well decide to exact on-thespot “fines” (which probably don’t end up in the official police treasury). All-in-all, the laid-back attitude of the Canary Islanders extends to most things, and the cannabis community is now by-and-large an established fact of Canarian life. There’s a handful of clubs on each of the larger islands, and as long as they keep their paperwork in order, the local police are happy to let them exist. It’s so laid-back there even by Spanish standards that it easily takes all day to visit one club. We spend the obligatory hours examining the cannabis varieties on offer (at that time, it’s pretty limited, but they have some great outdoor Lavender), as well as hearing the life stories of a couple of the assorted

locals at the bar. After what seems like weeks, we extricate ourselves from our hosts’ relentless (although much appreciated) hospitality and make our way back to la casa for a welcome night’s rest. We’ll soon be heading up the side of the world’s third-tallest volcano El Teide—the centerpiece of Tenerife—to visit a grower and extract artist friend of ours, so we’ll need to be well-fed, well-rested, and ready to dab. The next day, we meet up with Julio, an Italian friend who’s taking us to meet Federico, the extract artist—yet another Italian. As a British person, I’m beginning to feel somewhat less ashamed of my country’s rampant infestation of these islands at this stage, now that there’s apparently an equally bad nationality to compare against. Julio takes us up some seriously hair-raising mountain roads to get us to Federico, who simply calls his outfit “BHO — Made in the Canary Islands.” This straightforward approach is mirrored in his tools and his manner: Federico explains that he uses simple open-blasting equipment and that for him, the quality is all the starting material. He also stresses that his products get at least four days in the vacuum oven, which helps to ensure their smoothness. His plants are grown outdoors, with minimal additives, in the bright Canarian sun.

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“THE CLUB LOOKS OUT OVER A GLITTERING BLUE OCEAN EDGED WITH BLACK VOLCANIC SAND, THE GRAY OUTLINE OF LA GOMERA ISLAND OFF IN THE DISTANCE. IT’S HERE THAT WE TRULY BEGIN TO COMPREHEND JUST WHAT A PARADISE THIS PLACE IS, AND WHY SO MANY WHO COME HERE NEVER WISH TO LEAVE.”

Federico takes us outside to show us some of his small plants, which are in full flower in mid-February and looking wonderfully purple due to the cold nighttime temperatures at this time of year. He explains that the average daytime temperature is between 70 and 75 degrees, but nighttime temperatures can drop to below 50, so there’s plenty of opportunity for purpling, along with some serious, frosty crystal development. He actually cropped his large plants just two weeks ago, so we don’t get to see them in flower, but we’re certainly happy to smoke their terpenerich, herbaceous harvest. Later, after another precarious drive down patchy mountain roads, we visit the second of Tenerife’s social clubs, the Association Medical Cannabis in Playa de las Americas. President Samuele (another Italian) greets us warmly, and we also talk to the club secretary Johan, who, to our endless surprise, isn’t Italian. He’s German, and he’s happy to talk to us at length about why he came to Tenerife three years ago. Although he is involved with the club, it turns out that Johan’s main responsibility is none other than the mighty Seedfinder.eu, a massively popular website that religiously tracks and records strains from commercial seed banks. Johan has built up the site over the last eight years or so, and finds that it’s easier to keep track of things while living a worry-free life far from the restrictive laws of his home country—and much closer to the very ground that many big European seed banks now use to grow their big crops! Samuele’s club is, without a doubt, one of the nicest we’ve ever been in, in terms of ambiance and atmosphere— not to mention the view, which looks out over a glittering blue ocean edged with black volcanic sand, the gray outline of La Gomera island off in the distance. It’s here that we truly begin to comprehend just what a paradise this place is, and why so many who come here never wish to leave. Our time here has been brief, but we’ve made some wonderful friends, and there is no doubt we’ll be back to investigate this budding community more closely.


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A RT I C L E T I T L E

GA N JA G U RU ED ROSENTHAL SHARES INSIGHT ON INDUSTRY ISSUES WRITER / BIANCA FOX

DESIGN / BRANDON PALMA

I

n order to live up to the title of “Guru of Ganja,” one must uphold the highest possible standards of excellence. Ed Rosenthal stands tall in this persona, studying the cannabis plant with the dignity it deserves.

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E D TA L K S Rosenthal has worn many hats for the past 40 years, living life as a leading authority on everything cannabis. His knowledge is studied and appreciated in numerous books and in courses at the trade school Oaksterdam University, where students learn about cannabis cultivation. After authoring the book Beyond Buds, Rosenthal developed his own line of non-specific insect and fungus eradication products, called Ed Rosenthal’s Zero Tolerance. Above all, fighting for the freedom to use the plant is top priority for the guru. He is currently working on a terpene project and preparing literature to guide voters about California’s Adult Use of Marijuana Act of 2016. Rosenthal met up with DOPE and shared his views on our industry’s current issues.

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DOPE MAGAZINE: Was there a precise moment in your life when you realized that you wanted to fight for the rights of cannabis? ED ROSENTHAL: I was heavily involved in the civil rights movement and the anti-Vietnam War movement. With that came the belief that cannabis should be legal. DM: Did you admire any activists growing up? ER: My big hero is Pete Seeger. He was blacklisted in the 50s. And then I sort of experienced the same thing. In the 80s I tried to get a book published and no printer would touch it for a while because of the drug war. That was the Marijuana Growers Handbook, first edition. DM: What that during Nancy Reagan’s time? ER: Yes. And the ironic thing is that I own the trademark for Zero Tolerance. It’s the name of my pesticide and fungicide. Just say no to pests. I should have called the pest Reagan.

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DM: Do you connect with soldiers who use cannabis as an aid for PTSD? ER: I have contact with patients of all kinds. PTSD is really big, I believe, in the US. Not only among soldiers, but just living in today’s society can cause tremendous amounts of stress over a period of time. Most people living in the US are just a couple paychecks away from homelessness.

Q

DM: What most recent studies on cannabis do you find to be most impressive? ER: There’s an incredible amount of research being done. Cannabis and the cannabinoid receptors are such a tremendous part of animal life, from primitive sea creatures and upward. There is a reason why it has been preserved through evolution, and why it has been ubiquitous in life. I think the thing that makes it so unique is that it helps to regulate the entire nervous system.

Q

DM: What are your thoughts on how Los Angeles should handle regulation, when and if the city goes recreational? ER: I think that beside from zoning, there should not be a regulation regarding the number of facilities. I think the market can control that. I think that all of these different regulations that are not dealing with hygienic standards and things like that; weights and measures… Things that aren’t actually dealing with protecting the public, they just should not be there. Let the public and the market determine how many facilities there should be. DM: What is your personal opinion about the Adult Use of Marijuana Act? ER: That’s a scam. It is not a legalization measure at all. The big wearers of that are the distributors. That is where all the money will flow into, the distributors. Away from the manufacturers and the retailers. And it doesn’t guarantee that people can grow their own. That people can transfer freely, like among friends. Or can grow collectively. If it ends up on the ballot, people should not vote for it.

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DM: Do you think that something else needs to be put on the ballot? ER: I don’t know if it can be done this year. But we would be better off maintaining the situation that we have, rather than putting that (Adult Use of Marijuana Act) on the ballot. Because once it is on the ballot, it cannot be changed, except by the vote of the people. Which is just not adequate. But word will spread as time goes on. DM: You work with commercial growers. What are their top concerns of today? ER: They are not political and they should be. It’s very weird -the difference between the activists and the capitalists. As capitalists prepare the noose for people in the industry, they just go on oblivious to everything. I’ve seen it before. At one time, there was this government war on the head shop industry and the hydro stores. As the hydro stores were going down, they did not stand up politically. They thought that if they kept their heads under the ground no one could chop them off. Some of the big manufacturers like Hydrofarm – they told the shops, “if we catch you getting political, we will cut you off.” DM: How is your hometown of San Francisco doing? ER: More dispensaries are opening. Everybody is getting ready for the big push. DM: Are you optimistic about the future? ER: Yes, I don’t think that Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act is ever going to totally go into effect. I think it’s going to be totally unworkable and people are just not going to do it. Everything is supposed to go through a distributor and I don’t think that’s going to happen. I think it’s highly unlikely.


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APRIL 2016 HAPPY 420!

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e finally did it!! Cannabis is legal all over the world, crime rates are at an all time low, and Donald Trump has moved to Mexico! Just kidding folks, April fools! We figured that with one of the all time favorite icons of cannabis culture, Willie Nelson, on the cover, we would add a little humor to the not-so-funny fact that prejudice against cannabis is alive and well in many states throughout the U.S. This April issue focuses on 4/20 and the warriors out there fighting for cannabis access. We continue to highlight and thank our stand out family in Oregon, as you are our biggest support. Our super feature is titled The Fascinating 4 & 20 and we’re proud to present 24 Oregonians from all walks of life. We invite you to take a journey into the work of these truly dope people. Let them educate, entertain, and hopefully inspire you. Grön Chocolate, Looking Glass Extracts, Anne Lininger, BDS Analytics, Urban Pharms, and The Grass Shack are all featured this month and are making big news out here in the wide world of cannabis. Wyld Farms introduces the strain of the month, an old favorite with a twist called Jack Hammer. After a few puffs, stress dissolves into irrelevance and is replaced with mental clarity and a relaxation that is pleasant yet mild. As you blow the trees in the breeze, remember to consume contentiously out there on your travels. With all of the celebration happening, we want to show our community in the best light, as we are in the public eye even more this election season. Let’s show the world how we do things in the dope way! Keep it dope this 4/20,

EMMETT FRASER @ i a m p h oto h e ad Sales Manager N U S H E E N BA K H T I A R @nushwander OR Office Manager Sales Executives R O S I E B O N DY @ k i l l a a ro s e T R I S TA N P OW E L L T E R R A N C E M C DA N I E L @ t.t h e d o p e m a n Contributing Writers S H A RO N L E T TS MEGHAN RIDLEY R.Z. HUGHES DAV I D H O D E S DAV I D PA L E S C H U C K JOE SCHOFIELD S A R A H JA N E GA L L E GO S @medicinaljanepdx J O N AT H O N F R O C H T Z WA J G L I N D S E Y R I N E H A RT @rinehartlindsey JOHNNY HALFHAND JOE SCHOFIELD BRANDON KRENZLER @cannadad LUKE ZIMMERMAN H I L A R Y S AU N D E R S L E A H M AU R E R @duhanna N I C H O L A S H AYA S H I @ l o o k i n g g l a s s ex t ra cts

Michael W. Fox | Oregon State Director D O P E M AG A Z I N E i s a f r e e m o n t h l y p u b l i c a t i o n d e d i c a t e d t o p ro v i d i n g a n i n fo r m a t i v e a n d w e l l n e s s - m i n d e d v o i c e t o t h e c a n n a b i s m o v e m e n t. W h i l e o u r fo u n d a t i o n i s t h e m e d i c a l c a n n a b i s i n d u s t r y, i t i s o u r i n t e n t t o p ro v i d e et h i c a l a n d re s e a rc h - b a s e d a r t i c l e s t h a t a d d re s s t h e m a n y fa c ets o f t h e w a r o n d r u g s , f ro m p o l i t i c s t o l i f e s t y l e a n d b e y o n d . We b e l i e v e t h a t t h ro u g h e d u c a t i o n a n d h o n e s t d i s c o u r s e , a c c u r a t e p o l i c y a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g c a n e m e rg e . D O P E M AG A Z I N E i s fo c u s e d o n d e f e n d i n g b o t h o u r p a t i e n t s a n d o u r p l a n t, a n d t o b e i n g a n u n c e a s i n g fo r c e fo r r e v o l u t i o n a r y c h a n g e.

Contributing Photographers A L E X FA L L E N S T E D T @ a l ex _ fa l l e n ste d t C H R I S R YA N @ c h r i s r ya n p h oto MELISSA MANKINS J A S O N H O R VAT H @ za l p a ra d i s e MIKE EMMONS @mr_emmons

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DISPENSARY

T H E GR AS S S H AC K A PIECE OF HAWAII IN PORTLAND WRITER / LINDSEY RINEHART

‌uietly set aside in a cute Northeast local, the Grass Shack is the epitome of a neighborhood hangout for those who enjoy cannabis. A true family business, it is owned by three sisters who grew up in Hawaii, but who have lived in Oregon for decades. Operated by two of the sisters, Adelaide Turner and Marie Nashif, Adelaide explained, “We want all of our patients and customers to have a positive experience at our shop, and strive to bring the spirit of the islands to each of them. The atmosphere in the shop is very casual, laid-back, and welcoming.” A picture of The Grass

PHOTO / JASON HORVATH

Shack Gift Store in Hawaii sits on a shelf in the Grass Shack dispensary, a tribute to its namesake. The sisters employ a small staff who are animated, kind, funny, and know their bud. The head budtender, Tessa, enthusiastically showed me several flowers that looked, and smelled, delicious; displaying her intimacy with the effects and flavors of the Vanilla Kush, from High Wind Farms; the Mango, from Red Dog organics; Strawberry Ice, from Indoor Organics; and Fruity Pebbles, from Rip City Gardens (all were priced fairly at $9– $12 per gram, before tax). The staff was proud to have at least

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three organic farms to choose from. To keep on with the family spirit, one of these organic vendors is Adelaide’s son own Happy Plant Farms. Even the Kona Coffee available for purchase is provided by Marie’s son, who farms it in Hawaii (not canna-infused). A fun deal is the $4.20 pre-roll, plus they have brunch specials everyday, and happy hour, Mon–Fri. You even get a song on your birthday. The store has a variety of other products available as well; including topicals from Empower and Bud Rub, extracts from Proper and Lunchbox Alchemy, and edibles from Miss Mack’s and Elbe’s.


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o honor the 4/20 holiday, we’ve compiled a list of the dopest defenders in Oregon. We are proud to celebrate leaders in our community that have dedicated endless hours to advocacy. Join us in celebrating those who are continuously preserving our right to grow, process, and consume cannabis.


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JOHN BAYES PHOTO / CHRIS RYAN

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erched at a high table in the apartment behind his Portland dispensary, Calyxes, John Bayes intersperses hits off a joint with sips from a cup of coffee. If tonight’s like most nights, he’ll need the caffeine: the 41-year-old tells me he typically gets as little as three hours of sleep. “I’m on a mission, man,” he says. That mission: to help others through cannabis, which Bayes sees as a healing, consciousness-raising “wisdom plant.” The Eugene-based entrepreneur not only owns Calyxes, but oversees a statewide network of some 20 organic grows under his business Green Bodhi. He also gives away cannabidiol—a cannabis compound that provides medical benefits without the sensation of being stoned—to pretty much anyone who asks for it, including parents of children suffering from conditions like epilepsy and cancer. A devout Buddhist, Bayes is driven by the concept of “bodhicitta,” or enlightenment for others. “Herb is like this money tree,” he says. “We’re not doing this for money.” Bayes wasn’t always so high-minded. In fact, he says, “I used to be a fuckin’ asshole.” A childhood as an itinerant military brat and a biracial kid—Bayes is half-Korean—left him feeling estranged and angry. At the same time, he says, “I felt like I was born here to do something special. I wanted to be a teacher, but I didn’t have shit to teach.” Then, a lifechanging LSD trip sent him on a journey of psychedelic self-improvement. Bayes traveled to Peru where he met his “first teacher...a crazy wisdom surfer” and started studying Buddhism. Soon after, he began experimenting with ayahuasca, peyote, and mescaline. One day, in the shadow of Huayna Picchu, Bayes’ teacher challenged him to put his newfound knowledge to use, he recalls.

"HIS DISPENSARY IS THE FIRST IN THE COUNTRY TO OFFER ONLY CANNABIS CERTIFIED UNDER THE STRINGENT CLEAN GREEN ORGANIC STANDARD. ‘I FEEL LIKE I NEED TO GIVE IT TO THE PEOPLE THE WAY THAT I FEEL IS BEST FOR MYSELF,’ HE EXPLAINS.”

“He was like, ‘Are you going to be some shaman, sitting on your ass in a cave somewhere, or are you going to take this relationship you’ve cultivated with the wisdom plant and change the world?’” Bayes says, “It wasn’t a question, you know?” Bayes works constantly to grow along a spiritual path. Regularly visiting a meditation yurt at Namgyal Monastery, the Dalai Lama’s North American seat. Bayes has met the Tibetan Buddhist leader on several occasions. “He’s a G in the most high way,” says Bayes, beaming even in reminiscence, “You get to see who you are.” For Bayes, growing and selling (and sometimes giving away) pot is part of his spirituality. His dispensary is the first in the country to offer only cannabis certified under the stringent Clean Green organic standard. “I feel like I need to give it to the people the way that I feel is best for myself,” he explains. Bayes’ growers must follow guidelines not only for cultivating plants, but for cultivating themselves, including engaging in some form of meditation. “That’s part of the program, too,” he says. “Somebody’s got to do it like this. Because nobody else is doing it like this.” In the space of an hour long conversation, Bayes bounces from concept to New Age concept: the Inkarri myth, Vedic astrology, Kalachakra empowerment. But just when you’ve pegged him as woo-woo, he’ll give you whiplash, mentioning, say, the Oregon Health Authority committee he’s on, or his relationships with politicians like Oregon State Senator (and legal-weed champion) Floyd Prozanski. Feet on the ground, but head most definitely in the stars, this marijuana-worshipping mystic is a mix of traditional pot culture and modern canna-business: a hybrid strain for our times.


4 & 2 0 F E AT U R E

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DONALD MORSE

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n recent years, Don Morse has become one of the most influential voices in Oregon on the growth and regulation of the cannabis industry. He’s been instrumental in paving the way for both medical and recreational legalization, able to speak “across the aisle” to people who may otherwise be unfriendly to the cause. This is partly due to the fact that he does not use cannabis himself and, fairly or not, that’s allowed him to be taken more seriously by people like State Representative Andy Olson, a Republican who sits on the Joint Interim Committee on Marijuana Legalization. Morse’s journey towards his role as co-owner and Managing Director of dispensary Human Collective began six years ago, he recalls. “My wife took ill. It turned out to be fibromyalgia. She was miserable for six months, but then a friend recommended marijuana, and it worked. It alleviated her pain when she had a flare.” The problem, in those black market days, became where to get it. “We went to some of the places that

PHOTO / HILARY SAUNDERS

were around in 2010,” Morse remem- sion” to legalize medical dispensaries. bers. “It was mostly just people sitting He met with several other dispensary around smoking, and the rooms were owners to discuss the situation and they smoky.” Human Collective was Oregon’s “wrote a measure on the back of a napfirst medical marijuana dispensary, and kin at the Woodburn outlet mall.” Each it had opened that same year. Morse was signatory contributed $25,000, and that impressed by how the place “operated napkin evolved into House Bill 3460. A pretty much like a pharmacy.” bill signed into law in August 2013. Soon, Morse began volunteering at To Morse, Human Collective is “a Human Collective. His time at the dis- model for dispensaries. We were the first pensary ignited his passion for the can- ones to do [safety] testing. We don’t alnabis movement. Morse was well aware low use on premises. Our mission is safe that patients were having a difficult access in a socially responsible manner.” time locating medicine, and 2012 was It would seem that only a sober adan especially tough year. “Everybody vocate like Morse could convince a was confident about Measure 80, but politician like Olson—an ex-cop who it didn’t pass.” Morse said. On Septem- represents a rural, largely conservaber 28 of that year, Human Collective, tive district—to support 2015’s cannabis Morse’s and Bennett’s homes, and three regulation bill HB 3400. “3400 wouldn’t of their growers were raided by Wash- have passed without [Olson’s] caucus,” ington County authorities. Morse re- says Morse. calls, “It was a horrible experience, and Morse thinks of himself as “a voice of it really ticked me off.” moderation trying to bring people toHuman Collective re-opened three gether. We need to accept responsibility months later in Multnomah County. Im- if we want respect.” mediately after, Morse “went on a mis-

"IT WOULD SEEM THAT ONLY A SOBER ADVOCATE LIKE MORSE COULD CONVINCE A POLITICIAN LIKE OLSON—AN EX-COP WHO REPRESENTS A RURAL, LARGELY CONSERVATIVE DISTRICT—TO SUPPORT 2015’S CANNABIS REGULATION BILL HB 3400.”

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STUDIO MCDERMOTT WRITER / LEAH MAURER

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hat’s Dope to you? Amy: Meeting everyone in the cannabis industry and movement while filming Oregon the State of Cannabis. Mike: That Oregon Public Broadcasting wants to air the first cut of Oregon the State of Cannabis. Max: Being a part of the emerging cannabis industry here, and the overall emergence of this industry…that’s pretty Dope. The McDermott family has been interviewing people who are involved in the Oregon cannabis movement and industry since September of 2014. Compiling a diverse range of stories for their soon-to-debut documentary, Oregon the State of Cannabis. They have now interviewed over 300 people and attended countless cannabis related hearings and events, which gave them a unique view of an unfolding industry and the respective policies in our state. Amy, who directs, has a background in fine art. Mike, her husband and the film’s producer, is a photographer by trade. Max, her son, is also involved in the production of the film, and recently earned a degree from the University of Oregon in journalism, with a focus in advertising. The McDermotts were able to keep the film centralized to the state of Oregon, priding themselves on making a “homegrown” film; “just like the cannabis that is grown here, it can’t leave the border,” says Mike. But, the film did not stay small. Each interview the McDermotts did gave way to several more, and it became apparent to them what an amazing story and time in history they were documenting. “It was like a waterfall or a rollercoaster after that,” Mike said. When asked what has been the most powerful experience in creating the film, Amy replied, “for me, it was just how

PHOTO / CHRIS RYAN

important the plant is to the industry. It was a really personal experience for every single person we interviewed. It’s not a just business, it was seeing the love for the plant through these people, and their compassion for others.” Max responded, “The reason that people got into it was always because of personal stories. […] People had their own reason[s] for being passionate about the plant, and that seemed like the big driving force behind why they were doing what they were doing.” Mike added, “People who were the essence of the beginning of this thing, they were connected to this plant in a very intimate and emotional way. We didn’t meet many people who were just doing this to make money.” Part of the insight that the McDermott’s can offer is how much the industry here wants to set a standard for other states in this country. Mike says, “Everybody wants to present in a really good, positive way, to the rest of the country, and the world.” “Besides,” says Amy, “everyone knows the best weed is grown here in Oregon [and] it has been such a great honor to document this!” The McDermotts have less than 10 key interviews left to complete Oregon the State of Cannabis. The first cut will be produced for Oregon Public Broadcasting, primarily focusing on Oregon’s participation in cannabis research. The second cut focuses on legalization and the bigger picture. They are hopeful for a national release, entertaining international reach through distribution as a commercial project. “Because,” Mike says, “there is no place in the world where there is a finer, more sophisticated cultivation of cannabis, than there is in Oregon.”

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"PART OF THE INSIGHT THAT THE MCDERMOTT’S CAN OFFER IS HOW MUCH THE INDUSTRY HERE WANTS TO SET A STANDARD FOR OTHER STATES IN THIS COUNTRY. MIKE SAYS, “EVERYBODY WANTS TO PRESENT IN A REALLY GOOD, POSITIVE WAY, TO THE REST OF THE COUNTRY, AND THE WORLD.” Left to right : Mike, Amy, and Max McDermott


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MARY JANE MARY JANE’S HOUSE OF GLASS WRITER / LINDSEY RINEHART

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hat’s Dope to you? “With the way cannabis legislation is going these days, I am finding a lot of things dope! One thing in particular is the amazingly innovative hand-blown glass being produced. The level of skill and creativity of these artists is very dope!” The highlights of Mary Jane’s “military brat” upbringing allow a glimpse into the woman Mary Jane would become. The first time she witnessed injustice was July 4th 1969, Washington D.C. at a Rolling Stones concert, as law enforcement officers tear-gassed innocent attendees. “I thought they were shooting a movie. My friend then said, ‘No, this is why we had to get you out of the house, to show you what was going on.’ It was horrible, but I dug the Rolling Stones.” Shortly after in Belgium of 1971, she smoked cannabis for the first time at a Led Zeppelin concert. Her most memorable smoking experience though, was in Austin, Texas, when she smoked a joint with Willie Nelson on his tour bus. Married for 37 years now and with four

PHOTO / CHRIS RYAN

children, she wanted a family business. would like to change is the stereotyping After an illness left her blind for two of stoners as lazy and slow. It’s an insult years, her passion led her to start Mary and far from the truth, a stereotype that Jane’s House of Glass with her son Bran- somehow has been perpetuated over don Brock as the CEO. She began using the years, and it’s time to see it go.” cannabis to treat her blindness; and now This fantastic woman’s super power is fully able to see, she and her family suc- “dreaming big!” She continued, “If I could cessfully operate 14 locations that serve pick one superpower to have I would the Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA ar- have to say the power to read minds. It eas. At the 2016 Oregon Dope Industry would give me a chance to understand Awards, Mary Jane’s House of Glass was opposing views that have always baffled voted “Best Glass Production” and “Best me; for example, why anyone would be Headshop”. opposed to legalizing hemp and cannaJack Herer is her hero. In the original bis. Then maybe I could convince them “little house” location where the business to come to our side!” started, she says watching his video, The Mary Jane says “thank you” to the Emperor of Hemp, was required while community by offering 10% discounts shopping. She says he taught her all on glass to military veterans, patients, about hemp: “If anyone hasn’t read his and to people who donate two cans of book or seen his video, it’s a must. He is food, which has allowed the company the one that opened my eyes to hemp to donate “thousands of pounds” from and how it could save the planet. Rest in their year-round food drives. To relax peace, Jack.” Mary Jane enjoys some lemon haze, a Speaking to the future she said, “In latte, and her gardening, whether it be five years, I hope to see cannabis legal in flowers or vegetables. all fifty states. If not recreational, at the very least medical. The one thing that I

"MARY JANE SAYS “THANK YOU” TO THE COMMUNITY BY OFFERING 10% DISCOUNTS ON GLASS TO MILITARY VETERANS, PATIENTS, AND TO PEOPLE WHO DONATE TWO CANS OF FOOD, WHICH HAS ALLOWED THE COMPANY TO DONATE “THOUSANDS OF POUNDS” FROM THEIR YEARROUND FOOD DRIVES.


WRITERS / BRANDON KRENZLER LINDSAY RINEHART SARAH JANE GALLEGOS LEAH MAURER NICK HAYASHI HOLLIE HAYES

PHOTOS / CHRIS RYAN JASON HORVATH READ EXTENDED BIO’S AT DOPEMAGAZINE.COM!

DELIA OLSON

AND I BIXEL

OW N E R D R I P I C E C REAM What’s dope to Andi Bixel, owner of Drip Cannabis Infused Ice Cream? “The freedom to enjoy cannabis in your own unique way. For me its to play and be silly.” What started as a hobby has grown into a full time career for Andi. She began making cannabis infused ice cream for herself and her friends. As word spread and demand grew, Bixel looked to expand her brand.

TH E THC FAC TORY

The THC Factory is popping lids as a prime choice for long-term, sustainable cannabis packaging—utilizing a unique system for preserving cannabis in nitrogen-sealed canisters. However, the Pacific Northwest strain she unseals most often, Jilly-Bean, is the lineage Delia Olsen, Product Development Specialist, relates to most: “It is a top choice for creative minds and social butterflies. It boasts an unencumbered euphoria during daytime hours.”

FARMER TO M

FOU NDER OF FARMER TOM ORGANICS Farmer Tom is one of the most recognizable faces in the industry. His hat and white beard can be seen at almost every cannabis event. Tom’s organic cannabis and vegetable farm offer classes and tours, as well as consultation services for farmers. A forefather of cannabis marketing, Tom has sought to help farmers get into the growing cannabis market.

AM Y M A RGOLIS E M E RGE L AW GROU P

Amy Margolis, a lawyer with Emerge Law Group, has been defending clients for the last 15 years. At the early age of 13, she became smitten by the law. Her uncle had been charged in a federal case that made headlines. The out of town lawyer hired to defend him would take breaks on her front porch, chain smoking and drinking whiskey. “My 13-yearold self had never seen anything so cool.” Amy recalls. That same lawyer hired her years later to work in Chicago.

T IM JONES

JOSH TAYLOR

SKY HI G H FARMS

When I asked Josh Taylor of Oregon Cannabis Concierge what strain he would be, he immediately knew the answer. “Durban Poison, the old landrace strain with great energy and focus.” As a third generation cultivator, now retired, Josh is applying his lifelong experience with cannabis to the newly legal market.

After spending over a decade cultivating cannabis at Sky High Farms with his multi-generational family, Tim Jones was inspired to work closely with his parents and siblings to create a family-run dispensary in their community of St. Johns. In 2013, Club Sky High opened its doors to serve the medical patients in the area, working every day to ensure safe access.

OR E GO N CANNABI S C ONC I ERGE

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ANT HO NY JOHN S O N

B EN C HRIST EN SEN MIN ORIT Y CA NNA BI S BUSIN E S S AS S O CIAT I O N Jesce Horton, founder of the Minority Cannabis Business Association, is working to bring much needed diversity to the cannabis industry. Growing up in the South, Horton has always faced adversity over cannabis. He has been arrested three times, each time for less than 2 grams of bud. Shortly after moving to Portland, Jesce began growing for elderly patients in need. “As soon as I got my medical card I went to a dispensary and got a clone, and that clone’s lineage is growing in my cultivation facility to this day.”

OREGON H EM P WORKS

CORWIN BROWN

J E S C E HORTO N

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Thirteen-year Army veteran and government employee, Corwin Brown, originally got involved with cannabis seeking a safer and more therapeutic option for managing pain, stemming from injuries sustained during years of duty. “I needed something drastic that would allow me to manage my pain levels, while benefitting my health.” He says, “Since my tolerance levels to prescription drugs are very low, cannabis turned out to be the most natural remedy.” He quickly discovered that cannabis oils and topicals were his ideal choice, opting to abstain from inhaling cannabis.

M A R K H ER ER

S ON O F JAC K H E R E R Ask Mark Herer what does dope mean to him and he’ll respond simply, “Awesome.” Mark is the son of legendary cannabis ambassador, Jack Herer. He’s also the owner of the Third Eye Shoppe, a grower, an advocate, and a sportsman. He is a man of many trades.

C O- AUTHOR AND C HI EF PETI TIONER OF M EASU RE 9 1 ; DIRECTOR OF NEW APPROACH OREGON

“There’s a whole metaphor with hemp soap—It’s using hemp to clean things “If I were a strain I would be Jack literally and metaphorically,” says Herer, because he was the godfather Ben Christensen, founder of a local, of cannabis activism and I hope to artisan, hemp soap company, Oregon continue his mission to completely Hemp Works, “cleaning the world of free the cannabis plant for all its uses.” petroleum products, finding a soluEnding the drug war has become a tion instead of finding problems.” life mission for Anthony Johnson, The soap craftsman produces natuco-author of Oregon’s Measure 91 ral and organic hemp soap using a legalization bill. Noting the inequalmethod that is nearly 5,000 years old. ity in his home state surrounding “Most soap on the market isn’t actually marijuana, Anthony was concerned soap, either. It’s a detergent that uses about the civil liberties disparity in all kinds of harsh chemicals to recannabis. “I became an activist in the produce what hand-made soap does,” fight to end prohibition because I saw he says with a knowing grin, “’soap’ my African-American friends in Misis short for the word ‘saponification,’ souri treated more harshly for mariwhich is the chemical reaction bejuana offences than my white middle tween the base and acid.” class friends.”

MEG HAN & MAT T WALSTAT T ER PU RE GREEN

Matt and Meghan Walsatter are urban family farmers with their hands in all aspect of the cannabis world. When her husband Matt was struck with a stomach problem they searched high and low all around the country to find a doctor that could help, but with all their efforts they could not get a straight answer.

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JENNIFER VAL L E Y

STONEY G I RL G ARDENS & PORTLANDSTERDAM U NIVERSIT Y Known for their cannabis education, training, and classes, Jennifer Valley, of Stoney Girl Gardens, created Portlandsterdam University in 2014: “I had stage 4 cancer, became one of the top breeders in cannabis, and opened up 50 dispensaries in Oregon, fighting for equal protection under the law for everyone.” To Jennifer, cannabis could “address the primary drivers of healthcare costs, getting a handle on cancer and diabetes.”


ANN LINI NGE R W H I T N E Y HOBBS Whitney Hobbs is the first female co-founder in Oregon of a cannabis distribution company, Highly Distributed, where she also serves as Vice President of Sales. A proud member of Women Grow, she believes in strengthening relationships in order to further safe access to cannabis. She has a fascinating background in birding, brewing, and traveling; but we are lucky she landed in Oregon at the time that HB 3460 was implemented, which legalized medical cannabis dispensaries in Oregon.

MAR Y LOU BU RTON Mary Lou Burton is the owner of Bravo Event Company and has now successfully organized and hosted not one, but two Cannabis Creative Conferences (CCC) in Portland, in less than a year’s time. This hard working and enthusiastic mom of four has a way of lighting up the room and gaining momentum amongst people, and she admits her super power is “high energy.”

HOLLY WEIG Holly Weig’s story begins in South Dakota, a home she left five years ago. Weig says that it was there she had her first experience with true injustice, as she witnessed a good friend serve 45 days for possessing a half gram of bubble hash.

Representative Ann Lininger (D) of Lake Oswego, OR, is a pro-cannabis reform representative, serving as cochair on the Joint Committee on Marijuana Legalization during the 2016 Legislative Session, as well as having co-chaired the “Measure 91” Joint Committee in 2015. Representative Lininger has a vision for the Oregon cannabis industry for five years from now. She’d like to see “Oregon businesses at the forefront of a legal, traded-sector industry. One that supports good farming, processing, research, healthcare, and retail jobs around our state.”

J E S S E S P ONBERG The iconic, local underdog of the 2016 campaign for Portland City Mayor, is undoubtedly 42 year-old, Portland native, Jessie Sponberg. A social justice activist for decades, Jessie is the grassroots champion, catching hot leads in early polls due to overwhelming word-of-mouth communication amongst locals who know his passion. The candidate is becoming a household name, challenging the opposition to spend a night in a camp built by Portland’s economic refugees.

SAM C HAPMAN

MRX FAMILY

Sam Chapman believes that failures drive success, for those who don’t give up. Although many would never suspect he’s just 26 years old by his accomplishments, Mr. Chapman has been a registered Oregon lobbyist for three years, and helped write HB 3460, which legalized and regulated medical cannabis dispensaries in Oregon.

Meet the MRX family, proprietors of MRX Labs. This powerhouse family started out in the cannabis industry with a mission to protect the public from consuming bad cannabis. They opened their first analytical testing facility in July of 2014 and have since expanded to producing commercial CO2 extraction machines. What will this family come up with next?

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I N T E L L E C T UA L P RO P E RT Y PA RT 3 WRITER / LUKE ZIMMERMAN

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HE FUTURE OF EVERY industry is inevitably linked with the development of technology, and cannabis is no different. The innovations derived from practices such as solar panels, water reclamation, organic pest control, and efficient grow lights are all part of the future of sustainability in cannabis production. The industry is reliant on new inventions, and to establish ownership and protect these inventions, the creators must seek out new patents through the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). There are three types of patents: utility, design and plant based. The amount of time where no one else can use the patented technology is 14 years for a design patent, and 20 years for a utility or plant patent. Design

patents are the only type that cannot be renewed. The USPTO explains that patent protection is to be used when a person “invents or discovers any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof”. The words “any new and useful” are profound when considering the vast amount of technological advancements being made in the cannabis industry at present. Cannabis has grown into a multibillion dollar industry, and opportunit ce has granted numerous patents for cannabis based filings. One of the oldest and most controversial patents is US Patent 6630507 B1, which is a patent that protects the use of Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants. The patent

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explains that “ the cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia.” The patent was filed in 1999, which means the patent protection period is half-way over. The controversial aspect of this patent is that the owner of this patent is The United States of America, represented By The Department of Health and Human Services. Let this sink in for a moment. The United States Government filed a patent in 1999 to protect the medical benefit of the use of cannabinoids. This is quite convincing evidence that cannabis does not qual-


ify as a Schedule 1 narcotic that provides no discernable medical benefits. There are plenty of less controversial patents that have been granted for cannabis innovations, but these patents face a unique problem. The jurisdiction for patent litigation is in federal court, which would mean that to bring a claim of patent infringement, the owner of the patent would need to admit in federal court that they are involved in the cannabis industry, which few attorneys are recommending to their clients at this point in time. This admission would be more than a claim of ownership of a patent, it would also be an admission to the possession, cultivation, and/or distribution of a Schedule 1 narcotic. This means there isn’t currently a safe way to litigate patent disputes. This lack of recourse to resolve conflict has some patent attorneys theorizing that after a federal rescheduling of cannabis occurs, there will likely be a mile-high wave of patent litigation requests. The issue of cannabis patents is not just a phenomenon in the United States. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) records internationally registered patents. There are currently over 11,000 patents registered with WIPO that include the word “cannabis” in their description. An example of an inter-

nationally registered patent is patent WO2016019353, which is registered to a man from Florida, for the design of a cartridge that allows for the atomization of cannabis extracts for the purpose of pulmonary delivery. In simpler terms, he owns a patent on the design of one version of the extract cartridges that are all too familiar. If you are an innovator, tinkerer, designer, or have discovered a new system for growing cannabis, then you may consider talking to a patent attorney. While copyrights and trademarks grant common law protection to the author or original user, patent law grants no such protection. Patent law is based on a “first to record” system, so recording is essential to asserting any ownership rights. The future of the cannabis industry will be determined by the innovations and inventions that will make it more sustainable, profitable, and efficient. Hopefully, the federal government will come to its senses and allow for a rescheduling of cannabis so that the industry can freely innovate and further explore the medical benefits of cannabis. If the federal government needs justification for exploring these benefits, it should just take a moment to reread the cannabis related patent that it has owned for the past 17 years.

Luke Zimmerman is an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of California. By reading this article you are not entering into an attorney client relationship with Luke Zimmerman. This article should not be considered legal advice. This article is not an advertisement of services for Luke Zimmerman.

"THE FUTURE OF THE CANNABIS INDUSTRY WILL BE DETERMINED BY THE INNOVATIONS AND INVENTIONS THAT WILL MAKE IT MORE SUSTAINABLE, PROFITABLE, AND EFFICIENT.


50

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I N T E RV I EW

A N N L I N I N GE R IMPLEMENTATION IN OREGON WRITER / LEAH MAURER

A Q A

NN LININGER IS NOT only a democrat who serves District 38 in the Oregon House of Representatives (most of Lake Oswego and portions of SW Portland), but a champion of cannabis. Lininger is currently serving as a committee co-chair of the Joint Committee on Marijuana Legalization for the state.

businesses; and probably, people who are concerned right now will get more comfortable with the idea of legal cannabis cafés as they get more familiar with this “legal adult use” phase that we’re in.

Let’s talk about the licensing process. How do you feel the rule-making process is working right now?

AL: As we moved though the legislative process, in order to get something done that we really wanted to get done, and in order to address concerns of some communities about the method for opting-out, we ended up making a compromised decision in communities that had a strong “no” position [...] The cannabis community has done a really good job giving people the dignity and information they need to shift in their thinking about legal cannabis. The Joint Committee on Marijuana Legalization started out as probably 60:40 opponents of Measure 91 and migrated into a group of ten people who were pretty excited about the economic opportunity and the health opportunities for patients that this legal sector provides. It’s because of the dignity that people in the movement have shared with people who are newcomers, skeptics, or non-consumers. The cannabis community here completely aligns with the principals of the legalization movement, which is people should be treated with dignity whether they choose to use cannabis or not. They should not be incarcerated or stigmatized for making a choice as an adult to do something that is no more harmful than a lot of things that adults may legally do. There’s a lot of credit going to the legalization community for helping us evolve this far, and the optout stuff is still happening and it’s still a problem, but eventually we’ll all get to a place where people are comfortable, whether or not they choose to use it.

ANN LININGER: A lot of us had some concern, early on, with how rule making would go, and I am pleased with the amount of outreach that Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) has done. I think the members of the Measure 91 Committee are evolving in terms of what they think makes sense as they learn more about issues. We have a good rapport with OLCC and we’re going to pass some legislative clarifications in a short session to help […] get rid of the residency restrictions, to make co-location of medical and adult use sales allowed, and clarify some other important things. The OLCC has been doing a good job. They’re open to evolving and learning, which is important for all of us in this sector, and I think they’re going to have businesses licensed by the fourth quarter of 2016. What are your thoughts about the potential ban of already existing cannabis cafés in the state? AL: I think the potential ban is a problem. With appropriate protections for employee health, public safety, and neighborhood livability, I think adults should have the opportunity to go to cannabis cafés if they choose to. This may be one piece of our community’s evolving comfort with legal cannabis

Let’s talk about opting-out. What do you think about counties that are considering outright banning recreational adult use sales? Do you think it should be allowed?

Do you believe that Measure 91 will be used as a model for other states in our country that choose to legalize cannabis and adult/recreational use? AL: Our crime reduction and expungement work is absolutely a model. The idea behind this that we are making it much easier for adults and youth to expunge marijuana related conviction from the record, and that we’re turning a lot of former felonies into misdemeanors. Our goal is to lift the burden of a felony conviction as non-violent offenders try to get jobs, apartments, and an education. The Criminal Justice Policy Foundation said that they think it’s going to help 50,000 people in Oregon alone; so I think one of the big things we need to do is encourage other states to address criminal justice system reform together with decriminalization of cannabis. LAST WORDS “The over-arching principle is that I care about strong families, and in order to have strong families, we need to improve how we approach public safety and how people find the dignity and stability of a good job. Tied to this is ensuring that we have a safe environment, and protect our clean water and clean air […]”


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L I B E RT Y 503 PRECISE DETAIL IN THREE DIMENSIONS WRITER / JOE SCHOFIELD

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T

he pupils dilate and breathing slows upon first catching sight of a Liberty 503 glass piece. Three dimensional images with stunningly precise detail are etched across the surface of each unique work of art. “We create to inspire a sense of ancient grandeur,” says Paul Long, head Glassblower and co-founder of the company, “Like something Indiana Jones would fight through a whole movie to win.” What began as a passion for excellence and innovation took them to the forefront of the artisanal glasswork avant garde. Paul Long met Buddha Miller 10 years back and they combined their extensive glass-blowing knowledge to establish a business creating cutting edge pieces. Chip Steeler, another cofounder, came from a back ground as a professional artist with 22 years experience preserving and restoring artifacts in various museums.

These artists and their growing team shared a common vision: push the boundaries of craftsmanship and quality to create glass pieces unlike the world has ever seen. The designs for the pieces are drawn out by hand, perfected on the computer, printed out in the vinyl printer, cut out as decals, attached to exact positions on the glass, and the negative space is etched away on the sand blaster. The effects of this process are etched designs with depth and vivid beauty. Liberty 503 has expanded their operation exponentially over the last 6 years. “We’ve had a very selective hiring process with the young blood who have bolstered our ranks. We only keep the best artists, but we operate as one body.”

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THANK YOU A very big thank you goes out to all of our patients and supporters for voting us “Best Edible Brand” & “Best Overall Brand” in the 2016 Dope Industry Awards. Respect to all the nominees and congratulations to all the winners. There are a multitude of ways to enjoy our edibles, and all of them help provide long-lasting relief from whatever ails you. Available in sweet and savory flavors at fine dispensaries across the great state of Oregon.

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ITH DECADES OF experience among their team, Urban Pharms continuously seeks out ways to elevate production. A huge emphasis is placed on quality, and a certified chemist is on staff to oversee the process, making sure everything produced meets Urban’s high-standard. Seeing the need for exceptional cannabis products, not only for patients but also for the emerging recreational market, Urban Pharms sets out to create what they describe as “boutique buds.” CEO Johnnie Walker didn’t get his start in the cannabis industry, but he was destined for it. Coming from Memphis Tennessee, Walker says cannabis is often referred to as “the devil’s weed,” and there’s always been push-back against cannabis as medicine. Born on the 20th of April, it seems only natural that Walker would be a cannabis user. However, he is a lifelong non-user, dedicating his life to seeking

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out ways to ease the pain and suffering of patients. With a background in the pharmaceuticals industry, Walker hopes to apply his expertise to the emerging cannabis market. “Most associates of mine don’t even speak to me because of what I do now,” Walker notes. This makes the mission at Urban Pharms abundantly clear; bringing cannabis into the mainstream. It was this passion for patients that lead Walker to hire the best grower he could find in the medical market. Enter Seth Marsh. “I love coming to work every day,” Marsh comments as he surveys the 300 acres of farm land Urban Pharms calls home. Marsh began his career as a medical grower. His dedication to cannabis led him to southern Oregon where “we have one of the best growing environments in the country.” Keeping the land healthy is important to the organization, and this drives the farm’s sustainability efforts. Everything is grown and then processed in-house, as close to organic as


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possible. Even the water used comes from a runoff catch system. With nothing wasted, Walker prides himself and the Pharms’ efforts on doing “whatever it takes to produce a great product, with no shortcuts. I want people to heal their kids and heal themselves. That’s why I came out here,” says Walker. Growing great strains isn’t the only way Urban Pharms is elevating the cannabis experience. Wanting to make the very best extractions possible, the team researched industry standards for extracting botanical and essential oils. Using this research, Urban Pharms has become one of the top producers of CO2 oil. Organically-derived sustainability practices allow Walker and Marsh to bring their customers the best product, while lowering the stigma around cannabis. “I want people to have the same feeling about cannabis grows that they do with vineyards,” says Marsh. “Not in a million years while growing in basements did I think this would be pos-

sible. This is my passion and now I get to do this as a career.” By offering over 30 different strains, Urban Pharms is able to meet the needs of the dynamic cannabis market. With cannabis innovations occurring at lightning speed, the Urban team is constantly researching new genetics, while working to improve the go-to favorites like Girl Scout Cookies and Bubba Kush. Even offering rare strains such as Beaujolais, Urban Pharms has something for everyone. It is no big secret that Oregon cannabis is the next big thing. As old favorites gain popularity and new brands hit the scene, consumers are faced with endless options. This can be a little overwhelming, but one Southern Oregon pharm is aiming to be “high above the rest.”

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“WHATEVER IT TAKES TO PRODUCE A GREAT PRODUCT, WITH NO SHORTCUTS. I WANT PEOPLE TO HEAL THEIR KIDS AND HEAL THEMSELVES. THAT’S WHY I CAME OUT HERE,” SAYS WALKER.


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Dope Magazine - April 2016 - The 4/20 Issue - Oregon  

"The Four Twenty Feature" featuring Willie Nelson

Dope Magazine - April 2016 - The 4/20 Issue - Oregon  

"The Four Twenty Feature" featuring Willie Nelson